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4.
J Korean Med Sci ; 36(34): e243, 2021 Aug 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1379957

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic may increase the total number of suicide attempts and the proportion of low-rescue attempts. We investigated the factors affecting low-rescue suicide attempts using the risk-rescue rating scale (RRRS) among patients who visited the emergency department (ED) after attempting suicide before or during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We retrospectively investigated suicide attempts made by patients who visited our ED from March 2019 to September 2020. Patients were classified into two groups based on whether they attempted suicide before or during the COVID-19 pandemic. Data on demographic variables, psychiatric factors, suicide risk factors and rescue factors were collected and compared. RESULTS: A total of 518 patients were included in the study, 275 (53.1%) of whom attempted suicide during the COVID-19 pandemic. The proportion of patients who made low-rescue suicide attempts differed before and during the COVID-19 pandemic (37.1% vs. 28.8%) (P = 0.046). However, the proportions of patients who made high-risk suicide attempts and high-lethality suicide attempts did not significantly differ between the two periods. The independent risk factors for low-rescue suicide attempts were age and the COVID-19 pandemic (odds ratio [OR], 1.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00-1.03; P = 0.006) (OR, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.03-2.25; P = 0.034). CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic was associated with low-rescue suicide attempts in patients visiting the ED after attempting suicide. Thus, we need to consider the implementation of measures to prevent low-rescue suicide attempts during similar infectious disease crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Failure to Rescue, Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Suicide, Attempted/prevention & control , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/virology , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Hospitals, University , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Suicide, Attempted/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Care Centers , Young Adult
5.
J Child Psychol Psychiatry ; 62(8): 919-921, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1360502

ABSTRACT

This editorial discusses lessons learned from the COVID-19 public health emergency as they relate to the prevention of suicide, the second leading cause of death in adolescents and young adults globally. Recognizing that COVID-19 impact and response varied across nations, we offer a US perspective, addressing two questions: (a) what have we learned from this pandemic and mitigation strategies used to reduce cases of COVID-19 illness and deaths; and (b) how can our research advance knowledge and be advanced by work aimed at understanding the impact of this 'unusual' period? Provisional data indicate that during the pandemic and lockdown period, there were some declines in suicide rates for the total US population and no change in youth. However, data also indicate increases in reported suicidal ideation and behavior, mental health-related ED visits, and ED visits for suicidal ideation and behavior in youth. Heterogeneity of pandemic effects is noteworthy, with ethnic and racial minority populations suffering the most from COVID-19, COVID-19-related risk factors, and possibly suicide deaths. As vaccinations can prevent severe COVID-19 cases and deaths, we also have demonstrations of effective 'psychological inoculations' such as community-based interventions for reducing suicide attempts and deaths. During COVID-19, we mobilized to provide clinical care through telehealth and digital interventions. The challenge now is to continue to put our science to work to mitigate the adverse impacts of the pandemic on suicide and suicide risk factors, our children's mental health, and enhance mental health and well-being in our communities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychology, Child , Suicidal Ideation , Suicide, Attempted/prevention & control , Suicide, Attempted/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
6.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 15828, 2021 08 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343475

ABSTRACT

Precise remote evaluation of both suicide risk and psychiatric disorders is critical for suicide prevention as well as for psychiatric well-being. Using questionnaires is an alternative to labor-intensive diagnostic interviews in a large general population, but previous models for predicting suicide attempts suffered from low sensitivity. We developed and validated a deep graph neural network model that increased the prediction sensitivity of suicide risk in young adults (n = 17,482 for training; n = 14,238 for testing) using multi-dimensional questionnaires and suicidal ideation within 2 weeks as the prediction target. The best model achieved a sensitivity of 76.3%, specificity of 83.4%, and an area under curve of 0.878 (95% confidence interval, 0.855-0.899). We demonstrated that multi-dimensional deep features covering depression, anxiety, resilience, self-esteem, and clinico-demographic information contribute to the prediction of suicidal ideation. Our model might be useful for the remote evaluation of suicide risk in the general population of young adults for specific situations such as the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Mental Disorders/diagnosis , Mental Disorders/psychology , Neural Networks, Computer , Suicidal Ideation , Suicide, Attempted/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , Area Under Curve , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/prevention & control , Prognosis , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Republic of Korea , Resilience, Psychological , Risk Factors , Self Concept , Sensitivity and Specificity , Suicide, Attempted/prevention & control , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
10.
Encephale ; 46(3S): S66-S72, 2020 Jun.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065052

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic affected today more than 3,000,000 worldwide, and more than half of humanity has been placed in quarantine. The scientific community and the political authorities fear an epidemic of suicide secondary to this crisis. The aim of this review is to analyze the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the dimensions of the suicidal process and its interaction with the various risk factors. We also propose innovative strategies to manage suicidal behavior in the context of pandemic. METHODS: We carried out a narrative review of international publications dealing with major pandemics (COVID-19, SARS) and their influence on suicidal vulnerability. RESULTS: Many factors are likely to increase the emergence of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts during this crisis. Social distancing and quarantine could increase the feeling of disconnection and the perception of social pain in vulnerable individuals. Some populations at high suicidal risk could be further impacted by the current pandemic: the elderly, medical staff and individuals exposed to economic insecurity. Several innovative tools adapted to the constraints of social distancing and quarantine may prevent suicide risk: e-health, VigilanS, buddhist-derived practices and art engagement. CONCLUSIONS: This unprecedented crisis may interact with certain dimensions of the suicidal process. However, it is time to innovate. Several suicide prevention tools all have their place in new modes of care and should be tested on a large scale.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Suicide/psychology , Alcoholic Intoxication/psychology , Artificial Intelligence , Betacoronavirus/physiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Cost of Illness , Crisis Intervention/instrumentation , Economic Recession , France/epidemiology , Humans , Inflammation , Loneliness/psychology , Models, Neurological , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Psychotherapy/methods , Psychotic Disorders/etiology , Psychotic Disorders/physiopathology , Psychotic Disorders/virology , Quarantine/psychology , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/psychology , Social Isolation/psychology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/therapy , Suicidal Ideation , Suicide/prevention & control , Suicide/statistics & numerical data , Suicide, Attempted/prevention & control , Suicide, Attempted/psychology , Telemedicine , Vulnerable Populations
11.
Arch Suicide Res ; 24(4): 477-482, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-926062

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic presents us with unusual challenges to the global health system and economics. The pandemic may not have an immediate impact on suicide rates, however, given that it is likely to result in a confluence of risk factors for suicide and economic crisis, it is highly possibly that it will lead to increases in suicide rates in the long-run. Elderly persons are more likely to live alone, be socially isolated during COVID-19 and have physical health problems, which are risk factors for suicide. Young children and health professionals may also be population at risk. Isolation, quarantine and the economic crisis that follows may impact mental health significantly. The International Academy of Suicide Research (IASR) is an organization dedicated to promote high standards of research and scholarship in the field of suicidal behaviour to support efforts to prevent suicide globally. This IASR's board position paper gives recommendations for suicide research during the COVID-10 pandemic. Clinical research has to be modified due to COVID-19 shutdown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Resilience, Psychological , Suicide, Attempted/prevention & control , Suicide/prevention & control , Adaptation, Psychological , Humans , Risk Factors , Social Support , Suicidal Ideation , Suicide/psychology , Suicide, Attempted/psychology
12.
BMJ Case Rep ; 13(10)2020 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-901291

ABSTRACT

A previously fit and well 37-year-old male healthcare worker presented with confusion, psychotic symptoms and a suicide attempt in the context of a new COVID-19 diagnosis. Following surgical interventions and an extended admission to the intensive care unit, he made a good recovery in terms of both his physical and mental health. A number of factors likely contributed to his presentation, including SARS-CoV-2 infection, severe insomnia, worry, healthcare worker-related stress, and the unique social and psychological stressors associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. This case highlights the need to further characterise the specific psychiatric sequelae of COVID-19 in community settings, and should remind general medical clinicians to be mindful of comorbid psychiatric symptoms when assessing patients with newly diagnosed COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Psychotic Disorders/complications , Psychotic Disorders/diagnosis , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Suicide, Attempted/prevention & control , Adult , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Humans , Male , Nurses, Male/psychology , Occupational Stress/complications , Occupational Stress/diagnosis , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Prognosis , Psychotic Disorders/drug therapy , Psychotic Disorders/physiopathology , Risk Assessment , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/complications , Stress, Psychological , Treatment Outcome , United Kingdom
14.
Suicide Life Threat Behav ; 50(6): 1223-1229, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-617135

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to identify leading sources of stress, describe rates of mental health outcomes, and examine their associations among U.S. adults during the first months of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHOD: In a cross-sectional, general population survey conducted from March 18 to April 4, 2020, U.S. adults (n = 10,625) were recruited through Qualtrics Panels using quota sampling methods. RESULTS: Life stressors, probable depression, past-month suicide ideation, and past-month suicide attempts were not elevated among participants subject to state-level stay-at-home orders and/or large gathering bans. Multiple life stressors were associated with increased rates of probable depression. Past-month suicide ideation was significantly higher among participants reporting ongoing arguments with a partner and serious legal problems. Past-month suicide attempt was significantly higher among participants reporting concerns about a life-threatening illness or injury, but was significantly lower among participants reporting an unexpected bill or expense. CONCLUSIONS: Results failed to support the conclusion that physical distancing measures are correlated with worse mental health outcomes. Concerns about life-threatening illness or injury were uniquely associated with increased risk of suicide attempt.


Subject(s)
Physical Distancing , Stress, Psychological , Suicide, Attempted , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Catastrophic Illness/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fear , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Suicidal Ideation , Suicide, Attempted/prevention & control , Suicide, Attempted/psychology , Suicide, Attempted/statistics & numerical data
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