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1.
Am Surg ; 88(5): 1026-1027, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1789074

ABSTRACT

Social media platforms are becoming more ubiquitous in surgery with a mission to bring surgeons closer together through education and learning. The purpose of this project is to evaluate the social media posts relating to referral of patients through one of the online social media platforms. The International Hernia Collaboration closed Facebook site was queried with terms relating to referrals and descriptive statistics generated. There were a total of 36 posts relating to surgical referrals between October 2014 and January 2021. Posts were from 32 different surgeons and included 30 different locations throughout the United States. An online social media platform is a viable way to refer patients throughout the United States and abroad. Further study is needed to evaluate the role of social media for surgical referrals and its impact on patient care.


Subject(s)
Social Media , Surgeons , Hernia , Humans , Referral and Consultation , Surgeons/education , United States
3.
Surg Endosc ; 36(3): 1699-1708, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1661696

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has presented multiple challenges for health systems throughout the world. The clinical priorities of redirecting personnel and resources to provide the necessary beds, care, and staff to handle the initial waves of infected individuals, and the drive to develop an effective vaccine, were the most visible and rightly took precedent. However, the spread of the COVID-19 virus also led to less apparent but equally challenging impediments for healthcare professionals. Continuing professional development (CPD) for physicians and surgeons practically ceased as national societies postponed or canceled annual meetings and activities. The traditional in-person conferences were no longer viable options during a pandemic in which social distancing and minimization of contacts was the emerging norm. Like other organizations, The Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) had to first postpone and then cancel altogether the in-person 2020 Annual Meeting due to the contingencies brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic. As a result, the traditional hands-on (HO) courses that typically occur as part of the Annual Meeting, could not take place. SAGES had already begun to re-structure these courses in an effort to increase their effectiveness (Dort, Trickey, Paige, Schwarz, Dunkin in Surg Endosc 33(9):3062-3068, 2019; Dort et al. in Surg Endosc 32(11):4491-4497, 2018; Dort, Trickey, Schwarz, Paige in Surg Endosc 33(9):3062-3068, 2019). The cancelations brought about by COVID-19 provided an opportunity to refine and to innovate further. METHODS: In this manner, the Re-imaging Education & Learning (REAL) project crystallized, an innovative effort to leverage the latest educational concepts as well as communication and simulation-based technologies to enhance procedural adoption by converting HO courses to a virtual format. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: This manuscript describes the key components of REAL, reviewing the restructuring of the HO courses before and after the spread of COVID-19, describing the educational framework underlying it, discussing currently available technologies and materials, and evaluating the advantages of such a format.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Surgeons , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgeons/education , United States
5.
Ann Vasc Surg ; 76: 28-37, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525690

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in the cancellation of in-person testing across the country. We sought to understand the feasibility of conducting virtual oral examinations as well as solicit opinions of vascular surgery program directors (PD) regarding the use of virtual platforms to conduct both low stakes mock oral examinations with their trainees and potentially "real" high stakes certifying examinations (CE) moving forward. METHODS: Forty-four senior vascular surgery trainees from 17 institutions took part in a virtual mock oral examination conducted by 38 practicing vascular surgeons via Zoom. Each examination lasted 30 minutes with four clinical scenarios. An anonymous survey pertaining to the conduct of the examination and opinions on feasibility of using virtual examinations for the vascular surgery CE was sent to all examiners and examinees. A similar survey was sent to all vascular surgery program directors. RESULTS: The overall pass rate was 82% (36/44 participants) with no correlation with training paradigm. 32/44 (73%) of trainees, 29/38 (76%) of examiners and 49/103 (48%) of PDs completed the surveys. Examinees and examiners thought the experience was beneficial and PDs also thought the experience would be beneficial for their trainees. While the majority of trainees and examiners believed they were able to communicate and express (or evaluate) knowledge and confidence as easily virtually as in person, PDs were less likely to agree confidence could be assessed virtually. The majority of respondents thought the CE of the Vascular Surgery Board of the American Board of Surgery could be offered virtually, although no groups thought virtual exams were superior to in person exams. While cost benefit was perceived in virtual examinations, the security of the examination was a concern. CONCLUSIONS: Performing virtual mock oral examinations for vascular surgery trainees is feasible. Both vascular surgery trainees as well as PDs feel that virtual CEs should be considered by the Vascular Surgery Board.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Certification , Education, Medical, Graduate , Educational Measurement , Internship and Residency , Surgeons/education , Vascular Surgical Procedures/education , Clinical Competence , Educational Status , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires , Test Taking Skills , Verbal Behavior
6.
J Vasc Surg ; 74(6): 2064-2071.e5, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1479664

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In the present study, we sought to understand the challenges, advantages, and applications of a vascular surgery virtual subinternship (VSI) curriculum. METHODS: Our institution hosted 25 students for two 4-week VSI rotations, one in July 2020 and one in August 2020. The students participated in a curriculum centered around the use of Zoom and telephone interactions with residents and faculty. The curriculum included selected readings, surgical videos, group didactics, and one-on-one mentorship. Anonymous pre- and postrotation self-assessments were used to ascertain the students' achievement of the learning objectives and the utility of the educational tools implemented during the rotation. The faculty and resident mentors were also surveyed to assess their experience. RESULTS: With the exception of knot-tying techniques (P = .67), the students reported significant improvement in their understanding of vascular surgery concepts after the virtual elective (P < .05). The highest ranked components of the course were interpersonal, including interaction with faculty, mentorship, and learning the program culture. The lowest ranked components of the course were simulation training and research opportunities. The rating of the utility of aspects of the course were consistent with the ranking of the components, with faculty interaction receiving the highest average rating. The ideal amount of time for daily virtual interaction reported by the students ranged from 3 to 6 hours (median, 4 hours). Overall, most of the mentors were satisfied with the virtual course. However, they reported limited ability to assess the students' personality and fit for the program. The time spent per week by the mentors on the virtual vascular surgery rotation ranged from 2 to 7 hours (median, 4 hours). Of the 17 mentors completing the surveys, 14 reported that having a virtual student was a significant addition to their existing workload. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, our student and mentor feedback was positive. Several challenges inherent to the virtual environment still require refinement. However, the goals of a VSI are distinct and should be explored by training programs. With changes to healthcare in the United States on the horizon and the constraints resulting from the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 pandemic, implementing a virtual away rotation could be an acceptable platform in our adaptations of our recruitment strategies.


Subject(s)
Computer-Assisted Instruction , Education, Distance , Education, Medical, Graduate , Surgeons/education , Vascular Surgical Procedures/education , Virtual Reality , Adult , COVID-19 , Clinical Competence , Computer-Assisted Instruction/standards , Curriculum , Education, Distance/standards , Education, Medical, Graduate/standards , Educational Status , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency , Learning , Male , Quality Improvement , Retrospective Studies , Vascular Surgical Procedures/standards
8.
Br J Surg ; 108(10): 1162-1180, 2021 10 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462296

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was declared a pandemic by the WHO on 11 March 2020 and global surgical practice was compromised. This Commission aimed to document and reflect on the changes seen in the surgical environment during the pandemic, by reviewing colleagues' experiences and published evidence. METHODS: In late 2020, BJS contacted colleagues across the global surgical community and asked them to describe how severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) had affected their practice. In addition to this, the Commission undertook a literature review on the impact of COVID-19 on surgery and perioperative care. A thematic analysis was performed to identify the issues most frequently encountered by the correspondents, as well as the solutions and ideas suggested to address them. RESULTS: BJS received communications for this Commission from leading clinicians and academics across a variety of surgical specialties in every inhabited continent. The responses from all over the world provided insights into multiple facets of surgical practice from a governmental level to individual clinical practice and training. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has uncovered a variety of problems in healthcare systems, including negative impacts on surgical practice. Global surgical multidisciplinary teams are working collaboratively to address research questions about the future of surgery in the post-COVID-19 era. The COVID-19 pandemic is severely damaging surgical training. The establishment of a multidisciplinary ethics committee should be encouraged at all surgical oncology centres. Innovative leadership and collaboration is vital in the post-COVID-19 era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Perioperative Care/trends , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Surgical Procedures, Operative/trends , Adult , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/economics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/trends , Female , Global Health , Health Resources/supply & distribution , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Infection Control/economics , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , International Cooperation , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Perioperative Care/education , Perioperative Care/methods , Perioperative Care/standards , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/standards , Surgeons/education , Surgeons/psychology , Surgeons/trends , Surgical Procedures, Operative/education , Surgical Procedures, Operative/methods , Surgical Procedures, Operative/standards
11.
J Surg Oncol ; 124(7): 989-994, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1333014

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The early COVID-19 pandemic rapidly transformed healthcare and medical education. We sought to evaluate the professional and personal impact of the pandemic on 2019-2020 Breast Surgical Oncology (BSO) fellows in Society of Surgical Oncology approved programs to capture the experience and direct future changes. METHODS: From July 15, 2020 to August 4, 2020 a survey was administered to the American Society of Breast Surgeons' fellow members. The survey assessed the impact of the pandemic on clinical experience, education/research opportunities, personal health/well-being, and future career. Responses were collected and aggregated to quantify the collective experience of respondents. RESULTS: Twenty-eight of fifty-seven (54%) eligible fellows responded. Twenty-one (75%) indicated the clinical experience changed. Twenty-seven (96%) reported less time spent caring for ambulatory breast patients and sixteen (57%) reported the same/more time spent in the operating room. Fourteen (50%) stated their future job was impacted and eight (29%) delayed general surgery board examinations. Stress was increased in 26 (93%). Personal health was unaffected in 20 (71%), and 3 (10%) quarantined for COVID-19 exposure/infection. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic altered the clinical experience of BSO fellows; however, the operative experience was generally unaffected. The creation of frameworks and support mechanisms to mitigate potential challenges for fellows and fellowship programs in the ongoing pandemic and other times of national crisis should be considered.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Fellowships and Scholarships/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Surgeons/education , Surgical Oncology/education , Adult , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , United States/epidemiology
13.
J Pak Med Assoc ; 71(Suppl 1)(1): S49-S55, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1079957

ABSTRACT

The catastrophic effects of the coronavirus disease-2019 global pandemic have revolutionised human society. The unprecedented impact on surgical training needs to be analysed in detail to achieve an understanding of how to deal with similar situations arising in the foreseeable future. The challenges faced by the surgical community initiated with the suspension of clinical activities and elective practice, and included the lack of appropriate personal protective equipment, and the self-isolation of trainees and reassignment to coronavirus patient-care regions. Together, all these elements had deleterious effects on the psychological health of the professionals. Surgical training irrespective of specialty is equally affected globally by the pandemic. However, the global crisis inadvertently has led to a few constructive adaptations in healthcare systems, including the development of tele-clinics, virtual academic sessions and conferences, and increased usage of simulation. The current review article was planned to highlight the impact of corona virus disease on surgical training and institutions' response to the situation in order to continue surgical training, and lessons learnt from the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , General Surgery , Pandemics , Surgeons , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , General Surgery/education , General Surgery/organization & administration , General Surgery/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Physical Distancing , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgeons/education , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data
14.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(6): 486-491, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228219

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Simulation training has become a key part of the surgical curriculum over recent years. Current trainees face significantly reduced operating time as a result of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, alongside increased costs to surgical training, thus creating a need for low-cost simulation models. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature was performed using multiple databases. Each model included was assessed for the ease and expense of its construction, as well as its validity and educational value. RESULTS: A total of 18 low-cost simulation models were identified, relating to otology, head and neck surgery, laryngeal surgery, rhinology, and tonsil surgery. In only four of these models (22.2 per cent) was an attempt made to demonstrate the educational impact of the model. Validation was rarely formally assessed. CONCLUSION: More efforts are required to standardise validation methods and demonstrate the educational value of the available low-cost simulation models in otorhinolaryngology.


Subject(s)
Computer Simulation/economics , Otolaryngology/education , Simulation Training/economics , Surgeons/education , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Clinical Competence/economics , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Computer Simulation/statistics & numerical data , Curriculum , Databases, Factual , Humans , Models, Biological , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Simulation Training/methods , United Kingdom/epidemiology
17.
Surg Endosc ; 35(5): 1963-1969, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1171565

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Surgeons in practice have limited opportunities to learn new techniques and procedures. Traditionally, in-person hands-on courses have been the most common means for surgeons to gain exposure to new techniques and procedures. The COVID19 pandemic caused a cessation in these courses and left surgeons with limited opportunities to continue their professional development. Thus, SAGES elected to create an innovative hands-on course that could be completed at home in order to provide surgeons with opportunities to learn new procedures during the pandemic. METHODS: This course was initially planned to be taught as an in-person hands-on course utilizing the Acquisition of Data for Outcomes and Procedure Transfer(ADOPT) method 1. We identified a virtual telementoring platform, Proximie Ltd(London, UK), and a company that could create a model of an abdominal wall in order to perform a Transversus Abdominis Release, KindHeart™(Chapel Hill, NC, USA). The course consisted of pre-course lectures and videos to be reviewed by participants, a pre-course call to set learning goals, the hands-on telementoring session from home, and monthly webinars for a year. RESULTS: The ADOPT hands-on hernia course at home was successfully completed on October 23rd of 2020. All participants and faculty were successfully able to set up their model and utilize the telementoring platform, but 15% required assistance. Post course-surveys showed that participants felt that the course was successful in meeting their educational goals and felt similar to prior in-person courses. CONCLUSIONS: SAGES was successfully able to transition and in-person hands-on course to a virtual at-home format. This innovative approach to continuing professional development will be necessary during the times of the COVID19 pandemic, but may be a helpful option for rural surgeons and others with travel restrictions in the future to continue their professional development without the need to travel away from their practice.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Herniorrhaphy/education , Surgeons/education , Animals , COVID-19 , Curriculum , Faculty , Herniorrhaphy/methods , Humans , Incisional Hernia/surgery , Proof of Concept Study , Swine , Virtual Reality
18.
Surgery ; 170(3): 719-726, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169289

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic led to major changes in health care and education options for all health care employees. The aim of this study is to achieve insight into coronavirus disease-care participation of surgical residents in the Netherlands, the impact of coronavirus disease 2019 on the experienced quality of surgical training, and the influence on Burn-out and Work Engagement compared with the non-coronavirus disease 2019 period in January 2020. METHODS: In this study, we have conducted 2 digital surveys immediately before and 2 months after the start of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. We surveyed a validated Dutch questionnaire 'Utrecht Burn-out Scale,' derived from the Maslach Burn-out Inventory, and also collected the 'Utrecht Work Engagement Scale' measuring work engagement. Additionally, we describe the coronavirus disease-care participation of surgical residents, the impact on how they experienced the quality of their surgical training, and the influence on 'Burn-out and Work Engagement' compared with the pre-coronavirus disease 2019 period for surgical residents in the Netherlands. RESULTS: In January 2020, a total of 317 residents completed the online survey, and in April 2020, a total of 313 residents completed the online survey. Of the responders, 48.6%, in April, participated in coronavirus disease-care in both the coronavirus disease ward as well as the coronavirus disease intensive care unit. Residents experienced that the coronavirus disease 2019 influenced their surgical training in 85.2% of responders. In only 5% of the residents did the pandemic not affect the exposure to surgical training in the operating theater. More burn-out symptoms were noted amongst coronavirus disease ward deployed residents versus no coronavirus disease ward deployment, (16.0% vs 7.6%, P = .06). The Work-Engagement questionnaire showed a significantly lower work engagement score of 4.2 for residents who were deployed in a coronavirus disease-care intensive care unit versus a score of 4.6 for residents scheduled in a coronavirus disease ward (P = .02). CONCLUSION: This study shows a significant impact of the first months of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic on the Dutch surgical trainee program, with a major redistribution of residents with a decrease of surgical exposure and education. We emphasize the need for adequate guidance of all surgical residents and potentially lengthening the surgical training program.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Surgeons/psychology , Work Engagement , Adult , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency , Male , Netherlands/epidemiology , Surgeons/education , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires
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