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1.
J Korean Acad Nurs ; 51(6): 648-660, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1614087

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aimed to develop an emerging infectious disease (COVID-19) simulation module for nursing students and verify its effectiveness. METHODS: A one-group pretest-posttest quasi-experimental study was conducted with 78 under-graduate nursing students. A simulation module was developed based on the Jeffries simulation model. It consisted of pre-simulation lectures on disaster nursing including infectious disease pandemics, practice, and debriefings with serial tests. The scenarios contained pre-hospital settings, home visits, arrival to the emergency department, and follow-up home visits for rehabilitation. RESULTS: Disaster preparedness showed a statistically significant improvement, as did competencies in disaster nursing. Confidence in disaster nursing increased, as did willingness to participate in disaster response. However, critical thinking did not show significant differences between time points, and neither did triage scores. CONCLUSION: The developed simulation program targeting an infectious disease disaster positively impacts disaster preparedness, disaster nursing competency, and confidence in disaster nursing, among nursing students. Further studies are required to develop a high-fidelity module for nursing students and medical personnel. Based on the current pandemic, we suggest developing more scenarios with virtual reality simulations, as disaster simulation nursing education is required now more than ever.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Diseases , Disasters , Students, Nursing , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 57(12)2021 Dec 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613899

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives: The coronavirus disease pandemic is ongoing. Infection-prevention measures in nursing education (practicum) are essential. However, there are few studies on infection-prevention behaviors among nursing students participating in practicums. We aimed to clarify the effect of practicums during the coronavirus disease crisis on infection-prevention behavior in Japanese nursing students. Materials and Methods: We conducted semi-structured interviews with 13 third-year nursing students in Osaka City within one week of their clinical placement training. From the results of the interview analysis, we compiled a questionnaire and surveyed 90 third-year students. We conducted qualitative and quantitative analyses. We used descriptive statistics for the quantitative analysis and the chi-squared test for binary variables. Results: From the qualitative analysis, we identified five categories regarding the awareness of infection-prevention measures: , , , , and . In the quantitative analysis, the practicum students who attended at least three pre-practicum orientations continued wearing masks during lunch breaks and avoided the three Cs. Conclusions: Students could recall the knowledge and experiences gained from pre-practicum orientations/practicums. This experience created a new awareness of infection-prevention and change of infection-prevention behavior. Infection-prevention education using practicums is important for infection-prevention behavior during this pandemic. However, there should be a much larger-scale study to support these findings in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Nursing , Humans , Preceptorship , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh ; 18(1)2022 Jan 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613390

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Studies on quality of life (QoL) and academic resilience among nursing students during the Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic remain underreported. This study investigated the relationship between nursing students' QoL and academic resilience and their predictors during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A descriptive survey, cross-sectional study that used two self-reported questionnaire scales to evaluate the QoL and academic resilience of Filipino nursing students (n=924). Chi-squared test and multiple regression were used to analyze the data. RESULTS: There was no significant association between the QoL and academic resilience to participants' profile variables. Gender and year level of nursing students were significant predictors of QoL and academic resilience. CONCLUSIONS: Our study concludes that a better understanding of the QoL and academic resilience, which are two distinct concepts critical in developing a student's mental well-being, will help stakeholders in nursing education establish effective psychoeducation programs for nursing students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Nursing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Am J Nurs ; 122(1): 44-47, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1584033

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Restrictions on groups and public gatherings during the COVID-19 pandemic have limited in-person learning experiences for nursing students. But the crisis has also led to unanticipated opportunities. In this article, we describe how participation in vaccination clinics at our university offered students occasions for experiential learning that aren't normally part of nursing education. Volunteering at these clinics allowed our students to practice important skills while participating in efforts to help mitigate the spread of the virus.


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing, Continuing/trends , Learning , Students, Nursing/psychology , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/trends , Georgia , Humans
6.
Inquiry ; 58: 469580211060279, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582739

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Perceived control is an individual's subjective beliefs about the amount of control he or she has over the environment or outcome. Objective: To examine the relationship between perceived control, preventive health behaviors, and mental health effects of undergraduate nursing students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: This cross-sectional correlational study used online self-administered questionnaires. Participants were nursing students attending 3 universities in Tokyo, Japan. Relationships among variables were quantitatively analyzed using linear regressions and a structural equation modeling after adjusting for demographic factors. Results: A total of 557 students participated in the survey. The analysis indicated that higher levels of perceived control were significantly related to higher levels of preventive health behaviors. Although higher preventive health behaviors were related to negative mental health effects, higher levels of perceived health competence translated to improved mental health effects. Perceived control was not directly related to mental health effects but positively related to perceived health competence. Long work hours per week and short hours of sleep per day were associated with lower preventive health behaviors. There were significant differences in the levels of perceived control and preventive health behaviors among students at the 3 universities. Discussion: To improve health behaviors and health competence and subsequently alleviate the mental health effects caused by strictly adhering to recommended health behaviors, students may be supported by the strategies that increase their perceived control. In addition to institutional support, students also require adequate sleep and financial stability to help prevent infections while protecting their mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Nursing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Behavior , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1886649, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575951

ABSTRACT

Online classes have been provided for health-care pre-licensure learners during the novel coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of online group work in interprofessional education. A total of 209 students were assigned to 50 groups (18 medical student groups, 13 nursing student groups, and 19 mixed medical/nursing student groups). Learners performed group work during the orientation for the course, which was hosted using an online video conferencing system. The learners first performed the activity individually (10 min) and then engaged in a group discussion to reach consensus on their answers (30 min). We calculated the scores before and after the group discussion and shared the results with the students. Scores were improved after the group discussion (mean ± SEM, 23.7 ± 0.9) compared with before (37.3 ± 1.3) (P < .0001). Lower scores after the group discussion, which indicated the effect of the group discussion on making better decisions, were observed most in the mixed medical/nursing student groups, followed by the nursing student and medical student groups. We noted only 3 groups in which the group discussion showed a negative effect on decision-making: all 3 of these groups were mixed (3 of 19 groups; 16%). These data demonstrated the power of group discussion for solving tasks when the participants' professional fields were mixed. However, the small size of the interdisciplinary groups might have resulted in less effective discussion, which might be due in part to psychological barriers arising from professional differences. Online group work is effective for facilitating discussion and building consensus about decisions in interprofessional education for medical and nursing students. Potential psychological barriers may exist in about 16% of mixed group students at the start, which should be kept in mind by instructors. Abbreviations: COVID-19: coronavirus disease 2019; IPE: Interprofessional Education; NASA: National Aeronautics and Space Administration; SD: standard deviation; WHO: World Health Organization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Interdisciplinary Studies , Interprofessional Relations , Students, Medical/psychology , Students, Nursing/psychology , Adult , Education, Distance , Female , Group Processes , Humans , Learning , Male , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1892017, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575053

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Telesimulation may allow simulationists to continue with essential simulation-based training programs during the COVID-19 pandemic. Hence, we investigated the feasibility of telesimulation for neonatal resuscitation training, assessed participants' attitudes towards telesimulation as well as its effect on neonatal resuscitation knowledge, and compared results between medical students and neonatal nurses. Methods: For this prospective observational pilot study, medical students and neonatal nursing staff were recruited on a voluntary basis. Pre- and post-training knowledge was assessed using a 20-question questionnaire. Following the educational intervention, participants further answered a six-item questionnaire on their perception of telesimulation. For the telesimulation session, participants received a simulation package including a low-fidelity mannequin and medical equipment. The one-hour telesimulation session was delivered by an experienced instructor and broadcasted via Cisco Webex for groups of 2-3 participants, covering all elements of the neonatal resuscitation algorithm and including deliberate technical skills practice. Results: Nine medical students and nine neonatal nurses participated in a total of seven telesimulation sessions. In general, participants enjoyed the telesimulation session, acknowledged a positive learning effect and found telesimulation suitable for neonatal resuscitation training, but were critical of potential technical issues, training logistics, and the quality of supervision and feedback. Neonatal resuscitation knowledge scores increased significantly after the educational intervention both for medical students and nurses. Conclusions: Telesimulation is feasible for neonatal resuscitation training and associated with significant improvements in knowledge of current resuscitation guidelines, without differences between medical students and neonatal nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Resuscitation/education , Simulation Training/methods , Students, Medical/psychology , Students, Nursing/psychology , Telemedicine/methods , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , Clinical Competence , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Learning , Male , Pandemics , Pilot Projects , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1554880

ABSTRACT

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many nursing students are being taught remotely. Remote learning has drawbacks, such as decreased motivation for learning and difficulties conveying the instructor's intentions. Strategies that compensate for the shortcomings of remote learning should be identified. This study aimed to evaluate the understanding of the knowledge use and awareness of negotiation methods through cases and teaching tools in nursing student classes on environmental assessment and daily life support, and to examine whether supplementary assistance can compensate for the drawbacks of remote learning. This study used a mixed-method design, and included 59 second-year nursing students attending an environmental assessment course in 2021. Students' knowledge use and awareness of negotiation methods were evaluated using self-assessment worksheets before and after the class. The pre- and post-class scores were compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The mean knowledge score increased significantly during the study period (p < 0.001). Students acquired awareness of how to use the knowledge gained during class and negotiation awareness by observing role play, factors that strengthen motivation when learning alone. This study provides insight into the potential of class supplements to compensate for the deficits of remote learning. Supplementing the shortcomings of remote learning should be a priority and may be a focal point of hybrid learning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Nursing , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Br J Nurs ; 30(21): 1250-1255, 2021 Nov 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542994

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The emergency measures implemented by the Nursing and Midwifery Council in response to the COVID-19 pandemic provided nursing students in their final 6 months of study with the opportunity to complete a paid consolidation clinical placement and thus increase their personal responsibility for the care they delivered under supervision. AIM: To explore the experiences of third-year nursing students who completed their final clinical placement during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted via a virtual platform. FINDINGS: Three themes were identified: the importance of support mechanisms, the development of confidence, and innovative learning opportunities. Students reported improved confidence in the transition period to registered practitioner and felt well supported, which enabled them to take greater responsibility. CONCLUSION: This study provided insight into the experience of nursing students during the COVID-19 pandemic, and found that support mechanisms, and a sense of belonging, helped to increase their confidence in clinical practice.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Midwifery , Students, Nursing , Adult , Female , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pregnancy , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
12.
J Holist Nurs ; 39(4): 314-324, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526578

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This study investigated the relationship between nursing students' profile variables and their state of mental well-being and resilience during the coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic and how this impacts their understanding of holistic nursing care provision. Design: This study used a cross-sectional design and total enumeration sample (n = 439) from all enrolled nursing students in the College of Nursing of a state-run university. Method: The 10-item Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) and 14-item Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale (WEMWBS) were used to collect data from the participants. A correlational analysis was employed to determine the relationship between the responses of the participants to their profile variables. Findings: There were no significant differences in age, gender, and year level in the 10-item CD-RISC and WEMWBS. Regarding the WEMWBS, the mean total score of those with 61-100% of the allowed units was significantly higher than those with 31-60%. Finally, the CD-RISC scores revealed that participants with a general point average (GPA) of A were significantly higher than those with a GPA of B+ or B. Conclusion: Academically performing students (those with a GPA of B and above) are more resilient. In addition, there is an existing linear relationship between high mental well-being and the ability to pursue higher academic loads.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , Students, Nursing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
Curationis ; 44(1): e1-e9, 2021 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1524276

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Integrating the use of information communication technology (ICT) in nursing curricula when preparing student nurses for the digital health future such as the sudden online learning as a result of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is vital. However, when student nurses in a South African private nursing education institution, struggled to complete obligatory online learning courses, nurse educators had to search for solutions. OBJECTIVES: To explore the barriers and enablers for ICT adoption by a diverse group of student nurses in a private nursing education institution in the Free State Province. METHOD: Following a qualitative, explorative, interpretive-descriptive design, student nurses were invited to participate. Based on all-inclusive, purposive sampling with inclusion criteria enabled selecting, a total of 17 participants who took part in three focus groups and written narratives. Transcribed interviews underwent thematic analysis with co-coder consensus. The study adhered to strategies to enhance trustworthiness. RESULTS: Students shared their views related to ICT and online learning within their theory and practice training. Student nurses held positive, negative and contrasting views of ICT adoption and online learning. Actions to master ICT adoption and online learning are highlighted. Information communication technology brings a challenging interdependence between nurses and technology. CONCLUSION: Integration of ICT into nursing programmes is important. The enablers and barriers to ICT are described. Expose students to different technologies, especially using smart phones to search for (academic/non-academic) information. The adoption of ICT should enhance the learning process and facilitate deep learning. Students preferred online learning for self-assessment and described how they tried to master ICT and online learning. Information communication technologies in the clinical setting highlight the challenged interdependence between nurses and technology. Context-specific recommendations are proposed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Education, Nursing , Nurses , Students, Nursing , Communication , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Technology
14.
Am J Nurs ; 121(12): 39-44, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1522339

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: During the COVID-19 pandemic, many health care facilities closed their doors to nursing students, depriving them of the experience of caring for patients, a foundation of nursing education. The purpose of this article is to report on how the National Council of State Boards of Nursing convened nurse leaders from around the country to explore this problem and develop possible solutions.Coming together virtually, these leaders recommended a national model, the practice-academic partnership, to provide nursing students with in-person clinical experiences during the pandemic. This model is unique in its recognition of the important role of nursing regulatory bodies in these partnerships. The practice-academic partnership model creates clinical education opportunities for students during a public health crisis, such as the COVID-19 pandemic. Further, the model could be applied to meet the chronic challenges nursing education programs have often faced in securing clinical sites, even in the absence of a global or national public health emergency. We provide the context in which the practice-academic partnership model was developed, along with keys to its successful implementation and suggestions for its evaluation. We also discuss the implications of using this model once the pandemic ends.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Education, Nursing/organization & administration , Health Facilities , Interinstitutional Relations , Schools, Nursing , Forecasting , Humans , Models, Organizational , Students, Nursing
15.
Enferm Clin ; 31: 580-582, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1520891

ABSTRACT

Objective: The objective of this study was to assess levels of anxiety and ways of coping among nursing students in The School of Nursing, University of Riau during the COVID-19 Outbreak. Method: This study was conducted among 247 students through the web-based cross-sectional survey. Results: The findings show that more than one in three students 87 (35.3%) had mild to severe anxiety. Many students experienced anxiety when doing activities outside, having no use personal protection equipment (PPE), worrying about being infected if they have a cough, fever, or sore throat. The top three ways of coping to reduce student's anxiety are implemented healthy lifestyle behaviors (46.56%), staying at home and doing activities together with family (44.94%), and doing positive activities (22.67%). Conclusions: The school should give attention to the mental health of students by providing psychological support to reduce student's anxiety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Nursing , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Internet , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Br J Nurs ; 30(20): 1198-1202, 2021 Nov 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513210

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the delivery of nursing training in higher education and how workforce development programmes are delivered. Using simulated practice is an opportunity for experiential and immersive learning in a safe and supported environment that replaces real life. This article discusses the use of simulation in nurse education to improve patient safety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Simulation Training , Students, Nursing , Clinical Competence , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Safety , Patient Simulation , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Nurse Educ Today ; 108: 105213, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1510139

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has raised the need for distance learning in nursing education. The necessary precautions have been taken in nursing schools involving the application of various restrictions, including the suspension of face-to-face classes and the closure of educational institutions, and this has had a profound effect on nursing educators and nursing students alike. OBJECTIVES: The study seeks to answer the following questions: DESIGN: descriptive, cross-sectional, multicentered and international study. SETTINGS: An online survey was completed by 30 nursing educators working in establishments listed among the top 60 highest-ranked nursing schools in the world. PARTICIPANTS: nursing educators in undergraduate nursing programs. METHOD: An internet-based survey comprising open-ended and multiple choices questions was disseminated to 60 nursing schools on the 2020 QS World University Ranking list. RESULTS: Survey responses were received from 30 nursing schools in 30 countries. Since the announcement of the pandemic, the structure of distance education in nursing has taken different forms from one country to another, and nursing educators and students alike have encountered a diversity of problems during this process. The findings of the present study reveal that 65% of the nursing educators thought that they had been caught unprepared for the COVID-19 outbreak, 44% thought that the nursing program outcomes had been achieved through distance education, and 48% encountered Internet-related problems. CONCLUSION: We believe that the present study will (i) aid in the decisions of nursing educators considering a transition to distance education, provide suggestions to those that have already made such a transition or inspire those seeking to improve the effectiveness of practice in obligatory cases, (ii) serve as a guide for educational institutions, and (iii) contribute to the taking of precautions to counter potential problems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Education, Nursing , Students, Nursing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Med Ref Serv Q ; 40(4): 383-395, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506839

ABSTRACT

Due to the global COVID-19 pandemic, higher education and library instruction made the quick and necessary pivot to remote delivery. This report discusses one librarian's efforts to address student learning needs, negotiate disciplinary faculty needs, and provide just-in-time instruction for a Nursing department that lacked a full-time subject specialist librarian for several years. A multi-pronged approach was adopted to ensure students had access to course-specific instructional materials presented on a YouTube-inspired channel, research appointments, and the ability to contact the embedded subject librarian. Next steps, improvements, assessments, and future sustainability are considered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Social Media , Students, Nursing , Humans , Information Literacy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Nurse Educ Today ; 108: 105183, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504046

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Due to the rapid spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) around the world, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared it a global pandemic on March 11, 2020. This declaration had an unprecedented impact on health profession education, especially the clinical clerkship of nursing and medical students. The teaching hospitals had to suspend traditional bedside clinical teaching and switch to digital education. OBJECTIVE: To systematically synthesize the available literature on the application of digital education in undergraduate nursing and medical interns during the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: A systematic review informed by PRISMA guidelines. DATA SOURCES: Five electronic databases were systematically searched: PubMed, Embase, MEDLINE (OVID), CINAHL and the Cochrane Library. REVIEW METHODS: The retrieved articles were screened at the title, abstract, and full text stages. The Mixed-Methods Appraisal Tool (MMAT) was used to assess the quality of quantitative and mixed-method studies. Then, two reviewers extracted the quantitative data of the included studies. RESULTS: A total of 4596 studies were identified following a comprehensive search, and 16 studies were included after removing duplicates and screening, which focused on undergraduate nursing students (3 studies) and medical students (13 studies). We found that the standalone digital education modalities were as effective as conventional learning for knowledge and practice. Different educational technologies have different effects on the knowledge and practice of interns. CONCLUSION: Digital education plays a significant role in distance training for nursing and medical interns both now and in the future. The overall risk of bias was high, and the quality of evidence was found to be variable. There is a need for further research designing more quasi-experimental studies to assess the effectiveness of standalone digital education interventions for the remote training of nursing or medical interns to be fully prepared for emergencies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Nursing , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
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