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1.
Psico USF ; 26(spe): 33-44, 2021. tab
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-2197459

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to estimate validity evidence based on the internal structure and accuracy of the adapted version of the Learning Strategies Assessment Scale for High School (EAVAP-EM), using Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA). Participants were 701 first- to third-year high school students (M = 16.1; SD = 1.0), from public and private institutions in the states of Paraná and São Paulo. The CFA indicated the presence of the three factors of the EAVAP-EM, with adequate internal consistency. The instrument also showed good fit indices. There were positive and significant correlations between the factors, with magnitude ranging from medium to large. Moreover, students reported making more use of metacognitive strategies. The results evinced significant advances regarding measures with good psychometric parameters to assess learning strategies, considering their relevance to the psychoeducational context (AU).


Objetivou-se no presente estudo estimar indicadores de validade com base na estrutura interna e precisão da versão adaptada da Escala de Avaliação das Estratégias de Aprendizagem para o Ensino Médio (EAVAP-EM), por meio de uma análise fatorial confirmatória (AFC). Participaram 701 alunos do primeiro ao terceiro ano do Ensino Médio (M = 16,1; DP = 1,0), provenientes de instituições públicas e particulares dos estados do Paraná e de São Paulo. A AFC indicou a presença dos três fatores da EAVAP-EM, com consistência interna considerada adequada, sendo que o instrumento apresentou bons índices de ajuste. Houve correlações positivas e significativas entre os fatores, com magnitude variando de média a grande. Ainda, os estudantes reportaram fazer mais uso de estratégias metacognitivas. Os resultados evidenciam importantes avanços no que concerne a medidas com bons indicadores psicométricos para avaliação das estratégias de aprendizagem, considerando sua relevância ao contexto psicoeducacional (AU).


El objetivo del presente estudio fue estimar evidencias de validez a partir de la estructura interna y la precisión de la versión adaptada de la Escala de Evaluación de Estrategias de Aprendizaje para la Escuela Preparatoria (EAVAP-EM), mediante un Análisis Factorial Confirmatorio (AFC). Participaron 701 estudiantes de primero a tercer año de secundaria (M = 16.1; DS = 1.0), de instituciones públicas y privadas de las provincias de Paraná y São Paulo. El AFC indicó la presencia de los tres factores del EAVAP-EM, con consistencia interna considerada adecuada. El instrumento mostró índices de ajuste adecuados. Hubo correlaciones positivas y significativas entre los factores, cuya magnitud varió de moderada a alta. Además, los estudiantes informaron que hacen un mayor uso de las estrategias metacognitivas. Los resultados evidencian avances importantes en cuanto a medidas con buenos indicadores psicométricos para evaluar estrategias de aprendizaje, considerando su relevancia para el contexto psicoeducativo (AU).


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adolescent , Adult , Psychometrics , Metacognition , Learning , Students/psychology , Reproducibility of Results , Education, Primary and Secondary
3.
J Am Vet Med Assoc ; 260(15): 1911, 2022 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2198260
4.
Adv Physiol Educ ; 46(4): 606-614, 2022 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2194185

ABSTRACT

Research investigating how the brain develops and learns profoundly impacts education. Understanding the brain mechanisms responsible for learning and memory and the factors that influence them, such as age, environment, emotions, and motivation, can transform educational strategies by contributing to the development of programs that optimize learning. Including neuroscience education in teachers' training requires teaching them a multidisciplinary approach to science, which presents a challenge. Furthermore, the potential educational advances from the incorporation of neuroscience into teachers' training are hindered by significant obstacles such as translating research into the classroom; this includes the spread of neuromyths and the products, practices, and programs based on them. Our group has 9 years of experience in developing courses for training teachers. However, in 2020 the world faced the COVID-19 pandemic, which imposed on society a new way of carrying out its daily activities, including teaching. This study reports the experiences of our group as we developed the ninth edition of the Neuroscience Applied to Education teachers' training in an online format that included synchronous and asynchronous activities. Sixty teachers participated in the course. The synchronous meetings lasted 1.5 h/wk and addressed different themes: neuroscience and education, neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neurobiology of learning and memory, factors that interfere with learning, and pedagogical innovation. According to the teachers' perceptions, the course was fundamental for them in terms of acquiring new knowledge about neuroscience. Everyone agreed on the possible applicability of the concepts covered to improve their pedagogical practice and teaching environment.NEW & NOTEWORTHY This study reports the experience of developing the ninth edition of the Neuroscience Applied to Education course in an online format that included synchronous and asynchronous activities. Here we show that schoolteachers consider the course important for acquiring new knowledge about neuroscience and the applicability of the concepts covered to improve their pedagogical practice and teaching environment. The online format did not prejudice the experience, and the technologies used were well evaluated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Faculty , Humans , Pandemics , School Teachers , Students
5.
Trends Biochem Sci ; 47(4): 279-283, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2183791

ABSTRACT

One of the biggest obstacles to success is a lack of practical time management skills. Here, we provide suggestions on how to optimize time management.


Subject(s)
Pandemics , Time Management , Humans , Students
6.
J Biol Chem ; 298(9): 102298, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2180105

ABSTRACT

Integrating research into the classroom environment is an influential pedagogical tool to support student learning, increase retention of STEM students, and help students identify as scientists. The evolution of course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) has grown from individual faculty incorporating their research in the teaching laboratory into well-supported systems to sustain faculty engagement in CUREs. To support the growth of protein-centric biochemistry-related CUREs, we cultivated a community of enthusiastic faculty to develop and adopt malate dehydrogenase (MDH) as a CURE focal point. The MDH CURE Community has grown into a vibrant and exciting group of over 28 faculty from various institutions, including community colleges, minority-serving institutions, undergraduate institutions, and research-intensive institutions in just 4 years. This collective has also addressed important pedagogical questions on the impact of CURE collaboration and the length of the CURE experience in community colleges, undergraduate institutions, and research-intensive institutions. This work provided evidence that modular or partial-semester CUREs also support student outcomes, especially the positive impact it had on underrepresented students. We are currently focused on expanding the MDH CURE Community network by generating more teaching and research materials, creating regional hubs for local interaction and increasing mentoring capacity, and offering mentoring and professional development opportunities for new faculty adopters.


Subject(s)
Biochemistry , Malate Dehydrogenase , Students , Biochemistry/education , Faculty , Humans , Universities
8.
Health Promot J Austr ; 33 Suppl 1: 87-97, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2157811

ABSTRACT

ISSUE ADDRESSED: The complexity and uncertainty of the COVID-19 pandemic highlights the need to change training of public health professionals in higher education by shifting from siloed specialisations to interdisciplinary collaboration. At the end of 2020 and 2021, public health professionals collaboratively designed and delivered, a week-long intensive course-Public Health in Pandemics. The aim of this research study was to understand whether the use of systems thinking in the design and delivery of the course enabled students to grasp the interdisciplinary nature of contemporary health promotion and public health practice. RESEARCH METHODS: Two focus group interviews (n = 5 and 3/47) and a course opinion survey (n = 11/47) were utilised to gather information from students regarding experiences and perceptions of course design and delivery, and to determine if students felt better able to understand the complex nature of pandemics and pandemic responses. MAJOR FINDINGS: Students provided positive feedback on the course and believed that the course design and delivery assisted in understanding the complex nature of health problems and the ways in which health promotion and public health practitioners need to work across sectors with diverse disciplines for pandemic responses. CONCLUSIONS: The use of an integrated interdisciplinary approach to course design and delivery enabled students used systems thinking to understand the complexity in preparing for and responding to a pandemic. This approach may have utility in preparing an agile, iterative and adaptive health promotion and public health workforce more capable of facing the challenges and complexity in public health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Students , Public Health/education , Systems Analysis , Curriculum
9.
J Nerv Ment Dis ; 210(11): 824-830, 2022 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2152266

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Concerns have been raised about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on individuals with lived experience of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI). Yet, few efforts have explored this. Accordingly, using a mixed-methods approach, we sought to examine whether emerging adults who have self-injured experienced changes in NSSI urges and behavior during the pandemic and what may have accounted for these changes. To do so, university students with lived experience of NSSI completed online questions asking about NSSI and self-reported changes in urges and behavior since the onset of COVID-19. They then answered open-ended questions asking what contributed to these changes and how they have coped during this timeframe. Approximately 80% of participants reported no change or a decrease in NSSI urges and behavior. Participants discussed removal from stressors (e.g., social stress) that previously evoked NSSI, as well as having time for self-care and to develop resilience as accounting for this. Nevertheless, some participants reported challenges amid the pandemic (i.e., exacerbated stress, isolation); approximately one fifth of participants reported increases in NSSI urges and behavior. Our findings add to recent evidence that many individuals with prior mental health difficulties, including NSSI, can demonstrate resilience in the face of collective adversity. Research and clinician implications are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Self-Injurious Behavior , Adult , Humans , Universities , Pandemics , Self-Injurious Behavior/epidemiology , Students
10.
Work ; 73(3): 777-786, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2162933

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In early 2020, the coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic necessitated changes in social behavior to prevent its spread, including holding online classes, implementing social distancing, and allowing employees to telecommute. However, these changes have had a negative impact on people's sleep patterns and mental health, particularly for college students. OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the relationship between mental health and sleep quality according to the changes in lifestyle of college students in the periods before and after COVID-19. METHODS: The study subjects were 164 college students from Korea who had both face-to-face and non-face-to-face college experiences before and after COVID-19. The experiment was conducted using a Google survey, and the participants were recruited from the college community. The general features and lifestyle habits for the individuals were assessed using the AUDIT-K, Delphi method, KGHQ (General Mental Health Scale), and PSQI-K (Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index). RESULTS: The KGHQ and PSQI scores increased with the spread of COVID-19, which means that the mental health and sleep quality of college students deteriorated. 11 categories of variables were further investigated to evaluate changes in lifestyle, and the results indicate significant changes in the number of private meetings per week, monthly drinking, outdoor activity time, electronic device usage time, weekly food delivery, weekly late-night snacks, daily snacks, and daily coffee intake and no significant changes in exercise, smoking, and fast food intake. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 caused many changes in the lifestyle of college students, which adversely affected mental health and sleep.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Sleep Quality , Students/psychology , Habits
11.
PLoS One ; 17(5): e0268063, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1849805

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is a critical need to identify the drivers of willingness to receive new vaccines against emerging and epidemic diseases. A discrete choice experiment is the ideal approach to evaluating how individuals weigh multiple attributes simultaneously. We assessed the degree to which six attributes were associated with willingness to be vaccinated among university students in Uganda. METHODS: We conducted a single-profile discrete choice experiment at Makerere University in 2019. Participants were asked whether or not they would be vaccinated in 8 unique scenarios where attributes varied by disease risk, disease severity, advice for or against vaccination from trusted individuals, recommendations from influential figures, whether the vaccine induced indirect protection, and side effects. We calculated predicted probabilities of vaccination willingness using mixed logistic regression models, comparing health professional students with all other disciplines. FINDINGS: Of the 1576 participants, 783 (49.8%) were health professional students and 685 (43.5%) were female. Vaccination willingness was high (78%), and higher among health students than other students. We observed the highest vaccination willingness for the most severe disease outcomes and the greatest exposure risks, along with the Minister of Health's recommendation or a vaccine that extended secondary protection to others. Mild side effects and recommendations against vaccination diminished vaccination willingness. INTERPRETATION: Our results can be used to develop evidence-based messaging to encourage uptake for new vaccines. Future vaccination campaigns, such as for COVID-19 vaccines in development, should consider acknowledging individual risk of exposure and disease severity and incorporate recommendations from key health leaders.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Diseases, Emerging , Vaccines , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Students , Uganda , Universities , Vaccination
12.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(10): e26840, 2021 10 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2141319

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of COVID-19 in China occurred around the Chinese New Year (January 25, 2020), and infections decreased continuously afterward. General adoption of preventive measures during the Chinese New Year period was crucial in driving the decline. It is imperative to investigate preventive behaviors among Chinese university students, who could have spread COVID-19 when travelling home during the Chinese New Year break. OBJECTIVE: In this study, we investigated levels of COVID-19-related personal measures undertaken during the 7-day Chinese New Year holidays by university students in China, and associated COVID-19-related cognitive factors. METHODS: A cross-sectional anonymous web-based survey was conducted during the period from February 1 to 10, 2020. Data from 23,863 students (from 26 universities, 16 cities, 13 provincial-level regions) about personal measures (frequent face-mask wearing, frequent handwashing, frequent home staying, and an indicator that combined the 3 behaviors) were analyzed (overall response rate 70%). Multilevel multiple logistic regression analysis was performed. RESULTS: Only 28.0% of respondents (6684/23,863) had left home for >4 hours, and 49.3% (11,757/23,863) had never left home during the 7-day Chinese New Year period; 79.7% (19,026/23,863) always used face-masks in public areas. The frequency of handwashing with soap was relatively low (6424/23,863, 26.9% for >5 times/day); 72.4% (17,282/23,863) had frequently undertaken ≥2 of these 3 measures. COVID-19-related cognitive factors (perceptions on modes of transmission, permanent bodily damage, efficacy of personal or governmental preventive measures, nonavailability of vaccines and treatments) were significantly associated with preventive measures. Associations with frequent face-mask wearing were stronger than those with frequent home staying. CONCLUSIONS: University students had strong behavioral responses during the very early phase of the COVID-19 outbreak. Levels of personal prevention, especially frequent home staying and face-mask wearing, were high. Health promotion may modify cognitive factors. Some structural factors (eg, social distancing policy) might explain why the frequency of home staying was higher than that of handwashing. Other populations might have behaved similarly; however, such data were not available to us.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hand Disinfection , Humans , Male , Masks , Physical Distancing , Students , Surveys and Questionnaires , Universities
13.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(4): e26330, 2021 04 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2141310

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 led to the COVID-19 pandemic starting in January 2020. The Swiss Federal Council prescribed a lockdown of nonessential businesses. Students and employees of higher education institutions had to install home offices and participate in online lectures. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this survey study was to evaluate lifestyle habits, such as physical activity (PA), sitting time, nutritional habits (expressed as median modified Mediterranean Diet Score [mMDS]), alcohol consumption habits, and sleeping behavior during a 2-month period of confinement and social distancing due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Survey participants were students and employees of a Swiss university of applied sciences. METHODS: All students and employees from Bern University of Applied Sciences, Department of Health Professions (ie, nursing, nutrition and dietetics, midwifery, and physiotherapy divisions) were invited to complete an anonymous online survey during the COVID-19 confinement period. Information on the lifestyle dimensions of PA, sitting time, nutritional and alcohol consumption habits, and sleep behavior was gathered using adaptations of validated questionnaires. Frequency analyses and nonparametric statistical methods were used for data analysis. Significance was set at 5% α level of error. RESULTS: Prevalence of non-health-enhancing PA was 37.1%, with participants of the division of physiotherapy showing the lowest prevalence. Prevalence of long sitting time (>8 hours/day) was 36.1%. The median mMDS was 9, where the maximal score was 15, with participants of the division of nutrition and dietetics being more adherent to a Mediterranean diet as compared to the other groups. Prevalence of nonadherence to the Swiss alcohol consumption recommendations was 8.3%. Prevalence of low sleeping quality was 44.7%, while the median sleeping duration was 8 hours, which is considered healthy for adult populations. CONCLUSIONS: In the group analysis, differences in PA, sitting time, and mMDS were observed between different divisions of health professions as well as between Bachelor of Science students, Master of Science students, and employees. Therefore, public health messages regarding healthy lifestyle habits during home confinement should be more group specific. The results of this study may provide support for the implementation of group-specific health promotion interventions at universities in pandemic conditions. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04502108; https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04502108.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Exercise/psychology , Faculty/psychology , Feeding Behavior , Quarantine , Sleep , Students/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Faculty/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Students/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Switzerland/epidemiology , Universities , Young Adult
14.
Asia Pac J Public Health ; 33(8): 990-991, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2138684
15.
Vet Rec ; 190(11): 466, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2128322

Subject(s)
Students , Animals , Humans
16.
Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 47(10): 1435-1443, 2022 Oct 28.
Article in English, Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2145242

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: During the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), vaccine is an important way to build and improve the immune barrier of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) in the population. The purpose of this study is to understand the current situation of knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine inoculation among Chinese college students during the epidemic of COVID-19, and analyze the influencing factors. METHODS: Using the convenient sampling method, we selected the college students from a comprehensive university in Hunan Province in May 2021 and designed KAP questionnaire about SARS-CoV-2 vaccine inoculation for offline and online survey to analyze the current situation of college students' KAP of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine inoculation and the influenting factors. RESULTS: The total score of KAP of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine inoculation of Chinese college students was 43.72±5.60. The total score of knowledge was 16.28 ±3.09, and the score of each item was 3.26±0.62. The correct rate of the 5 questions in knowledge was 80.34%, 93.18%, 94.64%, 99.60% and 39.18%, respectively. The total score of attitude was 13.56±2.39, and the score of each item was 3.39±0.60. The total score of behavior was 13.88±2.51, and the score of each item was 3.47±0.63. The total scores of better health status, girls, and medical majors were relatively higher; those of medical majors, older students, and girls had higher scores on vaccination knowledge; those with better health and younger age had higher scores on attitude; those of better health status and girls had higher behavior scores (all P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: College students' KAP about SARS-CoV-2 vaccine inoculation is generally high, but the knowledge level is relatively low. We should strengthen the propaganda and education for SARS-CoV-2 vaccine inoculation related knowledge, and strengthen the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine inoculation attitude and behavior of college students. Special attention should be paid to the education of vaccination knowledge for non-medical majors, younger, and male students, the guidance of vaccination attitude for those with poor health and older age, and encouragement of vaccination behavior for those with poor health and boys.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination , Students
18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Oct 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2142956

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The implementation of online teaching in the context of epidemic prevention and control has had an impact on the learning engagement of college students to some extent. This study aims to investigate the mechanisms that influence perceived social support and health behaviors on learning engagement, so as to make college students more focused on their studies by improving their physical and mental health as well as their ability to perceive social support. METHODS: A total of 538 college students from Henan Province, China, were studied using the Perceived Social Support Scale, Health Behavior Scale and Learning Engagement Scale, and the data were analyzed by IBM SPSS Amos 26.0 software (IBM SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). RESULTS: (1) The level of health behavior among college students was positively correlated with perceived social support ability (ß = 0.289, p < 0.001); both perceived social support and health behaviors predicted college students' learning engagement significantly (ß = 0.200, p < 0.01; ß = 0.406, p < 0.001). (2) College students' perceived social support partially mediated the relationship between health behaviors and learning engagement. CONCLUSION: One of the main ways to improve college students' learning engagement is to improve their health behavior and perceived social support. This study contributes to a better understanding of the relationships between health behaviors and learning engagement, as well as to the development of interventions to improve learning engagement among college students.


Subject(s)
Social Support , Students , Health Behavior , Humans , Learning , Mental Health
19.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1041695, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2142365

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic and restrictions on travel and quarantine measures made people turn to self-medication (SM) to control the symptoms of their diseases. Different studies were conducted worldwide on different populations, and their results were different. Therefore, this global systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to estimate the pooled prevalence of self-medication. Methods: In this systematic review and meta-analysis, databases of Scopus, PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science were searched without a time limit. All eligible observational articles that reported self-medication during the COVID-19 pandemic were analyzed. Heterogeneity among the studies was assessed using Cochran's Q test and I2 statistics. A random-effects model was used to estimate the pooled prevalence of self-medication. The methodological quality of the articles was evaluated with the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Results: Fifty-six eligible studies were reviewed. The pooled prevalence of self-medication was 48.6% (95% CI: 42.8-54.3). The highest and lowest prevalence of self-medication was in Asia (53%; 95% CI: 45-61) and Europe (40.8%; 95% CI: 35-46.8). Also, the highest and lowest prevalence of self-medication was related to students (54.5; 95% CI: 40.8-68.3) and healthcare workers (32.5%; 16-49). The prevalence of self-medication in the general population (48.8%; 40.6-57) and in patients with COVID-19 (41.7%; 25.5-58). The prevalence of self-medication was higher in studies that collected data in 2021 than in 2020 (51.2 vs. 48%). Publication bias was not significant (p = 0.320). Conclusion: During the COVID-19 pandemic, self-medication was highly prevalent, so nearly half of the people self-medicated. Therefore, it seems necessary to provide public education to control the consequences of self-medication.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Prevalence , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Quarantine , Students
20.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1041580, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2142364

ABSTRACT

Background: The outbreak of the new coronavirus-2019 (COVID-19) has had a significant impact on people's mental and physical health. Meanwhile, people's perceptions of risk may influence their emotional states and preventative behavior during an epidemic. Previous research have revealed the diversity and uniqueness of risk perception, and college students may have a different perspective on risk perception. The objective of this study was to describe the subtypes of risk perception for COVID-19 among college students in China, identify the subtypes' traits, and investigate their affecting variables. Methods: College students from 10 Chinese provinces participated in a cross-sectional study (n = 2,000) that from January 16 to 30, 2022. The latent profiles and influencing factors for risk perception were investigated using latent profile analysis, one-way analysis of variance, and multinomial logistical regression. Results: The sample group of this survey was 1,946 students, and the response rate was 97.3%. The best model was suggested to consist of three profiles: "neutral risk perception" (20.3%), "perception seriously without susceptible" (52.8%), and "low risk perception" (26.9%). Risk perception of COVID-19 was positively associated with attention to negation information (r = 0.372, p < 0.01), anxiety (r = 0.232, p < 0.01), and depression (r = 0.241, p < 0.01), and negatively associated with perceived social support (r = -0.151, p < 0.01). Logistic-regressions analyses mainly revealed that the risk perception of three profiles related to having chronic diseases (OR = 2.704, p < 0.01), medical major (OR = 0.595, p < 0.01; OR = 0.614, p < 0.05), without having COVID-19 confirmed cases around (OR = 0.539, p < 0.01), attention to negative information (OR = 1.073, p < 0.001; OR = 1.092, p < 0.001), and perceived social support (OR = 0.0.975, p < 0.01). Conclusions: The level of risk perception for COVID-19 among Chinese college students was unsatisfactory, and the risk perception of COVID-19 had significant group characteristics and heterogeneity. Colleges and public health practitioners could have a theoretical and empirical basis to implement risk perception intervention efforts by identifying latent subgroups during the COVID-19 epidemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Students/psychology , China/epidemiology , Perception
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