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1.
Scand J Work Environ Health ; 48(8): 598-610, 2022 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2144720

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Working in high-stress and male-dominated occupations is associated with an elevated risk of suicide. The current study sought to conduct the first systematic literature review and meta-analysis aimed at determining suicide risk across the diverse, high pressure and male-dominated transport industry (commercial aviation, merchant seafaring, transit/driving) as compared to the general/employed population. METHODS: Searches of PubMed/Medline, Scopus and PsycINFO databases were conducted without date restriction until March 2021. Studies were included if they were written in English, were peer reviewed, and presented primary observational research data. Studies referring exclusively to suicidal ideation, suicide attempts, self-harm, and/or accidents were excluded. RESULTS: Following deletion of duplicates and non-English titles, a total of 4201 titles/abstracts were screened and 92 full-texts were read against inclusion/exclusion criteria. The final included sample consisted of 23 articles (16 used for meta-analysis). Results from the meta-analysis indicated that transport workers had a significantly elevated risk for suicide as compared to the general/employed population. Results were consistent across sensitivity analyses, and there was some variation across subgroup analyses. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, we found transport workers had a significantly higher risk for suicide than the general/employed population, and this appeared to be driven by the association for those working in merchant seafaring/maritime occupations. The findings are discussed in relation to an identified need for the development, implementation, and evaluation of tailored workplace suicide prevention strategies for transport industry workers.


Subject(s)
Suicide, Attempted , Suicide , Male , Humans , Suicidal Ideation
2.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0275973, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119392

ABSTRACT

The US population faced stressors associated with suicide brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. Understanding the relationship between stressors and suicidal ideation in the context of the pandemic may inform policies and programs to prevent suicidality and suicide. We compared suicidal ideation between two cross-sectional, nationally representative surveys of adults in the United States: the 2017-2018 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and the 2020 COVID-19 and Life Stressors Impact on Mental Health and Well-being (CLIMB) study (conducted March 31 to April 13). We estimated the association between stressors and suicidal ideation in bivariable and multivariable Poisson regression models with robust variance to generate unadjusted and adjusted prevalence ratios (PR and aPR). Suicidal ideation increased from 3.4% in the 2017-2018 NHANES to 16.3% in the 2020 CLIMB survey, and from 5.8% to 26.4% among participants in low-income households. In the multivariable model, difficulty paying rent (aPR: 1.5, 95% CI: 1.2-2.1) and feeling alone (aPR: 1.9, 95% CI: 1.5-2.4) were associated with suicidal ideation but job loss was not (aPR: 0.9, 95% CI: 0.6 to 1.2). Suicidal ideation increased by 12.9 percentage points and was almost 4.8 times higher during the COVID-19 pandemic. Suicidal ideation was more prevalent among people facing difficulty paying rent (31.5%), job loss (24.1%), and loneliness (25.1%), with each stressor associated with suicidal ideation in bivariable models. Difficulty paying rent and loneliness were most associated with suicidal ideation. Policies and programs to support people experiencing economic precarity and loneliness may contribute to suicide prevention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Suicidal Ideation , Adult , Humans , United States/epidemiology , Suicide, Attempted/psychology , Loneliness/psychology , Nutrition Surveys , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Risk Factors
3.
BMC Psychiatry ; 22(1): 686, 2022 11 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108752

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A "suicide pact" is a joint and actively induced death of two individuals with the essential and unavoidable characteristic of a mutual consent. One of the partners (dominant in the relationship, commonly male) usually induces the action and in most cases, it is the one who actively carries it out. Undiagnosed psychopathological dimension or pathological subthreshold traits are found in those who enter into suicide agreements, the presence of cluster B personality traits such as narcissistic or borderline is of particular relevance in the dominant partner, while in the submissive one dependent personality traits are more frequent. As in the case of other similar health emergencies, COVID-19 pandemic seems to lead to greater suicidality, including the "suicide pacts" of couples whose motivation varies including firstly financial problems, strictly followed by fear of infection and not being able to return home from abroad. CASE PRESENTATION: We reported a case of a couple who entered a suicide agreement consequently to the economic difficulties caused by COVID-19 pandemic, hospitalized in our department. Both partners were assessed with Adult Autism Subthreshold Spectrum (AdAS Spectrum) and both crossed the threshold for clinically relevant autistic traits (M = 67; F = 49). CONCLUSION: This case further confirms the link between COVID-19 pandemics and suicidality. The role of autism spectrum traits as a vulnerability factor towards the development of severe psychopathological consequences after traumatic events is also stressed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Suicide , Adult , Male , Humans , Pandemics , Suicide, Attempted/psychology , Suicide/psychology , Suicidal Ideation
5.
Psychiatr Danub ; 34(Suppl 8): 96-99, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2046026

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In March 2020, the Belgian population was exposed to a confinement situation that it had never experienced before associated with the collapse in access to psychiatric care. Initially, only emergencies and constrained care continued to operate. In these specific circumstances, where both the overall population and the psychiatric population, was exposed to unique stress factors, what was the role of forced psychiatric internments in the treatment of mood disorders? SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We have measured the number of detentions for observation with and without suicide attempt over the two years prior to the pandemic in order to obtain theoretical reference values. We have compared these values with the measures over the 12 months following the start of the confinement period, which constitute the Crisis values. The continuation of measures, with an equal number of observation measures, constituted the Post-Crisis values. For these same cases, we compared in suicide attempt cases, whether the criteria for Severe Major Depressive Disorder were met or not. Lastly we compared the number of observation measures that were lifted, or not, within ten days of patient care. RESULTS: There was no significant increase in Detentions for Observation following a suicide attempt during the Crisis period. However a significant increase was observed during the Post-Crisis period. As regards cases of attempted suicide during the Crisis period, the number of patients suffering from Major Depressive Disorders reduced significantly in terms of statistics. This confirms our impression of a change in population. The Post-Crisis values dropped to the Theoric values. The number of Observation measures lifted increased quite significantly during the Crisis period, while there was a return to values in terms of statistics similar to the Theoric values during the Post-Crisis period. CONCLUSIONS: Although the population, both the healthy population and those suffering from a psychiatric condition, was subject to stress that it had never before experienced coinciding with a collapse of healthcare provision, there was no increase in patients meeting the criteria to benefit from constrained care during the Crisis period. On the other hand, there was a significant change in statistical terms in the population of patients who attempted suicide. We have seen a collapse in the number of patients suffering from depressive disorders and an equivalent increase in the number of patients with personality disorders or adjustment disorders. The number of Observation measures lifted during the Crisis period also grew quite significantly. Constrained care was available to help manage reactive suicide attempts. All other things being equal, they indirectly showed a reduction in Major Depressive Disorders requiring constrained care in the population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depressive Disorder, Major , Depressive Disorder, Major/epidemiology , Depressive Disorder, Major/therapy , Humans , Mood Disorders/epidemiology , Mood Disorders/therapy , Pandemics , Suicide, Attempted/prevention & control
6.
Psychiatry Res ; 317: 114837, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2031635

ABSTRACT

Current suicidal ideation and suicide attempts among psychiatric patients during the COVID-19 pandemic were studied through systematic review and meta-analysis. We searched the following electronic databases using the relevant search terms: Medline, Embase, PubMed and Web of Science, with the search time as of January 31,2022. Forest plots were obtained using Stata statistical software and a random-effects model was used to conduct a meta-analysis of the prevalence of suicidal ideation. We found 21 eligible studies, 11 of which provided suitable data for meta-analysis. 10 studies explored current suicidal ideation and reported a pooled prevalence of 20.4% (95%CI 14.0-26.8). Six studies examined suicide attempts, with a pooled prevalence of 11.4% (95%CI 6.2-16.6). The prevalence of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts varied by the study method used and by the study sites. This work highlights the need for real-time monitoring of suicidal ideation and suicide in psychiatric patients during the covid-19 pandemic r to inform clinical practice and help identify research questions for future epidemiological studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Suicide, Attempted , Humans , Suicide, Attempted/psychology , Suicidal Ideation , Pandemics , Prevalence
7.
J Affect Disord ; 318: 393-399, 2022 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2031407

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic and public life restrictions may have a negative impact on people's mental health. Therefore, we analyzed whether this condition affected the occurrence of suicide attempts (SA) over 20 months during the pandemic period. METHODS: We included patient records according to DSM-5 criteria for suicidal behavior disorders (n = 825) between Jan 1, 2017, and Dec 31, 2021. We applied interrupted time-series Poisson regression models to investigate the effect of the pandemic on SA occurrence, time trends, and seasonal patterns in the whole group of patients as well as stratified by age and gender. RESULTS: There was no significant effect of the pandemic on the occurrence of SA in the overall group. However, we observed a significant impact of the pandemic on the seasonal pattern of SA, also the variance differed significantly (pre-pandemic mean ± variance: 13.33 ± 15.75, pandemic: mean ± variance: 13.86 ± 7.26), indicating less periodic variation in SA during the pandemic. Male patients and young adults mainly contributed to this overall effect. Subgroup analysis revealed a significant difference in SA trends during the pandemic in older adults (>55 years) compared with younger adults (18-35 years); SA numbers increased in older adults and decreased in younger adults as the pandemic progressed. LIMITATIONS: A few patients may have received initial care in an emergency department after SA without being referred to psychiatry. CONCLUSIONS: In general, the COVID-19 pandemic and related measures did not significantly affect the occurrence of SA but did significantly affect the dynamics. In addition, the pandemic appeared to affect suicidal behavior differently across age groups as it progressed. Particularly for the older adult group, negative long-term effects of the pandemic on suicidal behavior can be derived from the present results, indicating the need to strengthen suicide prevention for the elderly.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Disorders , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/psychology , Pandemics , Suicidal Ideation , Suicide, Attempted/psychology , Young Adult
9.
Eur J Epidemiol ; 37(9): 901-913, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2014244

ABSTRACT

Concerns have been raised about early vs. later impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on suicidal behavior. However, data remain sparse to date. We investigated all calls for intentional drug or other toxic ingestions to the eight Poison Control Centers in France between 1st January 2018 and 31st May 2022. Data were extracted from the French National Database of Poisonings. Calls during the study period were analyzed using time trends and time series analyses with SARIMA models (based on the first two years). Breakpoints were determined using Chow test. These analyses were performed together with examination of age groups (≤ 11, 12-24, 25-64, ≥ 65 years) and gender effects when possible. Over the studied period, 66,589 calls for suicide attempts were received. Overall, there was a downward trend from 2018, which slowed down in October 2019 and was followed by an increase from November 2020. Number of calls observed during the COVID period were above what was expected. However, important differences were found according to age and gender. The increase in calls from mid-2020 was particularly observed in young females, while middle-aged adults showed a persisting decrease. An increase in older-aged people was observed from mid-2019 and persisted during the pandemic. The pandemic may therefore have exacerbated a pre-existing fragile situation in adolescents and old-aged people. This study emphasizes the rapidly evolving situation regarding suicidal behaviour during the pandemic, the possibility of age and gender differences in impact, and the value of having access to real-time information to monitor suicidal acts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Poison Control Centers , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Databases, Factual , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Suicide, Attempted
10.
Curr Opin Psychiatry ; 35(5): 317-323, 2022 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2008720

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Suicide is a major, global, public health issue. Those who attempt suicide represent a high-risk subgroup for eventual death by suicide. We provide an update on emerging evidence for interventions for attempted suicide to reduce subsequent suicidal behavior. RECENT FINDINGS: Major approaches that have been examined recently include pharmacological, psychosocial, brief active contact and outreach interventions, and digitally driven interventions. Notwithstanding the limited evidence base for most of these approaches, brief contact and follow-up interventions appear to have more robust effects on reduction of repeat suicidal behavior, including attempts; such approaches may have especial significance in emergency settings because of their brevity. Digital interventions for self-harm appear promising in the short-term whereas the evidence for pharmacological and psychosocial strategies remain inconclusive. SUMMARY: Although current evidence supports the use of brief interventions, contact, and outreach for reducing risk of subsequent suicide attempts and suicidal behavior, there are large gaps and limitations in the evidence base related to trial design, lack of long-term efficacy data, and implementational challenges. More robustly designed long-term trials that examine integrated intervention approaches with well defined outcomes are needed to develop recommendations in this area.


Subject(s)
Self-Injurious Behavior , Suicide, Attempted , Humans , Suicidal Ideation , Suicide, Attempted/prevention & control , Suicide, Attempted/psychology
11.
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry ; 61(9): 1084-1086, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2007786

ABSTRACT

The study by Berk et al.1 highlights potential trajectories of response and nonresponse to dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) as compared to individual and group supportive therapy (IGST) for teens with repeated self-harm and suicidal ideation. The authors also posit a testable function to predict responsiveness vs nonresponsiveness and provide critical guidance about when to reassess nonresponders and alter treatment. This is the fourth major article from a large federally funded, randomized controlled trial. Previous publications have highlighted superiority of DBT over IGST,2 reported the moderating factors of treatment outcomes,3 and explored the mechanism of effectiveness for DBT in the treatment of suicidal ideation and self-harm.4 These articles provide useful information given the rising rates of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts among youth5 and recent research suggesting the powerful role of social media in supporting contagion of suicidal behavior among youth.


Subject(s)
Dialectical Behavior Therapy , Self-Injurious Behavior , Adolescent , Humans , Psychotherapy , Self-Injurious Behavior/therapy , Suicidal Ideation , Suicide, Attempted/prevention & control
12.
J Med Virol ; 94(12): 5827-5835, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1990501

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to understand the suicidal ideation and suicidal attempts among cancer patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. The data were collected from patients diagnosed with cancer while attending the largest cancer center in the south of China. A structured questionnaire was used to investigate patients' demographic data, suicidal behavior, and factors related to COVID-19. Mental health conditions were measured by the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and the Brief Symptom Inventory. Comorbidities and medical conditions of cancer patients were extracted from the electronic healthcare records. Among the 5670 cancer patients, 755 (13.3%) reported suicidal ideation, and 266 (4.7%) reported suicidal attempts during the COVID-19 pandemic. The age group with the highest risk of suicidal ideation was 20-24 years (23.9%). Lifetime history of suffering from mental disorders, longer time since cancer diagnosis, regional and distant tumor stage, depression, anxiety, hostility, having a higher frequency of worrying about cancer management due to COVID-19, higher frequency feeling of overwhelming psychological pressure due to COVID-19, having a higher level of barriers to manage cancer due to COVID-19, and higher barriers to continue treatment of cancer due to inconveniences caused by COVID-19, were all significantly associated with increased risk of suicidal ideation. We also identified the risk factors of suicide attempts. This is the first study investigating the prevalence and risk factors associated with suicidal ideation and suicidal attempts in Chinese cancer patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our findings suggest that it is essential to monitor the mental health conditions of this vulnerable population, especially for cancer patients who have comorbidity with a history of mental disorders. Also, government policymakers should take action to protect cancer patients to avoid any interruption of their continued treatment. Further efforts are urgently required to develop specific psychological interventions to reduce the risk factors among cancer patients during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics , Risk Factors , Suicidal Ideation , Suicide, Attempted/psychology , Young Adult
13.
Psychiatry Res ; 316: 114796, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1983848

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Suicide is among the leading causes of death for college students. We aimed to assess the impact of the pandemic on trends in suicidal thoughts and behaviors among college students, and whether suicidal thoughts and behaviors were associated with COVID-19 infection and psychosocial factors. METHODS: We analyzed 2017-2021 data from 4 waves of Healthy Minds Study including a random sample of college students (N = 354,473) from 286 U.S. institutions. We performed interrupted time series analysis to model the effect of the pandemic on trends in suicidal ideation (SI), plan (SP), and attempt (SA). At the peripandemic assessment, we utilized multivariable logistic regression to examine the association of SI, SP, and SA with COVID-19 infection and psychosocial factors. RESULTS: We observed significant decreases in SI, SP, and SA among college students from 2017 to 2021. The pandemic was significantly associated with a 1.33 percentage points reduction in SI and a 0.85 percentage points reduction in SP but was not associated with a significant reduction in SA. Adjusted associations of SI, SP, and SA with risk factors showed the significant odds ratio (OR) for suspected COVID-19 infection (SI: 1.33, SP: 1.22, SA: 1.32), severe depression (SI: 6.39, SP: 6.63, SA: 5.63), severe anxiety (SI: 3.66, SP: 3.62, SA: 3.60), COVID-19-related financial stress (SI: 1.35, SP: 1.34, SA: 1.48), food insecurity (SI: 2.12, SP: 2.13, SA: 2.79), and academic impairment (SI: 2.07, SP: 2.05, SA: 2.14) but not for test-confirmed COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Certain COVID-19 mitigation strategies might have protected college students from suicidal thoughts/behaviors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Suicide , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Interrupted Time Series Analysis , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Students/psychology , Suicidal Ideation , Suicide, Attempted/psychology , United States/epidemiology
14.
Pediatrics ; 150(2)2022 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1974393

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The worldwide severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 pandemic challenges adolescents' mental health. In this study, we aim to compare the number of pediatric ICU (PICU) admissions after suicide attempts during the first German lockdown and one year later during a second, prolonged lockdown with prepandemic years. METHODS: A retrospective multicenter study was conducted among 27 German PICUs. Cases <18 years admitted to the PICU because of accidents or injuries between March 16 and May 31 of 2017 to 2021 were identified based on International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision codes (German modification) and patient data entered into a database. This study is a subset analysis on suicide attempts in adolescents aged 12 to 17.9 years. The Federal Statistics Office was queried for data on fatal suicides, which were available only for 2020 in adolescents aged 10 to 17.9 years. RESULTS: Total admissions and suicide attempts declined during the first lockdown in 2020 (standardized morbidity ratio 0.74 (95% confidence interval; 0.58-0.92) and 0.69 (0.43-1.04), respectively) and increased in 2021 (standardized morbidity ratio 2.14 [1.86-2.45] and 2.84 [2.29-3.49], respectively). Fatal suicide rates remained stable between 2017 to 2019 and 2020 (1.57 vs 1.48 per 100 000 adolescent years) with monthly numbers showing no clear trend during the course of 2020. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows a strong increase in serious suicide attempts among adolescents during the course of the pandemic in Germany. More research is needed to understand the relation between pandemic prevention measures and suicidal ideation to help implement mental health support for adolescents.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Suicide, Attempted , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric , Pandemics , Suicidal Ideation
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(15)2022 07 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1957306

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is related to changes in rates of suicide and suicide attempts in many countries, and some differences have been observed regarding the prevalence of suicidal behaviours in different age and gender groups. The aim of this study is to analyse the number of suicides and suicide attempts per 100,000 people between 2019 and 2021 in Poland. Using police and government data on suicide and suicide attempts in Poland, three age categories were investigated: 13-24 years old, 25-65 years old, and above 65 years old, and the analysis encompassed the whole population and the populations of men and women separately. Study results indicated an increase in suicide attempts in the two younger age categories (aged 7-24 years and 25-65 years) between 2021 and 2019-2020. There was an increase in suicide among women in all age categories during the study period, whilst no increase was observed in suicide in men in any age group. The differences in the prevalence of suicide and attempted suicide in Poland during the COVID-19 pandemic in different age and gender groups indicate the need for tailored suicide prevention activities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Suicide, Attempted , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Poland/epidemiology , Sex Factors , Suicide, Attempted/prevention & control , Young Adult
16.
Rev Med Suisse ; 18(789): 1343-1344, 2022 Jul 06.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1925073

ABSTRACT

People living in detention are at high risk of suicidal behaviour, with an incidence of suicides 3- to 9-fold higher compared to the general population. During the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, suicidality among some disadvantaged populations increased and this trend was also observed in Swiss prisons. This article describes the clinical, psychosocial, institutional, criminological, and judicial factors associated with an increased risk of suicide attempt, as well as those that may lead to increased depression and other psychiatric disorders in the context of the pandemic in detention. Solutions are proposed to limit the incidence and consequences of these events in this vulnerable population.


Les personnes vivant en détention sont exposées à un risque élevé de comportements suicidaires, avec une incidence des suicides 3 à 9 fois plus élevée que dans la population générale. Durant la pandémie de SARS-CoV-2, la suicidalité au sein de certaines populations défavorisées s'est accrue et cette tendance a été observée dans certaines prisons, notamment en Suisse. Cet article décrit les facteurs cliniques, psychosociaux, institutionnels, criminologiques et judiciaires qui sont associés à un risque augmenté de passage à l'acte suicidaire, ainsi que ceux pouvant conduire à une exacerbation de la dépression et d'autres troubles psychiatriques dans le contexte pandémique en détention. Des solutions sont proposées pour limiter l'incidence et les conséquences de ces événements au sein de cette population vulnérable.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Suicide, Attempted , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Suicidal Ideation , Suicide, Attempted/psychology
17.
J Affect Disord ; 305: 115-121, 2022 05 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1920980

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to clarify the possible causal associations between education phenotypes and non-fatal suicide attempts. In particular, we evaluated the roles of academic achievement (school grades), cognitive performance (IQ), and educational attainment (education level). METHODS: Based on longitudinal Swedish registry data, we included 2,335,763 individuals (48.7% female) with available school grades, 1,448,438 men with IQ measures, and 4,352,989 individuals (48.4% female) with available data on education level. We combined two different approaches to aid in causal inference: 1) instrumental variables analysis, using month of birth as an instrument related to education but not suicide attempt, to control for measured and unmeasured confounders, and 2) co-relative analysis, comparing pairs of different genetic relatedness (cousins, half, and full siblings) to control for genetic and environmental influences. RESULTS: High education was associated with reduced risk of suicide attempt. Instrumental variable analysis indicated evidence of a likely causal association between higher school grades and lower risk of suicide attempts (HR = 0.71). Co-relative analyses supported the causality between the three predictors and suicide attempt risk (school grades, HR = 0.80, IQ, HR = 0.83, education level, HR = 0.76). Finally, we examined the specificity of education phenotypes and found that both cognitive (IQ) and non-cognitive (school grades, education level) processes were involved in suicide attempt risk. LIMITATIONS: IQ was only available in men, limiting the generalizability of this analysis in women. CONCLUSIONS: Efforts to support causal associations in psychiatric research are needed to offer better intervention. Programs improving education during adolescence would decrease suicide attempt risk.


Subject(s)
Cognition , Suicide, Attempted , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Risk Factors , Sweden/epidemiology
18.
Suicide Life Threat Behav ; 52(5): 983-993, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1901846

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in increased distress at a societal level, with youth and young people bearing a disproportionate burden. A series of recent Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports has highlighted emergency department (ED) visit rates for suicide attempts among youth ages 12-25 during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study expands those analyses by adding race and ethnicity to the examination of suspected suicide attempts among youth. METHODS: This study uses National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) data for Wisconsin from hospitals that consistently reported ED visits between the study period of January 1, 2019 and September 30, 2021. Suspected suicide attempt visits were identified using the CDC-developed suicide attempt query. RESULTS: During the study period, there were 8915 ED visits for suicide attempts by children and youth ages 12-25 in Wisconsin's NSSP system. We confirm gendered patterns of ED visit rates for suspected suicide attempts among youth that were first noted in studies using a non-representative national dataset. Large and significant 2019 vs. 2021 increases were noted for Black females ages 12-17 (79% increase) and White non-Hispanic females ages 12-17 (58%), but no significant change for Hispanic females ages 12-17. Black females ages 18-25 had high and relatively stable rates throughout this period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Child , Female , Adolescent , Humans , Young Adult , Adult , Suicide, Attempted , COVID-19/epidemiology , Intersectional Framework , Ethnicity , Emergency Service, Hospital
19.
Braz J Psychiatry ; 44(3): 237-238, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1896567
20.
Pan Afr Med J ; 41: 245, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1887334

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted our way of life and continue to exert significant psychological impact. A surge in suicide has been associated with all previous major epidemics and pandemics. The suicide rate associated with COVID-19 pandemic would continue increasing if urgent measures are not put in place. We report two cases of attempted suicide among confirmed COVID-19 patients. The first case is a 30-year-old nurse who attempted suicide in an isolation facility and the second case is a 43-year-old male who travelled with his wife and a trusted friend from Burkina-Faso to Ghana to access haemodialysis care for his wife in a COVID-19 pandemic era. Unfortunately, the couple tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection. We discussed interventions to prevent suicide in treatment facilities. We recommend psychological assessment and counselling for all COVID-19 patients. We also recommend social interaction among patients in the isolation or treatment centres, and active management of COVID-19 related stigma and misinformation. Screening for means of suicide should be conducted in treatment facilities. Pre-test and post-test counselling are essential interventions. Also, telemedicine, telephone calls, computer assisted psychotherapy, mobile applications, self-guided digital interventions have been identified as effective tools for administering psychotherapeutic interventions to COVID-19 patients particularly in instances where face-to-face may not be possible.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Suicide, Attempted/prevention & control
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