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2.
Minerva Surg ; 77(2): 171-179, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1789849

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The recent COrona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused a massive disruption of surgical activity and after a year from its first outbreak surgeons still struggle to keep their regular activity coexisting with the virus exhausting requests of healthcare resources. The aim of this paper is to offer a comprehensive overview of the most important recommendations by the International Guidelines about general surgery, and possibly to invite building common shared guidelines to preserve the potential to provide surgical assistance despite the pandemic. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: This systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis statement. PubMed, Embase, Cochrane and Web of Science databases were searched. EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: The searches revealed a total of 18579 articles published up to the end of February 2021. Five articles published between March and May 2020, were included in the present study: Guidelines from The European Society of Trauma and Emergency Surgery (ESTES), The Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) and The European Association for Endoscopic Surgeons (EAES), The Endoscopic and Laparoscopic Surgeons of Asia (ELSA), The European Hernia Society (EHS) and The International Organization for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IOS-IBD). CONCLUSIONS: In the likely scenario that the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic will become an endemic chronic problem, we should not be forced to choose between COVID-19 or surgery in the future and find a way to make both coexisting.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Laparoscopy , Surgeons , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Surg Endosc ; 36(5): 3340-3346, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1787817

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The protection of intellectual property (IP) is one of the fundamental elements in the process of medical device development. The significance of IP, however, is not well understood among clinicians and researchers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the current status of IP awareness and IP-related behaviors among EAES members. METHODS: A web-based survey was conducted via questionnaires sent to EAES members. Data collected included participant demographics, level of understanding the need, new ideas and solutions, basic IP knowledge, e.g., employees' inventions and public disclosure, behaviors before and after idea disclosures. RESULTS: One hundred and seventy-nine completed forms were obtained through an email campaign conducted twice in 2019 (response rate = 4.8%). There was a dominancy in male, formally-trained gastrointestinal surgeons, working at teaching hospitals in European countries. Of the respondents, 71% demonstrated a high level of understanding the needs (frustration with current medical devices), with 66% developing specific solutions by themselves. Active discussion with others was done by 53%. Twenty-one percent of respondents presented their ideas at medical congresses, and 12% published in scientific journals. Only 20% took specific precautions or appropriate actions to protect their IPs before these disclosures. CONCLUSIONS: The current level of awareness of IP and IP-related issues is relatively low among EAES members. A structured IP training program to gain basic IP knowledge and skill should be considered a necessity for clinicians. These skills would serve to prevent the loss of legitimate IP rights and avoid failure in the clinical implementation of innovative devices for the benefit of patients.


Subject(s)
Intellectual Property , Surgeons , Europe , Humans , Male , Publications , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Am Surg ; 88(5): 1026-1027, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1789074

ABSTRACT

Social media platforms are becoming more ubiquitous in surgery with a mission to bring surgeons closer together through education and learning. The purpose of this project is to evaluate the social media posts relating to referral of patients through one of the online social media platforms. The International Hernia Collaboration closed Facebook site was queried with terms relating to referrals and descriptive statistics generated. There were a total of 36 posts relating to surgical referrals between October 2014 and January 2021. Posts were from 32 different surgeons and included 30 different locations throughout the United States. An online social media platform is a viable way to refer patients throughout the United States and abroad. Further study is needed to evaluate the role of social media for surgical referrals and its impact on patient care.


Subject(s)
Social Media , Surgeons , Hernia , Humans , Referral and Consultation , Surgeons/education , United States
6.
Ann Surg Oncol ; 29(5): 2773-2783, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779708

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this article is to summarize the opinions of the surgical oncology leaders from the Global Forum of Cancer Surgeons (GFCS) about the global impact of COVID-19 pandemic on cancer surgery. METHODS: A panel session (virtual) was held at the annual Society of Surgical Oncology 2021 International Conference on Surgical Cancer Care to address the impact of COVID-19 on cancer surgery globally. Following the virtual meeting, a questionnaire was sent to all the leaders to gather additional opinions. The input obtained from all the leaders was collated and analyzed to understand how cancer surgeons from across the world adapted in real-time to the impact of COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: The surgical oncology leaders noted that the COVID-19 pandemic led to severe disruptions in surgical cancer care across all domains of clinical care, education, and research. Several new changes/protocols associated with increased costs were implemented to deliver safe care. Leaders also noted that preexisting disparities in care were exacerbated, and the pandemic had a detrimental effect on well-being and financial status. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to severe disruptions in surgical cancer care globally. Leaders of the GFCS opined that new strategies need to be implemented to prepare for any future catastrophic events based on the lessons learned from the current events. The GFCS will embark on developing such a roadmap to ensure that surgical cancer care is preserved in the future regardless of any catastrophic global events.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Surgeons , Surgical Oncology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Neoplasms/surgery , Pandemics
8.
Surg Endosc ; 36(4): 2430-2435, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1748485

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The European Association of Endoscopic Surgery (EAES) fellowship programme was established in 2014, allowing nine surgeons annually to obtain experience and skills in minimally invasive surgery (MIS) from specialist centres across the Europe and United States. It aligns with the strategic focus of EAES Education and Training Committee on enabling Learning Mobility opportunities. To assess the impact of the programme, a survey was conducted aiming to evaluate the experience and impact of the programme and receive feedback for improvements. METHODS: A survey using a 5-point Likert scale was used to evaluate clinical, education and research experience. The impact on acquisition of new technical skills, change in clinical practice and ongoing collaboration with the host institute was assessed. The fellows selected between 2014 and 2018 were included. Ratings were analysed in percentage; thematic analysis was applied to the free-text feedbacks using qualitative analysis. RESULTS: All the fellows had good access to observing in operating theatres and 70.6% were able to assist. 91.2% participated in educational activities and 23.5% were able to contribute through teaching. 44.1% participated in research activities and 41.2% became an author/co-author of a publication from the host. 97.1% of fellows stated that their operative competency had increased, 94.3% gained new surgical skills and 85.7% was able to introduce new techniques in their hospitals. 74.29% agreed that the clinical experience led to a change in their practices. The most commonly suggested improvements were setting realistic target in clinical and research areas, increasing fellowship duration, and maximising theatre assisting opportunities. Nevertheless, 100% of fellows would recommend the fellowship to their peers. CONCLUSION: EAES fellowship programme has shown a positive impact on acquiring and adopting new MIS techniques. To further refine the programme, an individualised approach should be adopted to set achievable learning objectives in clinical skills, education and research.


Subject(s)
Fellowships and Scholarships , Surgeons , Clinical Competence , Endoscopy , Humans , Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures/education , United States
9.
Indian J Dent Res ; 32(3): 275, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1711905
10.
Pol Przegl Chir ; 94(1): 1-5, 2022 Feb 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1704702

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) pandemic has markedly affected the life of people worldwide. In Poland, one of its consequences consisted in new laws being put into force to regulate the provision of healthcare services. This gave rise to much anxiety and concern within the healthcare community, particularly among the specialists in interventional medicine. Taking into account all signals received by the National Consultant, Voivodeship Consultants, as well as the Association of Polish Surgeons and the Polish Chamber of Physicians and Dentists, the new regulations negatively affect the performance of healthcare professionals, e.g. in the context of diagnostic and therapeutic decision-making or activities potentially beneficial for patients not being undertaken. The authors of the article have analyzed the regulations in force in an attempt to bring their interpretation into line with their substance and their objective, as well as to provide comprehensive answers to questions and concerns as raised by interventional surgeons.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Criminals , Surgeons , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Cir Esp (Engl Ed) ; 100(3): 115-124, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1703329

ABSTRACT

The current situation of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has paralyzed non-urgent and/or oncological surgery in many hospitals in our country with what it means for the health of citizens who are awaiting a surgical procedure. Outpatient Surgery can afford more than 85% of the surgical procedures that are performed in a surgical department and is presented as a feasible and safe alternative at the present time since it does not require admission and decreases clearly the risk of infection. In addition, it is the tool that should be generalized to solve the accumulation of patients on the waiting list that the pandemic is generating, so it seems appropriate that the Ambulatory Surgery section of the Spanish Association of Surgeons present a series of recommendations for the implementation of outpatient surgery in these exceptional circumstances that we have to live.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Surgeons , Ambulatory Surgical Procedures , Consensus , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
13.
J Nephrol ; 35(3): 725-733, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1694152

ABSTRACT

The quality of follow-up has clearly emerged as a key factor for long-term kidney graft survival. Currently, many clinics are facing difficulties in delivering optimal surveillance because of the increased number and complexity of kidney transplant recipients, and because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Additional ways of performing follow-up visits are needed and telemedicine has emerged as a tool to strengthen patient care intensity. Six Italian transplant surgeons and nephrologists convened via teleconference to develop a consensual model of video visits for the follow-up of kidney transplant recipients. Issues discussed were: profile of eligible patients; assessments that can be carried out; video visit organization and medical professionals involved; supporting tools and implementation. The video visit was consensually recognized as the most relevant for the follow-up of kidney transplant recipients. Eligible patients should have basic electronic devices and the skills to correctly use them and be in clinically stable condition. With the exception of physical and instrumental examination, and kidney biopsy, all other assessments are feasible during a video visit and can be implemented by specific training and use of supporting tools. The video visit model is simple and adaptable to most transplant patients. It is not intended to replace face-to-face examinations, but is an additional tool for improving the intensity of follow-up of kidney transplant recipients, which can be integrated into current monitoring protocols.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Kidney Transplantation , Surgeons , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Consensus , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Nephrologists , Pandemics , Telemedicine/methods , Transplant Recipients
14.
J Nepal Health Res Counc ; 19(3): 635-637, 2021 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1687868

ABSTRACT

There has been a substantial impact on surgical education globally due to COVID-19 pandemic. The subtle and overt changes in surgical training programs during this pandemic along with its possible implications on the competence of future surgeons needs to be analyzed. If the essential measures are not taken in time, the surgical training programs are in a probable risk of failing to help surgery trainees successfully transition to the next phase of their surgical career. With a timely intervention for remediation, the surgery education programs will be sending surgical graduates into the community and society with the level of competency, expected from a surgeon despite COVID-19 pandemic. Keywords: COVID-19; surgical education; surgical simulation training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Surgeons , Clinical Competence , Humans , Nepal , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
16.
BMJ Open ; 12(2): e052972, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1673434

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to use qualitative interviews with surgical providers to explore challenges and solutions to providing surgical and anaesthesia care in Sierra Leone's hospitals. DESIGN: Data were collected through anonymous, semistructured interviews. We used a qualitative framework approach to analyse interview data and determine themes relating to challenges that were reported. SETTING: A purposive sample of 12 hospitals was selected throughout Sierra Leone to include district and referral hospitals of varying ownership (private, non-governmental organisation and government). PARTICIPANTS: The most senior surgical provider available during each hospital site visit participated in a semistructured interview. A total of 12 interviews were conducted. RESULTS: Providers described both challenges and solutions relating to the following categories: equipment and supplies, access to services, human resources, infrastructure, management and patient factors. These challenges were found to affect surgical care in hospitals by delaying surgical care, decreasing operative capacity and decreasing quality of care. Providers identified not only the root causes of these challenges, but also the varied workarounds and solutions they employ to overcome them. CONCLUSION: Surgical providers can offer important insights into challenges affecting surgical services in hospitals. Despite working in challenging environments with limited resources, providers have developed innovative solutions to improve surgical and anaesthesia care in hospitals in Sierra Leone. Qualitative research has an important role to play in improving understanding of the challenges facing surgeons in low-income countries.


Subject(s)
Anesthesiology , Surgeons , Hospitals , Humans , Qualitative Research , Sierra Leone , Workforce
18.
JAMA Surg ; 156(10): 989-990, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1664334
19.
Surg Endosc ; 36(3): 1699-1708, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1661696

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has presented multiple challenges for health systems throughout the world. The clinical priorities of redirecting personnel and resources to provide the necessary beds, care, and staff to handle the initial waves of infected individuals, and the drive to develop an effective vaccine, were the most visible and rightly took precedent. However, the spread of the COVID-19 virus also led to less apparent but equally challenging impediments for healthcare professionals. Continuing professional development (CPD) for physicians and surgeons practically ceased as national societies postponed or canceled annual meetings and activities. The traditional in-person conferences were no longer viable options during a pandemic in which social distancing and minimization of contacts was the emerging norm. Like other organizations, The Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) had to first postpone and then cancel altogether the in-person 2020 Annual Meeting due to the contingencies brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic. As a result, the traditional hands-on (HO) courses that typically occur as part of the Annual Meeting, could not take place. SAGES had already begun to re-structure these courses in an effort to increase their effectiveness (Dort, Trickey, Paige, Schwarz, Dunkin in Surg Endosc 33(9):3062-3068, 2019; Dort et al. in Surg Endosc 32(11):4491-4497, 2018; Dort, Trickey, Schwarz, Paige in Surg Endosc 33(9):3062-3068, 2019). The cancelations brought about by COVID-19 provided an opportunity to refine and to innovate further. METHODS: In this manner, the Re-imaging Education & Learning (REAL) project crystallized, an innovative effort to leverage the latest educational concepts as well as communication and simulation-based technologies to enhance procedural adoption by converting HO courses to a virtual format. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: This manuscript describes the key components of REAL, reviewing the restructuring of the HO courses before and after the spread of COVID-19, describing the educational framework underlying it, discussing currently available technologies and materials, and evaluating the advantages of such a format.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Surgeons , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgeons/education , United States
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