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1.
Bratisl Lek Listy ; 123(2): 140-143, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1643738

ABSTRACT

This study aims to make a comparative evaluation of the change in the incidence of intracranial hemorrhage [intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)] cases that attended our hospital in the Covid-19 pandemic period with that of the same term one year ago. This study included 80 patients diagnosed with ICH and/or SAH in the period that started with the pandemic in 2020. It was determined that 51 patients had been diagnosed with ICH and/or SAH during the same period of 2019. A total of 131 ICH and SAH patients (2019; n=51, 39%; and 2020; n=80, 61 %) having an average age of 64.52±7.33 including 66 women (50.4 %) were included in the study in the nine -month follow-up periods covering the period of March-November of 2019 and 2020, respectively. It was determined that the number of patients diagnosed with ICH and SAH during the pandemic was higher than the number of those who attended our clinic in 2019 (80 vs 51) and that they were older (65.76±6.56 years vs 62.57±8.09 years) (p=0.014 and p=0.026, respectively). The incidence and distribution of ICH and SAH among the patients were similar (p >0.05). It was determined that in 1 patient, ICH and SAH co-existed. In the study, it was determined that among the patients treated for intracranial hemorrhage in 2020, 32.5 % were diagnosed with COVID-19 as validated by positive nasopharyngeal SARS-CoV-2 PCR. The evaluation of the patients in 2020 revealed that the average age and ICH and SAH incidence in COVID-19 (+) and COVID-19 (-) patients were similar. Although increased incidence of acute intracranial hemorrhage has been observed during COVID-19 pandemic a athophysiological correlation between the two clinical presentations could not be clearly demonstrated. When rapidly progressing neurological deterioration findings are present in COVID-19 patients, existence of intracranial hemorrhage should always be considered (Tab. 2, Ref. 21). Keywords: subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage, COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage , Aged , Cerebral Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Cerebral Hemorrhage/etiology , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/epidemiology
2.
Acta Neurochir (Wien) ; 164(1): 141-150, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1482221

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lombardy was the most affected Italian region by the first phase of the COVID-19 pandemic and underwent urgent reorganization for the management of emergencies, including subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured cerebral aneurysm (aSAH). The aim of the study was to define demographics, clinical, and therapeutic features of aSAH during the COVID-19 outbreak and compare these with a historical cohort. METHODS: In this observational multicenter cohort study, patients aged 18 years or older, who were diagnosed with aSAH at the participating centers in Lombardy from March 9 to May 10, 2020, were included (COVID-19 group). In order to minimize bias related to possible SAH seasonality, the control group was composed of patients diagnosed with aSAH from March 9 to May 10 of the three previous years, 2017-2018-2019 (pre-pandemic group). Twenty-three demographic, clinical, and therapeutic features were collected. Statistical analysis was performed. RESULTS: Seventy-two patients during the COVID-19 period and 179 in the control group were enrolled at 14 centers. Only 4 patients were positive for SARS-CoV-2. The "diagnostic delay" was significantly increased (+ 68%) in the COVID-19 group vs. pre-pandemic (1.06 vs. 0.63 days, respectively, p-value = 0.030), while "therapeutic delay" did not differ significantly between the two periods (0.89 vs. 0.74 days, p-value = 0.183). Patients with poor outcome (GOS at discharge from 1 to 3) were higher during the COVID-19 period (54.2%) compared to pre-pandemic (40.2%, p = 0.044). In logistic regression analysis, in which outcome was the dichotomized Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS), five variables showed p-values < 0.05: age at admission, WFNS grade, treatment (none), days in ICU, and ischemia. CONCLUSIONS: We documented a significantly increased "diagnostic delay" for subarachnoid hemorrhages during the first COVID-19 outbreak in Lombardy. However, despite the dramatic situation that the healthcare system was experiencing, the Lombardy regional reorganization model, which allowed centralization of neurosurgical emergencies such as SAHs, avoided a "therapeutic delay" and led to results overall comparable to the control period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage , Cohort Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Treatment Outcome
3.
World Neurosurg ; 154: e473-e480, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376112

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is an ongoing public health emergency. While most cases end in asymptomatic or minor illness, there is growing evidence that some COVID-19 infections result in nonconventional dire consequences. We sought to describe the characteristics of patients with intracranial hemorrhage who were infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Also, with the existing literature, we raise the idea of a possible association between SARS-CoV-2 infection and intracranial hemorrhage and propose possible pathophysiological mechanisms connecting the two. METHODS: We retrospectively collected and analyzed intracranial hemorrhage cases who were also positive for SARS-CoV-2 from 4 tertiary-care cerebrovascular centers. RESULTS: We identified a total of 19 patients consisting of 11 males (58%) and 8 females (42%). Mean age was 52.2, with 95% younger than 75 years of age. With respect to COVID-19 illness, 50% had mild-to-moderate disease, 21% had severe disease, and 20% had critical disease requiring intubation. Of the 19 cases, 12 patients had intraparenchymal hemorrhage (63%), 6 had subarachnoid hemorrhage (32%), and 1 patient had a subdural hematoma (5%). A total of 43% had an intracerebral hemorrhage score of 0-2 and 57% a score of 3-6. Modified Rankin Scale cores at discharge were 0-2 in 23% and 3-6 in 77%. The mortality rate was 59%. CONCLUSIONS: Our series sheds light on a distinct pattern of intracerebral hemorrhage in COVID-19-positive cases compared with typical non-COVID-19 cases, namely the severity of hemorrhage, high mortality rate, and the young age of patients. Further research is warranted to delineate a potential association between SARS-CoV-2 infection and intracranial hemorrhage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Intracranial Hemorrhages/epidemiology , Intracranial Hemorrhages/etiology , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , Female , Hematoma, Subdural/epidemiology , Hematoma, Subdural/etiology , Humans , Intracranial Hemorrhages/mortality , Intubation, Intratracheal , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/etiology , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
4.
World Neurosurg ; 153: e259-e264, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1366706

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic is a pressing public health issue. Although most cases do not result in severe illness requiring hospitalization, there is increasing evidence that SARS-CoV-2-induced inflammation can exacerbate pre-existing diseases. We sought to describe the characteristics of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage who were actively or very recently infected with SARS-CoV-2. METHODS: We reviewed subarachnoid hemorrhage cases of patients who also were positive for SARS-CoV-2 at 5 high-volume cerebrovascular centers in the United States from March 2020 to January 2021. Cases of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage were analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 10 patients were identified, consisting of 5 women (50%) and 5 men (50%). Median age was 38.5 years. Four of the 10 patients (40%) were asymptomatic with respect to SARS-CoV-2-related symptoms, 3 patients (30%) had mild-to-moderate symptoms, and 3 patients (30%) had severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), with pneumonia and sepsis. Of the 10 cases, 4 had dissecting pseudoaneurysms (40%), 3 in the posterior circulation and 1 in the anterior circulation. Among 6 saccular/blister aneurysms, 4 (67%) were ≤4 mm in largest diameter. CONCLUSIONS: Our experience with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in patients positive for COVID-19 reveals a possibly distinct pattern compared with traditional aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, namely a high frequency of small aneurysms, dissecting pseudoaneurysms, and young patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Intracranial Aneurysm/complications , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/complications , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Adult , Age Factors , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
5.
World Neurosurg ; 151: e615-e620, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1297239

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Intracranial hemorrhage (including subarachnoid hemorrhage [SAH]) has been reported in 0.3%-1.2% of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, no study has evaluated the risk of SAH in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: We analyzed data from 62 health care facilities using the Cerner de-identified COVID-19 dataset. RESULTS: There were 86 (0.1%) and 376 (0.2%) patients with SAH among 85,645 patients with COVID-19 and 197,073 patients without COVID-19, respectively. In the multivariate model, there was a lower risk of SAH in patients with COVID-19 (odds ratio 0.5, 95% confidence interval 0.4-0.7, P < 0.0001) after adjusting for sex, age strata, race/ethnicity, hypertension, and nicotine dependence/tobacco use. The proportions of patients who developed pneumonia (58.1% vs. 21.3%, P < 0.0001), acute kidney injury (43% vs. 27.7%, P = 0.0005), septic shock (44.2% vs. 20.7%, P < 0.0001), and respiratory failure (64.0% vs. 39.1%, P < 0.0001) were significantly higher among patients with SAH and COVID-19 compared with patients without COVID-19. The in-hospital mortality among patients with SAH and COVID-19 was significantly higher compared with patients without COVID-19 (31.4% vs. 12.2%, P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: The risk of SAH was not increased in patients with COVID-19. The higher mortality in patients with SAH and COVID-19 compared with patients without COVID-19 is likely mediated by higher frequency of systemic comorbidities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/epidemiology , Databases, Factual , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Databases, Factual/trends , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality/trends
6.
PLoS One ; 16(4): e0248728, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1183650

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To examine the outcomes of adult patients with spontaneous intracranial and subarachnoid hemorrhage diagnosed with comorbid COVID-19 infection in a large, geographically diverse cohort. METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis using the Vizient Clinical Data Base. We separately compared two cohorts of patients with COVID-19 admitted April 1-October 31, 2020-patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and those with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-with control patients with ICH or SAH who did not have COVID-19 admitted at the same hospitals in 2019. The primary outcome was in-hospital death. Favorable discharge and length of hospital and intensive-care stay were the secondary outcomes. We fit multivariate mixed-effects logistic regression models to our outcomes. RESULTS: There were 559 ICH-COVID patients and 23,378 ICH controls from 194 hospitals. In the ICH-COVID cohort versus controls, there was a significantly higher proportion of Hispanic patients (24.5% vs. 8.9%), Black patients (23.3% vs. 20.9%), nonsmokers (11.5% vs. 3.2%), obesity (31.3% vs. 13.5%), and diabetes (43.4% vs. 28.5%), and patients had a longer hospital stay (21.6 vs. 10.5 days), a longer intensive-care stay (16.5 vs. 6.0 days), and a higher in-hospital death rate (46.5% vs. 18.0%). Patients with ICH-COVID had an adjusted odds ratio (aOR) of 2.43 [1.96-3.00] for the outcome of death and an aOR of 0.55 [0.44-0.68] for favorable discharge. There were 212 SAH-COVID patients and 5,029 controls from 119 hospitals. The hospital (26.9 vs. 13.4 days) and intensive-care (21.9 vs. 9.6 days) length of stays and in-hospital death rate (42.9% vs. 14.8%) were higher in the SAH-COVID cohort compared with controls. Patients with SAH-COVID had an aOR of 1.81 [1.26-2.59] for an outcome of death and an aOR of 0.54 [0.37-0.78] for favorable discharge. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with spontaneous ICH or SAH and comorbid COVID infection were more likely to be a racial or ethnic minority, diabetic, and obese and to have higher rates of death and longer hospital length of stay when compared with controls.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cerebral Hemorrhage/therapy , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/therapy , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , Cerebral Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Cerebral Hemorrhage/mortality , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infant , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Minority Groups , Patient Discharge , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/mortality , Treatment Outcome , United States/epidemiology
7.
Stroke Vasc Neurol ; 6(4): 542-552, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1153702

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, decreased volumes of stroke admissions and mechanical thrombectomy were reported. The study's objective was to examine whether subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) hospitalisations and ruptured aneurysm coiling interventions demonstrated similar declines. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional, retrospective, observational study across 6 continents, 37 countries and 140 comprehensive stroke centres. Patients with the diagnosis of SAH, aneurysmal SAH, ruptured aneurysm coiling interventions and COVID-19 were identified by prospective aneurysm databases or by International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, codes. The 3-month cumulative volume, monthly volumes for SAH hospitalisations and ruptured aneurysm coiling procedures were compared for the period before (1 year and immediately before) and during the pandemic, defined as 1 March-31 May 2020. The prior 1-year control period (1 March-31 May 2019) was obtained to account for seasonal variation. FINDINGS: There was a significant decline in SAH hospitalisations, with 2044 admissions in the 3 months immediately before and 1585 admissions during the pandemic, representing a relative decline of 22.5% (95% CI -24.3% to -20.7%, p<0.0001). Embolisation of ruptured aneurysms declined with 1170-1035 procedures, respectively, representing an 11.5% (95%CI -13.5% to -9.8%, p=0.002) relative drop. Subgroup analysis was noted for aneurysmal SAH hospitalisation decline from 834 to 626 hospitalisations, a 24.9% relative decline (95% CI -28.0% to -22.1%, p<0.0001). A relative increase in ruptured aneurysm coiling was noted in low coiling volume hospitals of 41.1% (95% CI 32.3% to 50.6%, p=0.008) despite a decrease in SAH admissions in this tertile. INTERPRETATION: There was a relative decrease in the volume of SAH hospitalisations, aneurysmal SAH hospitalisations and ruptured aneurysm embolisations during the COVID-19 pandemic. These findings in SAH are consistent with a decrease in other emergencies, such as stroke and myocardial infarction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intracranial Aneurysm , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm/diagnostic imaging , Intracranial Aneurysm/epidemiology , Intracranial Aneurysm/therapy , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Treatment Outcome
8.
Neurol Sci ; 42(6): 2167-2172, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1141440

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to aneurysmal rupture is a devastating vascular disease accounting for 5% of strokes. COVID-19 pandemic resulted in a decrease in elective and emergency admissions in the majority of neurosurgical centers. The main hypothesis was that fear of COVID-19 may have prevented patients with critical medical or surgical emergencies from actively presenting in emergency departments and outpatient clinics. METHODS: We conducted a single-center, retrospective, observational study searching our institutional data regarding the incidence of spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and compare the admissions in two different periods: the pre COVID-19 with the COVID-19 period. RESULTS: The study cohort was comprised of a total of 99 patients. The mean (SD) weekly case rate of patients with SAH was 1.1 (1.1) during the pre-COVID-19 period, compared to 1.7 (1.4) during the COVID-19 period. Analysis revealed that the volume of admitted patients with SAH was 1.5-fold higher during the COVID period compared to the pre-COVID period and this was statistically significant (ExpB = 1.5, CI 95% 1-2.3, p = 0.044). Difference in mortality did not reach any statistical significance between the two periods (p = 0.097), as well as patients' length of stay (p = 0.193). CONCLUSIONS: The presented data cover a more extended time period than so far published reports; it is reasonable that our recent experience may well be demonstrating a general realistic trend of overall increase in aneurysmal rupture rates during lockdown. Hospitalization of patients with SAH cannot afford any reductions in facilities, equipment, or personnel if optimum outcomes are desirable.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage , Communicable Disease Control , Greece/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/therapy
10.
World Neurosurg ; 144: e414-e420, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1019564

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a severe respiratory viral illness that has spread rapidly across the world. However, the United Kingdom has been particularly affected. Evidence has suggested that stroke, cardiac, and spinal presentations decreased during the pandemic as the public avoided seeking care. The effect on neurosurgical presentations and referrals during COVID-19 is unclear. Our aim, therefore, was to describe the referral patterns to a high-volume neurosurgical department in the United Kingdom during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Electronic referrals were identified from the referrals database from January 1, 2020 to May 31, 2020, inclusive, with January used as the baseline. The demographic data and referral diagnoses were captured on Excel (Microsoft, Redmond, Washington, USA). Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS, version 22 (IBM Corp., Armonk, New York, USA). Differences between referral volumes were evaluated using χ2 goodness-of-fit tests. RESULTS: A total of 2293 electronic referrals had been received during the study period. The median age was 63 years. Overall, the referrals had decreased significantly in volume during the study period [χ2(4) = 60.95; P < 0.001]. We have described the patterns in the daily referrals as the pandemic progressed. The reduction in the volume of referrals for degenerative spine cases and traumatic brain injuries was statistically significant (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The referrals for degenerative spine and traumatic brain injuries decreased significantly during the pandemic, which can be explained by the lower vehicular traffic and patient avoidance of healthcare services, respectively. The risk of neurological deterioration and increased morbidity and mortality, as a consequence, is of concern, and neurosurgeons worldwide should consider the optimal strategies to mitigate these risks as the pandemic eases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Neurosurgery , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Brain Neoplasms/epidemiology , Cauda Equina Syndrome/epidemiology , Craniocerebral Trauma/epidemiology , Female , Hematoma, Subdural, Chronic/epidemiology , Hemorrhagic Stroke/epidemiology , Humans , Hydrocephalus/epidemiology , Ischemic Stroke/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Spinal Cord Neoplasms/epidemiology , Spinal Diseases/epidemiology , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/epidemiology , United Kingdom/epidemiology
12.
Acta Neurochir (Wien) ; 162(11): 2715-2724, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-793657

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To ensure adequate intensive care unit (ICU) capacity for SARS-CoV-2 patients, elective neurosurgery and neurosurgical ICU capacity were reduced. Further, the Finnish government enforced strict restrictions to reduce the spread. Our objective was to assess changes in ICU admissions and prognosis of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) during the Covid-19 pandemic. METHODS: Retrospective review of all consecutive patients with TBI and aneurysmal SAH admitted to the neurosurgical ICU in Helsinki from January to May of 2019 and the same months of 2020. The pre-pandemic time was defined as weeks 1-11, and the pandemic time was defined as weeks 12-22. The number of admissions and standardized mortality rates (SMRs) were compared to assess the effect of the Covid-19 pandemic on these. Standardized mortality rates were adjusted for case mix. RESULTS: Two hundred twenty-four patients were included (TBI n = 123, SAH n = 101). There were no notable differences in case mix between TBI and SAH patients admitted during the Covid-19 pandemic compared with before the pandemic. No notable difference in TBI or SAH ICU admissions during the pandemic was noted in comparison with early 2020 or 2019. SMRs were no higher during the pandemic than before. CONCLUSION: In the area of Helsinki, Finland, there were no changes in the number of ICU admissions or in prognosis of patients with TBI or SAH during the Covid-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Brain Injuries, Traumatic/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus , Brain Injuries, Traumatic/mortality , COVID-19 , Critical Care , Female , Finland/epidemiology , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Neurosurgery , Neurosurgical Procedures , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/mortality
13.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 29(10): 105114, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-640910

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Little is known about the effect of the Coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic on stroke care and the impact of the epidemic on acute stroke hospitalizations has not been described. METHODS: We analyze the stroke admission rate in three hospitals in New York City from January 1, 2020 through April 17, 2020, identifying all cases of acute ischemic stroke, intraparenchymal hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage. RESULTS: We confirmed 518 cases of out-of-hospital stroke. During the baseline period up to February 25, 2020, the daily stroke admission rate was stable, with the slope of the regression describing the number of admissions over time equal to -0.33 (se = 1.21), not significantly different from 0 (p = 0.79), with daily admissions averaging 41. During the pandemic period, the slope was -4.4 (se = 1.00); i.e., the number of stroke admissions decreased an average of 4.4 per week, (p = 0.005), with weekly admissions averaging 23, a reduction of 44% versus baseline. This general result was not different by patient age, sex, or race/ethnicity. CONCLUSIONS: The weekly stroke admission rate started declining two weeks prior to the local surge of coronavirus admissions. The consequences of lack of diagnosis and treatment of a large proportion of acute stroke patients are likely severe and lasting.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Intracranial Hemorrhages/therapy , Patient Admission/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Stroke/therapy , Aged , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Host Microbial Interactions , Humans , Intracranial Hemorrhages/diagnosis , Intracranial Hemorrhages/epidemiology , Intracranial Hemorrhages/virology , Male , Middle Aged , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/virology , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/therapy , Time Factors
14.
Stroke ; 51(8): 2315-2321, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-596641

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Since the onset of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, doctors and public authorities have demonstrated concern about the reduction in quality of care for other health conditions due to social restrictions and lack of resources. Using a population-based stroke registry, we investigated the impact of the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in stroke admissions in Joinville, Brazil. METHODS: Patients admitted after the onset of COVID-19 restrictions in the city (defined as March 17, 2020) were compared with those admitted in 2019. We analyzed differences between stroke incidence, types, severity, reperfusion therapies, and time from stroke onset to admission. Statistical tests were also performed to compare the 30 days before and after COVID-19 to the same period in 2019. RESULTS: We observed a decrease in total stroke admissions from an average of 12.9/100 000 per month in 2019 to 8.3 after COVID-19 (P=0.0029). When compared with the same period in 2019, there was a 36.4% reduction in stroke admissions. There was no difference in admissions for severe stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score >8), intraparenchymal hemorrhage, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. CONCLUSIONS: The onset of COVID-19 was correlated with a reduction in admissions for transient, mild, and moderate strokes. Given the need to prevent the worsening of symptoms and the occurrence of medical complications in these groups, a reorganization of the stroke-care networks is necessary to reduce collateral damage caused by COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Ischemic Attack, Transient/epidemiology , Pandemics , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Stroke/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Incidence , Intracranial Hemorrhages/epidemiology , Intracranial Hemorrhages/therapy , Ischemic Attack, Transient/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Quality of Health Care , Reperfusion , Stroke/therapy , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/therapy
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