Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 343
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
1.
PLoS One ; 17(1): e0262550, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1633310

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is continuing unabated in Japan, as of October 2021. We aimed to compare first-year university students' psychological distress before the pandemic in 2019, during the pandemic in 2020, and one year after the onset of the pandemic, in 2021. METHODS: The study conducted online surveys over three years from April to May each year. Participants were 400 first-year students in 2019, 766 in 2020, and 738 in 2021. We examined differences in scores on the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-Japanese version (CCAPS-Japanese) between the three years using a one-way analysis of variance, and differences in the CCAPS-Japanese critical items using chi-squared test and residual analysis. RESULTS: The average scores on the Depression and Generalized Anxiety subscale in 2021 were significantly higher than those in 2020, but remained the same as in 2019. The Academic Distress subscale score in 2020 was the worst compared to 2019 and 2021. Meanwhile, the number of students who experienced severe suicidal ideation increased year by year from 2019 to 2021. CONCLUSION: The mean mental health of first-year university students worsened after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, and recovered to the pre-pandemic level over the next two years. However, the number of high-risk students with suicidal ideation continued to increase. A system is required for early detection and support for students at high risk of mental health issues.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Mental Health , Students/psychology , Anxiety/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Depression/pathology , Female , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Suicidal Ideation , Surveys and Questionnaires , Universities , Young Adult
2.
PLoS One ; 17(1): e0262562, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1631073

ABSTRACT

Higher education students' mental health has been a growing concern in recent years even before the COVID-19 pandemic. The stresses and restrictions associated with the pandemic have put university students at greater risk of developing mental health issues, which may significantly impair their academic success, social interactions and their future career and personal opportunities. This paper aimed to understand the mental health status of University students at an early stage in the pandemic and to investigate factors associated with higher levels of distress. An online survey including demographics, lifestyle/living situations, brief mental well-being history, questions relating to COVID-19 and standardised measures of depression, anxiety, resilience and quality of life was completed by 1173 students at one University in the North of England. We found high levels of anxiety and depression, with more than 50% experiencing levels above the clinical cut offs, and females scoring significantly higher than males. The survey also suggested relatively low levels of resilience which we attribute to restrictions and isolation which reduced the opportunities to engage in helpful coping strategies and activities rather than enduring personality characteristics. Higher levels of distress were associated with lower levels of exercising, higher levels of tobacco use, and a number of life events associated with the pandemic and lockdown, such as cancelled events, worsening in personal relationships and financial concerns. We discuss the importance of longer-term monitoring and mental health support for university students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Mental Health , Students/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Depression/pathology , Exercise , Female , Humans , Internet , Life Style , Linear Models , Male , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Universities , Young Adult
3.
PLoS One ; 17(1): e0261869, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1629533

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study is to investigate the key factors influencing the acceptance of COVID-19 vaccines and develop a model based on the theory of reasoned action, belief in conspiracy theory, awareness, perceived usefulness, and perceived ease of use. The authors created and distributed a self-administered online questionnaire using Google Forms. Data were collected from 351 respondents ranging in age from 19 to 30 years, studying at the graduate and postgraduate levels at various public universities in Bangladesh. The Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM) method was used to analyze the data. The results indicate that belief in conspiracy theory undermines COVID-19 vaccine acceptance, thereby negatively impacting the individual attitudes, subjective norms, and acceptance. Individual awareness, on the other hand, has a strong positive influence on the COVID-19 vaccine acceptance. Furthermore, the perceived usefulness of vaccination and the perceived ease of obtaining the vaccine positively impact attitude and the acceptance of immunization. Individuals' positive attitudes toward immunization and constructive subjective norms have a positive impact on vaccine acceptance. This study contributes to the literature by combining the theory of reasoned action with conspiracy theory, awareness, perceived usefulness, and perceived ease of use to understand vaccine acceptance behavior. Authorities should focus on campaigns that could reduce misinformation and conspiracy surrounding COVID-19 vaccination. The perceived usefulness of vaccination to prevent pandemics and continue normal education will lead to vaccination success. Furthermore, the ease with which people can obtain the vaccine and that it is free of cost will encourage students to get vaccinated to protect themselves, their families, and society.


Subject(s)
Awareness , COVID-19/prevention & control , Vaccination/psychology , Adult , Attitude , Bangladesh , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Least-Squares Analysis , Male , Perception , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Students/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Universities , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
5.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0261590, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598523

ABSTRACT

This study investigated the reliability and factorial validity of General Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7) in the context of university students in Bangladesh. The research aimed to assess whether the original one-dimensional model or a model containing both somatic and cognitive-emotional factors is appropriate. A repeated cross-sectional survey design based on convenience sampling was used to collect data from 677 university students. The factor structure of the GAD-7 was assessed by exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), and its convergent validity was determined by investigating its correlations with Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and Patient Health Questionnaire Anxiety-Depression Scale (PHQ-ADS). Results showed excellent reliability of GAD-7 as measured by Cronbach's α. CFA suggested that a modified one-factor model is appropriate for the sample. This model provided high values of comparative fit index (CFI), goodness of fit index (GFI), and Tucker Lewis Index (TLI), low value of standardized root mean square residual (SRMR) and a non-significant root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA). Correlation between GAD-7 and PHQ-9 was 0.751 and 0.934 between GAD-7 and PHQ-ADS. Overall, the study provided support for modified unidimensional structure for GAD-7 and showed high internal consistency along with good convergent validity.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/diagnosis , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , Patient Health Questionnaire , Psychometrics/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Bangladesh , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depressive Disorder/diagnosis , Depressive Disorder/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/diagnosis , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/psychology , Reproducibility of Results , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Students/psychology , Universities , Young Adult
6.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0261745, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598351

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 pandemic has had a global major healthcare, social and economic impact. In present study we aim to adapt the Fear of COVID-19 Scale to Hungarian. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forward-backward translation method was used to translate the English version of the scale to Hungarian. Participants were a convenience sample of 2175 university students and employees. The study was conducted between January 18th and February 12th 2021. The test battery included Hungarian versions of Fear of COVID-19 scale, short Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-H) and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). RESULTS: The scale showed one-factor structure, the loadings on the factor were significant and strong (from .47 to .84). Internal consistency was very good (α = .84). Construct validity for the Fear of COVID-19 Scale was supported by significant and positive correlations with STAI (r = 0.402; p < 0.001) and BDI-H (r = 0.270; p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: The Hungarian version of Fear of COVID-19 Scale is a reliable and valid tool in assessing fear of coronavirus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Fear/psychology , Pandemics , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales/standards , Psychometrics/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/virology , Faculty/psychology , Female , Humans , Hungary/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Reproducibility of Results , Students/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
7.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0260586, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1597862

ABSTRACT

Knowledge about how science works, trust in scientists, and the perceived utility of science currently appear to be eroding in these times in which "alternative facts" or personal experiences and opinions are used as arguments. Yet, in many situations, it would be beneficial for the individual and all of society if scientific findings were considered in decision-making. For this to happen, people have to trust in scientists and perceive science as useful. Still, in university contexts, it might not be desirable to report negative beliefs about science. In addition, science-utility and science-trust associations may differ from explicit beliefs because associations were learned through the co-occurrence of stimuli rather than being based on propositional reasoning. We developed two IATs to measure science-utility and science-trust associations in university students and tested the psychometric properties and predictive potential of these measures. In a study of 261 university students, the IATs were found to have good psychometric properties and small correlations with their corresponding self-report scales. Science-utility and science-trust associations predicted knowledge about how science works over and above self-reported beliefs. The results suggest that indirect measures are useful for assessing beliefs about science and can be used to predict outcome measures.


Subject(s)
Knowledge , Trust , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Attitude , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Psychometrics , Self Report , Students/psychology , Universities , Young Adult
8.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 24510, 2021 12 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595341

ABSTRACT

Due to its suddenness and unpredictability, COVID-19 caused strife and effects on public mental health, resulting in a surge of negative emotions. The study explores the relationship between physical exercise and negative emotions in home-based college students during the COVID-19 epidemic, as well as the mediating role of resilience, thus providing a new basis for understanding the role of physical exercise in improving negative emotions in college students; A total of 1214 college students were investigated with the Physical Exercise Questionnaire, Negative Emotion Scale and Resilience Scale; Both physical exercise and resilience were significantly negatively correlated with negative emotions in college students (r = - 0.25, - 0.33, P < 0.001), and there was a significant positive correlation between physical exercise and resilience (r = 0.47, P < 0.001). Physical exercise had a direct effect on the negative emotions of college students (ß = - 0.14, P < 0.001). Resilience had a partial mediating effect between physical exercise and the negative emotions of the college students, with a mediating effect value of 0.14 and a mediating effect contribution rate of 50.00%; The study found that physical exercise not only directly affected the negative emotions of college students but also improved their resilience by slowing down their negative emotions and promoting their mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Exercise/psychology , Mental Health , Pandemics , Resilience, Psychological , Students/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , China/epidemiology , Emotions , Female , Humans , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
9.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 24059, 2021 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574866

ABSTRACT

During lockdowns associated with the COVID-19 pandemic, individuals have experienced poor sleep quality and sleep regularity, changes in lifestyle behaviours, and heightened depression and anxiety. However, the inter-relationship and relative strength of those behaviours on mental health outcomes is still unknown. We collected data between 12 May and 15 June 2020 from 1048 South African adults (age: 32.76 ± 14.43 years; n = 767 female; n = 473 students) using an online questionnaire. Using structural equation modelling, we investigated how insomnia symptoms, sleep regularity, exercise intensity/frequency and sitting/screen-use (sedentary screen-use) interacted to predict depressive and anxiety-related symptoms before and during lockdown. We also controlled for the effects of sex and student status. Irrespective of lockdown, (a) more severe symptoms of insomnia and greater sedentary screen-use predicted greater symptoms of depression and anxiety and (b) the effects of sedentary screen-use on mental health outcomes were mediated by insomnia. The effects of physical activity on mental health outcomes, however, were only significant during lockdown. Low physical activity predicted greater insomnia symptom severity, which in turn predicted increased depressive and anxiety-related symptoms. Overall, relationships between the study variables and mental health outcomes were amplified during lockdown. The findings highlight the importance of maintaining physical activity and reducing sedentary screen-use to promote better sleep and mental health.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Exercise/statistics & numerical data , Students/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/etiology , Depression/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Quarantine/psychology , Sedentary Behavior , South Africa , Young Adult
11.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0261346, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1571993

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: COVID-19 has affected people's health in various ways. University students are a particularly sensitive group for mental and physical health issues. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the mental and physical health of male and female first-year university students during and before COVID-19. METHOD: Total of 115 first-year university students (54% male) answered questions about mental and physical health. The students were asked to estimate their physical activity, sedentary behavior, loneliness, stress, and sleep quality during COVID-19 opposed to before the pandemic. RESULT: Males had fewer symptoms of anxiety and depression, and their self-esteem was higher than females (p<0.05). Over 50% of both genders estimated their mental health to be worse than before COVID-19. Larger proportion of males (69%) compared to females (38%) estimated that their physical health had worsened than before the pandemic. Larger proportion of females (38%) than males (14%) experience increased loneliness and stress (68% vs. 48%). Over 70% of both genders estimated increased sedentary behavior than before the pandemic, and larger proportion of males (76%), compared to females (56%), estimated that they were less physically active than before COVID-19. About 50% of participants estimated their sleep quality was worse than before COVID-19. CONCLUSION: University students estimated their mental and physical health to have deteriorated during the pandemic. Therefore, it is important that the school and healthcare systems assist students in unwinding these negative health and lifestyle changes that have accompanied the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Loneliness/psychology , Students/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Humans , Iceland/epidemiology , Male , Mental Health , Pandemics , Sedentary Behavior , Sex Characteristics , Young Adult
12.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(21): 6775-6781, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1524865

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This longitudinal descriptive study aimed to evaluate cognitive skills acquisition in basic Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (bCPR) among a group of Year 5 and Year 6 primary school pupils. The study made use of online tools due to the impossibility of conventional methods during the COVID-19 lockdown. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Pupils received formal training in bCPR. Training was imparted uniformly by a teacher at the school (qualified in Basic Life Support -BLS- and Advanced Life Support -ALS- training by the CPR National Plan). The skills acquired (those proposed as essential for bCPR training by the European Resuscitation Council) were evaluated fifteen weeks later. Skills acquisition was evaluated by means of an online questionnaire developed specifically for the study. RESULTS: In all the cognitive skills included in bCPR training, the acquisition level achieved was over 65%. Acquisition of knowledge of the anatomical areas at which cardiac massage must be applied and the means of emergency systems activation was high, while 25.5% of pupils knew the order in which maneuvers should be performed. Pupils' self-confidence and self-perception of their capacity to act when faced with a real CPR situation increased significantly. CONCLUSIONS: Primary school pupils learned all the cognitive skills involved in bCPR, showing high levels of skills acquisition and positive self-perception of their capacity to apply them.


Subject(s)
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/education , Students/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Child , Female , Humans , Knowledge , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Pilot Projects , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Schools , Self Concept , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
Environ Health Prev Med ; 26(1): 107, 2021 Nov 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501988

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) emerges in China, which spreads rapidly and becomes a public health emergency of international concern. Chinese government has promptly taken quarantine measures to block the transmission of the COVID-19, which may cause deleterious consequences on everyone's behaviors and psychological health. Few studies have examined the associations between behavioral and mental health in different endemic areas. This study aimed to describe screen time (ST), physical activity (PA), and depressive symptoms, as well as their associations among Chinese college students according to different epidemic areas. METHODS: The study design is cross-sectional using online survey, from 4 to 12 February 2020, 14,789 college students accomplished this online study, participants who did not complete the questionnaire were excluded, and finally this study included 11,787 college students from China. RESULTS: The average age of participants was 20.51 ± 1.88 years. 57.1% of the college students were male. In total, 25.9% of college students reported depression symptoms. ST > 4 h/day was positively correlated with depressive symptoms (ß = 0.48, 95%CI 0.37-0.59). COVID-19ST > 1 h/day was positively correlated with depressive symptoms (ß = 0.54, 95%CI 0.43-0.65), compared with COVID-19ST ≤ 0.5 h/day. Compared with PA ≥ 3 day/week, PA < 3 day/week was positively associated with depression symptoms (ß = 0.01, 95%CI 0.008-0.012). Compared with low ST and high PA, there was an interaction association between high ST and low PA on depression (ß = 0.31, 95%CI 0.26-0.36). Compared with low COVID-19ST and high PA, there was an interaction association between high COVID-19ST and low PA on depression (ß = 0.37, 95%CI 0.32-0.43). There were also current residence areas differences. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings identified that high ST or low PA was positively associated with depressive symptoms independently, and there was also an interactive effect between ST and PA on depressive symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Exercise , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Screen Time , Students/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Time Factors , Universities , Young Adult
15.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258642, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484859

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Ethiopian Federal government has locked down schools as one measure to contain Covid-19 pandemic. Psychological effect of COVID-19 on students is increased due to the reopening of schools. The psychological effect of the pandemic is increasing along with physical aspect of health. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the psychological impact of Covid-19 and its contributing factors of students' behavior in Ethiopia. METHODS: A cross sectional design was conducted from November to December 2020. Data were collected using pre tested self- administered questionnaire from secondary school students in Gondar city North West Ethiopia. Stratified simple random sampling technique was used to select 403 secondary school students. Data were entered and cleaned with Epidata version 4.62 and exported for analysis STATA version 14. Multivariable logistic regression and multiple linear regression were used to show the association of dependent and independent variables. Independent variables in relation to dependent variable measured using odd ratios and B coefficient with 95% confidence interval for Covid-19 anxiety and preventive behavior of Covid-19 respectively were used. RESULTS: A total of 370 students were participated giving response rate of 92%. The prevalence of Covid-19 anxiety and obsession among secondary school students were 38.1% and 40.27% respectively. Being 11thgrade 54% (AOR = 0.46; 95%CI:0.22, 0.95) and increased knowledge16% (AOR = 0.84;95%CI: 0.77, 0.89) score associated with decreased COVID-19 anxiety while Covid-19 obsession, 14.51 times (AOR = 14.51;95%CI: 8.05, 26.17), and being female 1.6 times (AOR = 1.6; 95%CI: 1.01, 2.51) increased Covid-19 Anxiety. Furthermore, increased self-efficacy 0.5 times (B = 0.5; 95%CI: 0.28, 0.62), and increased cues to action 0.4 times (B = 0.4; 95% CI: 0.19, 0.69) increased preventive behavior of Covid-19 while perceived barrier 0.1 times (B = -0.1; 95%CI:-0.22, 0.01) decrease preventive behavior of Covid-19. CONCLUSION: Almost two individuals of five participants developed COVID-19 anxiety and COVID-19 obsession. Being grade 11th and knowledge were negatively associated with anxiety while being female and being obsessed with COVID-19 were positively associated with anxiety. No variable was associated with obsession of Covid-19. Intervention is needed to reduce anxiety among females. Furthermore, perceived barrier, self-efficacy and cues to action were significant factors of preventive behaviour of Covid-19. Therefore, to increase preventive behaviour of Covid-19, information, education and communication and behavioural change communication should be targeted on reducing barriers and increasing motivations and confidences.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Obsessive Behavior/epidemiology , Students/psychology , Adolescent , COVID-19/prevention & control , Ethiopia , Female , Health Behavior , Humans , Male , Quarantine/psychology , Self Efficacy , Sex Factors , Young Adult
16.
Pediatr Clin North Am ; 68(5): 1071-1079, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1482856

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has changed education for learners of all ages. Preliminary data project educational losses at many levels and verify the increased anxiety and depression associated with the changes, but there are not yet data on long-term outcomes. Guidance from oversight organizations regarding the safety and efficacy of new delivery modalities for education have been quickly forged. It is no surprise that the socioeconomic gaps and gaps for special learners have widened. The medical profession and other professions that teach by incrementally graduated internships are also severely affected and have had to make drastic changes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Students/statistics & numerical data , Child , Crime Victims/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Learning , School Teachers , Students/psychology
17.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258294, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477532

ABSTRACT

Individuals are dependent on institutions (e.g., universities, governments, healthcare systems) to protect their safety and advocate for their needs. When institutions harm the individuals who depend on them, they commit institutional betrayal, which has been associated with numerous negative outcomes in prior research. Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, students have entrusted universities to protect both their health and their educational opportunities. However, many universities have failed to meet these expectations, and it is likely that many students experience COVID-19-related institutional betrayal. In two similar studies, we examined the prevalence and correlates of institutional betrayal among undergraduate students at a large, public university in the Northwest United States during the fall 2020 and winter 2021quarters. In both studies, more than half of students endorsed at least one type of COVID-19-related institutional betrayal, and higher institutional betrayal ratings were significantly correlated with both current trauma symptoms and COVID-19-related avoidance and intrusion cognitions. In Study 2, the relationship between COVID-19-related institutional betrayal and current trauma symptoms remained significant, even when controlling for gender, personal and familial COVID-19 infection, and past trauma history. These results indicate that COVID-19 institutional betrayal is common and may be uniquely associated with distress among undergraduate students. We suggest it would behoove university institutions to reduce COVID-19-related institutional betrayal.


Subject(s)
Betrayal/psychology , COVID-19 , Psychological Trauma , SARS-CoV-2 , Students/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Northwestern United States/epidemiology , Psychological Trauma/epidemiology , Psychological Trauma/psychology , Universities
18.
Psychiatry Res ; 301: 113863, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1474998

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and its accompanying infection control measures introduced significant disruptions to the routines of many higher education students around the world. It also deprived them of in-person counselling services and social support. These changes have put students at a greater risk of developing mental illness. The objective of this review is to assess the prevalence of depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms and sleep disturbances in higher education students during the pandemic. A systematic search of English and Chinese databases was conducted current to January 1st, 2021. The quality of included studies was evaluated using a modified Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Prevalence of depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms and sleep disturbances were pooled using random-effects meta-analysis. Eighty-nine studies (n=1,441,828) were included. The pooled prevalence of depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and sleep disturbances was 34%, 32% and 33%, respectively. The prevalence values differ based on geographical regions, diagnostic criteria, education level, undergraduate year of study, financial situation, living arrangements and gender. Overall, the prevalence of depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms synthesized in this study was higher compared to pre-pandemic prevalence in similar populations. Evidently, mental health screening and intervention should be a top priority for universities and colleges during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Students/psychology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep/physiology , Universities
19.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258493, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468179

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic raises concerns about the mental health of the world population. Protection measures to prevention the disease impacted education and undergraduate students were exposed to additional stressors. OBJECTIVES: Analyze depression, anxiety and stress symptoms in undergraduates, their respective predictors and the association with satisfaction with life, psychological well-being and coping strategies. METHODS: An online cross-sectional study was conducted from September 14 to October 19, 2020, involving undergraduate students enrolled in 33 courses from 5 public university campuses in the state of Parana, Brazil, using: questionnaire with sociodemographic, academic, health and pandemic effects variables; Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21); Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS); Psychological Well-Being (PWB); BriefCOPE. The convenience sample was composed of 1,224 participants, with 18 years old or older, that completed all research instruments. Spearman correlation and logistic analysis (univariate and multivariate) were applied to the collected data. RESULTS: Most of the undergraduates presented symptoms of depression (60.5%), anxiety (52.5%) and stress (57.5%). Depression, anxiety and stress presented significant correlations in common: negative with satisfaction with life, all dimensions of psychological well-being, and 3 adaptive copings (active coping, planning, positive reframing); positive with 5 maladaptive copings (behavioral disengagement, denial, self-blame, self-distraction, substance use). In addition, there were 7 common predictors for symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress: female; age 18-24 years old; having a chronic disease; lower scores in 2 dimensions of psychological well-being (positive relations with others, self-acceptance); higher scores in 2 maladaptive copings (self-blame, substance use). CONCLUSIONS: The data indicate a high prevalence of symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress, and suggest that higher scores of satisfaction with life, psychological well-being dimensions and adaptive copings may present protective effects in undergraduates during a pandemic crisis.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Anxiety/pathology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/pathology , Stress, Psychological , Students/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Personal Satisfaction , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Surveys and Questionnaires , Universities , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...