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3.
Nurse Educ Today ; 93: 104516, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454378

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this review was to identify pedagogical practices that contribute to professional identity formation in undergraduate nursing education and to map the components of professional identity described within these practices. DESIGN: A scoping review using a six-stage methodological framework was used to capture a range of evidence describing how professional identity has been conceptualized and integrated into nursing curriculum. DATA SOURCES: Databases searched included: Ovid MEDLINE: Epub Ahead of Print, In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE® Daily and Ovid MEDLINE® 1946-Present, EBSCO CINAHL (1981 to present), OVID PsycINFO (1806 to Present), ProQuest ERIC, ASSIA, and Sociological Abstracts. Additional studies were identified by scanning the reference lists of relevant articles. REVIEW METHODS: The study team collaboratively designed the data charting table and two coauthors independently screened the studies using Covidence software. Qualitative content analysis was used to categorize learning outcomes into five components of professional identity that were associated with pedagogical practices identified in the studies. RESULTS: A total of 114 peer-reviewed journal articles were initially charted. Articles were categorized as intervention studies (46, 40%), perspective studies (40, 35%), theoretical papers (17, 15%), or reviews (11, 10%). To ensure feasibility in collating and reporting the results, the review focused on the 46 empirical intervention studies that described associations between pedagogical practices and professional identity formation learning outcomes for students. CONCLUSIONS: This scoping review illustrates the range of contexts in which nursing students learn, the multidimensional nature of identity formation, as well as the breadth of pedagogical practices and learning outcomes that guide course design. The results can be used to inform future curriculum planning and to identify focused research questions to extend our understanding of evidence-based teaching practices supporting professional identity formation.


Subject(s)
Learning , Nurse's Role , Professionalism , Students, Nursing/psychology , Curriculum , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Humans
4.
Nurs Ethics ; 27(4): 924-934, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453014

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Fifteen years have passed since the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome in Hong Kong. At that time, there were reports of heroic acts among professionals who cared for these patients, whose bravery and professionalism were highly praised. However, there are concerns about changes in new generation of nursing professionals. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to examine the attitude of nursing students, should they be faced with severe acute respiratory syndrome patients during their future work. RESEARCH DESIGN: A questionnaire survey was carried out to examine the attitude among final-year nursing students to three ethical areas, namely, duty of care, resource allocation, and collateral damage. ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS: This study was carried out in accordance with the requirements and recommendations of the Central Research and Ethics Committee, School of Health Sciences at Caritas Institute of Higher Education. FINDINGS: Complete responses from 102 subjects were analyzed. The overwhelming majority (96.1%) did not agree to participate in the intubation of severe acute respiratory syndrome patients if protective measures, that is, N95 mask and gown, were not available. If there were insufficient N95 masks for all the medical, nursing, and allied health workers in the hospital (resource allocation), 37.3% felt that the distribution of N95 masks should be by casting lot, while the rest disagreed. When asked about collateral damage, more than three-quarters (77.5%) said that severe acute respiratory syndrome patients should be admitted to intensive care unit. There was sex difference in nursing students' attitude toward severe acute respiratory syndrome care during pregnancy and influence of age in understanding intensive care unit care for these patients. Interestingly, 94.1% felt that there should be a separate intensive care unit for severe acute respiratory syndrome patients. CONCLUSION: As infection control practice and isolation facilities improved over the years, relevant knowledge and nursing ethical issues related to infectious diseases should become part of nursing education and training programs, especially in preparation for outbreaks of infectious diseases or distress.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Disease Outbreaks , Ethics, Nursing , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Students, Nursing/psychology , Adult , Female , Health Care Rationing , Hong Kong , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Patient Admission , Standard of Care , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Nurs Manag (Harrow) ; 28(4): 36-40, 2021 Aug 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1399611

ABSTRACT

On 11 March 2020, the World Health Organization declared that the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was a pandemic. As the COVID-19 pandemic has developed there have been many parallels made with other pandemics and epidemics, such as the 1918 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic and the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic. This article discusses the challenges experienced by healthcare staff working during COVID-19, and the lessons that can be learned, such as the enhanced support required for staff.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Mental Health , Nursing Staff/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Social Support , Students, Nursing/psychology
7.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0254870, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1378134

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The concept of death is abstract, complex and has a number of meanings. Thus, its understanding and the approach taken to it depend, to a large extent, on aspects such as age, culture, training and religion. Nursing students have regular contact with the process of death and so it is of great interest to understand the attitudes they have towards it. As we live in a plural society it is even more interesting to not only understand the attitudes of Spanish students but, also, those of students coming from other countries. In the present article, we seek to identify and compare the attitudes held by nursing degree students at Hekima-Santé University (Senegal) and the University of Huelva (Spain) about end of life processes. The study identifies elements that condition attitudes and coping with death, whilst considering curricular differences with regards to specific end of life training. METHOD: A descriptive, cross-sectional and multi-center study was conducted. The overall sample (N = 142) was divided into groups: Hekima-Santé University (Dakar, Senegal) and the University of Huelva (Huelva, Spain). The measurement instruments used were an ad-hoc questionnaire and Bugen´s Coping with Death Scale. RESULTS: Statistically significant differences (p = 0.005, 95%CI) were found in relation to overall Bugen Scale scores. We can confirm that specialized end of life training (University of Huelva, Spain) did not lead to better coping when compared with a population whose academic curriculum did not provide specific training and who engaged in more religious practices (Hekima-Santé University, Senegal). CONCLUSIONS: In cultures where religion not only influences the spiritual dimension of the individual, but acts in the ethical and moral system and consequently in the economic, educational and family sphere, the accompaniment at the end of life transcends the formative plane. Considering the plural society in which we live, the training that integrates the Degree in Nursing with regard to the care of the final process, must be multidimensional in which spirituality and faith are integrated, working emotional and attentional skills, as well as cultural competence strategies in this process.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Culture , Students, Nursing/psychology , Terminal Care/psychology , Death , Emotions/physiology , Female , Humans , Male , Senegal , Spain , Young Adult
8.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(34): e27016, 2021 Aug 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376351

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Nursing students are the main force of future nursing development, and their hope and death anxiety are important aspects of their coping styles and clinical practice.The present study examined the relationships between hope, death anxiety and simplified coping style scores of nursing students during the outbreak of COVID-19.Between February and April 2020, a cross-sectional descriptive study was performed using a Sojump online survey, and 870 nursing students completed the herth hope (HH), death anxiety scale (DAS) and simplified coping style questionnaire. The data were analyzed using t-tests, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and multiple linear regression in SPSS 23.0 (IBM Corp, Armonk, NY).The average HH, DAS and active and passive coping scores of the 870 nursing students were 3.07 ±â€Š0.32, 3.01 ±â€Š0.37, 2.84 ±â€Š0.48, and 2.25 ±â€Š0.50, respectively. Participants with contact experience with individuals with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 were more likely to adopt passive coping styles than students without contact experience (t = 5.019, P = .025). Being older and having higher inner positive readiness and expectancy, a lower inner sense of temporality and future, and lower time awareness were predictors of passive coping styles (P < .05). Living in cities (vs towns) and having a higher inner positive readiness and expectancy, a higher inner sense of temporality and future and lower cognition of death were predictors of active coping styles (P < .05).The findings of this study suggest that hope and death anxiety are important aspects of the coping styles of nursing students. Nursing educators should emphasize the role of hope, further deepen the death education mode, and perform scientific and reasonable death education programmes to reduce the death anxiety level of nursing students to promote their coping styles in crisis.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Anxiety/epidemiology , Attitude to Death , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hope , Students, Nursing/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
9.
Asian Nurs Res (Korean Soc Nurs Sci) ; 15(3): 189-196, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1370439

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Virtual reality simulation can give nursing students a safe clinical experience involving high-risk infants where access to neonatal intensive care units is limited. This study aimed to examine the effects of a virtual reality simulation program on Korean nursing students' knowledge, performance self-efficacy and learner satisfaction. METHODS: A nonequivalent control group design was applied. Senior nursing students were divided into an experimental group (n = 25) experiencing virtual reality simulation and routine neonatal intensive care unit practice and a control group (n = 25) having routine neonatal intensive care unit practice. The program consisted of three scenarios: basic care, feeding management and skin care and environmental management for prevention of neonatal infection. The total execution time for the three scenarios was 40 minutes. The simulation created immersive virtual reality experiences using a head-mounted display with hand-tracking technology. Data were collected from December 9, 2019, to January 17, 2020, and were analyzed using descriptive statistics and the t-test, paired t-tests, Mann-Whitney test and Wilcoxon signed-ranks test. RESULTS: Compared to the control group, the experimental group showed significantly greater improvements in high-risk neonatal infection control performance self-efficacy (t = -2.16, p = .018) and learner satisfaction (t = -5.59, p < .001). CONCLUSION: The virtual reality simulation program can expand the nursing students' practice experience in safe virtual spaces and enhance their performance self-efficacy and learning satisfaction.


Subject(s)
Cross Infection/prevention & control , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/prevention & control , Intensive Care, Neonatal/methods , Neonatal Nursing/education , Virtual Reality , Adult , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal , Male , Students, Nursing/psychology , Young Adult
10.
Health Qual Life Outcomes ; 19(1): 198, 2021 Aug 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1365358

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused significant disruptions in the implementation of programs across educational institutions. Nursing students, being both young adults and by practical training, part of the health care system, may be particularly vulnerable during the COVID-19 pandemic. The purpose of this study was to explore the associations between self-reported fear of COVID-19, general health, psychological distress and overall quality of life (QoL) in a sample of Norwegian baccalaureate nursing students compared to reference data. METHODS: The survey targeted baccalaureate nursing students from five universities in February 2021. An electronic questionnaire consisted of the Fear of COVID-19 Scale (FCV-19S), the Hopkins Symptom Checklist 5 (SCL-5), one general health and one overall QoL question. The respondents' mean scores were compared to reference data. Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted, and effect sizes (Cohen's d) were evaluated. RESULTS: In total, 2605 out of 6088 (43%) students responded. Their FCV-19S scores (mean 2.45, CI 2.42, 2.48) were significantly higher than those of the reference population (mean 1.8, P < 0.001). Nursing students scores showed significantly lower general health (mean 3.50 ± 0.93 SD, population mean = 3.57, Cohen's d = 0.07), higher levels of psychological distress (mean 2.68 ± 1.03 SD, population mean = 2.12, Cohen's d = 0.55) and lower overall QoL (mean 5.50 ± 2.16 SD, population mean = 8.00, Cohen's d = 1.16) compared to pre-pandemic reference data. FCV-19S scores were significantly associated with levels of general health (Cohen's d = 0.26), psychological distress (Cohen's d = 0.76) and overall QoL (Cohen's d = 0.18). CONCLUSIONS: Baccalaureate nursing students reported worse outcomes during the Covid-19 pandemic on general health, psychological distress and overall QoL compared to the reference population. Level of fear of Covid-19, however, accounted for few of these differences. Other factors related to the pandemic may have reduced nursing students' overall QoL.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Fear/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology , Students, Nursing/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Universities , Young Adult
11.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0255772, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1357432

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The growing COVID-19 pandemic has posed a great threat to millions of people worldwide. Nurses and nursing students are an important group of health professionals who are most likely to face many challenges in this unprecedented scenario. The present study aimed at exploring nurses' and nursing students' perception of psychological preparedness for the pandemic (COVID-19) management. MATERIALS & METHODS: The study employed a quantitative cross-sectional online survey research design. Purposive sampling was used with an attempt to represent the entire nurses (i.e. nursing officers, nurse administrators and nursing teachers) and nursing students' group of India. The survey link including the questionnaires was shared to their email ID and they were invited to participate in the study. Data were collected using Psychological Preparedness for Disaster Threat Scale (PPDTS)-Modified, General Self Efficacy (GSE) Scale, Optimism Scale and Brief Resilient Coping Scale (BRS). Totally 685 responses were received and 676 forms were completed which were analyzed using SPSS software (version 24). RESULTS: The mean age of the subjects was 31.72±9.58 years. Around 20% of the subjects previously had some kind of psychological training and 4% of the subjects had taken care of persons with COVID-19. Findings revealed that mean score for PPDTS, GSE, BRCS and Optimism was 73.44±10.82, 33.19±5.23, 16.79±2.73 and 9.61±2.26 respectively indicating that the subjects had moderate level of psychological preparedness, self-efficacy and resilience but higher level of optimism. Psychological preparedness, self-efficacy, optimism and resilience were positively correlated to each other. Self- efficacy, optimism, and resilience emerged as predictors of psychological preparedness. CONCLUSION: The findings suggested that self-efficacy, optimism and resilience can be considered as predictors for psychological preparedness in pandemic management. Appropriate training could influence self-efficacy while programs addressing resilience and coping may strengthen psychological preparedness which can help in further management of ongoing pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Nurses/psychology , Resilience, Psychological , Students, Nursing/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , India , Male , Middle Aged , Optimism , Self Efficacy
12.
J Prev Med Hyg ; 62(2): E270-E276, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1355281

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The aim of the study was to evaluate the knowledge, attitude and practices towards SARS-CoV-2 among nursing students of University of Palermo during the rapid rise period of the COVID-19 pandemic. Materials and methods: This is cross-sectional study. A survey was provided to all nursing students and consisted of two parts: demographics and Knowledge, Attitude and Practices (KAP) survey. A multivariate linear regression model was used and adjusted Odds Ratios (aOR) are presented. Results: 575 students were interviewed, and their mean age was 22.29 ± 4.2. The overall score indicates good knowledge (p=0.046) and good practices among the four courses of study (p=0.038). Multivariate linear regression showed that Attitude score (b = -0.29; p = 0.024) and Knowledge score (b = 0.10; p = 0.026) adjusted for age, gender, year of study, perceived economic status, perceived health status were significantly associated with Practice score. Conclusion: Our results suggest that proper health education is useful for encouraging optimistic attitudes and maintaining safe practices among future category of nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Students, Nursing/psychology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
15.
Nurse Educ ; 46(4): 255-260, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334317

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The unprecedented pandemic presented new stresses and challenges in nursing education impacting the mental health of nursing students. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between virtual learning and the mental health of nursing students. METHOD: This study used a descriptive, cross-sectional design with a convenience sample of 256 nursing students enrolled in a baccalaureate program. Data were collected through an online survey using 2 screening tools for stress, anxiety, and depression. RESULTS: Mean sum Patient Health Questionnaire-4 scores and subscale scores suggest that more than 40% of students experienced mild to moderate levels of psychological distress. Mean sum Perceived Stress Scale-10 scores indicate 84% of students experienced moderate levels of stress, and 14% experienced high levels of stress. CONCLUSIONS: During periods of societal crisis, faculty must be hypervigilant to the mental health needs of students.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance , Education, Nursing , Mental Health , Pandemics , Students, Nursing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Education, Nursing/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Students, Nursing/psychology , Students, Nursing/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Nurse Educ ; 46(4): E79-E83, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331619

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The need for faculty to educate prospective nurses is urgent: without sufficient nursing faculty, schools regularly reject qualified applicants, despite an increasing need for nurses. At the same time, many graduate-prepared nurses lack preparation in teaching and pedagogical frameworks. PROBLEM: Literature on how PhD programs in nursing prepare graduates for teaching indicates that there is typically more emphasis on research than pedagogical learning. APPROACH: With the shift to remote learning under the COVID-19 pandemic, the University of California Irvine created a Graduate Fellows program to provide support to faculty while offering graduate students education in pedagogy and remote learning. OUTCOMES: Fellows were satisfied and reported increased understanding of challenges in teaching and increasing comfort with nurse faculty roles. CONCLUSIONS: The collaborative efforts of fellows and faculty provided important resources at a critical time, and insights gained can inform similar projects in nursing faculty development.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance , Education, Nursing, Graduate , Students, Nursing , Teaching , COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration , Faculty, Nursing/supply & distribution , Humans , Nursing Education Research , Nursing Evaluation Research , Students, Nursing/psychology , Teaching/education
17.
Rev. baiana enferm ; 34: e37097, 2020.
Article in Portuguese | LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1328338

ABSTRACT

Objetivo relatar a experiência do uso de estratégia musical para cuidar de discentes de Enfermagem no enfrentamento da Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Método trata-se de relato de experiência da construção de um vídeo musical, envolvendo 32 enfermeiros, docentes do curso de graduação em Enfermagem de uma Universidade pública do Sul do Brasil. Resultados o vídeo musical foi estruturado para que pudesse refletir a relevância dos discentes no cotidiano da Universidade. A música balizou os sentimentos que são necessários externalizar nesse período de pandemia, que ocasionalmente mostrou as mudanças abruptas relativas ao vivido. Conclusão a estratégia mostrou-se promotora de saúde e articuladora entre os docentes e discentes, apontando novas perspectivas de cuidado que ultrapassam as barreiras da presencialidade, vislumbrando o uso das tecnologias em prol da ampliação dos horizontes para o cuidado, em tempos de distanciamento social e quarentena.


Objetivo informar la experiencia del uso de la estrategia musical para el cuidado de los estudiantes de enfermería en el enfrentamiento de la Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Método este es un informe de experiencia de la construcción de un video musical, en el que participan 32 enfermeras, docentes del curso de graduación en Enfermería de una Universidad Pública en el Sur de Brasil. Resultados el vídeo musical se estructuró para que pudiera reflejar la relevancia de los estudiantes en la vida cotidiana de la Universidad. La música sacudió los sentimientos que se necesitan externalización en este período de pandemia, que ocasionalmente mostró los cambios abruptos relacionados con el vivido. Conclusión la estrategia resultó ser promotora y articuladora de la salud entre docentes y estudiantes, señalando nuevas perspectivas de atención que superan las barreras del presencial, vislumbrando el uso de tecnologías en favor de ampliar los horizontes para el cuidado, en tiempos de distanciamiento social y cuarentena.


Objetivo relatar a experiência do uso de estratégia musical para cuidar de discentes de Enfermagem no enfrentamento da Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Método trata-se de relato de experiência da construção de um vídeo musical, envolvendo 32 enfermeiros, docentes do curso de graduação em Enfermagem de uma Universidade pública do Sul do Brasil. Resultados o vídeo musical foi estruturado para que pudesse refletir a relevância dos discentes no cotidiano da Universidade. A música balizou os sentimentos que são necessários externalizar nesse período de pandemia, que ocasionalmente mostrou as mudanças abruptas relativas ao vivido. Conclusão a estratégia mostrou-se promotora de saúde e articuladora entre os docentes e discentes, apontando novas perspectivas de cuidado que ultrapassam as barreiras da presencialidade, vislumbrando o uso das tecnologias em prol da ampliação dos horizontes para o cuidado, em tempos de distanciamento social e quarentena.


Subject(s)
Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , Students, Nursing/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Pandemics , Betacoronavirus , Music Therapy , Video Recording , Health Promotion
18.
Br J Nurs ; 30(14): S34-S41, 2021 Jul 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1319861

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: For the student nurse, peripheral venous cannulation is one of the most stressful skills to be learned. Although some healthcare employers/establishments offer courses on vascular access and infusion nursing as part of their onboarding programs, ultimately educational institutions should share the responsibility to ensure that graduating nurses can provide safe infusion therapies. METHODS: An innovative vascular access and infusion nursing (VAIN) curriculum was created and mapped onto the entry to practice undergraduate nursing program at McGill University in Montréal, Québec, Canada. This presented an opportunity to implement new teaching approaches. RESULTS: Students experienced multiple new teaching approaches including multimedia and experiential learning and live simulation to ensure acquisition of knowledge and psychomotor skills. The teaching approaches had to be rapidly modified with the advent of the COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: The VAIN curriculum emphasizes simulation and directed practice, seeking to increase competence, confidence, and knowledge. The pandemic underscored the need for flexibility and creativity in content delivery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Catheterization, Peripheral , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Nursing , Canada/epidemiology , Catheterization, Peripheral/nursing , Curriculum , Diffusion of Innovation , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration , Humans , Nursing Education Research , Nursing Evaluation Research , Students, Nursing/psychology , Teaching
19.
J Educ Eval Health Prof ; 18: 9, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1308266

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Distance learning, which became widespread in response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, has been a burdensome challenge for students and lecturers. This study investigated the relationship between academic self-efficacy and burnout in first-year nursing students who participated in distance learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The study included 69 first-year nursing students at Jenderal Achmad Yani University in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Data were collected in September 2020 through self-efficacy and burnout questionnaires that were distributed via email and social media for 2 weeks. The responses were analyzed using the gamma test. RESULTS: Most respondents were women (78.3%), with an average age of 19 years. Most nursing students had a moderate level of academic self-efficacy (72.5%), while only 13.0% of respondents had a low level of academic self-efficacy. However, 46.4% of students experienced severe burnout during distance learning. Cross-tabulation showed that students with moderate self-efficacy were more likely to experience severe burnout (24 respondents) (P<0.01 and r=-0.884). Exhaustion was the burnout dimension most closely associated with academic self-efficacy. CONCLUSION: Students perceived distance learning as burdensome and reported high levels of exhaustion, which may negatively impact their academic achievement. Interventions to improve academic self-efficacy may foster students' confidence, potentially leading to reduced burnout levels. Nurse educators should reflect upon innovative learning strategies to create a favorable learning environment for nursing students.


Subject(s)
Academic Performance/psychology , Burnout, Psychological/psychology , COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Self Efficacy , Students, Nursing/psychology , Female , Humans , Indonesia , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
20.
J Hosp Palliat Nurs ; 23(5): 462-468, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1307599

ABSTRACT

Health care providers have an ethical obligation to reduce suffering during a patient's end of life (EOL), but few receive formal education on EOL care principles. The objective of this project was to determine the feasibility and potential benefits of an education initiative in which the principles of EOL care were taught to senior-level nursing students and practicing nurses. To assess feasibility, data regarding recruitment rates, retention rates, and implementation issues were collected. Workshop effectiveness was evaluated through use of the End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium-Knowledge Assessment Test survey, which evaluates knowledge levels regarding EOL care principles. A mixed-effects linear model was used to test for changes from the preworkshop to postworkshop scores. Demographic information and satisfaction data were also collected. Nineteen students and 24 nurses participated (total N = 43). There was a statistically significant time difference (P = .0001), with the postworkshop scores being higher (43.5 ± 0.93) versus the preworkshop scores (41.2 ± 0.93). However, no statistically significant workshop date difference (P = .3146) emerged. Satisfaction data were positive. Retention for the second workshop was negatively affected by COVID-19. The unique needs of patients nearing their EOL are significant. This project describes the implementation and outcomes of an education initiative, focused on EOL care principles, that was both feasible and beneficial.


Subject(s)
Nurses/psychology , Students, Nursing/psychology , Terminal Care , Curriculum , Education, Nursing , Humans
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