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1.
Orv Hetil ; 163(48): 1895-1901, 2022 Nov 27.
Article in Hungarian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2197422

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: While suicide rates did not change (or decreased) in the first pandemic year (i.e., 2020) in the majority of countries, in Hungary the number of completed suicides rose significantly. OBJECTIVE: In our study, we investigated whether the unfavourable trend reversal of the Hungarian suicide rate following the outbreak of COVID-19 pandemic persisted in the second pandemic year. METHOD: We used an interrupted time-series analysis with Prais-Winsten regression, controlling for time and seasonal effects as well as autoregressive effects, to estimate the effect of the pandemic on the suicide rates of the Hungarian male, female and total populations in 2020 and 2021. RESULTS: In the first pandemic year, we observed a significant increase in suicide rates in males and the total population. Although the case numbers for males and the total population in 2021 exceeded the case numbers of the pre-pandemic year, regression estimates suggest that the increase in rates did not differ significantly from the pre-pandemic years in males and it was only found to be significant at the 10% level in the total population. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Based on the examination of data from the first two pandemic years, we may conclude that by 2021 the adverse effect of the pandemic on suicidality reduced in the total population and disappeared in males. The question remains open whether this favourable development will continue. Orv Hetil. 2022; 163(48): 1895-1901.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Suicide , Humans , Male , Female , Pandemics , Hungary/epidemiology , Suicidal Ideation
2.
QJM ; 115(1): 59-60, 2022 Jan 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2190230
4.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 2135, 2022 11 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139226

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Insomnia and suicidal thoughts are two of the negative impacts that have been caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Identifying the factors that contribute to these psychological problems may help develop strategies to sustain the mental health of the public. The present study examined the psychosocial impacts caused by the COVID-19 pandemic among different populations in Taiwan, and investigated the relationships between these psychosocial variables, insomnia, and suicidal thoughts. METHODS: Between September 2020 and May 2021, online questionnaires including psychometrically validated scales were distributed to a convenience sample of outpatients (n = 205), healthcare workers (HCWs) (n = 500), and individuals in the general population (n = 1200) in Taiwan to collect data regarding their insomnia severity, suicidal thoughts, fear of COVID-19, trust of information, and resilience. Multivariate logistic regression methods were used to identify variables associated with suicidal thoughts and insomnia. RESULTS: Greater fear of COVID-19 was significantly associated with suicidal thoughts: odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.155 (1.002-1.330) for outpatients; 1.127 (1.035-1.228) for HCWs; and 1.100 (1.130-1.222) for those in the general population. Higher resilience was significantly associated with lower insomnia: OR (95% CI) = 0.819 (0.725-0.926) for outpatients; 0.803 (0.728-0.887), for HCWs; 0.829 (0.785-0.875), and for those in the general population. In addition, there was a statistically significant association between insomnia diagnosis and greater fear of COVID-19 among HCWs (OR [95% CI] = 1.102 [1.062-1.144]) and those in the general population (OR [95% CI] = 1.079 [1.053-1.106]). Among outpatients, there was a statistically significant association between suicidal thoughts and lower trust of information (OR [95% CI] = 0.794 [0.646-0.976]), while among those in the general population there was a statistically significant association between suicidal thoughts and higher insomnia severity (OR [95% CI] = 1.175 [1.13-1.222]). A statistically significant association was also found between insomnia diagnosis and higher suicidal thoughts among those in the general population (OR [95% CI] = 3.455 [2.338-5.106]). CONCLUSIONS: Trust of information, fear, and resilience were important factors for suppressing suicidal thoughts and insomnia among the three study populations. Health policies that monitor psychological status and build resiliency of the public are recommended to help develop tailored strategies for different populations affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Outpatients , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Suicidal Ideation , Cross-Sectional Studies , Taiwan/epidemiology , Pandemics , Health Personnel
5.
Child Adolesc Ment Health ; 27(4): 325-327, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2136725

ABSTRACT

Reducing deaths by suicide in youth is an urgent public health goal and effective treatment approaches remain limited. This editorial reviews new research published in this issue of Child and Adolescent Mental health that may inform youth suicide prevention efforts, including an open trial of a new, family-focused group intervention for youth with suicidal ideation and findings showing that life problems associated with presentation to the emergency department for self-harm vary by age and gender. The need for multi-component treatments that have the flexibility to target a range of life problems/risk factors and to include families in treatment is discussed, along with the need to find a way to make such interventions scalable. Finally, this editorial addresses this issue's debate by discussing the role of mindfulness in dialectical behavior therapy for suicidal youth and the need to carefully monitor and further examine the effectiveness and safety of mindfulness with this patient population.


Subject(s)
Self-Injurious Behavior , Suicide , Adolescent , Child , Humans , Mental Health , Risk Factors , Self-Injurious Behavior/prevention & control , Self-Injurious Behavior/psychology , Suicidal Ideation , Suicide/prevention & control , Suicide/psychology
6.
Scand J Work Environ Health ; 48(8): 598-610, 2022 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2144720

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Working in high-stress and male-dominated occupations is associated with an elevated risk of suicide. The current study sought to conduct the first systematic literature review and meta-analysis aimed at determining suicide risk across the diverse, high pressure and male-dominated transport industry (commercial aviation, merchant seafaring, transit/driving) as compared to the general/employed population. METHODS: Searches of PubMed/Medline, Scopus and PsycINFO databases were conducted without date restriction until March 2021. Studies were included if they were written in English, were peer reviewed, and presented primary observational research data. Studies referring exclusively to suicidal ideation, suicide attempts, self-harm, and/or accidents were excluded. RESULTS: Following deletion of duplicates and non-English titles, a total of 4201 titles/abstracts were screened and 92 full-texts were read against inclusion/exclusion criteria. The final included sample consisted of 23 articles (16 used for meta-analysis). Results from the meta-analysis indicated that transport workers had a significantly elevated risk for suicide as compared to the general/employed population. Results were consistent across sensitivity analyses, and there was some variation across subgroup analyses. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, we found transport workers had a significantly higher risk for suicide than the general/employed population, and this appeared to be driven by the association for those working in merchant seafaring/maritime occupations. The findings are discussed in relation to an identified need for the development, implementation, and evaluation of tailored workplace suicide prevention strategies for transport industry workers.


Subject(s)
Suicide, Attempted , Suicide , Male , Humans , Suicidal Ideation
7.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0275973, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119392

ABSTRACT

The US population faced stressors associated with suicide brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. Understanding the relationship between stressors and suicidal ideation in the context of the pandemic may inform policies and programs to prevent suicidality and suicide. We compared suicidal ideation between two cross-sectional, nationally representative surveys of adults in the United States: the 2017-2018 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and the 2020 COVID-19 and Life Stressors Impact on Mental Health and Well-being (CLIMB) study (conducted March 31 to April 13). We estimated the association between stressors and suicidal ideation in bivariable and multivariable Poisson regression models with robust variance to generate unadjusted and adjusted prevalence ratios (PR and aPR). Suicidal ideation increased from 3.4% in the 2017-2018 NHANES to 16.3% in the 2020 CLIMB survey, and from 5.8% to 26.4% among participants in low-income households. In the multivariable model, difficulty paying rent (aPR: 1.5, 95% CI: 1.2-2.1) and feeling alone (aPR: 1.9, 95% CI: 1.5-2.4) were associated with suicidal ideation but job loss was not (aPR: 0.9, 95% CI: 0.6 to 1.2). Suicidal ideation increased by 12.9 percentage points and was almost 4.8 times higher during the COVID-19 pandemic. Suicidal ideation was more prevalent among people facing difficulty paying rent (31.5%), job loss (24.1%), and loneliness (25.1%), with each stressor associated with suicidal ideation in bivariable models. Difficulty paying rent and loneliness were most associated with suicidal ideation. Policies and programs to support people experiencing economic precarity and loneliness may contribute to suicide prevention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Suicidal Ideation , Adult , Humans , United States/epidemiology , Suicide, Attempted/psychology , Loneliness/psychology , Nutrition Surveys , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Risk Factors
8.
BMC Psychiatry ; 22(1): 711, 2022 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2116827

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Suicide is one of the most important and increasing public health agenda around the world. Since the COVID-19 pandemic, concerns have been raised about the potential adverse impacts of the pandemic on suicide-related outcomes. The main objective of this study was to examine the association of psychosocial risk factors (mental health illnesses and social isolation) and substance use behaviors (cannabis and alcohol consumption) with suicidal ideation during the COVID-19 pandemic among Canadian adults. METHODS: The study was conducted based on a total of 4005 persons 18 years of age or older, living in Canada's ten provinces. The data used in this study were collected during April 20-28, 2021, by Mental Health Research Canada. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine the association of mental health conditions (anxiety, depression, and other mood disorder) before and since COVID-19 outbreaks, social isolation and living arrangement, as well as cannabis and alcohol consumption with suicidal ideation during COVID-19. RESULTS: The results of adjusted logistic regression showed that the odds of suicidal ideation were 1.526 times higher (95% CI:1.082-2.152) among those who reported continued negative impacts of social isolation. The odds of suicidal ideation were also higher for those who were diagnosed as having depression before (OR = 3.136, 95% CI: 2.376-4.138) and since the COVID-19 pandemic (OR = 3.019, 95% CI:1.929-4.726) and 1.627 times higher (95% CI: 1.225-2.163) for those who were diagnosed as having anxiety before the COVID-19 pandemic. Those who reported having increased and those who were consuming cannabis during the pandemic were 1.970 (95% CI: 1.463-2.653) and 1.509 times (95% CI: 1.158-1.966) more likely to have thought of suicide than non-takers, respectively. CONCLUSION: Given the significant associations of psychosocial factors (mental health illnesses and social isolation) and cannabis use with suicidal ideation, more attention and support need to be given to adults who had mental health conditions before and since COVID-19, those who were negatively impacted by social isolation, and those are exposed to substance use (cannabis).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hallucinogens , Substance-Related Disorders , Adult , Humans , Adolescent , Suicidal Ideation , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Canada/epidemiology , Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(10)2022 05 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2114421

ABSTRACT

The present study aimed to examine the link between attachment, personality traits, and suicidal ideation with consideration of the potential moderating role of age and sex. The Suicidal History Self-Rating Screening Scale, the Personality Inventory for DSM-5-Brief Form, and the Attachment Style Questionnaire were administered to 183 students. There was a significant indirect effect of need for approval on suicidal ideation via detachment. Moreover, the moderated mediation models of need for approval and preoccupation with relationships on suicidality via negative affectivity were significant in men, but not women, whereas the moderated mediation model of need for approval on suicidality via detachment was significant in women, but not men. Young men and women seem at risk for increased suicidal ideation based on specific attachment and personality characteristics, which should be considered for the development of prevention and therapeutic interventions.


Subject(s)
Personality Disorders , Suicidal Ideation , Female , Humans , Male , Personality , Students , Universities
11.
Neuropsychopharmacol Hung ; 24(3): 134-143, 2022 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2112074

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has created a situation that has never been experienced before, challenging the mobilization of adaptive coping strategies. There has been a marked increase in suicides and suicidal ideation following the onset of COVID-19 likely reflecting the toll of the pandemic on mental health. The aim of our study to investigate the associations between depressive symptoms and distinct symptom clusters and lifestyle changes related to sleep, eating and physical activity and change in suicidal thoughts and thinking about death during the pandemic. Analyses involved data from the Hungarian part of the COMET-G (COVID-19 Mental health in Ternational for the General population) study, including 763 Hungarian adults, who completed a detailed questionnaire focusing on changes in behavior, lifestyle, activity and mental health during the pandemic. The dataset was analyzed using ordinal regression models adjusted for age and sex. Depression, as well as its symptom clusters, including anhedonia and depressed mood and somatic complaints had a significant, but small effect increasing suicidal ideation, while the effect of irritability and social relationship problems was more marked. In case of lifestyle factors no associations was found between change in eating habits or physical activity and change in suicidal ideations, however, sleeprelated changes were associated with a significant increase in suicidal thoughts during the pandemic. Our findings show that not all symptoms related to mood disturbance have an equally marked effect on suicidal ideating and thus suicide risk, emphasizing the role of detailed screening and evaluation even in subclinical populations in times of such crises, and also highlight the importance of considering sleep problems when evaluating suicide risk. Thus, our findings help identify relevant targets for screening and intervention in decreasing suicide risk during crises. (Neuropsychopharmacol Hung 2022; 24(3): 134-143).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Suicide , Adult , Humans , Suicidal Ideation , Suicide/psychology , Depression , Syndrome , Sleep , Risk Factors
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110095

ABSTRACT

This study investigated the impact of increased depressive feelings during the COVID-19 pandemic on the suicidal behavior of Korean high school students using the 17th Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-Based Survey (KYRBS). We classified the independent variables into four groups ("no depressive mood and no increase in depressive feelings [group A]", "no depressive mood and increase in depressive feelings [group B]", "depressive mood and no increase in depressive feelings [group C]", and "depressive mood and increase in depressive feelings [group D]"). Compared to group A, group D showed an odds ratio of 18.30 in men and 14.87 in women for suicidal behavior after accounting for demographic and health behavioral characteristics. We found that depressive mood and a relatively short-term increase in depressive feelings had a synergistic effect, rather than an additive one, on suicidal behavior. Based on this result, we claim that an appropriate intervention method is necessary to prevent adolescents' depressive mood from developing into suicidal behavior during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Suicidal Ideation , Male , Humans , Adolescent , Female , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Risk-Taking , Internet
13.
BMC Psychiatry ; 22(1): 686, 2022 11 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108752

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A "suicide pact" is a joint and actively induced death of two individuals with the essential and unavoidable characteristic of a mutual consent. One of the partners (dominant in the relationship, commonly male) usually induces the action and in most cases, it is the one who actively carries it out. Undiagnosed psychopathological dimension or pathological subthreshold traits are found in those who enter into suicide agreements, the presence of cluster B personality traits such as narcissistic or borderline is of particular relevance in the dominant partner, while in the submissive one dependent personality traits are more frequent. As in the case of other similar health emergencies, COVID-19 pandemic seems to lead to greater suicidality, including the "suicide pacts" of couples whose motivation varies including firstly financial problems, strictly followed by fear of infection and not being able to return home from abroad. CASE PRESENTATION: We reported a case of a couple who entered a suicide agreement consequently to the economic difficulties caused by COVID-19 pandemic, hospitalized in our department. Both partners were assessed with Adult Autism Subthreshold Spectrum (AdAS Spectrum) and both crossed the threshold for clinically relevant autistic traits (M = 67; F = 49). CONCLUSION: This case further confirms the link between COVID-19 pandemics and suicidality. The role of autism spectrum traits as a vulnerability factor towards the development of severe psychopathological consequences after traumatic events is also stressed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Suicide , Adult , Male , Humans , Pandemics , Suicide, Attempted/psychology , Suicide/psychology , Suicidal Ideation
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(21)2022 Nov 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099517

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused remarkable psychological overwhelming and an increase in stressors that may trigger suicidal behaviors. However, its impact on the rate of suicidal behaviors has been poorly reported. We conducted a population-based retrospective analysis of all suicidal behaviors attended in healthcare centers of Catalonia (northeast Spain; 7.5 million inhabitants) between January 2017 and June 2022 (secondary use of data routinely reported to central suicide and diagnosis registries). We retrieved data from this period, including an assessment of suicide risk and individuals' socioeconomic as well as clinical characteristics. Data were summarized yearly and for the periods before and after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in Spain in March 2020. The analysis included 26,458 episodes of suicidal behavior (21,920 individuals); of these, 16,414 (62.0%) were suicide attempts. The monthly moving average ranged between 300 and 400 episodes until July 2020, and progressively increased to over 600 episodes monthly. In the postpandemic period, suicidal ideation increased at the expense of suicidal attempts. Cases showed a lower suicide risk; the percentage of females and younger individuals increased, whereas the prevalence of classical risk factors, such as living alone, lacking a family network, and a history of psychiatric diagnosis, decreased. In summary, suicidal behaviors have increased during the COVID-19 pandemic, with more episodes of suicidal ideation without attempts in addition to younger and lower risk profiles.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Suicidal Ideation , Female , Humans , Incidence , COVID-19/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Electronic Health Records , Pandemics , Risk Factors , Prevalence
15.
BMJ Open ; 12(11): e059860, 2022 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097978

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the risk factors for workplace bullying and mental health outcomes among workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study. SETTING: A nationwide online survey was conducted from August to September 2020 in Japan. PARTICIPANTS: 16 384 workers (men: n=9565; women: n=6789). MAIN OUTCOME VARIABLES: Workplace bullying was measured by one item from the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire; severe psychological distress according to the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (≥13) and suicidal ideation by one item. Prevalence ratios were calculated by modified Poisson regression analyses adjusting for potential confounders such as gender, age, occupational characteristics and a prior history of depression. RESULTS: Overall, 15% of workers experienced workplace bullying, 9% had severe psychological distress and 12% had suicidal ideation during the second and third wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Japan. The results of this study showed men, executives, managers and permanent employees had a higher risk of bullying than women or part-time workers. Increased physical and psychological demands were common risk factors for bullying, severe psychological distress and suicidal ideation. Starting to work from home was a significant predictor for adverse mental health outcomes but a preventive factor against workplace bullying. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study showed different high-risk groups for bullying or mental health during the pandemic. Any intervention to decrease workplace bullying or mental health problems should focus not only on previously reported vulnerable workers but also workers who have experienced a change in work style or job demands.


Subject(s)
Bullying , COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , Psychological Distress , Male , Female , Humans , Suicidal Ideation , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Workplace/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Japan/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Risk Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2093844

ABSTRACT

Addressing the mental health needs of healthcare workers (HCWs), who are at high risk of suicide, is an important public health issue. Therefore, this systematic review investigated the effect of psychosocial intervention targeting suicidal behavior (i.e., suicidal ideation, attempt, or fulfillment) of HCWs. Five electronic databases were searched for interventional studies reporting HCWs' suicidal behavior outcomes. Only two interventional studies were included in this review, and no consistent conclusion was drawn from the existing literature regarding the psychosocial prevention strategies focusing on the suicide risk of HCWs. The results indicate that compared with numerous observational studies reporting poor mental health and/or severity of suicidal risk among HCWs, intervention studies using psychosocial strategies to reduce the risk of suicide are relatively scarce. Although the insufficient number and heterogeneity of the included studies leave the results inconclusive, our findings emphasize the need to fill the research gap in this field. The causes of the gap are further explored, and suggestions for future research are provided.


Subject(s)
Suicide , Humans , Suicide/prevention & control , Suicidal Ideation , Mental Health , Research , Health Personnel
17.
Psicothema ; 34(4): 518-527, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2090821

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim was to estimate the rate of PIU in Spanish university students during the lockdown, taking sex and age into account, and to analyze its relationship with depression and suicidal ideation. METHOD: 921 university students (55% women) from 18 to 30 years old (M = 24.8 years; SD = 3) participated. RESULTS: The results showed that 21% of the participants presented PIU, 25.1% moderate depression, 2.1% severe depression, and 6.6% suicidal ideation. The 18 to 21-year-old age group presented the highest rate of PIU (37.8%). A positive correlation was observed between PIU and depression (r = .38; p (241.813) = -8.21; < d = .78) in university students with PIU (M = 9.8; SD = 5.1) than those without it (M = 6.4; SD = 4.1). The rate of severe depression was six times greater (χ2 (3) = 73.25; p < .001) in undergraduates with PIU (6.2%) than those without PIU (0.8%). Moreover, 3.6% of university students with PIU presented suicidal ideation. CONCLUSIONS: These findings establish the association between PIU and depression and suicidal ideation in the university population, providing novel contributions for prevention policies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Suicidal Ideation , Humans , Female , Adolescent , Young Adult , Adult , Male , Universities , Internet Use , Communicable Disease Control , Students , Internet , Depression/epidemiology
18.
J Psychiatr Res ; 155: 443-450, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2086486

ABSTRACT

Although research has examined disparities in suicidal ideation across multiple groups, few investigations have analyzed such disparities in the context of COVID-19 pandemic. Furthermore, there is limited research on differences within and across countries, further limiting the extent to which meaningful comparisons can be made. Therefore, this study examines risk and protective factors of suicidal ideation during COVID-19 lockdown in adults across five countries. Adults (N = 2,509) from the United States, Italy, Spain, Saudi Arabia, and India completed a survey to measure suicidal ideation, recent drug use, and sociodemographic factors. Prevalence of suicidal ideation was assessed using simple and multivariable logistic regression models, and severity of suicidal ideation was analyzed via a multinomial multivariable logistic regression. Cohen's d statistics were reported for all analyses to report effect size. In the United States subsample, racial/ethnic minorities endorsed a significantly greater prevalence of suicidal ideation compared to their White peers (aOR = 2.31, 95% CI: 1.26-4.27, d = 0.46). However, no significant racial differences in suicidal ideation were found in other countries. Past 90-day illicit drug use was associated with greater prevalence (aOR = 1.38, 95% CI: 1.06-1.80, d = 0.18) and severity (aRRR = 2.17, 95% CI: 1.33-3.53, (aRRR = 0.43) of suicidal ideation during COVID-19 lockdown. This study further highlights the social disparities that exist in suicidal ideation during COVID-19 lockdown in international samples, for which greater medical and mental health interventions are critical. As such, targeted multicomponent interventions that address substance use are important for reducing the rising prevalence and severity of COVID-related suicidal ideation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Illicit Drugs , Substance-Related Disorders , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Pandemics , Risk Factors , Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Substance-Related Disorders/psychology , Suicidal Ideation , United States/epidemiology
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2081824

ABSTRACT

Suicidal ideation and thoughts of self-harm continue to be challenging public health problems. It is presently unknown what the prevalence and correlates of suicidal thoughts and self-harm are in female residents of Fort McMurray, a city that has endured wildfires, flooding, and the COVID-19 pandemic in the last five years. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and correlates of suicidal ideation and thoughts of self-harm among female residents of Fort McMurray. A cross-sectional study using an online survey questionnaire was used to collect sociodemographic and clinical information from the residents of Fort McMurray between 24 April and 2 June 2021. Suicidal ideation and thoughts of self-harm among females were assessed using the ninth question of the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, a validated screening tool used to assess depression symptoms. Likely generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), major depressive disorder (MDD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and low resilience were measured using standardized rating scales. Data were analyzed with SPSS version 25 using chi-squared tests and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Among Fort McMurray residents, 249 accessed the online survey, while 186 ultimately completed it, yielding a survey completion rate of 74.7%. Of these, 159 (85%) were females. After controlling for other variables in the regression model, respondents who expressed a desire to receive mental health counselling were more than seven times more likely to report suicidal ideation and thoughts of self-harm compared to the respondents who did not desire to receive mental health counselling (OR: 7.29; 95% CI: 1.19-44.58). Similarly, respondents who reported having abused alcohol in the past year were nearly four times more likely to report suicidal ideation or thoughts of self-harm compared to the respondents who said they had not abused alcohol in the past year (OR: 3.91; 95% CI: 1.05-14.57). A high prevalence of suicidal thoughts and thoughts of self-harm were reported among female residents of Fort McMurray. Timely access to adequate mental health support should be offered to female residents of communities impacted by multiple natural disasters, particularly residents who self-report alcohol abuse or desire to receive mental health counselling.


Subject(s)
Alcoholism , COVID-19 , Depressive Disorder, Major , Self-Injurious Behavior , Humans , Female , Male , Suicidal Ideation , Self Report , Alcoholism/epidemiology , Mental Health , Depressive Disorder, Major/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Self-Injurious Behavior/epidemiology , Counseling
20.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 71(41): 1301-1305, 2022 Oct 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2067366

ABSTRACT

Social and educational disruptions during the COVID-19 pandemic have exacerbated concerns about adolescents' mental health and suicidal behavior. Data from the 2021 Adolescent Behaviors and Experiences Survey (ABES) indicate that 37.1% of U.S. high school students reported poor mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic, with 19.9% considering and 9.0% attempting suicide in the preceding year (1). Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs)* are associated with poor mental health and suicidal behaviors (2,3), and high prevalence of some ACEs have been documented during the pandemic (4). ACEs are preventable, potentially traumatic events that occur in childhood (ages 0-17 years) such as neglect, experiencing or witnessing violence, or having a family member attempt or die by suicide. Also included are aspects of a child's environment that can undermine their sense of safety, stability, and bonding. Associations between ACEs occurring during the pandemic and mental health or suicidal behaviors among U.S. high school students were examined using ABES data. Experience of one to two ACEs was associated with poorer mental health and increased suicidal behaviors, and these deleterious outcomes increased with additional ACE exposure. After adjusting for demographic characteristics, adolescents who reported four or more ACEs during the pandemic had a prevalence of poor current mental health four times as high as, and a prevalence of past-year suicide attempts 25 times as high as, those without ACEs during the pandemic. Experience of specific ACE types (e.g., emotional abuse) was associated with higher prevalences of poor mental health and suicidal behaviors. Prevention and intervention strategies (5), including early identification and trauma-informed mental health service and support provision, for ACEs and their acute and long-term impacts could help address the U.S. child and adolescent mental health and suicide crisis.†.


Subject(s)
Adolescent Behavior , Adverse Childhood Experiences , COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adolescent Behavior/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Mental Health , Pandemics , Students , Suicidal Ideation , United States/epidemiology
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