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1.
Clin Appl Thromb Hemost ; 27: 10760296211066945, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574469

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Argatroban is licensed for patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and is conventionally monitored by activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) ratio. The target range is 1.5 to 3.0 times the patients' baseline APTT and not exceeding 100 s, however this baseline is not always known. APTT is known to plateau at higher levels of argatroban, and is influenced by coagulopathies, lupus anticoagulant and raised FVIII levels. It has been used as a treatment for COVID-19 and Vaccine-induced Immune Thrombocytopenia and Thrombosis (VITT). Some recent publications have favored the use of anti-IIa methods to determine the plasma drug concentration of argatroban. METHODS: Plasma of 60 samples from 3 COVID-19 patients and 54 samples from 5 VITT patients were tested by APTT ratio and anti-IIa method (dilute thrombin time dTT). Actin FS APTT ratios were derived from the baseline APTT of the patient and the mean normal APTT. RESULTS: Mean APTT ratio derived from baseline was 1.71 (COVID-19), 1.33 (VITT) compared to APTT ratio by mean normal 1.65 (COVID-19), 1.48 (VITT). dTT mean concentration was 0.64 µg/ml (COVID-19) 0.53 µg/ml (VITT) with poor correlations to COVID-19 baseline APTT ratio r2 = 0.1526 p <0.0001, mean normal r2 = 0.2188 p < 0.0001; VITT baseline APTT ratio r2 = 0.04 p < 0.001, VITT mean normal r2 = 0.0064 p < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: We believe that dTT is a superior method to monitor the concentration of argatroban, we have demonstrated significant differences between APTT ratios and dTT levels, which could have clinical impact. This is especially so in COVID-19 and VITT.


Subject(s)
Arginine/analogs & derivatives , COVID-19/drug therapy , Partial Thromboplastin Time/methods , Pipecolic Acids/therapeutic use , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Sulfonamides/therapeutic use , Thrombocytopenia/drug therapy , Thrombosis/drug therapy , Aged , Arginine/pharmacology , Arginine/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pipecolic Acids/pharmacology , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sulfonamides/pharmacology , Thrombocytopenia/chemically induced , Thrombosis/chemically induced
2.
FEBS J ; 288(21): 6087-6094, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526365

ABSTRACT

Anthony Letai is Professor in Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Dana Farber Cancer Institute, and President of The Society for Functional Precision Medicine. Among Tony's scientific achievements, work from his lab contributed toward the FDA approval of Venetoclax combination treatment for adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Moreover, his studies on cancer cell death have led to the development of BH3 profiling, an assay that allows for the definition of how close a cell is to the threshold required to commit to apoptosis, which can be used to improve clinical outcomes for cancer patients. In this interview, Tony relays the story behind some of his scientific breakthroughs, discusses the importance of function when designing targeted cancer therapies, gives an overview of BH3 profiling and its application to cancer therapy, and recalls the key events and collaborations that drove his successful research career.


Subject(s)
Precision Medicine/methods , Bridged Bicyclo Compounds, Heterocyclic/therapeutic use , Humans , Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/drug therapy , Sulfonamides/therapeutic use
3.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258292, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480450

ABSTRACT

Chagas disease is a neglected illness caused by Trypanosoma cruzi and its treatment is done only with two drugs, nifurtimox and benznidazole. However, both drugs are ineffective in the chronic phase, in addition to causing serious side effects. This context of therapeutic limitation justifies the continuous research for alternative drugs. Here, we study the in vitro trypanocidal effects of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug nimesulide, a molecule that has in its chemical structure a toxicophoric nitroaromatic group (NO2). The set of results obtained in this work highlights the potential for repurposing nimesulide in the treatment of this disease that affects millions of people around the world.


Subject(s)
Chagas Disease/drug therapy , Chagas Disease/parasitology , Drug Repositioning , Sulfonamides/therapeutic use , Trypanosoma cruzi/physiology , Animals , Cell Death/drug effects , Cell Survival/drug effects , Life Cycle Stages/drug effects , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Parasites/drug effects , Sulfonamides/chemistry , Sulfonamides/pharmacology , Trypanosoma cruzi/drug effects , Trypanosoma cruzi/growth & development , Trypanosoma cruzi/ultrastructure
4.
Crit Care Med ; 49(9): e870-e873, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455369

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To describe the successful recovery from multiple and life-threatening venous thrombosis after ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccination. DESIGN: Case report. SETTING: University Hospital. PATIENT: Few days after the first dose of the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine, a 21-year-old woman experienced massive thrombosis in the deep and superficial cerebral veins together with seizures, neurologic focal deficit, and thrombocytopenia. In the neurointensive care unit, her condition worsened despite early decompressive craniectomy. She developed bilateral segmental pulmonary embolism, left hepatic, and left external iliac venous thrombosis. INTERVENTION: Argatroban (0.5-2.2 µg/kg/min) and high-dose IV immunoglobulin (1 g/kg/d for 2 consecutive days) were initiated on day 6 after admission. With these therapies, there was a gradual resolution of multiple sites of venous thrombosis, and platelet count returned to normal. The patient left the ICU with full consciousness, expressive aphasia, and right hemiparesis. CONCLUSIONS: This case of vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia shows that a good outcome can be obtained even with multiple and life-threatening venous thrombotic lesions. Argatroban and high-dose IV immunoglobulin along with management of severe cerebral venous thrombosis played a major role in this epilogue.


Subject(s)
Antithrombins/therapeutic use , Arginine/analogs & derivatives , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Pipecolic Acids/therapeutic use , Sulfonamides/therapeutic use , Thrombocytopenia/drug therapy , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy , Arginine/therapeutic use , Cerebral Veins/diagnostic imaging , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Fondaparinux/therapeutic use , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous , Thrombocytopenia/etiology , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Venous Thrombosis/etiology , Young Adult
5.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 13(18): 21866-21902, 2021 09 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1417381

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Many recent studies have investigated the role of drug interventions for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection. However, an important question has been raised about how to select the effective and secure medications for COVID-19 patients. The aim of this analysis was to assess the efficacy and safety of the various medications available for severe and non-severe COVID-19 patients based on randomized placebo-controlled trials (RPCTs). METHODS: We did an updated network meta-analysis. We searched the databases from inception until July 31, 2021, with no language restrictions. We included RPCTs comparing 49 medications and placebo in the treatment of severe and non-severe patients (aged 18 years or older) with COVID-19 infection. We extracted data on the trial and patient characteristics, and the following primary outcomes: all-cause mortality, the ratios of virological cure, and treatment-emergent adverse events. Odds ratio (OR) and their 95% confidence interval (CI) were used as effect estimates. RESULTS: From 3,869 publications, we included 61 articles related to 73 RPCTs (57 in non-severe COVID-19 patients and 16 in severe COVID-19 patients), comprising 20,680 patients. The mean sample size was 160 (interquartile range 96-393) in this study. The median duration of follow-up drugs intervention was 28 days (interquartile range 21-30). For increase in virological cure, we only found that proxalutamide (OR 9.16, 95% CI 3.15-18.30), ivermectin (OR 6.33, 95% CI 1.22-32.86), and low dosage bamlanivimab (OR 5.29, 95% CI 1.12-24.99) seemed to be associated with non-severe COVID-19 patients when compared with placebo, in which proxalutamide seemed to be better than low dosage bamlanivimab (OR 5.69, 95% CI 2.43-17.65). For decrease in all-cause mortality, we found that proxalutamide (OR 0.13, 95% CI 0.09-0.19), imatinib (OR 0.49, 95% CI 0.25-0.96), and baricitinib (OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.42-0.82) seemed to be associated with non-severe COVID-19 patients; however, we only found that immunoglobulin gamma (OR 0.27, 95% CI 0.08-0.89) was related to severe COVID-19 patients when compared with placebo. For change in treatment-emergent adverse events, we only found that sotrovimab (OR 0.21, 95% CI 0.13-0.34) was associated with non-severe COVID-19 patients; however, we did not find any medications that presented a statistical difference when compared with placebo among severe COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSION: We conclude that marked variations exist in the efficacy and safety of medications between severe and non-severe patients with COVID-19. It seems that monoclonal antibodies (e.g., low dosage bamlanivimab, baricitinib, imatinib, and sotrovimab) are a better choice for treating severe or non-severe COVID-19 patients. Clinical decisions to use preferentially medications should carefully consider the risk-benefit profile based on efficacy and safety of all active interventions in patients with COVID-19 at different levels of infection.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Azetidines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/mortality , Humans , Imatinib Mesylate/therapeutic use , Network Meta-Analysis , Oxazoles/therapeutic use , Purines/therapeutic use , Pyrazoles/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Sulfonamides/therapeutic use , Thiohydantoins/therapeutic use , Treatment Outcome
6.
Nature ; 599(7884): 283-289, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1404888

ABSTRACT

Derailed cytokine and immune cell networks account for the organ damage and the clinical severity of COVID-19 (refs. 1-4). Here we show that SARS-CoV-2, like other viruses, evokes cellular senescence as a primary stress response in infected cells. Virus-induced senescence (VIS) is indistinguishable from other forms of cellular senescence and is accompanied by a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), which comprises pro-inflammatory cytokines, extracellular-matrix-active factors and pro-coagulatory mediators5-7. Patients with COVID-19 displayed markers of senescence in their airway mucosa in situ and increased serum levels of SASP factors. In vitro assays demonstrated macrophage activation with SASP-reminiscent secretion, complement lysis and SASP-amplifying secondary senescence of endothelial cells, which mirrored hallmark features of COVID-19 such as macrophage and neutrophil infiltration, endothelial damage and widespread thrombosis in affected lung tissue1,8,9. Moreover, supernatant from VIS cells, including SARS-CoV-2-induced senescence, induced neutrophil extracellular trap formation and activation of platelets and the clotting cascade. Senolytics such as navitoclax and a combination of dasatinib plus quercetin selectively eliminated VIS cells, mitigated COVID-19-reminiscent lung disease and reduced inflammation in SARS-CoV-2-infected hamsters and mice. Our findings mark VIS as a pathogenic trigger of COVID-19-related cytokine escalation and organ damage, and suggest that senolytic targeting of virus-infected cells is a treatment option against SARS-CoV-2 and perhaps other viral infections.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cellular Senescence/drug effects , Molecular Targeted Therapy , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Aniline Compounds/pharmacology , Aniline Compounds/therapeutic use , Animals , COVID-19/complications , Cell Line , Cricetinae , Dasatinib/pharmacology , Dasatinib/therapeutic use , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Humans , Male , Mice , Quercetin/pharmacology , Quercetin/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Sulfonamides/pharmacology , Sulfonamides/therapeutic use , Thrombosis/complications , Thrombosis/immunology , Thrombosis/metabolism
8.
Rheumatology (Oxford) ; 60(1): 399-407, 2021 01 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388014

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor baricitinib may block viral entry into pneumocytes and prevent cytokine storm in patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia. We aimed to assess whether baricitinib improved pulmonary function in patients treated with high-dose corticosteroids for moderate to severe SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia. METHODS: This observational study enrolled patients with moderate to severe SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia [arterial oxygen partial pressure (PaO2)/fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) <200 mmHg] who received lopinavir/ritonavir and HCQ plus either corticosteroids (CS group, n = 50) or corticosteroids and baricitinib (BCT-CS group, n = 62). The primary end point was the change in oxygen saturation as measured by pulse oximetry (SpO2)/FiO2 from hospitalization to discharge. Secondary end points included the proportion of patients requiring supplemental oxygen at discharge and 1 month later. Statistics were adjusted by the inverse propensity score weighting (IPSW). RESULTS: A greater improvement in SpO2/FiO2 from hospitalization to discharge was observed in the BCT-CS vs CS group (mean differences adjusted for IPSW, 49; 95% CI: 22, 77; P < 0.001). A higher proportion of patients required supplemental oxygen both at discharge (62.0% vs 25.8%; reduction of the risk by 82%, OR adjusted for IPSW, 0.18; 95% CI: 0.08, 0.43; P < 0.001) and 1 month later (28.0% vs 12.9%, reduction of the risk by 69%, OR adjusted for IPSW, 0.31; 95% CI: 0.11, 0.86; P = 0.024) in the CS vs BCT-CS group. CONCLUSIONS: . In patients with moderate to severe SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia a combination of baricitinib with corticosteroids was associated with greater improvement in pulmonary function when compared with corticosteroids alone. TRIAL REGISTRATION: European Network of Centres for Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacovigilance, ENCEPP (EUPAS34966, http://www.encepp.eu/encepp/viewResource.htm? id = 34967).


Subject(s)
Azetidines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Hypoxia/therapy , Janus Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Purines/therapeutic use , Pyrazoles/therapeutic use , Sulfonamides/therapeutic use , Aged , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cohort Studies , Drug Combinations , Drug Therapy, Combination , Endothelium, Vascular , Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Interferon beta-1b/therapeutic use , Lopinavir/therapeutic use , Lung/blood supply , Male , Middle Aged , Oximetry , Prospective Studies , Ritonavir/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
11.
Respir Investig ; 59(6): 799-803, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347805

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has spread worldwide and is also an important disease in Japan. Thus, the optimal treatment strategy for severe COVID-19 should be established urgently. The effects of combination treatment with baricitinib-a Janus kinase inhibitor, remdesivir, and dexamethasone (BRD) are unknown. METHODS: Patients who received combination therapy with BRD at the Japanese Red Cross Medical Center were enrolled in the study. All patients received baricitinib (≤14 d), remdesivir (≤10 d), and dexamethasone (≤10 d). The efficacy and adverse events were evaluated. RESULTS: In total, 44 patients with severe COVID-19 were enrolled in this study. The 28-d mortality rate was low at 2.3% (1/44 patients). The need for invasive mechanical ventilation was avoided in most patients (90%, 17/19 patients). Patients who received BRD therapy had a median hospitalization duration of 11 d, time to recovery of 9 d, duration of intensive care unit stay of 6 d, duration of invasive mechanical ventilation of 5 d, and duration of supplemental oxygen therapy of 5 d. Adverse events occurred in 15 patients (34%). Liver dysfunction, thrombosis, iliopsoas hematoma, renal dysfunction, ventilator-associated pneumonia, infective endocarditis, and herpes zoster occurred in 11%, 11%, 2%, 2%, 2%, 2%, and 2% of patients, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Combination therapy with BRD was effective in treating severe COVID-19, and the incidence rate of adverse events was low. The results of the present study are encouraging; however, further randomized clinical studies are needed.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Azetidines/therapeutic use , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Purines/therapeutic use , Pyrazoles/therapeutic use , Sulfonamides/therapeutic use , Adenosine Monophosphate/adverse effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Aged , Alanine/adverse effects , Alanine/therapeutic use , Azetidines/adverse effects , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , Dexamethasone/adverse effects , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Purines/adverse effects , Pyrazoles/adverse effects , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2 , Sulfonamides/adverse effects , Treatment Outcome
13.
Biomolecules ; 11(7)2021 07 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1323103

ABSTRACT

Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an important enzyme involved in prostaglandins biosynthesis from arachidonic acid. COX-2 is frequently overexpressed in human cancers and plays a major tumor promoting function. Accordingly, many efforts have been devoted to efficiently target the catalytic site of this enzyme in cancer cells, by using COX-2 specific inhibitors such as celecoxib. However, despite their potent anti-tumor properties, the myriad of detrimental effects associated to the chronic inhibition of COX-2 in healthy tissues, has considerably limited their use in clinic. In addition, increasing evidence indicate that these anti-cancerous properties are not strictly dependent on the inhibition of the catalytic site. These findings have led to the development of non-active COX-2 inhibitors analogues aiming at preserving the antitumor effects of COX-2 inhibitors without their side effects. Among them, two celecoxib derivatives, 2,5-Dimethyl-Celecoxib and OSU-03012, have been developed and suggested for the treatment of viral (e.g., recently SARS-CoV-2), inflammatory, metabolic diseases and cancers. These molecules display stronger anti-tumor properties than celecoxib and thus may represent promising anti-cancer molecules. In this review, we discuss the impact of these two analogues on cancerous processes but also their potential for cancer treatment alone or in combination with existing approaches.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Celecoxib/therapeutic use , Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Pyrazoles/therapeutic use , Sulfonamides/therapeutic use , Animals , Antineoplastic Agents/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Agents/chemistry , Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology , Celecoxib/adverse effects , Celecoxib/analogs & derivatives , Celecoxib/pharmacology , Cell Cycle/drug effects , Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors/adverse effects , Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors/chemistry , Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors/pharmacology , Humans , Pyrazoles/adverse effects , Pyrazoles/chemistry , Pyrazoles/pharmacology , Sulfonamides/adverse effects , Sulfonamides/chemistry , Sulfonamides/pharmacology
16.
J Microbiol Immunol Infect ; 54(5): 787-793, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293986

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to analyze clinical outcomes from patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia that received either baricitinib plus dexamethasone or dexamethasone monotherapy. METHODOLOGY: We performed a retrospective comparative study. Data from hospitalized patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia (saturation <93%, bilateral pulmonary infiltrates) that were treated with baricitinib plus dexamethasone or dexamethasone were collected. Our primary objective was to compare overall mortality and secondly to compare progression to mechanical ventilation and over infection rates. RESULTS: A total of 793 patients were assessed for inclusion criteria, 596 were excluded and 197 were analyzed for primary outcome: 123 in the baricitinib plus dexamethasone group and 74 in the dexamethasone monotherapy group. The mean age was 59.9 years (SD ± 14.5) and 62.1% (123/197) were male. 42.9% (85/197) of the cases required ICU admission and 25.8% (51/197) underwent invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV). Overall thirty-day mortality was 27.9% (55/197); Mortality was significantly lower in the baricitinib plus dexamethasone group compared to the dexamethasone monotherapy group (20.3% vs 40.5%, P = <.05). There was no difference in hospital acquired infections between both groups. CONCLUSION: Thirty-day mortality was significantly lower in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia treated with baricitinib plus dexamethasone versus dexamethasone monotherapy. No difference was observed in progression to invasive mechanical ventilation and hospital acquired infections.


Subject(s)
Azetidines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Purines/therapeutic use , Pyrazoles/therapeutic use , Sulfonamides/therapeutic use , Aged , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
18.
Leukemia ; 35(9): 2616-2620, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228235

ABSTRACT

We analyzed reports on safety and efficacy of JAK-inhibitors in patients with coronavirus infectious disease-2019 (COVID-19) published between January 1st and March 6th 2021 using the Newcastle-Ottawa and Jadad scales for quality assessment. We used disease severity as a proxy for time when JAK-inhibitor therapy was started. We identified 6 cohort studies and 5 clinical trials involving 2367 subjects treated with ruxolitinib (N = 3) or baricitinib 45 (N = 8). Use of JAK-inhibitors decreased use of invasive mechanical ventilation (RR = 0.63; [95% Confidence Interval (CI), 0.47, 0.84]; P = 0.002) and had borderline impact on rates of intensive care unit (ICU) admission (RR = 0.24 [0.06, 1.02]; P = 0.05) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS; RR = 0.50 [0.19, 1.33]; P = 0.16). JAK-inhibitors did not decrease length of hospitalization (mean difference (MD) -0.18 [-4.54, 4.18]; P = 0.94). Relative risks of death for both drugs were 0.42 [0.30, 0.59] (P < 0.001), for ruxolitinib, RR = 0.33 (0.13, 0.88; P = 0.03) and for baricitinib RR = 0.44 (0.31, 0.63; P < 0.001). Timing of JAK-inhibitor treatment during the course of COVID-19 treatment may be important in determining impact on outcome. However, these data are not consistently reported.


Subject(s)
Azetidines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Janus Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Purines/therapeutic use , Pyrazoles/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Sulfonamides/therapeutic use , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Clinical Trials as Topic , Humans , Nitriles , Patient Safety , Pyrimidines , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Treatment Outcome
19.
Eur J Med Chem ; 221: 113514, 2021 Oct 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228023

ABSTRACT

While anti-inflammatory properties of isocoumarins are known their PDE4 inhibitory potential was not explored previously. In our effort the non-PDE4 inhibitor isocoumarins were transformed into the promising inhibitors via introducing an aminosulfonyl/aminocarboxamide moiety to the C-3 benzene ring attached to the isocoumarin framework. This new class of isocoumarins were synthesized via a PdCl2-catalyzed construction of the 4-allyl substituted 3-aryl isocoumarin ring starting from the appropriate 2-alkynyl benzamide derivative. Several compounds showed good inhibition of PDE4B in vitro and the SAR indicated superiority of aminosulfonamide moiety over aminocarboxamide in terms of PDE4B inhibition. Two compounds 3q and 3u with PDE4B IC50 = 0.43 ± 0.11 and 0.54 ± 0.19 µM and ≥ 2-fold selectivity over PDE4D emerged as initial hits. The participation of aminosulfonamide moiety in PDE4B inhibition and the reason for selectivity though moderate shown by 3q and 3u was revealed by the in silico docking studies. In view of potential usefulness of moderately selective PDE4B inhibitors the compound 3u (that showed PDE4 selectivity over other PDEs) was further evaluated in adjuvant induced arthritic rats. At an intraperitoneal dose of 30 mg/kg the compound showed a significant reduction in paw swelling (in a dose dependent manner), inflammation and pannus formation (in the knee joints) as well as pro-inflammatory gene expression/mRNA levels and increase in body weight. Moreover, besides its TNF-α inhibition and no significant toxicity in an MTT assay the compound did not show any adverse effects in a thorough toxicity studies e.g. teratogenicity, hepatotoxicity, cardiotoxicity and apoptosis in zebrafish. Thus, the isocoumarin 3u emerged as a new, safe and moderately selective PDE4B inhibitor could be useful for inflammatory diseases possibly including COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Arthritis, Experimental/drug therapy , Isocoumarins/therapeutic use , Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Sulfonamides/therapeutic use , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/chemical synthesis , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/metabolism , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/toxicity , Arthritis, Experimental/pathology , Catalysis , Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterases, Type 4/metabolism , Embryo, Nonmammalian/drug effects , Female , Isocoumarins/chemical synthesis , Isocoumarins/metabolism , Isocoumarins/toxicity , Knee Joint/drug effects , Knee Joint/pathology , Male , Mice , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Structure , Palladium/chemistry , Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitors/chemical synthesis , Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitors/metabolism , Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitors/toxicity , Protein Binding , RAW 264.7 Cells , Rats, Wistar , Structure-Activity Relationship , Sulfonamides/chemical synthesis , Sulfonamides/metabolism , Sulfonamides/toxicity , Zebrafish
20.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 427, 2021 May 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219337

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Hyperinflammation in severe COVID-19 infection increases the risk of respiratory failure and one of the cogent reasons of mortality associated with COVID-19. Baricitinib, a janus kinases inhibitor, can potentially suppress inflammatory cascades in severe COVID-19 pneumonia. METHODS: The objective of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of high dose of baricitinib with its usual dose in patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia. This prospective cohort study was conducted on 238 adult patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia. Eight milligram and 4 mg of baricitinib was given orally to 122 patients in the high dose (HD) group and 116 patients the usual dose (UD) group, respectively daily for 14 days, and clinical outcomes were compared among the groups. RESULTS: Blood oxygen saturation level was stabilized (≥94% on room air) earlier in the HD group compared to the UD group [5 (IQR: 4-5)/8 (IQR: 6-9), P < 0.05]. Patients in the HD group required intensive care unit (ICU) and intubation supports more in the UD group than that in patients of the HD group [17.2%/9%, P < 0.05; 11.2%/4.1%, P > 0.05; N = 116/122, respectively]. The 30-day mortality and 60-day rehospitalization rate were higher in the UD group than the HD group [6%/3.3%, P < 0.01; 11.9%/7.6%, P > 0.05; N = 116/122, respectively]. CONCLUSION: The daily high dose of baricitinib in severe COVID-19 results in early stabilization of the respiratory functions, declined requirements of critical care supports, reduced rehospitalization with mortality rate compared to its daily usual dose.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/administration & dosage , Azetidines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Purines/administration & dosage , Pyrazoles/administration & dosage , Sulfonamides/administration & dosage , Administration, Oral , Aged , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use , Azetidines/therapeutic use , Bangladesh , COVID-19/mortality , Comorbidity , Critical Care , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Readmission , Prospective Studies , Purines/therapeutic use , Pyrazoles/therapeutic use , Respiratory Insufficiency/drug therapy , Respiratory Insufficiency/virology , Sulfonamides/therapeutic use , Treatment Outcome
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