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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(13)2022 Jun 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1911359

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, dental education institutions throughout the world experienced significant challenges, including a quick shift to an online learning paradigm. Since the pandemic has had a considerable impact on dental education, this research evaluated the perspectives and attitudes towards online learning among undergraduate dental students in Bangladesh. METHODS: The research was conducted through a cross-sectional method using self-administered online questionnaires. The questionnaire included information on the students' sociodemographic status, their views, and their attitudes about the changes in the educational system, specifically regarding online learning. The study gathered data from 952 undergraduate students from 14 dental institutions in Bangladesh. RESULTS: The results suggested that 87.5% of all the students were unsatisfied with their online programs. Most of the respondents who expressed dissatisfaction with their online classes were female, did not receive assistance in overcoming barriers to accessing the classes or materials (64.23%), did not have access to the institutional online-learning management system (OLMS) (67.35%), and did not have access to the online course materials (71.43%). The students considered that the shift to online learning failed to provide quality clinical teaching. CONCLUSIONS: The lack of an OLMS was found to be linked with dissatisfaction with online learning among Bangladeshi dental students during the COVID-19 outbreak. Additionally, insufficient time allocation and a lack of support through online training were found to be strongly correlated with the students' discontent. The overall findings highlight the need to develop and implement effective online dentistry educational interventions to promote academic advancement and key practical skills.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Education, Distance/methods , Female , Humans , Internet , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Dental
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(13)2022 Jun 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1911347

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has drastically changed the routine way of life, having consequences in many segments of life, including dental practice and education. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of probable bruxism in a sample of dental students in Serbia and to estimate the potential association between psychological factors related to the COVID-19 pandemic and the presence of bruxism. A cross-sectional study included 178 dental students in Serbia, who were interviewed using a specially-designed self-administered online questionnaire, which consisted of three sections, and after that, a clinical examination for the presence of bruxism symptoms in the oral cavity. Psychological status was evaluated using the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21) and the Fear of COVID-19 Scale (FCV-19S). Saliva samples were taken to analyze salivary cortisol levels. The prevalence of probable bruxism was 34.8%. Respondents with probable bruxism had significantly higher DASS-21 and FCV-19S scores and mean values of salivary cortisol compared to non-bruxers. A history of COVID-19 infection, high stress, and fear of COVID-19 scores were associated with the presence of probable bruxism. The findings suggest that the COVID-19 pandemic has had a great psychological impact and impact on the presence and worsening of bruxism symptoms in a sample of dental students in Serbia.


Subject(s)
Bruxism , COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Hydrocortisone , Pandemics , Serbia/epidemiology , Students, Dental
3.
Niger J Clin Pract ; 25(6): 916-922, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1903683

ABSTRACT

Background: Although distance education has been received as an effective educational method in dentistry, the assessment of distance learning and online-exam methods in instantaneous conditions such as a pandemic has not been completely researched. Aims: The purpose of the present study was to assess student satisfaction with the distance learning and online-exam experience of dental students in Turkey during the pandemic. Subjects and Methods: Dental students in selected Turkish universities were invited to participate in the research. As a data collection tool, socio-demographic data and a web-based questionnaire consisting of 23 questions, addressing the problems experienced in education during the Covid-19 pandemic period and questioning the solutions of students regarding these problems were used. Satisfaction and attitudes towards distance education and online exams were examined. Results: A total of 1375 students participated in the study. The percentages of students at the various grades of dental school were as follows: first grade = 11.2%, second grade = 18.2%, third grade = 28.3%, fourth grade = 27%, and fifth grade = 15.1%. There is a significant relationship between classes and all scale expressions (P < 0.05). While 11.2% of the students who responded had not experienced any problems, the most common problem was that practical training could not be performed (45.8%) and the lessons were inefficient (29.7%). Conclusions: Dental students demonstrated a low degree of satisfaction and a negative attitude towards distance learning and the quality of presentation of educational material.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/methods , Humans , Pandemics , Students, Dental , Turkey
4.
PLoS One ; 17(6): e0270091, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1902641

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: COVID-19 pandemic continuously spread exacerbating global concerns. It had impacted all life aspects such as social, cultural, economic and education. This study assess the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on undergraduate dental students at Faculty of Dentistry, University of Malaya. The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of the pandemic on physical and mental health of undergraduate dental students. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study. An online questionnaire was administrated to 150 undergraduate dental students. The questionnaire included questions related to students' demographic data, their concerns on academic achievement, their opinion on institution response, and the impact of the crisis on their mental and physical health. SPSS software v26.0 was used to analyse the collected data. RESULTS: A total of 147 respondents participated in the study. About 66% of the students felt comfortable in adapting to the new technology while 85.7% were concerned about the quality of online learning. Almost all students 98.6% expressed their doubts on the ability to pass the competency exams and to graduate on time, with only 49.7% agreed that clinical experience was effectively delivered through online classes. Most students were also concerned on the impact of the pandemic on their physical and emotional health 85.8% and 76.9% respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of our study highlight the positive adaptation of the students to online learning and using technology. On the other hand, the study indicates that the COVID-19 pandemic brings negative impacts on our students' physical and mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , Students, Dental/psychology
5.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 26(9): 3351-3360, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1856621

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the study was to compare the oral health attitudes and behaviors of medical and dental students/interns during the Corona pandemic in Saudi Arabia using Hiroshima University Dental Behavioral Inventory (HU-DBI). SUBJECTS AND METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the oral health attitudes and behaviors of dental and medical students/interns in Saudi Arabia using an online Hiroshima University-Dental Behavioral Inventory (HUDBI). An English version of the questionnaires consisting of personal information and 20 HUDBI items were responded by the 638 (46.8%) dental and 726 (53.2%) medical students/interns. The mean score of oral health attitude and behavior of the study participants was calculated based on 12 point scale of the HUDBI items. The Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests compared the HUDBI scores across different groups. RESULTS: The study sample's overall mean HUDBI score was 6.44±1.80 (Median 7). Dental students/interns (825.60) demonstrated a significantly higher HUDBI mean score than medical students/interns (556.75) (p<0.001). Similarly, female students (712.25) than the male students (712.25 vs. 642, p=0.001), and those studying in private universities compared to government universities (741.56 vs. 673.52, p=0.028) showed significantly higher HUDBI mean scores. CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, dental students/interns displayed a better oral health attitudes and behaviors than medical students/interns. Therefore, oral health promotion programs aimed at medical and dental students/interns are essential for improving oral health attitudes and behaviors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Attitude to Health , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , Oral Health , Pandemics , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Students, Dental , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
J Ayub Med Coll Abbottabad ; 34(1): 101-107, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1812232

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Medical and dental students are the future of health workforce and a potential volunteer pool in the COVID-19 crises. This study aimed to assess the level and gender differences in the awareness, attitude and behaviours of medical and dentals students about COVID-19 in Pakistan. METHODS: An online cross-sectional survey was conducted among medical and dental undergraduate students in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province. Data was collected using a structured questionnaire having four sections: socio-demographics, knowledge, attitude and practices. RESULTS: A total of 1770 medical and dental students participated and completed the questionnaire. About 1239 (70%) of the respondents were female and 1526 (87%) were MBBS students. We found that 1685 (95%) of the students had adequate knowledge. Majority, 1565 (89%) of the students was concerned about COVID-19 and 1480 (84%) believed that disease will ultimately be controlled. Only about 1129 (64%) of the participants in our study had adequate practices. Male gender was associated with higher risk of inadequate practices. CONCLUSIONS: There were good knowledge and attitudes about COVID-19 among medical and dental students. However, one third of the participants did not have adequate practices and female had better practices than male students. This gap in the knowledge and practice calls for urgent interventions to improve practices.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , Pakistan/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Students, Dental , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 312, 2022 Apr 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1808361

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 caused significant confusion around the world, and dental education was no exception. Therefore, in line with the demands of the times, this study sought to determine the applicability of online active learning to dental education. METHODS: This study was conducted in the second semester of 2020 at a school of dentistry in a selective university in Korea. A total of 114 dental students were recruited. Participants were assigned to four different groups (lecture and discussion [LD], lecture and discussion with instructor's worksheet [LW], self-study and discussion [SSD], and self-study and discussion with instructor's worksheet [SW]) using the random breakout room function in the Zoom video conference application. Their final test scores were then analyzed using analysis of variance and the online active learning results were compared with the offline learning results. RESULTS: The scores were highest for the transfer type items in the SSD group, followed by the SW group and the two lecture groups, which had no significant differences. These scores and pattern differences between the groups were similar for all items. The results suggested that studying by oneself rather than simply listening to lectures enhanced the effects of the discussions and led to higher learning outcomes. In addition, the effect of the instructor's intervention in the middle of the discussion varied depending on the pre-learning activities of discussion. As with previous offline experiments, self-study followed by group discussion had higher learning outcomes for both the verbatim and transfer type items. CONCLUSIONS: In agreement with the Interactive, Constructive, Active, and Passive (ICAP) framework and other active learning theories, the findings clearly indicated that online active learning was applicable to dental students, and when self-study precedes discussion, the learning is richer and the learning outcomes are better.


Subject(s)
Academic Performance , COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Problem-Based Learning/methods , Republic of Korea , Students, Dental
8.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 309, 2022 Apr 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1799103

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The long-term psychological effects of COVID-19 on dental students are unclear. The aim of this cross-sectional online study was to investigate the psychological effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on dental students. METHOD: The Quality of Life Scale (WHOQOL-BREF) was sent to all dental students through Google Forms to evaluate their quality of life (QoL), and the DASS-21 scale was used to evaluate their psychosocial status due to distance learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. The answers were analyzed both on the basis of year of education and type of education (online versus classroom learning). One-way ANOVA was used for comparison of students in the different years of education; post hoc LSD test was used for pairwise comparisons. Sample t-test was used to compare the two groups separated as classroom/face-to-face learning and distance/online learning. RESULT: The questionnaire was completed by 580 students with a response rate of 87.74%. According to the QoL scale results, there was no significant difference between the groups regarding general health, physical health, and psychology, both between different years and learning methods (p > 0.05). According to the results of the DASS-21 scale, anxiety and depression in the 3rd year students were significantly higher than the other years. The stress level of the 2nd year students was statistically significantly different from the other years (p < 0.05). Evaluation of anxiety, stress and the QoL showed an overall detrimental effect of distance learning on the dental students, although the evaluation did not reach statistical significance. CONCLUSION: Anxiety, stress and factors affecting the quality of life negatively affected dental students who received online/distance learning, although the difference did not reach statistical significance when compared to students who received in-classroom learning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Dental
9.
PLoS One ; 17(4): e0267354, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793490

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Dental practitioners and dental students are classified as high-risk exposure to COVID-19 due to the nature of dental treatments, but evidence of their acceptance towards COVID-19 vaccination is still scarce. Hence, this systemic review aims to critically appraise and analyse the acceptability of COVID-19 vaccination among dental students and dental practitioners. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This review was registered in the PROSPERO database (CRD42021286108) based on PRISMA guidelines. Cross-sectional articles on the dental students' and dental practitioners' acceptance towards COVID-19 vaccine published between March 2020 to October 2021 were searched in eight online databases. The Joanna Briggs Institute critical appraisal tool was employed to analyse the risk of bias (RoB) of each article, whereas the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine recommendation tool was used to evaluate the level of evidence. Data were analysed using the DerSimonian-Laird random effect model based on a single-arm approach. RESULTS: Ten studies were included of which three studies focused on dental students and seven studies focused on dental practitioners. Four studies were deemed to exhibit moderate RoB and the remaining showed low RoB. All the studies demonstrated Level 3 evidence. Single-arm meta-analysis revealed that dental practitioners had a high level of vaccination acceptance (81.1%) than dental students (60.5%). A substantial data heterogeneity was observed with the overall I2 ranging from 73.65% and 96.86%. Furthermore, subgroup analysis indicated that dental practitioners from the Middle East and high-income countries showed greater (p < 0.05) acceptance levels, while meta-regression showed that the sample size of each study had no bearing on the degree of data heterogeneity. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the high degree of acceptance of COVID-19 vaccination among dental practitioners, dental students still demonstrated poor acceptance. These findings highlighted that evidence-based planning with effective approaches is warranted to enhance the knowledge and eradicate vaccination hesitancy, particularly among dental students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dentists , Humans , Professional Role , Students, Dental , Vaccination
10.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 257, 2022 Apr 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785151

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In mid-March 2020, the coronavirus pandemic led to a national lockdown in Germany. Face-to-face teaching was cancelled in universities for the 2020 summer semester. Teaching moved online with no prior IT testing and lecturer training. The study analyses experiences of the suspension of face-to-face teaching and the move to digitalised learning for students and lecturers of dentistry at Kiel. METHODS: In summer 2020, qualitative guided interviews were conducted with students (4th, 6th, 8th, and 10th semesters), and lecturers. Deductive and inductive qualitative content analysis of the results was carried out. RESULTS: Thirty-nine students (69% female) and 19 lecturers (32% female) were interviewed. Reactions to the changes in teaching were observed. Feelings ranged from an essentially positive attitude, through insecurity and uncertainty to a failure to fully appreciate the situation. The loss of social contact was lamented. Digitalisation was associated with technological challenges and additional work. However, it also fostered learning independent of time and place, and encouraged autonomy. Negative aspects of digitalisation included a lack of feedback and loss of interaction. CONCLUSION: The introduction of ad hoc digitalisation challenged both students and lecturers alike. Dealing with lockdown and the changes in teaching and studying required significant flexibility.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Dental , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Humans , Learning , Male , Pandemics , Teaching
11.
Ann Afr Med ; 21(1): 91-97, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753752

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus is an emerging respiratory pathogen that causes coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19), as per the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Objective: This study aimed to assess the state of awareness and extent of knowledge about COVID-19 among dental students from India, Pakistan, and Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: The present descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 872 participants from December 2020 to January 2021. Random sampling was performed using an electronic questionnaire. One-way analysis of variance and independent sample t-test were performed to assess and compare the mean knowledge score between different demographic data. Results: Approximately 60% (n = 520) of the responders were women and 40% responders were men (n = 352). The responders were from Saudi Arabia (36.9%; n = 322), India (34.2%; n = 298), and Pakistan (28.8%; n = 252). The difference within the subgroups was statistically nonsignificant (P > 0.05), indicating that dental students of all subparameters possessed equal knowledge on COVID-19. Conclusions: Dental students possess sufficient knowledge about COVID-19, qualifying them at least to work in a medical ward. However, more emphasis must be placed on infection prevention and control policies such as hand hygiene, personal protective equipment, and pre- and postexposure prophylaxis.


Résumé Contexte: Le coronavirus est un agent pathogène respiratoire émergent qui provoque la maladie à coronavirus-2019 (COVID-19), selon le Centre chinois chinois de contrôle et de prévention des maladies. Objectif: Cette étude visait à évaluer le degré de sensibilisation et l'étendue des connaissances sur le COVID-19 parmi les étudiants en médecine dentaire d'Inde, du Pakistan et d'Arabie Saoudite. Matériaux et méthodes: La présente étude descriptive transversale a été menée sur 872 participants de décembre 2020 à janvier 2021. Un échantillonnage aléatoire a été réalisé à l'aide d'un questionnaire électronique. Une analyse de variance à sens unique et un test t d'échantillon indépendant ont été réalisés pour évaluer et comparer le score moyen de connaissances entre les différentes données démographiques. différentes données démographiques. Résultats: Environ 60% (n = 520) des répondants étaient des femmes et 40% des répondants étaient des hommes (n = 352). Les répondants étaient originaires d'Arabie Saoudite (36,9% ; n = 322), d'Inde (34,2% ; n = 298) et du Pakistan (28,8% ; n = 252). La différence au sein des les sous-groupes était statistiquement non significative (P > 0,05), ce qui indique que les étudiants en médecine dentaire de tous les sous-paramètres possédaient les mêmes connaissances sur COVID-19. Conclusions: Les étudiants en médecine dentaire possèdent des connaissances suffisantes sur la COVID-19, ce qui les qualifie au moins pour travailler dans un service médical. Cependant, il faut mettre davantage l'accent sur les politiques de prévention et de contrôle des infections, telles que l'hygiène des mains, les équipements de protection individuelle, et la prophylaxie pré- et post-exposition. Mots-clés: Sensibilisation, maladie à coronavirus-2019, étudiants en médecine dentaire.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , Perception , Students, Dental , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
Pesqui. bras. odontopediatria clín. integr ; 22: e210015, 2022. tab, graf
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1736589

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective To determine the level of knowledge of dentistry students regarding the COVID-19 outbreak and to evaluate whether the risk factors of the outbreak cause depression. Material and Methods This study was conducted with 516 dentistry students (3rd, 4th and 5th grades) who started clinical practice in their education. The first part of the questionnaires applied to the students includes questions about demographic information, while the second part contains questions to determine their knowledge levels on the COVID-19 pandemic and protection against it. In the third section, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was used to examine depression symptoms. The data were analyzed by frequency analyses and Chi-squared tests via the IBM SPSS 22.0 software. Results Of the 516 students, 150 (29%) participants were in the 3rd, 212 (41%) were in the 4th and 154 (30%) were in the 5th grade. 355 (69%) students stated that their knowledge level about COVID-19 was high. 30.9% were conscious of the importance of using masks. 29.6% were aware of the importance of using gloves, 30.3% of not shaking hands. According to BDI scores, 37.1% of the participants seemed to experience moderate to severe and very severe depression. Conclusion It was observed that the students didn't have a sufficient level of knowledge about the factors affecting the spread of the pandemic. New stress factors such as COVID-19 may increase the incidence of depression.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Students, Dental , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Risk Factors , Infection Control , Education, Dental , COVID-19 , Turkey/epidemiology , Chi-Square Distribution , Cross-Sectional Studies/methods , Surveys and Questionnaires , Data Interpretation, Statistical , Statistics, Nonparametric , Depression
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 03 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1732035

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to map dental students' experience of the study situation throughout the pandemic. All clinical dental students (year 3 to 5) at the Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Dentistry (IKO), University of Bergen (UiB), Norway, were invited. Participation was anonymous and voluntary, and the response rate was 63%. Questions regarding stress-related factors were divided into three categories. In the category «Stressors/learning¼, a statistically significant difference was observed between both the genders (p = 0.001) and years of study (p = 0.028). Statistically significant differences between the genders were also observed in the category «Stressors/infection¼ (p = 0.008). Women were significantly more stressed due to lack of clinical skills (p = 0.048), not receiving as good theoretical teaching as before the pandemic (p = 0.016), and uncertain issues around the exams (p = 0.000). Fourth year students were significantly more stressed due to lack of clinical skills (p = 0.012), for not passing the clinic/skills courses due to lack of study progression (p = 0.005), and worries about not being a good enough dentist after graduation (p = 0.002). In conclusion, the pandemic had a major impact on dental students. The most prominent stressors in relation to the study situation were experienced by students from the fourth year and female students. Clinical and theoretical learning outcomes among students were regarded as worse than before the pandemic. The students preferred in presence lectures, but experienced digital asynchronous video lectures as a good alternative. The pandemic negatively affected the students' social life. Dental schools should be aware that students have been exposed to increased distress and burden through the pandemic and should provide support for those in need.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Norway/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Dental
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1715377

ABSTRACT

Our aim was to study attitudes toward vaccinations, full vaccination rates and susceptibility rates against vaccine-preventable diseases among students attending a University Dental School. A total of 134 students were studied. Full vaccination rates were as follows: 56.5% against measles and mumps, 70.6% against rubella, 32.3% against varicella, 44.1% against hepatitis A, 45.9% against hepatitis B, and 87.7% against COVID-19. In the past decade, 63.2% of students had received a booster shot against tetanus-diphtheria, 47.8% against pertussis, and 28.1% against poliomyelitis, while 29.4% of students had been vaccinated against influenza in the past year. Susceptibility rates were 40.4% for measles, 42.4% for mumps, 28.3% for rubella, 32.3% for varicella, 55.3% for hepatitis A, 54.1% for hepatitis B, 36.8% for tetanus-diphtheria, 52.2% for pertussis, and 71.9% for poliomyelitis. Overall, 123 (91.8%) students favored mandatory vaccinations, mainly for all dentists (88.4%), while 11.6% of students favored them only for dentists who provide care to high-risk patients. In conclusion, most dental students favored mandatory vaccinations, yet we found significant vaccination gaps and susceptibility rates against vaccine-preventable diseases. Vaccinations for dental students should be intensified. A national vaccination registry for healthcare personnel including dental students is urgently needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccination Coverage , Attitude , Greece , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Dental , Vaccination
15.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0264323, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1708330

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the COVID-19 vaccination experience among United States-based dental professionals and students: to understand their beliefs, concerns, safety and confidence levels, and side effects experienced after vaccination; striving to boost vaccination acceptability to curtail the pandemic. METHODS: An observational survey study approved by The University of Texas Health San Antonio Institutional Review Board was distributed to members of the School of Dentistry community using Qualtrics XM software. The survey was completed anonymously. Data were analyzed using R statistical computing software, χ2 test and Fisher's Exact test. RESULTS: Over 80% of all participants felt moderately to very safe working after the COVID-19 vaccine was made available, and more than 75% were moderately to very confident that the vaccine can protect them during the pandemic. At least 35% were moderately to very concerned about immediate and long-term side effects of the vaccine; despite the concerns, 94% received the vaccine. Side effects were more common after the second dose of the vaccine. Most common side effects were injection site pain, and general side effects of fatigue/tiredness, headache, muscle/body ache, and chills/fever. 74% reported no effect of the vaccine on daily activities, and the severity of side effects no worse than mild (about 60%). CONCLUSIONS: Majority of the participants felt safe and confident that the vaccine would protect them against COVID-19 infection. Sharing these findings and reliable information that the vaccine is safe and effective is paramount to fostering the vaccine uptake and curtailing the pandemic. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Findings of this study demonstrated the confidence of the UT Health San Antonio, School of Dentistry community that the benefits of the vaccines greatly outweigh the risks; boosting the vaccination acceptance while creating a COVID-19 free environment both for the academic dental setting and the community it serves.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 , Dentists , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Dental , Vaccination , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , United States/epidemiology
16.
BMC Oral Health ; 22(1): 46, 2022 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1704396

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by a novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) has gained worldwide attention and proved to hold an impact to humankind in all aspects of life. Dental students' performances may indirectly be affected following the preventive measures in containing the disease. This study aims to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on physical, mental, financial health and academic concern among dental students in Malaysia. METHODS: The current research implemented a cross sectional study among dental students in Malaysia. Assessment of the impact of COVID-19 on dental education was done by the distribution of a set of online survey consisting of 28 questions to dental students (n = 353) from public and private universities in Malaysia. The questionnaires include sociodemographic backgrounds and assessment on the mental health, financial health, physical health and academic concern. Kruskal Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U test were used to analyse the impact of COVID-19 to these 4 domains according to sociodemographic background. RESULTS: A total number of 353 respondents was recorded and 76.2% comprised of female. 59.7% were clinical students and 40.3% were preclinical students. Most of students were concerned about their own emotional health, financial concern, physical wellbeing, in which Year 3 students were found to be more concerned about their mental and financial health concern. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 pandemic had indeed significantly affected Malaysian dental students mainly due to fear of the quality of online learning and the amount of clinical skills acquired. Therefore, it is important to identify dental stressors and lessen the impact of COVID-19 to dental students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Dental
17.
J Dent Educ ; 86(7): 893-899, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1703542

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The impact of COVID-19 required revisions in curricula, especially among professional programs that have traditionally required hands-on learning of content. This study endeavored to assess the level of effectiveness of the online presentation of material both qualitatively and quantitatively in a 5-week module on cariology for first-year dental students. Quantitative analysis of the assessment data was required to determine if an interactive engagement platform increased student outcomes. Quantitative survey and qualitative student comments were analyzed to determine the students' preferences for supplemental learning opportunities and utilization trends. The purpose of this study was to measure the learning outcomes of online course delivery with the use of an interactive education platform. METHODS: The dental class of 2023 received the cariology material in a live, in-person lecture format. The class of 2024 received the same material in a combination of synchronous Zoom lectures and asynchronous interactive presentations utilizing the interactive education platform (Nearpod). The identical midterm examination on cariology was administered to both cohorts at the completion of the 5-week module. RESULTS: Quantitatively, the class of 2024 had a significantly higher mean score than the class of 2023 on the midterm examination, collectively and in both female and male cohorts. Qualitatively, the dental students overwhelmingly expressed support for the ease of use and educational value of the Nearpod platform. CONCLUSIONS: This study found that student performance on the identical exam was improved through the use of synchronous Zoom lectures and asynchronous Nearpod review sessions. The application of technology to enhance remote learning can be effective in supporting student mastery of core concepts in dental education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Simulation Training , Curriculum , Educational Measurement , Female , Humans , Learning , Male , Students, Dental
18.
J Dent Educ ; 86(7): 874-882, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1664412

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies only focused on attitudes and behaviors of US dental students without examining direct effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on academic performance. This study examined effects of COVID-19 pandemic on dental students' academic performance, self-reported attitudes, behavior, and service utilization. We hypothesized that the pandemic provided more beneficial learning environments. METHODS: This mixed study design implemented a cross sectional survey with retrospective extraction of students' academic grades. A survey of 274 predoctoral students assessed self-reported attitudes/behaviors and service utilization. First year Doctor of Dental Medicine (DMD1) 2021-2024 students' academic performance data were extracted. Independent t-test and chi-square crosstab analyses were conducted assessing differences between pre-COVID and post-COVID cohorts. RESULTS: Participants' academic grades identified statistically significant associations between pre-/post-COVID grades in five of 12 DMD1 courses. Grade percentages identified increased average grades in four of 12 DMD1 courses, with one of 12 courses demonstrating decreased grade percentage. Half of survey participants were female (n = 37/72, 51.4%), 79.2% were 25-34 years old, and 44.4% (n = 32) were DMD 2024. About 1/5 (20.8%, n = 15) sought counseling/therapy. Students agreed staying home allowed more time to study (66.7%, n = 48), while 59.2% (n = 42) reported increased financial concerns. A majority reported lacking in-person group studying decreased performance, and 55.6% (n = 40) reported feeling depressed. CONCLUSION: Students performed better overall in courses delivered remotely with clinical application and team-based engagement. Students performed equally overall; however, the majority had concerns regarding finances, group studying, and mental health challenges. This highlights the need for more readily available resources at institutions.


Subject(s)
Academic Performance , COVID-19 , Adult , Attitude , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Students, Dental/psychology
19.
Dent Med Probl ; 59(1): 5-11, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662905

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Dentistry is one of the professions that are most exposed to the contagion with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID­19). However, the prevalence and positivity rates of COVID­19 are low in dentists, indicating that the current measures of infection control may be sufficient to prevent infection in dental settings. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to determine whether the preventive measures for COVID­19 during the mandatory social isolation were followed by dental students and dentists in Latin America and the Caribbean in 2020. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross­sectional study was conducted using anonymous virtual surveys in a convenience sample of 2,036 dental students and dentists from 21 Latin American and Caribbean coun­ tries. The variables were the preventive measures for COVID­19 and the sociodemographic characteristics. Descriptive and bivariate analyses were performed. RESULTS: The final sample included 2,036 dental students and dentists. The self­perceived level of know­ ledge about COVID­19 was found to be associated with age, sex, body mass index (BMI), the type of aca­ demic training, having a specialty in the case of professionals, the place of origin, and having met someone with COVID­19 (p < 0.05). The self­perceived level of concern regarding COVID­19 was associated with sex, BMI and having met someone with COVID­19 (p < 0.05). The number of days in the mandatory social isolation was associated with age, the type of academic training, having a specialty, the place of origin, and having met someone with COVID­19 (p < 0.05). The confinement level was associated with age, sex, BMI, the type of academic training, and having met someone with COVID­19 (p < 0.05). Following the preven­ tive measures for COVID­19 was associated with age, the type of academic training, having a specialty, the place of origin, and having met someone with COVID­19 (p < 0.05). The use of face masks, hand washing and social distancing were associated with age, BMI, the type of academic training, the place of origin, and having met someone with COVID­19 (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Dental students and dentists followed the preventive measures for COVID­19 during the mandatory social isolation period in Latin America and the Caribbean in 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/prevention & control , Caribbean Region/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dentists , Humans , Latin America/epidemiology , Social Isolation , Students, Dental
20.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0260698, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1637153

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Currently, world is suffering from a respiratory disease names as COVID-19. This is a novel coronavirus (n-CoV), a new strain which has not been previously identified in humans and it has spread in more than 100 locations internationally due to which it is termed as "public health emergency of international concern" (PHEIC) by the World Health Organization So far, no study done as yet to assess whether the dental workforce is aware about the facts and myths related to Covid-19 awareness. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to analyze and compare the level of awareness about the facts and myths related to COVID-19 amongst faculty, dental students and prep year students of the College of Dentistry (COD) as part of an awareness campaign. METHODS: An awareness test about COVID-19 was designed using information from the World Health Organization's (WHO) Myth Busters Awareness webpage. The questionnaire was administrated online to faculty and students, of the College of Dentistry and preparatory year students who had applied for the admission to the dental college using a secure enterprise online assessment platform (Blackboard). The tests were administered over a period of three months from March to June 2020. A written informed consent was obtained. RESULTS: The online COVID-19 awareness test was administered to 810 participants, out of which 325 (40%) were prep year students, 429(53%%) were dental students, and 56 (7%) were faculty members. Analysis of the results showed that 86% of the Faculty were able to correctly identify the facts and the myths related to COVID-19 followed by 81% of the prep year students and 74% of the dental students. Preparatory year student's knowledge related to COVID-19 was found to be high when compared to dental students (26.47±4.27, 23.67±6.2). Student to faculty knowledge score did not differ significantly (p = 0.808). CONCLUSION: This study reports about a successful pilot test conducted to assess the perceived knowledge about facts and myths related to corona virus amongst the dental workforce.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Schools, Dental , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Saudi Arabia , Students, Dental/statistics & numerical data
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