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1.
Int J Med Educ ; 12: 243-244, 2021 Nov 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1811051
2.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 276, 2022 Apr 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1789118

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, undergraduate medical students had to follow high amounts of online education. This does not match their preferences and might negatively affect their education satisfaction and study engagement. As low levels of education satisfaction and study engagement are risk factors for burnout and dropout, resources that mitigate these possible negative consequences of forced online education need to be identified. Therefore, the current study investigated 1) the associations of the amount of online education with education satisfaction and study engagement, and 2) whether quantitative (i.e., network size) and qualitative (i.e., perceived support) aspects of peer relationships can buffer the expected negative associations. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, 372 undergraduate medical students from all eight Dutch medical schools (79.8% female; mean age: 20.4 years) completed an online survey assessing the relevant variables. Data were analysed using correlation and moderated mediation analyses. RESULTS: The amount of online education was significantly negatively related to education satisfaction and study engagement. Additionally, higher amounts of online education were indirectly associated with lower levels of study engagement through lower levels of education satisfaction. More importantly, both quantitative and qualitative aspects of peer relationships significantly buffered this negative indirect association. Specifically, among medical students with a large peer network or high levels of perceived peer support, the amount of online education was no longer significantly negatively related to education satisfaction and subsequently to study engagement. CONCLUSIONS: The current study underlines the importance of peer relationships in the educational context, since our findings indicate that both the peer network size and the perceived peer support protect medical students' education satisfaction and study engagement when confronted with study demands, such as forced online education during the COVID-19 pandemic. These findings may be translated into educational efforts that stimulate collaborative learning and the formation of formal peer networks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Students, Medical , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Personal Satisfaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
3.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 156, 2022 Mar 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1789115

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and its quick progression to a global pandemic has urged medical schools to shift from didactic to distance learning and assessment approaches. The quality of clinical training and assessment have been jeopardized due to the regulatory restrictions and potential hazards to human lives. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the utility and efficacy of an electronic Objective Structured Clinical Examination (e-OSCE), which attempted to transform the format of a face-to-face OSCE to an e-OSCE. METHODS: We conducted three end of clerkship e-OSCEs for final year medical students in Surgery, Medicine and Family Medicine using the teleconferencing application of Microsoft Teams (MST). The e-OSCE blueprint included the assessment of all clinical skills except physical examination and procedural skills. Examiners supervised e-OSCE from the college campus, while all students were remotely assessed through the MST channels. During the exam, the students stayed in their specified MST channel and examiners rotated across all students. The utility and efficacy of e-OSCE was evaluated using a self-administered questionnaire for students, examiners and e-OSCE team. RESULTS: The data analysis showed that 93.4% students and 92.2% examiners agreed with the quality and process of e-OSCE. Similarly, 83.6% students and 98% examiners agreed with the seamless organization of e-OSCE. As many as 45.9% students and 74.5% examiners agreed that e-OSCE was close to real life practice. Approximately one fifth of students and one third of examiners preferred e-OSCE over the face-to-face OSCE. The analysis of qualitative data generated the themes of e-OSCE structure and technology. While majority of participants were satisfied with e-OSCE, students were concerned about examiners' training and e-OSCE contents. Examiners and e-OSCE team recognized the paper-less, tech-savy, fast and reliable format of e-OSCE. CONCLUSION: During and beyond COVID- 19 era, e-OSCE is a strong substitute to standard OSCE for assessing clinical competence except for physical examination and procedural skills. The planning and implementation of e-OSCE reflects an ingenuity in the assessment of clinical competencies of medical students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Clinical Competence , Educational Measurement , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
PLoS One ; 17(4): e0266426, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785195

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic substantially undermined medical education and healthcare systems. Owing to the pandemic in South Korea, most medical schools needed to be flexible when conducting online and offline classes, but the guidelines did not reflect the specificity of medical schools. This study described the impact of modified anatomy education schedules at the Seoul National University College of Medicine (SNUCM) on students' academic performance and satisfaction. METHODS: Anatomy education in SNUCM is divided into three regional units (the upper and lower limbs, trunk, and head and neck). Owing to the COVID-19 pandemic, the schedule was mixed with simultaneous and rotating schedules. The authors conducted exceptions for online lectures, cadaver dissections, and written and practical examinations in three classes of approximately 50 students each. Furthermore, the authors assessed students' performance using three sets of written and practical examinations, and students completed a questionnaire regarding modified anatomy laboratory schedules. RESULTS: Despite the pandemic events in Seoul and South Korea during the laboratory sessions, all sessions were completed without any confirmed COVID-19 cases among the students, faculty, and staff. Most of the scores on the written and practical examinations significantly decreased in 2020 compared to those in 2019. However, in the trunk session that used the virtual anatomy application, the score on the practical examination in 2020 was significantly higher than that in 2019. Over 70% (79 and 77 out of 105 respondents on the upper and lower limbs and trunk, respectively) and 53% (55/105) students reported that there were no significant difficulties in studying anatomy in a face-to-face laboratory. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, an adequate education program for cadaver dissection should be developed and provided to overcome the pandemic restrictions. The study findings could serve as a reference for anatomy education during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anatomy , COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Students, Medical , Anatomy/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cadaver , Humans , Pandemics , Republic of Korea/epidemiology
5.
Front Public Health ; 10: 868914, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785458

ABSTRACT

Background: Professional identity (PI) influences the doctor's thoughts and behaviors. Thus, PI formation (PIF) plays an important role in medical students' education. Major changes to the learning environment could impact PIF, but the influence of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on medical students' PI had confusing conclusions in previous studies. We aimed to compare PI of medical students by using the data from three waves of national cross-sectional surveys conducted in China in 2019, 2020, and 2021, and to examine factors that influence PIF. Method: We used data from the China Medical Student Survey (CMSS) which has conducted three national cross-sectional surveys. From 2019 to 2021, CMCC retrieved data on PI from a nationally representative sample of medical students from 33, 121, and 123 colleges, respectively. We analyzed the data using Chi-square test, analysis of variance, and multivariable logistic regression according to sociodemographic characteristics, pre-university experience, college characteristics, and college experience. Results: A total of 244,040 medical students in China participated in the surveys. The overall score of PI increased from 3.80 in 2019 to 3.85 in 2021. Medical students with family medical background, high intrinsic and extrinsic motivation of major selection, teachers' positive role model, and high personal comprehensive quality ranking were more likely to have higher PI (all p < 0.05). The more attention students paid to the COVID-19 pandemic, the higher PI they would have (aOR 1.93, 95% CI 1.67-2.24 for more attention; aOR 2.31, 95% CI 2.00-2.68 for the most attention). However, parents' participation on the front lines of COVID-19 pandemic negatively influenced the PI of medical students (aOR 0.72, 95% CI 0.57-0.93). Conclusions: PI of medical students increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. The impact of the pandemic on PI was complex. To improve the PI of medical students, the education sector, health sector and the society need to make concerted efforts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Self Concept , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
7.
PLoS One ; 17(4): e0266670, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779778

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 vaccination in Sudan launched in March 2021 but the extent of its acceptance has not been formally studied. This study aimed to determine the acceptance and hesitancy of the COVID-19 vaccine and associated factors among medical students in Sudan. METHODS: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted using an online self-administered questionnaire designed on Google Form and sent to randomly-selected medical students via their Telegram accounts from 30th June to 11th July 2021. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences software. Chi-square or Fisher's exact test and logistic regression were used to assess the association between vaccine acceptance and demographic as well as non-demographic factors. RESULTS: Out of the 281 students who received the questionnaire, 220 (78%) responded, of whom 217 consented and completed the form. Males accounted for 46. 1%. Vaccine acceptance was 55. 8% (n = 121), and vaccine hesitancy was 44. 2% (n = 96). The commonly cited reasons for accepting the vaccine were to protect themselves and others from getting COVID-19. Concerns about vaccine safety and effectiveness were the main reasons reported by those who were hesitant. Factors associated with vaccine acceptance were history of COVID-19 infection (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 2. 2, 95% CI 1. 0-4.7, p = 0. 040), belief that vaccines are generally safe (aOR = 2.3, 95% CI 1. 2-4.5, p = 0.020), confidence that the vaccine can end the pandemic (aOR = 7.5, 95% CI 2. 5-22. 0, p<0.001), and receiving any vaccine in the past 5 years (aOR = 2.4, 95% CI 1.1-5.4, p = 0.031). No demographic association was found with the acceptance of the vaccine. CONCLUSIONS: This study has revealed a high level of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among medical students. Efforts to provide accurate information on COVID-19 vaccine safety and effectiveness are highly recommended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Urogenital Abnormalities , Vaccines , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Sudan/epidemiology , Vaccination
8.
BMC Ophthalmol ; 22(1): 159, 2022 Apr 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779620

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 has necessitate the routine use of masks worldwide. This study assessed the relationship between wearing a facemask and dry eye disease (DED) among a sample of medical students in Jordan. METHODS: This cross-sectional online survey enrolled medical students from all medical schools in Jordan. The questionnaire, which was shared via social media platforms, assessed sociodemographic information, ocular and medical history, facemask-wearing habits, the use of ocular devices, and the relationship with ocular discomfort. The ocular surface disease index (OSDI) questionnaire was also administered to quantify DED symptoms. RESULTS: A total of 1,219 students participated in this study. In total, 58.3% participants were females, and 52% were in the clinical science years. Symptomatic DED was found in 71.7% of participants. Female sex, basic science years, allergy reporting, and spending more than 6 h looking at screens were significantly associated with symptomatic DED. CONCLUSION: Wearing a facemask was not significantly associated with symptomatic DED. Further studies are needed to investigate the effect of wearing a facemask on the ocular surface.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dry Eye Syndromes , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dry Eye Syndromes/diagnosis , Dry Eye Syndromes/epidemiology , Dry Eye Syndromes/etiology , Female , Humans , Masks , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
BMJ Open ; 12(4): e056749, 2022 Apr 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779375

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To find out how medical students think well-being should be measured. DESIGN: A mixed-methods study comprising a cross-sectional online survey (November 2020-March 2021) and semi-structured online interviews. Views on the frequency of availability for measurement, the format, type and purpose of measurement, and with whom well-being should be discussed were measured. When an outcome was scored 7-9 on a 9-point Likert scale of agreement by ≥75% of participants it was considered critical. Inductive thematic analysis was undertaken on the interview transcripts. SETTING: All medicine programmes at University of Southampton. PARTICIPANTS: Medical students from all years took part in the survey (n=118) and interviews (n=16). RESULTS: Most participants (94%) felt able to give 5 min to measure their well-being at least once per month. Research, governance and individual feedback were all considered critically important. Only subjective assessments undertaken by the individual in real-time were rated critically important (78.1%) measurement tools. Students selected that they would discuss their well-being with other medical students (n=87) nearly as often as they selected a member of the faculty (n=104). Five interview themes further explained these findings: (1) well-being is mental well-being; (2) exercise and support from friends and family are most important; (3) isolation and the design of the medicine programme are detrimental to well-being; (4) there are advantages to surveys, and conversations; (5) personal academic tutors and medical students in later years are the best to discuss well-being with. CONCLUSIONS: Medical students thought that measurement of their well-being was critically important for governance showing their support for quality assurance of well-being and peer support. They wanted to be able to choose surveys, or conversations, to measure their well-being, as well as the person they discussed well-being with. Four recommendations are discussed in light of these findings.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , Cross-Sectional Studies , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 255, 2022 Apr 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1777388

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The 'MED-WELL' programme is a combined exercise and educational intervention designed to promote well-being among medical students and educate students about prescribing exercise as medicine in clinical practice. Due to COVID-19 public health restrictions of social distancing the 'MED-WELL' programme was offered online instead of in-person in 2021. The aim of this study is to compare the experiences of participants in the 'MED-WELL' programme online to those that previously participated in the same programme in-person to understand the student experience and optimize programme delivery. METHODS: Purposive sampling was used to recruit 20 participants to a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews. Ten study participants took part in the 'MED-WELL' programme when it was offered in-person, and the other ten study participants took part in the programme when it was offered online. All interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed using Microsoft Teams. A combined inductive and deductive approach was used for analysis. An inductive thematic analysis was utilized to categorize data into higher order codes, themes, and overarching themes. The theory of online learning provided the theoretical framework for a deductive approach. RESULTS: Analysis of the data produced five overarching themes: 'student-student', 'student-teacher', 'student-content', 'student-environment', and 'effects of a pandemic'. The first four themes detail distinct types of interaction that participants had with various entities of the 'MED-WELL' programme and the effects that these interactions had on participant experiences. 'Effects of a pandemic' refers to the context of delivering the 'MED-WELL' programme online during a pandemic and how this mode of delivery influenced participants and the programme. CONCLUSIONS: Optimizing the 'MED-WELL' programme relies on an understanding of how participants interact with different entities of the programme and are motivated to attend and engage. Participants tended to favour an in-person mode of delivery, however certain advantages of delivering the programme online were also identified. The findings from this study can be used to inform similar experiential and educational exercise interventions, and may help plan for potential future restrictions on in-person educational and exercise-based programmes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Exercise , Humans , Pandemics
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 Apr 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776244

ABSTRACT

School attendance is crucial for the development of a child. Sickness absence is the most common type of absenteeism and can be a red flag for underlying problems. To address sickness absence, the intervention Medical Advice for Sick-reported Students for Primary School (MASS-PS) was recently developed. It targets children at risk and is a school-based child and youth health care intervention. The present study is a process evaluation of the intervention. MASS-PS was implemented and evaluated in 29 schools in the West-Brabant region of the Netherlands, during three school years (2017-2020). Attendance coordinators (ACs) from the different schools were interviewed in six focus group interviews as well as in over 200 individual conversations, of which logbooks were kept. Content analysis was used based on a framework of implementation elements. During the first year of the study, the uptake was low. Changes were made by the project group to improve the uptake. The ACs generally considered the MASS-PS as compatible and relevant, but suggested improvements by adding a medical consultation function with a child and youth healthcare physician and increasing the threshold for selecting children at risk. They saw several personal benefits, although time was necessary to learn to use the intervention. An organisational barrier was the lack of teaching staff. A strength in the organisational structure was the appointment of ACs. A major event in the sociological structure was the COVID-19 pandemic. ACs felt that the intervention helped them keep track of sickness absence during the pandemic. The Medical Advice for Sick-reported Students for Primary School intervention was implemented successfully, and the process evaluation gave insight into possible improvements.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Absenteeism , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Pandemics , Schools
12.
Front Public Health ; 10: 738098, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775966

ABSTRACT

Objective: Students' perceptions of the educational environment have a significant impact on their behavior and academic progress. This study aims to measure medical graduates' perception of the educational environment within the School of Public Health at Wuhan University in China. Methods: The survey was conducted by emails sent to 119 graduates, and 93 valid questionnaires were returned. The DREEM was used to assess the medical graduates' satisfaction with the educational environment. Results: The average score on the scale was 126.02 (±18.27). The scoring rate of the areas ranged between 61.06 and 67.11%. The area with the highest score was "perception of teachers." The area with the lowest score was "academic self-perception." No difference was found between genders. Except for "perception of atmosphere," the total scores and other areas showed differences in graduation time. Conclusion: The educational environment at the School of Public Health at Wuhan University was satisfactory. The program contributed to the graduates' later careers. The information obtained in this study identified some areas for improvement.


Subject(s)
Public Health , Students, Medical , Female , Humans , Male , Perception , Public Health/education , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
Front Public Health ; 9: 732550, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775866

ABSTRACT

Toxicology is needed to implement in the occupational health and safety (OHS) curriculum. Teaching toxicology is very challenging as its multidisciplinary science. Keeping students engaged in learning is a difficult issue when introducing solely theoretical framework. To enhance student performance, educators need to be aware of different learning styles and teach students accordingly. This study aimed to examine preferred learning styles and to further investigate the impact of learning style on team allocation and the effectiveness of team-based learning (TBL) in toxicology. A cross-sectional study of OHS students was performed. The visual, aural, reading/writing, and kinesthetic (VARK) learning style questionnaire and the Grasha-Reichmann Student Learning Styles Scale (GRSLSS), which identifies independent, dependent, collaborative, participant, competitive, and avoidant learning styles, were used with 101 study participants. After classification, participants studied three aspects of toxicology in three respective situations: (i) individual learning, (ii) TBL with students of the same VARK learning style, and (iii) TBL with students of varying VARK learning styles. Afterward, participants wrote a test on each of the aspects. The dominant VARK and GRSLSS learning styles were reading/writing (33.33%) and collaborative (50.00%), respectively. The participants achieved the highest test scores (88.31%) when they studied in a team with the various VARK styles, followed by studying in a team with the same VARK style (83.43%). Individual learning produced the lowest average score (69.79%). The results of this study suggest that creating a successful heterogeneity team based on the preferred learning styles is an effective teaching method in toxicology. It might be useful to toxicology educators and research studies from a wide range of disciplines to enhance student performance.


Subject(s)
Students, Medical , Cross-Sectional Studies , Curriculum , Humans , Learning
14.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 241, 2022 Apr 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775320

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The shortage of healthcare workers is becoming a serious global problem. The underlying reasons may be specific to the healthcare system in each country. Over the past decade, medicine has become an increasingly unpopular profession in China due to the heavy workload, long-term training, and inherent risks. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has placed the life-saving roles of healthcare professionals under the spotlight. This public health crisis may have a profound impact on career choices in Chinese population. METHODS: We conducted a questionnaire-based online survey among 21,085 senior high school students and 21,009 parents from 24 provinces (or municipalities) of China. We investigated the change of interest in medical study due to the outbreak of COVID-19 and the potential motivational factors based on the expectancy-value theory framework. Pearson correlation analysis was used to assess the correlation of static or dynamic interest in medical career pursuit with the reported number of COVID-19 cases. Logistic regression model was adopted to analyze the main factors associated with students' choices. RESULTS: We observed an increased preference for medical study post the outbreak of COVID-19 in both students (17.5 to 29.6%) and parents (37.1 to 47.3%). Attainment value was found to be the main reason for the choice among students, with the contribution to society rated as the top motivation. On the other hand, the predominant demotivation in high school students was lack of interest, followed by concerns regarding violence against doctors, heavy workload, long-term training and heavy responsibility as a doctor. Additionally, students who were female, in the resit of final year, had highly educated parents and outside of Hubei province were significantly associated with a keen interest in pursuing medical study. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first multi-center cross-sectional study exploring the positive change and motivations of students' preferences in medical study due to the outbreak of COVID-19. Our results may help medical educators, researchers and policymakers to restructure medical education to make it more appealing to high school students, particularly, to develop a more supportive social and working environment for medical professionals to maintain the observed enhanced enthusiasm.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Public Health
15.
Front Public Health ; 9: 658220, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1771095

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The patient-doctor relationship has evolved from early paternalism to a consumerism and partnership model that emphasizes cooperation. Patient-doctor relationships might vary with the socio-cultural environment, because the medical environment affects such relationships. Method: We investigated the patient-doctor relationship among medical students through concept mapping analysis. Twenty-six fourth-grade Korean medical students wrote a reflection journal and participated in the concept classification and the importance evaluation of the derived concept. ALSCAL multidimensional scaling and Ward hierarchical cluster analysis were performed. Also, the 5-point Likert scale was used to evaluate the importance of the concept. Results: Sixty-six statements about the patient-doctor relationship were extracted and grouped into six clusters. The x-axis is the dimension of "Information-Respect," and the y-axis is "Changeability-Persistence." Six patient-doctor concepts were derived and students evaluated "Patient-centered" as the most important. Conclusions: Medical students express various concepts of the patient-doctor relationship. Considering that they may encounter various medical conditions and patients, it is necessary that they understand deeply the complex patient-doctor relationship.


Subject(s)
Physician-Patient Relations , Students, Medical , Humans , Republic of Korea
16.
Front Public Health ; 10: 803937, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1771117

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives: During the pandemic, the growing influence of social media, accessibility of over-the-counter medications, and fear of contracting the virus may have led to self-medication practices among the general public. Medical students are prone to such practices due to relevant background knowledge, and access to drugs. This study was carried out to determine and analyze the prevalence of self-medication practices among medical students in Pakistan. Materials and Methods: This descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted online in which the participants were asked about the general demographics, their self-medication practices and the reasons to use. All participants were currently enrolled in a medical college pursuing medical or pharmacy degree. Non-probability sampling technique was used to recruit participants. Results: A total of 489 respondents were included in the final analysis. The response rate was 61%. Majority of the respondents were females and 18-20 years of age. Self-medication was quite prevalent in our study population with 406 out of 489 individuals (83.0%) were using any of the drugs since the start of pandemic. The most commonly utilized medications were Paracetamol (65.2%) and multivitamins (56.0%). The reasons reported for usage of these medications included cold/flu, or preventive measures for COVID-19. The common symptoms reported for self-medication included fever (67.9%), muscle pain (54.0%), fatigue (51.7%), sore throat (46.6%), and cough (44.4%). Paracetamol was the most commonly used drug for all symptoms. Female gender, being in 3rd year of medical studies, and individuals with good self-reported health were found more frequent users of self-medication practices. Conclusion: Our study revealed common self-medication practices among medical and pharmacy students. It is a significant health issue especially during the pandemic times, with high consumption reported as a prevention or treating symptoms of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Self Medication
17.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 218, 2022 Mar 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1770524

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic required a transformation of medical education in Egypt. Public health measures necessitated a rapid shift from traditional face to face lectures to largely online platforms following campus closures. The aim of this study is to characterize medical student use and perception of online medical education in Egypt as well as exploring the efficacy of different e-learning modalities. Additionally, many barriers and opportunities as perceived by students are reviewed to inform future educational improvements. METHODS: A 29-item online survey was created on google forms and distributed by social media to medical students across 26 Egyptian medical schools. The survey was administered from August 20th, 2021, to September 5th, 2021. The survey consisted of a mixture of questions style. The medical students were asked about their experiences with online medical education during the COVID-19 pandemic as well as medical students' anxiety, perceived academic performance, and obstacles related to online education. RESULTS: Of the 4935 responses collected, 43.4% (n = 2140) of respondents were women; 56.6% (n = 2795) were men. Medical students from private medical schools were 13.0% (n = 644), whereas 87.0% (n = 4291) were from public medical schools. 54.6% of students reported that online education is not as effective as face-to-face education. There was a significant rise in hours spent by medical students on online medical education compared to before COVID-19 pandemic. More than half of students (63%) agreed that online recorded video tutorials (e.g., YouTube) were the most effective form of online medical education. CONCLUSION: The shift to online education has significantly impacted medical students in Egypt. Medical students reported various limitations and challenges of online medical education, which must be addressed considering the potential benefits of online platforms over traditional face to face learning. The results of this nationwide study provide a framework for potential areas to implement change to improve the accessibility and structure of online medical education in Egypt.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Medical , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/methods , Egypt/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Schools, Medical
18.
MedEdPORTAL ; 18: 11224, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1761321

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) can lead to a toxic stress response with impacts on health that affect health equity. As part of our Health Equity, Social Justice, and Anti-racism curriculum, our aim was to introduce second-year medical students to a case-based method using a template-based screening and application of toxic stress, buffering factors, and resiliency-fostering tools to address health disparities and inequities with a trauma-informed care approach. Methods: We developed an asynchronous e-learning module that demonstrated the impact of ACEs by introducing students to screening for toxic stress response and buffering factors on health, their role as health equity determinants, and the use of brief in-clinic resilience-fostering tools in patient care. This was followed by a synchronous, facilitated, small-group, virtual discussion of a clinical case. Pre- and postworkshop surveys assessed changes in knowledge, skills, and attitudes. A 3-month follow-up survey assessed students' behavioral changes. Results: Sixty-four students completed the learning module. Paired t-test analysis showed a statistically significant increase in students' knowledge, skills, and attitudes regarding the Educational Objectives, with a survey response rate of 98%. Three months after the workshop, a third of students were applying these concepts, with a survey response rate of 87%. Discussion: Implementing this case-based curriculum in trauma-informed patient care helped increase opportunities for equitable health in patient encounters by providing students with the skills to screen for toxic stress, buffering, and brief in-clinic resiliency-fostering tools. Such skills will become even more impactful as we emerge from the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Equity , Students, Medical , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Curriculum , Humans , Pandemics
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(4)2022 Feb 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1760545

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in the closure of all Polish medical universities. Simultaneously, due to staff shortages and the Polish health-care system being seriously challenged, many students were eager to contribute to the fight against the outbreak. This study explores medial student volunteers' (MSV) perspectives and their lived experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic in Poland. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twenty-one students. RESULTS: A total of seven major themes emerged from the interviews: 1. students' reactions to the COVID-19 pandemic, 2. students' experiences of the outbreak, 3. motivations for volunteering, 4. students' perceptions of the COVID-19 volunteering, 5. organization of students' volunteering, 6. benefits and costs of volunteering during COVID-19, and 7. social perception of MSVs. Although students volunteering was an example of civic responsibility and created new learning opportunities, many students felt unprepared for the pandemic, lacked social skills and access to psychological support, and were the target of stigmatization and discrimination. DISCUSSION: Because during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic medical universities were closed and classes were held online, students' volunteering became an important part of service learning and created an opportunity for education. Consequently, while it benefited students, patients and the healthcare system, students' involvement reinforced such important values of medical ethos as: altruism, public service, and (professional) solidarity. However, some systemic approach should be undertaken that would prepare students better for future crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Perception , Poland/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Volunteers
20.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0265733, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1759960

ABSTRACT

Dry eye disease (DED) is one of the most common ophthalmological disorders, resulting from several systemic and ocular etiologies including meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD). During the COVID-19 pandemic, medical students are among the high-risk group for DED, mainly due to the increasing use of a visual display terminal (VDT) for online lectures and psychological stress from encountering several changes. Our study aimed to explore the prevalence of DED using the symptom-based definition and potential risk factors in medical students. This is a prospective cross-sectional study that included medical students at Chiang Mai University between November 2020 and January 2021. All participants were assessed using the Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) questionnaire, the Thai version of the 10-Item Perceived Stress Scale-10 (T-PSS-10), the LipiView® II interferometer, and an interview for other possible risk factors. Overall, 528 participants were included in the study; half of the participants were female. The prevalence of DED was 70.8%. In the univariate analysis, female sex, contact lens wear, and T-PSS-10 stress scores were significantly higher in the DED group (P = 0.002, 0.002, and <0.001, respectively). Moreover, participants with severe DED were likely to have higher meibomian gland tortuosity but not statistically significant. In the multivariate analysis, contact lens use and T-PSS-10 score were significant risk factors associated with the severity of DED. In conclusions, the prevalence of DED in medical students was as high as 70.8%. Contact lens use and psychological stress evaluated using the T-PSS-10 questionnaire had a significant correlation with a risk of DED. Female gender and duration of VDT use were also associated. Most of the risk factors were modifiable and may be used as initial management in patients with DED.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Dry Eye Syndromes/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Screen Time , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Dry Eye Syndromes/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Occupational Stress/complications , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Students, Medical/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Thailand/epidemiology , Young Adult
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