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1.
J Educ Eval Health Prof ; 19: 28, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2198662

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Distance learning describes any learning based on the use of new multimedia technologies and the internet to allow students to acquire new knowledge and skills at a distance. This study aimed to deter-mine satisfaction levels with distance learning and associated factors among nursing and health technician students during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic in Morocco. METHODS: An observational, cross-sectional study was conducted between April and June 2022 among nursing and health technician students using a self-administered instrument. The student satisfaction ques-tionnaire consists of 24 questions categorized into 6 subscales: instructor, technology, course setup, interac-tion, outcomes, and overall satisfaction. It was based on a 5-point Likert scale, ranging from 1 (strongly disagree) to 5 (strongly agree). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with student satisfaction during distance learning. RESULTS: A total of 330 students participated in this study, and 176 students (53.3%) were satisfied with the distance learning activities. A mean score higher than 2.8 out of 5 was obtained for all subscales. Multiple regression analysis showed that students' year of study (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]=2.34; 95% CI, 1.28-4.27) and internet quality (aOR=0.47; 95% CI, 0.29-0.77) were the significant factors associated with students' satisfaction during distance learning. CONCLUSION: This study highlights the satisfaction level of students and factors that influenced it during distance learning. A thorough understanding of student satisfaction with digital environments will contrib-ute to the successfully implementation of distance learning devices in nursing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Students, Nursing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Morocco , Pandemics , Personal Satisfaction
2.
Vaccine ; 40(30): 3989-3990, 2022 06 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2150756
3.
J Med Life ; 15(9): 1090-1095, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2146199

ABSTRACT

Due to the rapid spread of COVID-19, virtual education was proposed globally. This study aimed to examine the views and experiences of nursing students regarding quality, quantity, e-learning challenges, and solutions. This is a qualitative study using a purposive sampling method in which 42 nursing students were included. Data were collected through in-depth semi-structured face-to-face or telephone interviews and analyzed using content analysis. Concepts that were raised in the experience of nursing students were: "Incompatibility of educational processes", including ineffective teaching methods, limited interaction, limited feedback, low creativity, and educational injustice. "Loss of opportunities" including lack of clinical competence, concern for job opportunities, and lack of time management. "Imposed burnout", including forced labor and personal protection. "Personal helplessness", including lack of access to electronic facilities, struggles with the coronavirus, unemployment, and family conflicts. The enforcement of e-learning imposed restrictions on students with different conditions. Older students, those living in rural areas, students with work and family responsibilities, and people with limited electronic resources experienced challenges that require educational management based on challenges. Because e-learning goes beyond COVID-19 and given the continuing trend in e-learning in the coming years, it is necessary to address these challenges.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Nursing , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Educational Status , Learning
4.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 813, 2022 Nov 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139262

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The lack of interaction and communication in pharmacology courses, especially since the onset of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, which required a fast shift to remote learning at medical schools, leads to an unsatisfactory learning outcome. New interactive teaching approaches are required to improve pharmacology learning attention and interaction in remote education and traditional classrooms. METHODS: We introduced bullet screens to pharmacology teaching. Then, a survey was distributed to first-, second- and third-year pre-clinical undergraduate medical and nursing students at the Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine from November 2020 to March 2022. We evaluated the essential features, instructional effectiveness, and entertainment value of bullet screens. Responses to structured and open-ended questions about the strengths and weaknesses of the bullet screen and overall thoughts were coded and compared between medical and nursing students. RESULTS: In terms of essential features, bullet screens have a high degree of acceptability among students, and this novel instructional style conveniently increased classroom interaction. Considering instructional effectiveness, bullet screen may stimulate students' in-depth thinking. Meanwhile, students tended to use bullet-screen comments as a way to express their support rather than to make additional comments or to express their different viewpoints. The entertainment value of bullet screen was noteworthy. The lack of ideas might lead to relative differences between medical and nursing students, indicating that guiding the appropriate use of bullet screen is necessary. CONCLUSIONS: The bullet screen may be popularized as an auxiliary teaching approach to promote interaction between teachers and students in the classroom as well as during remote education. It is an interesting and beneficial tool in pharmacology courses, yet there are several aspects of this device that should be improved for popularization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Medicine , Students, Nursing , Humans , China , Schools, Medical
5.
Public Health Nurs ; 39(6): 1255-1270, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2137203

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The innovative Population Health Internship (PHI) addresses the evolving need for baccalaureate-prepared nurses to achieve population health competency. A comprehensive evaluation of the inaugural year of the PHI was conducted using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Framework for Program Evaluation in Public Health and the Context, Input, Process, Product (CIPP) curricular evaluation model. Students and community agency partners-both key stakeholders-contributed to the evaluation. METHODS AND RESULTS: Quantitative data were used to address functional and outcome areas of the PHI for purposes of PHI logistics, student learning gains, and program impact and sustainability. Qualitative data were used to provide insights into challenges in instituting curricular change, complexity in student-agency communications, importance of student preparedness/attitude, issues of role confusion, misperceptions about the population health nursing role, student learning, and impacts on partner agencies and their populations. IMPLICATIONS: Educational implications include the importance of assessing both learning gains and student buy-in, the need for a long-term evaluation approach to accommodate for challenges related to radical curriculum change, and the importance of strong stakeholder support to facilitate mutually beneficial relationships and a positive learning experience.


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Internship and Residency , Population Health , Students, Nursing , Humans , Curriculum , Students , Learning , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods
6.
Nursing ; 52(12): 6, 2022 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2135610
7.
J Nurs Educ ; 61(11): 641-645, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110336

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although mental health symptoms increased during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, little is known about the associations between nursing students' perceived risk of contracting COVID-19 and their academic and psychological well-being. This study examined associations between perceived COVID-19 risk, likelihood of completing nursing education, and mental health factors of nursing students. METHOD: A total of 979 nursing students completed self-report measures of perceived COVID-19 risk, anticipated academic completion, anxiety and depressive symptoms, stress, coping self-efficacy, hope, and social support. RESULTS: Students with higher perceived COVID-19 risk reported increased anxiety and depression as well as decreased likelihood of graduating, coping self-efficacy, and levels of social support. CONCLUSION: Findings indicate the need for increased mental health support for nursing students for successful completion of their programs. Educators should increase support and proactively strengthen positive psychology factors to mitigate the effects of COVID-19 and other crises on nursing students' well-being. [J Nurs Educ. 2022;61(11):641-645.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Nursing , Humans , Students, Nursing/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Pandemics , Adaptation, Psychological
8.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1042071, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119500

ABSTRACT

This study reports the physical activity (PA) levels among medical and nursing students at a university in Bahrain during the COVID-19 pandemic. Through self-selection sampling of an online survey, participants' data on general demographics, PA levels before and during the COVID-19 pandemic and reasons for PA changes were collected. From the 110 valid responses, 70 participants (63%) experienced a decrease in PA during the COVID-19 lockdown. Fear of contracting COVID-19 and lack of motivation were two significant reasons for reduced PA levels (p < 0.001) compared to those who did not experience a decrease in PA. Other factors significantly associated with reduced PA levels include living alone (p < 0.018) or with roommates (p < 0.006) compared to living with family. Having more time available was associated with positive changes to PA levels (p < 0.001). Significant differences in MET-min/week were seen between students who experienced increased PA (median of 1605 MET-min/week) compared to those who experienced a decrease (424 MET-min/week) or no change (1070 MET-min/week) in PA levels (p < 0.001). In conclusion, low PA levels are prevalent within medical and nursing students in Bahrain (51% reported < 600 MET-min/week), with ~2 in 3 students reporting a decrease in PA levels during the COVID-19 pandemic. Support programs and strategies to increase engagement in PA within this population are warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Nursing , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Communicable Disease Control , Exercise/physiology
9.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 775, 2022 Nov 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2117192

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since COVID-19 limits safe clinical practice settings, virtual reality (VR) emerged as an alternative to practical education. Using VR simulation to learn mechanical ventilation is rare in nursing education. METHODS: This study developed a VR simulation program for mechanical ventilation care and evaluated its effects. We adopted a quasi-experiment design. Participants were fourth-year students across nursing colleges in South Korea. RESULTS: The interaction effect of the intervention time point and control group, to which the VR simulation program was applied, showed a significant difference in self-efficacy (F = 19.54, p < .001) and clinical reasoning capacity (F = 16.97, p < .001). Learning satisfaction of the experimental group was statistically significantly higher than that of the control group(F = 5.22, p = .026). The level of learning immersion (t = - 3.13, p = .003) and learning satisfaction (t = - 3.49, p = .001) were statistically significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group. CONCLUSION: These findings confirmed that the VR stimulation program for nursing students had a positive effect on their self-efficacy, clinical reasoning capacity, and learning satisfaction. Furthermore, it was effective in improving their nursing competence.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing , Students, Nursing , Virtual Reality , Humans , Respiration, Artificial , Clinical Competence , COVID-19/epidemiology
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2116074

ABSTRACT

Evidence shows that university students, especially healthcare students, experienced considerable health impacts during COVID-19. This study examined Hong Kong general nursing students' mental health and quality of life during the COVID-19 pandemic. An online questionnaire composed of personal demographics, the Fear of COVID-19 scale (FCV-19S), the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale short version (DASS21), and the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF) was used for data collection in early 2021. Among 380 respondents, 170 (45%) did not attend clinical practicum during the pandemic. Students who did not participate in clinical training scored lower in FCV-19S but higher in WHOQOL-BREF than those who participated (p = 0.001 or p < 0.001). FCV-19S and WHOQOL-BREF were negatively correlated (r = -0.623 to -0.446, p < 0.001). Slight negative correlations were found between the FCV-19S and DASS-21 scores. Although there were no significant differences in DASS21 (p = 0.294-0.931) between these two student groups, there was a considerably high prevalence rate of depression (57.1%), anxiety (47.6%), and stress (39.5%). Hong Kong nursing students, especially those who attended clinical practicum during the pandemic, experienced substantial emotional and quality of life implications. Local universities are recommended to organize appropriate interventions to prepare and support nursing students' wellbeing and health in coping with future disasters.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Nursing , Humans , Quality of Life/psychology , Mental Health , Students, Nursing/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Hong Kong/epidemiology
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2115943

ABSTRACT

Globally, foreign citizens, particularly ethnic and racial minorities, experienced discrimination and received imbalanced medical services and insufficient economic resources during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study aimed to examine the factors that affect the cultural competence of nursing students. This is descriptive cross-sectional study adheres to Strengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) guidelines. A convenience sample of 235 nursing students from two nursing colleges in D city completed an online Google Forms questionnaire from 9 August to 12 August 2022. The self-report questionnaire included a sociodemographic data form, a cultural intelligence scale, an ethnocentrism scale, a global competence scale, and a cultural competence scale. The mean score of cultural competence was 95.39 ± 15.64 (out of 135 points); cultural competence was significantly positively correlated with cultural intelligence and global competence (p < 0.001), and significantly negatively correlated with ethnocentrism (p < 0.001). The factors that significantly affected cultural competence were cultural intelligence (ß = 0.31, p < 0.001) and global competence (ß = 0.37, p < 0.001). The explanatory power of these effects was 47.3%. To improve the cultural competence of nursing students, it is necessary to develop, apply, and evaluate the results of curriculum and programs that can enhance the cultural intelligence and global competence of nursing students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Nursing , Humans , Cultural Competency/education , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Republic of Korea/epidemiology
12.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 757, 2022 Nov 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108767

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Professional calling (PC) is crucial for ascertaining their professional goals and fulfilling career choices in nursing students. Thus, understanding its antecedents and helping schools improve PC among nursing students is critical. This study aims to explore whether professional identity (PI), as a crucial antecedent of PC, acts as an intermediary between career self-efficacy (CSE) and professional calling during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A sample of 565 nursing students were selected by a web-based survey through convenience sampling. The study was conducted from October to November 2020. Measures of CSE, PI, and PC were assessed during the COVID-19 pandemic. We analyzed demographic data and the correlation of the research variables. The significance of the mediation effect was assessed using a bootstrap method with SPSS. RESULTS: CSE during the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak (r = 0. 359, p < 0. 01) and PI (r = 0. 670, p < 0. 01) were both relevant to PC among nursing students. In addition, CSE had a positive indirect effect on PC through PI (ß = 0. 288, p < 0. 05). CONCLUSIONS: Higher scores in CSE and a better PI were associated with PC in nursing students. Furthermore, a better CSE had an indirect effect on the PC of students through PI. The favorable evidence in our study confirms that nursing educators can adopt PI interventions to improve the sense of PC among nursing students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Nursing , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Self Efficacy , Pandemics , Career Choice , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
Br J Community Nurs ; 27(11): 546-550, 2022 Nov 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100426

ABSTRACT

This article explores the author's observations as a qualified district nurse and senior lecturer in pre-registration nurse education. Perceived 'troubling' reflections suggest pre-registration nurse education appears very hospital focussed. Additionally, the role of the district nurse has become synonymous with the term 'community nurse', hiding the historical specialism it represents. Media representations of the term 'frontline' was particularly noted in relation to COVID-19, suggesting a heroism of nursing that only happened in hospital. More discussion will take place around how nursing is viewed within education by students, such as what we do to patients (catheterisation, blood sugars etc) rather than how we can work with them. All these areas appear to strengthen lingering historical myths around district nursing and student perceptions of this specialist profession.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Education, Nursing , Students, Nursing , Humans , Nurse's Role
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(21)2022 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099496

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected many areas of life, including the formation of nursing students. After the COVID-19 crisis, learning during clinical training created different challenges. Nursing schools are responsible for ensuring that structures are in place to facilitate coping in the changed clinical setting. This study aimed to analyze nursing students' perceptions during clinical training while caring for COVID-19 patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A qualitative phenomenological study that explored nursing students' perceptions of learning in clinical settings with COVID-19 patients was performed. A total of 15 semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted with nursing students who carried out their clinical practices in COVID-19 units during February and April 2022. RESULTS: Through content analysis, categorization, and the method of comparison constant, four categories emerged: feelings, challenges, coping methods, and clinical practices. The students had to learn to "work" with fear and uncertainty and self-manage the emotional burden using different coping techniques to deal with learning during their practices. Interacting with professors and clinical tutors during the clinical practice were positive experiences. CONCLUSIONS: This study constituted an opportunity to build new and adapted educational approaches for teachers to train nursing students to deal with their emotions and thoughts in future pandemic situations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Nursing , Humans , Students, Nursing/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods , Learning
15.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0277198, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098776

ABSTRACT

Formal education is crucial for the development of nurses' professional identity and can play a decisive role in attracting students to the nursing profession. This is even more important during a public health emergency such as the COVID-19 pandemic. This study aimed to investigate nursing students' attitudes and feelings toward their future profession and academic studies during the first COVID-19 lockdown. A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted on 361 nursing students. The data were collected through the Students' attitudes toward the nursing profession during the COVID-19 outbreak scale, and the Satisfaction with online learning scale. Nursing students expressed higher levels of commitment and dedication to their profession compared to perceived job security. They were generally satisfied with their distance learning experience in terms of accessibility of study materials, adaptation of lectures and quality of communication with academic staff. However, students perceived the ICT-supported distance learning as moderately effective. Students' satisfaction with online learning was positively related to their perceived professional commitment. In times of health crisis, faculties should consider students' perceived quality of nursing education and attitudes toward future profession to promote appropriate professional identity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Students, Nursing , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Personal Satisfaction , Communicable Disease Control , Attitude
16.
Nurs Educ Perspect ; 43(6): E47-E49, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097469

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: This descriptive mixed-methods study was conducted to understand the impact of COVID-19 on undergraduate nursing students' education, perceptions of nursing, stress, and coping. A convenience sample (N = 150) reported high levels of stress with higher stress levels significantly associated with lower coping. The essence of nursing, emotions surrounding the transition to nursing, educational barriers, and faculty-student relationships emerged as themes. The findings can be used to revise curricula and better support nursing students in future disasters and transitions to practice during unpredictable times.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Education, Nursing , Students, Nursing , Humans , Students, Nursing/psychology , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Adaptation, Psychological
17.
Nurs Educ Perspect ; 43(6): E53-E55, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097468

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Nurses are graduating from educational programs and entering health care systems at a time of great turmoil because of the COVID-19 pandemic. To support the transition to practice, nursing faculty implemented a postgraduation mentorship program (START). This exploratory study sought to describe the faculty mentor and new graduate mentee experience. Related variables (NCLEX pass rates, perceived stress, and professional quality of life) are provided to contextualize the results. The research is significant given the burden the pandemic places on the health care system, which may limit the resources available to new graduate nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mentoring , Students, Nursing , Humans , Mentors , Pandemics , Quality of Life , COVID-19/epidemiology
18.
Nurs Educ Perspect ; 43(6): E109-E111, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097466

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The advent of COVID-19 required educational programs to rapidly transition courses to the remote environment. A postpartum hemorrhage simulation used within a traditional prelicensure bachelor of science in nursing program was rapidly transitioned to the remote virtual format to meet required social distancing guidelines. This quasi-experimental study examined student knowledge before and after participation in a remote virtual simulation (RVS) with a postanalysis of student confidence and satisfaction. RVS can increase student knowledge and provide adequate student satisfaction. However, hands-on learning appears to result in higher student confidence and satisfaction compared to RVS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Nursing , Pregnancy , Female , Humans , Learning , Personal Satisfaction
19.
Nurs Educ Perspect ; 43(6): E50-E52, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097464

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Associations between health belief model constructs and engagement in COVID-19 preventive practices were examined in a population of 234 nursing students. Most (93 percent/68 percent, respectively) reported occasionally/frequently performing 6-feet physical distancing and wearing face masks/covering in public. Among health belief model constructs, perceived benefits were significantly associated with practicing physical distancing; perceived barriers were associated with lower likelihood. Perceived self-efficacy was associated with a greater likelihood of wearing face masks/covering in public. Nursing students should be provided timely and relevant information on preventive measures based on the recognition of different risk appraisals among students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Nursing , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Belief Model
20.
Arch Psychiatr Nurs ; 41: 348-353, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2093303

ABSTRACT

This study was conducted to determine the level of beliefs toward mental illnesses in university students and to examine its relationship with empathic tendency and social distance level. This descriptive and relational study was conducted at the Faculty of Health Sciences and Faculty of Nursing of a state university in Turkey. The sample of the study consisted of 678 students studying in the 4th grade of these faculties. Personal Information Form, the Beliefs Toward Mental Illness Scale (BMI), the Empathic Tendency Scale (ETS), and the Social Distance Scale (SDI) were used to collect data. It was determined that there was a high level of negative relationship between the students' mean BMI score and the age variable and the empathic tendency and social distance mean scores. It was seen that the mean Empathic Tendecy Scale and Social Distance Scale scores accounted for 86.6 % of the change in the mean BMI score (Adjusted R2 = 0.826). The mean BMI score of the students was found to be below the medium level. On the other hand, it was found that empathic tendency and social distance mean scores were above the medium level and had an effect on the mean BMI score. Psychosocial factors that are effective in the emergence of negative beliefs about mental illnesses in students should be investigated and studies should be carried out to increase awareness about negative beliefs.


Subject(s)
Mental Disorders , Students, Nursing , Humans , Students, Nursing/psychology , Physical Distancing , Universities , Empathy
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