Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 4 de 4
Filter
1.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 143: 112159, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401247

ABSTRACT

Novel Coronavirus infection (COVID-19) has become a pandemic in these days. It is an acute respiratory and infectious disease with no known etiology and treatment. It is continuously causing losses of precious lives and economy at a global scale on daily basis. It is the need of the hour to find more treatment strategies by either developing a drug or to boost the immune system. This opinion article aims to provide Substance P (SP) as a possible cause of the initiation of cytokine storm developed in COVID-19 infection and to suggest Neurokinin-1 Receptor (NK-1R) antagonist, Aprepitant, as a drug to be used for its treatment. This perspective will provide directions to the Biomedical scientists to explore SP and NK-1R and prepare a drug to alleviate the symptoms and cure the disease. It is very important to work on this perspective at earliest to reach to some conclusion regarding the therapeutic intervention. Clinical studies may also be conducted if proven successful. SP is a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator, released from the trigeminal nerve of brainstem as a result of nociception. It is directly related to the respiratory illness as in COVID-19 infection. It is responsible for the increased inflammation and the signature symptoms associated with this disease. It is the main switch that needs to be switched off by administering Aprepitant along with glucocorticosteroid, dexamethasone.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurokinin-1 Receptor Antagonists/pharmacology , Receptors, Neurokinin-1/metabolism , Substance P/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , Drug Development , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Physiol Rep ; 9(5): e14796, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1120167

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), continues to be a world-wide pandemic with overwhelming socioeconomic impact. Since inflammation is one of the major causes of COVID-19 complications, the associated molecular mechanisms have been the focus of many studies to better understand this disease and develop improved treatments for patients contracting SARS-CoV-2. Among these, strong emphasis has been placed on pro-inflammatory cytokines, associating severity of COVID-19 with so-called "cytokine storm." More recently, peptide bradykinin, its dysregulated signaling or "bradykinin storm," has emerged as a primary mechanism to explain COVID-19-related complications. Unfortunately, this important development may not fully capture the main molecular players that underlie the disease severity. To this end, in this focused review, several lines of evidence are provided to suggest that in addition to bradykinin, two closely related vasoactive peptides, substance P and neurotensin, are also likely to drive microvascular permeability and inflammation, and be responsible for development of COVID-19 pathology. Furthermore, based on published experimental observations, it is postulated that in addition to ACE and neprilysin, peptidase neurolysin (Nln) is also likely to contribute to accumulation of bradykinin, substance P and neurotensin, and progression of the disease. In conclusion, it is proposed that "vasoactive peptide storm" may underlie severity of COVID-19 and that simultaneous inhibition of all three peptidergic systems could be therapeutically more advantageous rather than modulation of any single mechanism alone.


Subject(s)
Bradykinin/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , Neprilysin/metabolism , Neurotensin/metabolism , Substance P/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Microvessels/metabolism , Microvessels/pathology
3.
J Cosmet Dermatol ; 20(4): 1088-1090, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1004005

ABSTRACT

Telogen effluvium (TE), a common hair disease, is supposed to be related to stress, which could be secondary to poor sleep. We call attention to the current COVID-19 pandemic, that is leading to an increase in the prevalence of sleep disturbances, and as a consequence, higher states of stress and anxiety, which are possible triggers for TE. In parallel, trichodynia is a sensorial symptom that is commonly related with hair diseases, including TE. We argue that substance P, a neuropeptide that has participation in the neuroinflammation and in the sleep regulation, may play a possible role in this scalp paresthesia. We suggest that there may be an association between this substrate and sleep, which can aggravate trichodynia and TE. Further studies on this subject could provide more evidence on these relationships, and help to improve the patients' quality of life and management of the condition.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Hair Diseases/etiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/metabolism , Substance P/metabolism , Animals , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Mice , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology
4.
J Neurol Sci ; 420: 117276, 2021 01 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-997174

ABSTRACT

Sars-Cov-2 or Novel coronavirus infection (COVID-19) has become a global challenge, affecting elderly population at large, causing a burden on hospitals. It has been affecting the world from a health and economic perspective after its emergence since October 2019 at Wuhan province of China. Later on it became a pandemic, with aged people most affected. Surprisingly, the infants and children were not severely infected and mortality among them was reported infrequently. If they died it was due to some comorbidity or congenital heart problems. Why the rate of infection varies in different age groups around the world and what is the protective mechanism in children remains a mystery. Based on our neuropathological experience at the "Lino Rossi Research Center for the study and prevention of the unexpected perinatal death and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)" of the University of Milan, Italy, we hypothesize that the decreased severity of the disease in infants compared to the elderly may be due to alteration at neurotransmitter levels especially of the Substance P (SP) and of the spinal trigeminal nucleus in the brainstem that is responsible for its secretion. This neurotransmitter may be directly related to the respiratory illness as is in COVID-19 infection. It is responsible for the increased inflammation and the characteristic symptoms associated with this disease. It is the main switch that must be urgently turned off using the NK-1R antagonist which is the receptor of SP and responsible for its functionality, especially in the elderly.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Substance P/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/transmission , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL