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1.
Surgery ; 171(2): 437-446, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1500272

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In March 2020, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the New Zealand government instituted a 4-level alert system, which resulted in the rapid dissolution of nonurgent surgical services to minimize occupational exposure to both patients and staff, with the primary health sector bearing most of the diverted caseload. Consequently, the study authors sought to collate information around the establishment of a supportive nonacute surgical liaison role in a public hospital surgical department, with an interest in establishing this role in New Zealand. METHODS: The narrative review conducted systematically in line with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. Databases searched included Pubmed, MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Controlled Register of Trials. A deductive analysis was applied using a demand management model developed by the Institute for Innovation and Improvement at Waitemata District Health Board. All included studies were rated using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine Levels of Evidence tool. RESULTS: Collation of 19 studies resulted in 3 key findings: first, that a surgical liaison could be utilized at the primary care to specialist interface to improve communication and workflow between services. Second, a liaison could be utilized directly communicating with patients as a means of increasing engagement and self-management. Finally, this service can be offered through multiple modalities including a noncontact telehealth service. CONCLUSION: Evidence of nonacute surgical liaisons both internationally and specifically within New Zealand has been collated to provide evidence for its application.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Elective Surgical Procedures , Nurse's Role , Physician's Role , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , Referral and Consultation/organization & administration , Secondary Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Global Health , Humans , Nurse Practitioners/organization & administration , Surgeons/organization & administration , Workflow
2.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 148(4): 899-906, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398200

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY: In the wake of the death toll resulting from coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19), in addition to the economic turmoil and strain on our health care systems, plastic surgeons are taking a hard look at their role in crisis preparedness and how they can contribute to crisis response policies in their own health care teams. Leaders in the specialty are charged with developing new clinical policies, identifying weaknesses in crisis preparation, and ensuring survival of private practices that face untenable financial challenges. It is critical that plastic surgery builds on the lessons learned over the past tumultuous year to emerge stronger and more prepared for subsequent waves of COVID-19. In addition, this global health crisis presents a timely opportunity to reexamine how plastic surgeons can display effective leadership during times of uncertainty and stress. Some may choose to emulate the traits and policies of leaders who are navigating the COVID-19 crisis effectively. Specifically, the national leaders who offer empathy, transparent communication, and decisive action have maintained high public approval throughout the COVID-19 crisis, while aggressively controlling viral spread. Crises are an inevitable aspect of modern society and medicine. Plastic surgeons can learn from this pandemic to better prepare for future turmoil.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Leadership , Professional Role , Surgery, Plastic/organization & administration , COVID-19/economics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Global Health , Humans , Pandemics/economics , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Care Team/economics , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surgeons/organization & administration , Surgery, Plastic/economics , Uncertainty
3.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 148(1): 133e-139e, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284960

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY: The coronavirus disease of 2019 pandemic became a global threat in a matter of weeks, with its future implications yet to be defined. New York City was swiftly declared the epicenter of the pandemic in the United States as case numbers grew exponentially in a matter of days, quickly threatening to overwhelm the capacity of the health care system. This burgeoning crisis led practitioners across specialties to adapt and mobilize rapidly. Plastic surgeons and trainees within the New York University Langone Health system faced uncertainty in terms of future practice, in addition to immediate and long-term effects on undergraduate and graduate medical education. The administration remained vigilant and adaptive, enacting departmental policies prioritizing safety and productivity, with early deployment of faculty for clinical support at the front lines. The authors anticipate that this pandemic will have far-reaching effects on the future of plastic surgery education, trends in the pursuit of elective surgical procedures, and considerable consequences for certain research endeavors. Undoubtedly, there will be substantial impact on the physical and mental well-being of health care practitioners across specialties. Coordinated efforts and clear lines of communication between the Department of Plastic Surgery and its faculty and trainees allowed a concerted effort toward the immediate challenge of tempering the spread of coronavirus disease of 2019 and preserving structure and throughput for education and research. Adaptation and creativity have ultimately allowed for early rebooting of in-person clinical and surgical practice. The authors present their coordinated efforts and lessons gleaned from their experience to inform their community's preparedness as this formidable challenge evolves.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Surgery, Plastic/trends , Academic Medical Centers/standards , Academic Medical Centers/statistics & numerical data , Academic Medical Centers/trends , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Graduate/standards , Education, Medical, Graduate/trends , Elective Surgical Procedures/education , Elective Surgical Procedures/standards , Elective Surgical Procedures/trends , Faculty/organization & administration , Faculty/psychology , Faculty/statistics & numerical data , Forecasting , Humans , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , New York City/epidemiology , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/organization & administration , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/trends , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/education , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/standards , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/trends , Surgeons/organization & administration , Surgeons/psychology , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Surgery, Plastic/education , Surgery, Plastic/organization & administration , Surgery, Plastic/standards , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Uncertainty , Universities/standards , Universities/statistics & numerical data , Universities/trends
4.
Sci Prog ; 104(2): 368504211023282, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1277842

ABSTRACT

The surgical theatre is associated with the highest mortality rates since the onslaught of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, Operating Department Practitioners (ODPs) are neglected human resources for health in regards to both professional development and research for patient safety; even though they are key practitioners with respect to infection control during surgeries. Therefore, this study aims to describe challenges faced by ODPs during the pandemic. The secondary aim is to use empirical evidence to inform the public health sector management about both ODP professional development and improvement in surgical procedures, with a specific focus on pandemics. A qualitative study has been conducted. Data collection was based on an interview guide with open-ended questions. Interviews with 39 ODPs in public sector teaching hospitals of Pakistan who have been working during the COVID-19 pandemic were part of the analysis. Content analysis was used to generate themes. Ten themes related to challenges faced by ODPs in delivering services during the pandemic for securing patient safety were identified: (i) Disparity in training for prevention of COVID-19; (ii) Shortcomings in COVID-19 testing; (iii) Supply shortages of personal protective equipment; (iv) Challenges in maintaining physical distance and prevention protocols; (v) Human resource shortages and role burden; (vi) Problems with hospital administration; (vii) Exclusion and hierarchy; (viii) Teamwork limitations and other communication issues; (ix) Error Management; and (x) Anxiety and fear. The public health sector, in Pakistan and other developing regions, needs to invest in the professional development of ODPs and improve resources and structures for surgical procedures, during pandemics and otherwise.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Infection Control/organization & administration , Pandemics , Surgeons/organization & administration , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19 Testing , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pakistan/epidemiology , Personal Protective Equipment/ethics , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surgeons/psychology , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workforce/organization & administration
5.
Int J Surg ; 91: 105987, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1253037

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Multiple industries and organisations are afflicted by and respond to institutional crises daily. As surgeons, we respond to crisis frequently and individually such as with critically unwell patients or in mass casualty scenarios; but rarely, do we encounter institutional or multi-institutional crisis with multiple actors as we have seen with the COVID-19 pan-demic. Businesses, private industry and the financial sector have been in a more precar-ious position regarding crisis and consequently have developed rapid response strate-gies employing foresight to reduce risk to assets and financial liquidity. Moreover, large nationalised governmental organisations such as the military have strategies in place ow-ing to a rapidly evolving geopolitical climate with the expectation of immediate new chal-lenges either in the negotiating room or indeed the field of conflict. Despite both nation-alised and privatised healthcare systems existing, both appeared ill-prepared for the COVID-19 global crisis. METHODS: A narrative review of the literature was undertaken exploring the approach to crisis man-agement and models used in organisations exposed to institutional crises outside the field of medicine. RESULTS: There are many parallels between the organisational management of private business institutions, large military organisations and surgical organisational management in healthcare. Models from management consultancies and the armed forces were ex-plored discussed and adapted for the surgical leader providing a framework through which the surgical leader can bring about an successful response to an institutional crisis and ensure future resilience. CONCLUSION: We believe that healthcare, and surgeons (as leaders) in particular, can learn from these other organisations and industries to engage appropriate generic operational plans and contingencies in preparation for whatever further crises may arise in the future, both near and distant. As such, following a review of the literature, we have explored a number of models we believe are adaptable for the surgical community to ensure we remain a dy-namically responsive and ever prepared profession.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , General Surgery/organization & administration , Models, Organizational , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Surgeons/organization & administration , Humans , Leadership , Resilience, Psychological , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgeons/psychology
7.
8.
Eur J Cardiothorac Surg ; 58(5): 875-880, 2020 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066299

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Coronavirus disease 2019 is a new contagious disease that has spread rapidly across the world. It is associated with high mortality in those who develop respiratory complications and require admission to intensive care. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a supportive therapy option for selected severely ill patients who deteriorate despite the best supportive care. During the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, extra demand led to staff reorganization; hence, cardiac surgery consultants joined the ECMO retrieval team. This article describes how we increased service provisions to adapt to the changes in activity and staffing. METHODS: The data were collected from 16 March 2020 to 8 May 2020. The patients were referred through a dedicated Web-based referral portal to cope with increasing demand. The retrieval team attended the referring hospital, reviewed the patients and made the final decision to proceed with ECMO. RESULTS: We reported 41 ECMO retrieval runs during this study period. Apart from staffing changes, other retrieval protocols were maintained. The preferred cannulation method for veno-venous ECMO was drainage via the femoral vein and return to the right internal jugular vein. There were no complications reported during cannulation or transport. CONCLUSIONS: Staff reorganization in a crisis is of paramount importance. For those with precise transferrable skills, experience can be gained quickly with appropriate supervision. Therefore, the team members were selected based on skill mix rather than on roles that are more traditional. We have demonstrated that an ECMO retrieval service can be reorganized swiftly and successfully to cope with the sudden increase in demand by spending cardiac surgeons services to supplement the anaesthetic-intensivist roles.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Care/organization & administration , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Surgeons/organization & administration , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , Cardiology/organization & administration , Critical Care/methods , Critical Illness , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Female , Health Services Needs and Demand , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom
10.
J Surg Res ; 261: 39-42, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1009706

ABSTRACT

The Center for Basic and Translational Science was formed to address the unique challenges faced by surgeon-scientists. Shortly after its inception, COVID-19 upended research workflows at our institution. We discuss how the collaborative Center for Basic and Translational Science framework was adapted to support laboratories during the pandemic by assisting with ramp-down, promoting mentorship and community building, and maintaining research productivity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Intersectoral Collaboration , Research Personnel/organization & administration , Surgeons/organization & administration , /organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Efficiency , Humans , Mentors , Michigan/epidemiology , Pandemics
12.
Am Surg ; 86(7): 762-765, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-760336

ABSTRACT

The response of the American College of Surgeons (ACS) to the COVID-19 pandemic was vigorous and effective because it had mature programs in surgical quality and health policy and advocacy, the legacy of decades of work by its officers and leaders and its current executive director, David Hoyt. Hoyt had the foresight to institute a digital communications platform upon which the College collected data for its clinical programs and conducted many of its meetings. Through internet portals, online communities, and social media it broadcasted news and information to the membership. When the global COVID-19 pandemic struck, the College was able to quickly mobilize its leaders and scientific experts to disseminate credible information, recommend protocols to maintain patient and provider safety in operating room environments, provide a rational scheme of prioritization of urgent surgical operations, and a sensible means of resumption of normal surgical practice. As the financial impact of the outbreak on surgical practice became apparent, the ACS represented the interests of surgeons in the White House, Capitol, federal agencies, and governors' mansions and statehouses. In an interview by Steven Wexner, a member of the ACS Board of Regents, Hoyt described the response of the ACS to an unprecedented threat to the surgical care of patients in the country and the world. His story demonstrates the legacy of credibility and professionalism built by decades of principled leadership of generations of officers and Regents of the College, and his own example of effective leadership in crisis.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Leadership , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Societies, Medical/organization & administration , Surgeons/organization & administration , Total Quality Management , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Information Dissemination , Male , Organizational Innovation , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Professionalism , United States
14.
Am Surg ; 86(7): 757-761, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-760333

ABSTRACT

From the onset of the COVID-19 global pandemic of 2020, the American College of Surgeons (ACS) has been a leader in disseminating credible information on the clinical and scientific aspects of the disease. As governmental regulations enforced the closure of hospitals and operating rooms to elective surgical cases as part of its "shelter-in-place" public lockdown policies, the ACS brought specialty societies together to create guidelines to protect patients and preserve surgical quality. Federal agencies made available financial aid programs to mitigate the economic impact of the outbreak. The division of advocacy and health policy of the ACS made certain that the interests of surgeons and their patients were served. Steven Wexner, member of the Board of Regents of the ACS interviewed the medical directors of the division, Frank Opelka in quality and health policy, and Patrick Bailey in advocacy, for their stories of how the College responded to the many health and public policy issues that came before Congress and governmental agencies during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Infection Control/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Advocacy , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Public Policy , Surgeons/organization & administration , Advisory Committees , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Organizational Innovation , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Societies, Medical/organization & administration , United States
18.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 146(2): 447-454, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-691847

ABSTRACT

Plastic surgeons have the unique perspective of working with all types of patients and care teams from almost all specialties in surgery and medicine, which creates unique challenges in times of distress. As the initial epicenter of coronavirus disease 2019 cases in the United States, the University of Washington program was required to rapidly develop strategies to deal with the escalating crisis. All aspects of the program were affected, including the need to triage the urgency of plastic surgery care, safe staffing of plastic surgery teams, and the role of plastic surgery in the greater hospital community. In addition, as a residency training program, limiting the impact of resident education and maintaining a sense of community and connection among members of the program developed into important considerations. The authors hope that the narrative of their experience will provide insight into the decisions made in the University of Washington health care system but also remind others that they are not alone in dealing with the challenges of this pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Infection Control/standards , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Surgery, Plastic/education , Universities/organization & administration , Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration , Academic Medical Centers/standards , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/education , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgeons/education , Surgeons/organization & administration , Universities/standards , Washington , Workforce/organization & administration , Workforce/standards
20.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 146(5): 1197-1206, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-601618

ABSTRACT

The worldwide outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has forced health care systems across the United States to undertake broad restructuring to address the ongoing crisis. The framework of crisis management can assist plastic surgeons navigate the dynamic environment of the COVID-19 pandemic. This article outlines crisis management tools at a number of different levels, from hospital-wide to plastic surgeon-specific, and it offers a practical discussion of the coronavirus situation as it affects plastic surgeons. Although there are innumerable ways that this virus is currently changing plastic surgeons' practices, it is crucial to remember that these changes are temporary, and they will be best met by being confronted head-on.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Practice Management, Medical/organization & administration , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/organization & administration , Surgeons/organization & administration , Surgery, Plastic/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Health Care Rationing/organization & administration , Humans , Leadership , United States
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