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1.
Hematology ; 27(1): 318-321, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1713441

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is an immune-mediated adverse drug reaction associated with thrombosis. Clinical scoring systems and the presence of anti-platelet factor 4 (anti-PF4)/heparin antibodies determine the diagnosis. CASE PRESENTATION: A 57-year-old man who was treated with acenocoumarol due to a chronic left ventricular thrombus was admitted to the hospital for severe SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia and pulmonary embolism. The patient was started on bemiparin and discharged. Left lower limb acute arterial ischemia and thrombocytopenia were diagnosed 18 days later. Computed tomography angiography revealed a large left ventricular thrombus and multiple arterial thrombi. Left femoral-popliteal thromboembolectomy was performed. Anti-PF4/heparin antibodies confirmed an HIT diagnosis. Fondaparinux (7.5 mg/24 h) was initiated, but cardiac surgery was necessary. Bivalirudin was used during surgery, with an initial load (1.25 mg/kg) and maintenance infusion (2.5 mg/kg/h). The cardiac thrombus was extracted, but the patient experienced a postsurgical myocardial infarction. Percutaneous cardiovascular intervention (PCI) required a bivalirudin load (0.75 mg/kg) and maintenance infusion (1.75 mg/kg/h). No coronary lesions were detected, and argatroban was started afterwards (0.5 µg/kg/min). When the platelet count exceeded 100 × 109/L, acenocoumarol was initiated. Thereupon, acetylsalicylic acid (100 mg/24 h) was added. No other complications have been reported to date. CONCLUSION: The clinical presentation of intraventricular and multiple arterial thrombi is remarkable. SARS-CoV-2 infection likely contributed to a hypercoagulable state. The management of patients with HIT undergoing cardiac surgery is challenging. If surgery cannot be delayed, then treatment with bivalirudin is recommended. Additionally, this drug is recommended for PCI. Bivalirudin is safe and well-tolerated in both procedures.


Subject(s)
Acenocoumarol/administration & dosage , Anticoagulants/administration & dosage , Arginine/analogs & derivatives , COVID-19/drug therapy , Heparin , Hirudins/administration & dosage , Peptide Fragments/administration & dosage , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Pipecolic Acids/administration & dosage , SARS-CoV-2 , Sulfonamides/administration & dosage , Thrombocytopenia , Thrombosis , Arginine/administration & dosage , COVID-19/complications , Heparin/administration & dosage , Heparin/adverse effects , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Recombinant Proteins/administration & dosage , Thrombocytopenia/chemically induced , Thrombocytopenia/therapy , Thrombosis/chemically induced , Thrombosis/therapy
2.
Molecules ; 27(1)2021 Dec 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580565

ABSTRACT

Baricitinib (BTB) is an orally administered Janus kinase inhibitor, therapeutically used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Recently it has also been approved for the treatment of COVID-19 infection. In this study, four different BTB-loaded lipids (stearin)-polymer (Poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide)) hybrid nanoparticles (B-PLN1 to B-PLN4) were prepared by the single-step nanoprecipitation method. Next, they were characterised in terms of physicochemical properties such as particle size, zeta potential (ζP), polydispersity index (PDI), entrapment efficiency (EE) and drug loading (DL). Based on preliminary evaluation, the B-PLN4 was regarded as the optimised formulation with particle size (272 ± 7.6 nm), PDI (0.225), ζP (-36.5 ± 3.1 mV), %EE (71.6 ± 1.5%) and %DL (2.87 ± 0.42%). This formulation (B-PLN4) was further assessed concerning morphology, in vitro release, and in vivo pharmacokinetic studies in rats. The in vitro release profile exhibited a sustained release pattern well-fitted by the Korsmeyer-Peppas kinetic model (R2 = 0.879). The in vivo pharmacokinetic data showed an enhancement (2.92 times more) in bioavailability in comparison to the normal suspension of pure BTB. These data concluded that the formulated lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles could be a promising drug delivery option to enhance the bioavailability of BTB. Overall, this study provides a scientific basis for future studies on the entrapment efficiency of lipid-polymer hybrid systems as promising carriers for overcoming pharmacokinetic limitations.


Subject(s)
Azetidines/pharmacokinetics , Drug Carriers/chemistry , Drug Liberation , Liposomes/chemistry , Nanoparticles/chemistry , Polymers/chemistry , Purines/pharmacokinetics , Pyrazoles/pharmacokinetics , Sulfonamides/pharmacokinetics , Administration, Oral , Animals , Azetidines/administration & dosage , Azetidines/chemistry , Biological Availability , Male , Purines/administration & dosage , Purines/chemistry , Pyrazoles/administration & dosage , Pyrazoles/chemistry , Rats , Rats, Wistar , Sulfonamides/administration & dosage , Sulfonamides/chemistry
3.
J Med Virol ; 94(4): 1523-1534, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1540137

ABSTRACT

The benefits of baricitinib in coronavirus disease-2019 are inadequately defined. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies of baricitinib to determine its clinical efficacy and adverse events in patients with COVID-19. Databases were searched from their inception to September 5, 2021. The primary outcome was the coefficient of mortality. We also compared secondary indicators and adverse events between baricitinib treatment and placebo or other treatments. Twelve studies of 3564 patients were included and assessed qualitatively (modified Jadad and Newcastle-Ottawa Scale scores). Baricitinib effectively improved the mortality rate (relative risk of mortality = 0.56; 95% confidence interval: 0.46-0.69; p < 0.001; I2 = 2%), and this result was unchanged by subgroup analysis. Baricitinib improved intensive care unit admission, the requirement for invasive mechanical ventilation, and improved the oxygenation index. Data from these studies also showed that baricitinib slightly reduced the risk of adverse events. Regarding the choice of the drug dosage of baricitinib, the high-dose group appeared to have additional benefits for clinical efficacy. Our study shows that baricitinib may be a promising, safe, and effective anti-severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 drug candidate, with the advantages of low cost, easy production, and convenient storage.


Subject(s)
Azetidines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Purines/therapeutic use , Pyrazoles/therapeutic use , Sulfonamides/therapeutic use , Azetidines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/mortality , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Humans , Purines/administration & dosage , Pyrazoles/administration & dosage , SARS-CoV-2 , Sulfonamides/administration & dosage , Treatment Outcome
4.
Naunyn Schmiedebergs Arch Pharmacol ; 395(1): 99-104, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1473988

ABSTRACT

A massive vaccination campaign against the global COVID-19 pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 virus began worldwide in January 2021. However, studies continue to investigate the most effective and safe drug therapies to manage the various stages of viral infection. It is critical in the therapeutic management of the patient, with ongoing COVID-19 infection, to reduce viral load and replication, and to regulate the generalized hyperinflammatory state caused by the cytokine storm that occurs in the most severe phases. Probably the right drug therapy is represented by the use of different drugs acting in different modalities and on different targets, to avoid also viral drug resistance. In this article, we describe an interesting scientific pharmacological hypothesis arising from the evidence in the literature; we believe that the association of baricitinib/remdesivir/rhACE2, administered at the right time and dose, represents an important pharmacological synergism that can be therapeutically more effective for the treatment of COVID-19 infection than the single administration of drugs and avoid the phenomenon of drug resistance caused by the virus.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Azetidines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Disease Management , Purines/administration & dosage , Pyrazoles/administration & dosage , Sulfonamides/administration & dosage , Adenosine Monophosphate/administration & dosage , Alanine/administration & dosage , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , COVID-19/diagnosis , Clinical Trials as Topic/methods , Drug Administration Schedule , Drug Synergism , Drug Therapy, Combination , Humans
5.
Pharmacol Res Perspect ; 9(5): e00846, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1460269

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced clinical studies to accommodate imposed limitations. In this study, the bioequivalence part could not be conducted as planned. Thus, the aim was to demonstrate bioequivalence, using an adaptive study design, of tadalafil in fixed-dose combination (FDC) tablets of macitentan/tadalafil with single macitentan and tadalafil (Canadian-sourced) tablets and assess the effect of food on FDC tablets in healthy subjects. This Phase 1, single-center, open-label, single-dose, two-part, two-period, randomized, crossover study enrolled 62 subjects. Tadalafil bioequivalence as part of FDC of macitentan/tadalafil (10/40 mg) with single-component tablets of macitentan (10 mg) and tadalafil (40 mg) was determined by pharmacokinetic (PK) assessment under fasted conditions. The effect of food on FDC was evaluated under fed and fasted conditions. Fasted 90% confidence intervals (CIs) for geometric mean ratios (GMRs) were within bioequivalence limits for tadalafil and macitentan. Fed and fasted 90% CIs for area under the curve (AUC) GMR were within bioequivalence limits. However, 90% CIs for maximum plasma concentration (Cmax ) GMR for macitentan and tadalafil were outside bioequivalence limits. One FDC-treated subject experienced a serious adverse event of transient ischemic attack (bioequivalence part). To address pandemic-imposed limitations, an adaptive study design was implemented to demonstrate that the FDC tablet was bioequivalent to the free combination of macitentan and tadalafil (Canadian-sourced). No clinically significant differences in PK were determined between fed and fasted conditions; the FDC formulation could be taken irrespective of meals. The FDC formulation under fasted and fed conditions was well tolerated with no clinically relevant differences in safety profiles between the treatment groups. NCT Number: NCT04235270.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Fasting/blood , Food-Drug Interactions/physiology , Pyrimidines/blood , Research Design , Sulfonamides/blood , Tadalafil/blood , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Over Studies , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pyrimidines/administration & dosage , Research Design/trends , Sulfonamides/administration & dosage , Tadalafil/administration & dosage , Therapeutic Equivalency , Young Adult
6.
Pharmacotherapy ; 40(5): 416-437, 2020 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1449937

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has evolved into an emergent global pandemic. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) can manifest on a spectrum of illness from mild disease to severe respiratory failure requiring intensive care unit admission. As the incidence continues to rise at a rapid pace, critical care teams are faced with challenging treatment decisions. There is currently no widely accepted standard of care in the pharmacologic management of patients with COVID-19. Urgent identification of potential treatment strategies is a priority. Therapies include novel agents available in clinical trials or through compassionate use, and other drugs, repurposed antiviral and immunomodulating therapies. Many have demonstrated in vitro or in vivo potential against other viruses that are similar to SARS-CoV-2. Critically ill patients with COVID-19 have additional considerations related to adjustments for organ impairment and renal replacement therapies, complex lists of concurrent medications, limitations with drug administration and compatibility, and unique toxicities that should be evaluated when utilizing these therapies. The purpose of this review is to summarize practical considerations for pharmacotherapy in patients with COVID-19, with the intent of serving as a resource for health care providers at the forefront of clinical care during this pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Immunomodulation , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Adenosine Monophosphate/administration & dosage , Adenosine Monophosphate/adverse effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adrenal Cortex Hormones , Alanine/administration & dosage , Alanine/adverse effects , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/adverse effects , Azetidines/administration & dosage , Azetidines/adverse effects , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Chloroquine/administration & dosage , Chloroquine/adverse effects , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Drug Combinations , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/administration & dosage , Hydroxychloroquine/adverse effects , Immunization, Passive , Interferon-alpha/administration & dosage , Interferon-alpha/adverse effects , Lopinavir/administration & dosage , Lopinavir/adverse effects , Nelfinavir/administration & dosage , Nelfinavir/adverse effects , Nitro Compounds , Pandemics , Purines , Pyrazoles , Ribavirin/administration & dosage , Ribavirin/adverse effects , Ritonavir/administration & dosage , Ritonavir/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Sulfonamides/administration & dosage , Sulfonamides/adverse effects , Thiazoles/administration & dosage , Thiazoles/adverse effects
8.
Molecules ; 26(16)2021 Aug 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376916

ABSTRACT

Alcohol consumption is associated with gut dysbiosis, increased intestinal permeability, endotoxemia, and a cascade that leads to persistent systemic inflammation, alcoholic liver disease, and other ailments. Craving for alcohol and its consequences depends, among other things, on the endocannabinoid system. We have analyzed the relative role of central vs. peripheral cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1R) using a "two-bottle" as well as a "drinking in the dark" paradigm in mice. The globally acting CB1R antagonist rimonabant and the non-brain penetrant CB1R antagonist JD5037 inhibited voluntary alcohol intake upon systemic but not upon intracerebroventricular administration in doses that elicited anxiogenic-like behavior and blocked CB1R-induced hypothermia and catalepsy. The peripherally restricted hybrid CB1R antagonist/iNOS inhibitor S-MRI-1867 was also effective in reducing alcohol consumption after oral gavage, while its R enantiomer (CB1R inactive/iNOS inhibitor) was not. The two MRI-1867 enantiomers were equally effective in inhibiting an alcohol-induced increase in portal blood endotoxin concentration that was caused by increased gut permeability. We conclude that (i) activation of peripheral CB1R plays a dominant role in promoting alcohol intake and (ii) the iNOS inhibitory function of MRI-1867 helps in mitigating the alcohol-induced increase in endotoxemia.


Subject(s)
Alcohol Drinking/pathology , Cannabinoid Receptor Antagonists/pharmacology , Endotoxemia/pathology , Ethanol/adverse effects , Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II/antagonists & inhibitors , Receptor, Cannabinoid, CB1/antagonists & inhibitors , Alcohol Drinking/blood , Animals , Anxiety/blood , Anxiety/complications , Behavior, Animal/drug effects , Catalepsy/chemically induced , Catalepsy/complications , Cyclohexanols/administration & dosage , Elevated Plus Maze Test , Endotoxemia/blood , Endotoxemia/complications , Endotoxins/blood , Gastrointestinal Tract/drug effects , Gastrointestinal Tract/metabolism , Hypothermia, Induced , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II/metabolism , Pyrazoles/administration & dosage , Receptor, Cannabinoid, CB1/metabolism , Rimonabant/administration & dosage , Rimonabant/pharmacology , Stereoisomerism , Sulfonamides/administration & dosage
9.
Am J Clin Dermatol ; 22(5): 693-707, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1361347

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pivotal phase III studies demonstrated that abrocitinib, an oral, once-daily, JAK1-selective inhibitor, is effective treatment for moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis (AD) as monotherapy and in combination with topical therapy. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term safety of abrocitinib 200 mg and 100 mg in an integrated analysis of a phase IIb study, four phase III studies, and one long-term extension study. METHODS: Two cohorts were analyzed: a placebo-controlled cohort from 12- to 16-week studies and an all-abrocitinib cohort including patients who received one or more abrocitinib doses. Adverse events (AEs) of interest and laboratory data are reported. RESULTS: Total exposure in the all-abrocitinib cohort (n = 2856) was 1614 patient-years (PY); exposure was ≥ 24 weeks in 1248 patients and ≥ 48 weeks in 606 (maximum 108 weeks). In the placebo-controlled cohort (n = 1540), dose-related AEs (200 mg, 100 mg, placebo) were nausea (14.6%, 6.1%, 2.0%), headache (7.8%, 5.9%, 3.5%), and acne (4.7%, 1.6%, 0%). Platelet count was reduced transiently in a dose-dependent manner; 2/2718 patients (200-mg group) had confirmed platelet counts of < 50 × 103/mm3 at week 4. Incidence rates (IRs) were 2.33/100PY and 2.65/100 PY for serious infection, 4.34/100PY and 2.04/100PY for herpes zoster, and 11.83/100PY and 8.73/100PY for herpes simplex in the 200-mg and 100-mg groups, respectively. IRs for nonmelanoma skin cancer, other malignancies, and major adverse cardiovascular events were < 0.5/100PY for both doses. Five venous thromboembolism events occurred (IR 0.30/100PY), all in the 200-mg group. There were three deaths due to gastric carcinoma (diagnosed at day 43), sudden death, and COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Abrocitinib, with proper patient and dose selection, has a manageable tolerability and longer-term safety profile appropriate for long-term use in patients with moderate-to-severe AD. TRIAL REGISTRIES: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02780167, NCT03349060, NCT03575871, NCT03720470, NCT03627767, NCT03422822.


Subject(s)
Dermatitis, Atopic/drug therapy , Infections/epidemiology , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Pyrimidines/adverse effects , Skin Neoplasms/epidemiology , Sulfonamides/adverse effects , Acne Vulgaris/chemically induced , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cholesterol, HDL/blood , Cholesterol, LDL/blood , Female , Headache/chemically induced , Herpes Simplex/epidemiology , Herpes Zoster/epidemiology , Humans , Incidence , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Nausea/chemically induced , Platelet Count , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Pyrimidines/administration & dosage , Risk Factors , Sulfonamides/administration & dosage , Time Factors , Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Young Adult
10.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 69(10): 2752-2758, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1301522

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Older adults are at the highest risk of severe disease and death due to COVID-19. Randomized data have shown that baricitinib improves outcomes in these patients, but focused stratified analyses of geriatric cohorts are lacking. Our objective was to analyze the efficacy of baricitinib in older adults with COVID-19 moderate-to-severe pneumonia. METHODS: This is a propensity score [PS]-matched retrospective cohort study. Patients from the COVID-AGE and Alba-Score cohorts, hospitalized for moderate-to-severe COVID-19 pneumonia, were categorized in two age brackets of age <70 years old (86 with baricitinib and 86 PS-matched controls) or ≥70 years old (78 on baricitinib and 78 PS-matched controls). Thirty-day mortality rates were analyzed with Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazard models. RESULTS: Mean age was 79.1 for those ≥70 years and 58.9 for those <70. Exactly 29.6% were female. Treatment with baricitinib resulted in a significant reduction in death from any cause by 48% in patients aged 70 or older, an 18.5% reduction in 30-day absolute mortality risk (n/N: 16/78 [20.5%] baricitinib, 30/78 [38.5%] in PS-matched controls, p < 0.001) and a lower 30-day adjusted fatality rate (HR 0.21; 95% CI 0.09-0.47; p < 0.001). Beneficial effects on mortality were also observed in the age group <70 (8.1% reduction in 30-day absolute mortality risk; HR 0.14; 95% CI 0.03-0.64; p = 0.011). CONCLUSIONS: Baricitinib is associated with an absolute mortality risk reduction of 18.5% in adults older than 70 years hospitalized with COVID-19 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
Azetidines , COVID-19 , Pneumonia, Viral , Purines , Pyrazoles , Sulfonamides , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Azetidines/administration & dosage , Azetidines/adverse effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Janus Kinase Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Janus Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Male , Mortality , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Purines/administration & dosage , Purines/adverse effects , Pyrazoles/administration & dosage , Pyrazoles/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Spain/epidemiology , Sulfonamides/administration & dosage , Sulfonamides/adverse effects
11.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 427, 2021 May 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219337

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Hyperinflammation in severe COVID-19 infection increases the risk of respiratory failure and one of the cogent reasons of mortality associated with COVID-19. Baricitinib, a janus kinases inhibitor, can potentially suppress inflammatory cascades in severe COVID-19 pneumonia. METHODS: The objective of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of high dose of baricitinib with its usual dose in patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia. This prospective cohort study was conducted on 238 adult patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia. Eight milligram and 4 mg of baricitinib was given orally to 122 patients in the high dose (HD) group and 116 patients the usual dose (UD) group, respectively daily for 14 days, and clinical outcomes were compared among the groups. RESULTS: Blood oxygen saturation level was stabilized (≥94% on room air) earlier in the HD group compared to the UD group [5 (IQR: 4-5)/8 (IQR: 6-9), P < 0.05]. Patients in the HD group required intensive care unit (ICU) and intubation supports more in the UD group than that in patients of the HD group [17.2%/9%, P < 0.05; 11.2%/4.1%, P > 0.05; N = 116/122, respectively]. The 30-day mortality and 60-day rehospitalization rate were higher in the UD group than the HD group [6%/3.3%, P < 0.01; 11.9%/7.6%, P > 0.05; N = 116/122, respectively]. CONCLUSION: The daily high dose of baricitinib in severe COVID-19 results in early stabilization of the respiratory functions, declined requirements of critical care supports, reduced rehospitalization with mortality rate compared to its daily usual dose.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/administration & dosage , Azetidines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Purines/administration & dosage , Pyrazoles/administration & dosage , Sulfonamides/administration & dosage , Administration, Oral , Aged , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use , Azetidines/therapeutic use , Bangladesh , COVID-19/mortality , Comorbidity , Critical Care , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Readmission , Prospective Studies , Purines/therapeutic use , Pyrazoles/therapeutic use , Respiratory Insufficiency/drug therapy , Respiratory Insufficiency/virology , Sulfonamides/therapeutic use , Treatment Outcome
12.
Lancet ; 397(10286): 1749, 2021 05 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219082
13.
Recenti Prog Med ; 112(4): 49e-52e, 2021 04.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1194519

ABSTRACT

Combination treatment with BRAF plus MEK inhibitors is a standard of care in patients with BRAF-mutant advanced melanoma. In addition to dabrafenib+trametinib and vemurafenib+cobimetinib, a new combination of BRAF and MEK inhibitors, encorafenib and binimetinib, was recently introduced into clinical practice. Encorafenib plus binimetinib achieved similar efficacy to that observed with previously available combinations, but incidence of some toxicities such as pyrexia and photosensitivity, which have a relevant impact on patients quality of life, is lower. In this article, the case of a patient who received encorafenib and binimetinib within the phase 3 trial COLUMBUS is presented and discussed, with a focus on the clinical management during the pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 virus.


Subject(s)
Benzimidazoles/administration & dosage , Carbamates/administration & dosage , Melanoma/drug therapy , Skin Neoplasms/drug therapy , Sulfonamides/administration & dosage , Aged , COVID-19 , Drug Combinations , Female , Humans , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
14.
Anticancer Drugs ; 32(5): 589-591, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1082921

ABSTRACT

Encorafenib (Braftovi) is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with unresectable or metastatic melanoma with a BRAF V600 mutation, in combination with binimetinib (Mektovi). According to the product label of encorafenib, there are no specific treatment recommendations in case of an overdose. We report on a 63-year-old man who ingested a double dose (900 mg) of encorafenib for 16 days. He developed overall minor chronic overdose symptoms such as nausea and vomiting grade 1 and muscle pain. Based on the most occurring adverse events of encorafenib, liver values, kidney function parameters and QTc interval were measured. Kidney function parameters were normal, whereas liver values were slightly increased (grade 1) and QTc slightly prolonged. The plasma concentration 3 h after the last dose was 2110 ng/mL. We describe the course of a case with a chronic overdose during 16 days of the double dose of encorafenib as well as the followed approach, which could be taken into account when observing an encorafenib overdose. Providing information in times of Covid-19 is challenging, but remains necessary for good clinical care.


Subject(s)
Carbamates , Drug Overdose , Liver Function Tests/methods , Long QT Syndrome , Medication Therapy Management/standards , Melanoma , Skin Neoplasms , Sulfonamides , Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage , Antineoplastic Agents/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Agents/blood , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , Benzimidazoles/administration & dosage , Benzimidazoles/adverse effects , COVID-19/epidemiology , Carbamates/administration & dosage , Carbamates/adverse effects , Carbamates/blood , Communicable Disease Control , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Drug Monitoring/methods , Drug Overdose/blood , Drug Overdose/diagnosis , Drug Overdose/etiology , Drug Overdose/physiopathology , Humans , Long QT Syndrome/chemically induced , Long QT Syndrome/diagnosis , Male , Melanoma/drug therapy , Melanoma/genetics , Melanoma/pathology , Middle Aged , Mutation , Proto-Oncogene Proteins B-raf/antagonists & inhibitors , Proto-Oncogene Proteins B-raf/genetics , Skin Neoplasms/drug therapy , Skin Neoplasms/genetics , Skin Neoplasms/pathology , Sulfonamides/administration & dosage , Sulfonamides/adverse effects , Sulfonamides/blood , Vomiting/chemically induced , Vomiting/diagnosis
16.
J Clin Invest ; 130(12): 6409-6416, 2020 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1011054

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUNDPatients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) develop pneumonia generally associated with lymphopenia and a severe inflammatory response due to uncontrolled cytokine release. These mediators are transcriptionally regulated by the JAK/STAT signaling pathways, which can be disabled by small molecules.METHODSWe treated a group of patients (n = 20) with baricitinib according to an off-label use of the drug. The study was designed as an observational, longitudinal trial and approved by the local ethics committee. The patients were treated with 4 mg baricitinib twice daily for 2 days, followed by 4 mg per day for the remaining 7 days. Changes in the immune phenotype and expression of phosphorylated STAT3 (p-STAT3) in blood cells were evaluated and correlated with serum-derived cytokine levels and antibodies against severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 (anti-SARS-CoV-2). In a single treated patient, we also evaluated the alteration of myeloid cell functional activity.RESULTSWe provide evidence that patients treated with baricitinib had a marked reduction in serum levels of IL-6, IL-1ß, and TNF-α, a rapid recovery of circulating T and B cell frequencies, and increased antibody production against the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein, all of which were clinically associated with a reduction in the need for oxygen therapy and a progressive increase in the P/F (PaO2, oxygen partial pressure/FiO2, fraction of inspired oxygen) ratio.CONCLUSIONThese data suggest that baricitinib prevented the progression to a severe, extreme form of the viral disease by modulating the patients' immune landscape and that these changes were associated with a safer, more favorable clinical outcome for patients with COVID-19 pneumonia.TRIAL REGISTRATIONClinicalTrials.gov NCT04438629.FUNDINGThis work was supported by the Fondazione Cariverona (ENACT Project) and the Fondazione TIM.


Subject(s)
Azetidines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 , Off-Label Use , Purines/administration & dosage , Pyrazoles/administration & dosage , SARS-CoV-2 , Sulfonamides/administration & dosage , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/metabolism , B-Lymphocytes/pathology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Cytokines/blood , Cytokines/immunology , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Severity of Illness Index , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , T-Lymphocytes/pathology
17.
JAMA Dermatol ; 156(12): 1333-1343, 2020 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1008230

ABSTRACT

Importance: Baricitinib, an oral selective Janus kinase 1 and 2 inhibitor, effectively reduced disease severity in moderate to severe atopic dermatitis (AD) in 2 phase 3 monotherapy studies. Objective: To assess the efficacy and safety of 4 mg and 2 mg of baricitinib in combination with background topical corticosteroid (TCS) therapy in adults with moderate to severe AD who previously had an inadequate response to TCS therapy. Design, Setting, and Participants: This double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 randomized clinical trial, BREEZE-AD7 (Study of Baricitinib [LY3009104] in Combination With Topical Corticosteroids in Adults With Moderate to Severe Atopic Dermatitis) was conducted from November 16, 2018, to August 22, 2019, at 68 centers across 10 countries in Asia, Australia, Europe, and South America. Patients 18 years or older with moderate to severe AD and an inadequate response to TCSs were included. After completing the study, patients were followed up for up to 4 weeks or enrolled in a long-term extension study. Interventions: Patients were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to receive 2 mg of baricitinib once daily (n = 109), 4 mg of baricitinib once daily (n = 111), or placebo (n = 109) for 16 weeks. The use of low-to-moderate potency TCSs was allowed. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary end point was the proportion of patients achieving a validated Investigator Global Assessment for Atopic Dermatitis (vIGA-AD) score of 0 (clear) or 1 (almost clear), with a 2-point or greater improvement from baseline at week 16. Results: Among 329 patients (mean [SD] age, 33.8 [12.4] years; 216 [66%] male), at week 16, a vIGA-AD score of 0 (clear) or 1 (almost clear) was achieved by 34 patients (31%) receiving 4 mg of baricitinib and 26 (24%) receiving 2 mg of baricitinib compared with 16 (15%) receiving placebo (odds ratio vs placebo, 2.8 [95% CI, 1.4-5.6]; P = .004 for the 4-mg group; 1.9 [95% CI, 0.9-3.9]; P = .08 for the 2-mg group). Treatment-emergent adverse events were reported in 64 of 111 patients (58%) in the 4-mg group, 61 of 109 patients (56%) in the 2-mg group, and 41 of 108 patients (38%) in the placebo group. Serious adverse events were reported in 4 patients (4%) in the 4-mg group, 2 (2%) in the 2-mg group, and 4 (4%) in the placebo group. The most common adverse events were nasopharyngitis, upper respiratory tract infections, and folliculitis. Conclusions and Relevance: A dose of 4 mg of baricitinib in combination with background TCS therapy significantly improved the signs and symptoms of moderate to severe AD, with a safety profile consistent with previous studies of baricitinib in AD. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03733301.


Subject(s)
Azetidines/administration & dosage , Dermatitis, Atopic/drug therapy , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Purines/administration & dosage , Pyrazoles/administration & dosage , Sulfonamides/administration & dosage , Administration, Cutaneous , Administration, Oral , Adult , Azetidines/adverse effects , Dermatitis, Atopic/diagnosis , Dermatitis, Atopic/immunology , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Double-Blind Method , Drug Administration Schedule , Drug Therapy, Combination/adverse effects , Drug Therapy, Combination/methods , Female , Folliculitis/chemically induced , Folliculitis/epidemiology , Folliculitis/immunology , Glucocorticoids/adverse effects , Humans , Janus Kinase 1/antagonists & inhibitors , Janus Kinase 1/metabolism , Janus Kinase 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Janus Kinase 2/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Nasopharyngitis/chemically induced , Nasopharyngitis/epidemiology , Nasopharyngitis/immunology , Purines/adverse effects , Pyrazoles/adverse effects , Respiratory Tract Infections/chemically induced , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Signal Transduction/immunology , Sulfonamides/adverse effects , Young Adult
18.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(48): e23357, 2020 Nov 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-944499

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: As coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak globally, repurposing approved drugs is emerging as important therapeutic options. Danoprevir boosted by ritonavir (Ganovo) is a potent hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease (NS3/4A) inhibitor, which was approved and marketed in China since 2018 to treat chronic hepatitis C patients. METHODS: This is an open-label, single arm study evaluating the effects of danoprevir boosted by ritonavir on treatment naïve and experienced COVID-19 patients for the first time. Patients received danoprevir boosted by ritonavir (100 mg/100 mg, twice per day). The primary endpoint was the rate of composite adverse outcomes and efficacy was also evaluated. RESULTS: The data showed that danoprevir boosted by ritonavir is safe and well tolerated in all patients. No patient had composite adverse outcomes during this study. After initiation of danoprevir/ritonavir treatment, the first negative reverse real-time PCR (RT-PCR) test occurred at a median of 2 days, ranging from 1 to 8 days, and the obvious absorption in CT scans occurred at a median 3 days, ranging from 2 to 4 days. After 4 to 12-day treatment of danoprevir boosted by ritonavir, all enrolled 11 patients were discharged from the hospital. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that repurposing danoprevir for COVID-19 is a promising therapeutic option.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cyclopropanes/therapeutic use , Isoindoles/therapeutic use , Lactams, Macrocyclic/therapeutic use , Proline/analogs & derivatives , Ritonavir/therapeutic use , Sulfonamides/therapeutic use , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Cyclopropanes/administration & dosage , Cyclopropanes/adverse effects , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Humans , Isoindoles/administration & dosage , Isoindoles/adverse effects , Lactams, Macrocyclic/administration & dosage , Lactams, Macrocyclic/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Proline/administration & dosage , Proline/adverse effects , Proline/therapeutic use , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Ritonavir/administration & dosage , Ritonavir/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Sulfonamides/administration & dosage , Sulfonamides/adverse effects , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Young Adult
19.
Cell ; 184(2): 460-475.e21, 2021 01 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-917237

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2-induced hypercytokinemia and inflammation are critically associated with COVID-19 severity. Baricitinib, a clinically approved JAK1/JAK2 inhibitor, is currently being investigated in COVID-19 clinical trials. Here, we investigated the immunologic and virologic efficacy of baricitinib in a rhesus macaque model of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Viral shedding measured from nasal and throat swabs, bronchoalveolar lavages, and tissues was not reduced with baricitinib. Type I interferon (IFN) antiviral responses and SARS-CoV-2-specific T cell responses remained similar between the two groups. Animals treated with baricitinib showed reduced inflammation, decreased lung infiltration of inflammatory cells, reduced NETosis activity, and more limited lung pathology. Importantly, baricitinib-treated animals had a rapid and remarkably potent suppression of lung macrophage production of cytokines and chemokines responsible for inflammation and neutrophil recruitment. These data support a beneficial role for, and elucidate the immunological mechanisms underlying, the use of baricitinib as a frontline treatment for inflammation induced by SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/administration & dosage , Azetidines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , Macaca mulatta , Neutrophil Infiltration/drug effects , Purines/administration & dosage , Pyrazoles/administration & dosage , Sulfonamides/administration & dosage , Animals , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cell Death/drug effects , Cell Degranulation/drug effects , Disease Models, Animal , Inflammation/drug therapy , Inflammation/genetics , Inflammation/immunology , Janus Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , Lung/drug effects , Lung/immunology , Lung/pathology , Lymphocyte Activation/drug effects , Macrophages, Alveolar/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Virus Replication/drug effects
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