Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 42
Filter
2.
J Occup Environ Med ; 63(6): 521-527, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1494064

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We measured the seroprevalence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies among surgeons and anesthesiologists and associated antibody status with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) clinical illness. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of SARS-CoV-2 IgG seroprevalence with a survey assessing demographics, SARS-CoV-2 exposure risk, and COVID-19 illness. The primary outcome was the period prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies associated with COVID-19 illness. RESULTS: One hundred forty three surgeons and anesthesiologists completed both serology and survey testing. We found no significant relationships between antibody status and clinical role (anesthesiologist, surgeon), mode of commuting to work, other practice settings, or place of residence. SARS-CoV-2 IgG seroprevalence was 9.8%. Positive IgG status was highly correlated with presence of symptoms of COVID-19 illness. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest the relative safety of surgeons and anesthesiologists where personal protective equipment (PPE) is available and infection control protocols are implemented.


Subject(s)
Anesthesiologists/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospitals , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Infection Control , Male , Middle Aged , New York City/epidemiology , Personal Protective Equipment , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Seroepidemiologic Studies
3.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(37): e27240, 2021 Sep 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1434546

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the mandatory use of personal protective equipment (PPE) has resulted in a significant reduction in the infection rate among health care workers (HCWs). However, there are some ongoing concerns about the negative impact of using PPE for prolonged periods.This study examined the impact of wearing PPE on surgeons' performance and decision making during the COVID-19 pandemic.In this cross-sectional study, an anonymous online questionnaire was created and disseminated to surgeons all over the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. The questionnaire included the demographic data, the local hospital policies, the non-technical skills (e.g., communication, vision, and comfort) and the technical skills, and the process of decision making.From June 2020 to August 2020, 162 surgeons participated in this questionnaire. Of them, 80.2% were aged from 26 to 45 years, 70.4% have received a special training for PPE, and 59.3% of participants have operated on COVID-19 confirmed cases. A negative impact of wearing PPE was reported on their overall comfort, vision, and communication skills (92.6%, 95.1%, and 82.8%, respectively). The technical skills and decision making were not significantly affected (60.5% and 72.8%, respectively). More preference for conservative approach, damage control procedures, and/or open approach was reported.Despite its benefits, PPE is associated with a significant negative impact on the non-technical skills (including vision, communication, and comfort) as well as a non-significant negative impact on technical skills and decision making of surgeons. Extra efforts should be directed to improve PPE, especially during lengthy pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Decision Making , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Surgeons/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Saudi Arabia , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Pan Afr Med J ; 39: 59, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1357662

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: the rising rate of SARS-CoV-2 infections has caused perceptible strain on the global health system. Indeed, this disease is also a litmus test for the resilience of the structures in the African health system including surgery. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on surgical practice, training and research in Nigeria. METHODS: it was a cross-sectional study conducted over three weeks in Nigeria among doctors in 12 surgery-related specialties. Consenting participants filled a pre-tested online form consisting of 35 questions in 5 sections which assessed demographics, infection control measures, clinical practice, academic training, research program, and future trends. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences Version 20. RESULTS: a total of 384 respondents completed the form. Their mean age was 38.3 years. Lockdown measures were imposed in the state of practice of 89.0% of respondents. Most participants reported a decrease in patient volume in outpatient clinics (95.5%) and elective operations (95.8%) compared to reports for emergency operations (50.2%). They also noted a decrease in academic training [Bedside teaching (92.1%), seminar presentation (91.1%) and journal presentation (91.8%)] and research (80.5%). Except in bedside teaching, those who had other virtual academic programmes were thrice the number of those who used in-person mode for the events. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 pandemic has caused a significant change in pattern and a decrease in the volume of patients seen by surgeons in their practice as well as a decrease in the frequency of academic programs and research activities in Nigeria.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nigeria , Prospective Studies , Research/statistics & numerical data , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Surgical Procedures, Operative/education , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Ann R Coll Surg Engl ; 103(7): 520-523, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1288675

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In light of the COVID-19 recommendations from the Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland, we aimed to study patient and clinician satisfaction with a newly established telephone (TP) colorectal clinic service in lieu of traditional face-to-face (FTF) appointments. Comparative outcomes included patient versus clinician satisfaction; patient versus clinician desire to continue TP clinics postpandemic; and views of Specialty Trainee 3+ (ST3+)/Specialty Associate Specialist (SAS) doctors versus consultants on TP compared with FTF appointments. METHODS: We conducted a prospective service evaluation of patient and clinician satisfaction with colorectal surgery TP clinics between 1 June 2020 and 30 June 2020 in a British District General Hospital. RESULTS: Patients had higher satisfaction than clinicians with TP clinics: 91.5% versus 66.6% reported above-average experience [odds ratio (OR) = 5.35, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.53 to 18.75, p = 0.01]. Clinicians had lower demand to continue TP clinics post-COVID-19 versus patients, with a trend towards significance (60% versus 82.9%, OR = 0.31, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.97, p = 0.08). ST3+/SAS doctors were more likely than consultants to find TP clinics inferior to FTF consultation for patient assessment (48.3% versus 23.7%, OR = 3.00, 95% CI 1.17 to 7.71, p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: While clinicians may be concerned that patient assessment suffers, patient satisfaction with TP clinics is high. There should be a place for TP clinics post-COVID-19 but there must be a robust process for patient selection as well as adequate training for current and future generations of clinicians.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Colorectal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Medical Oncology/methods , Remote Consultation/methods , Telephone , Aftercare/methods , Aftercare/standards , Aftercare/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Colorectal Neoplasms/therapy , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Job Satisfaction , Medical Oncology/standards , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Prospective Studies , Remote Consultation/standards , Remote Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Surgeons/psychology , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , United Kingdom/epidemiology
8.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 148(1): 133e-139e, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284960

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY: The coronavirus disease of 2019 pandemic became a global threat in a matter of weeks, with its future implications yet to be defined. New York City was swiftly declared the epicenter of the pandemic in the United States as case numbers grew exponentially in a matter of days, quickly threatening to overwhelm the capacity of the health care system. This burgeoning crisis led practitioners across specialties to adapt and mobilize rapidly. Plastic surgeons and trainees within the New York University Langone Health system faced uncertainty in terms of future practice, in addition to immediate and long-term effects on undergraduate and graduate medical education. The administration remained vigilant and adaptive, enacting departmental policies prioritizing safety and productivity, with early deployment of faculty for clinical support at the front lines. The authors anticipate that this pandemic will have far-reaching effects on the future of plastic surgery education, trends in the pursuit of elective surgical procedures, and considerable consequences for certain research endeavors. Undoubtedly, there will be substantial impact on the physical and mental well-being of health care practitioners across specialties. Coordinated efforts and clear lines of communication between the Department of Plastic Surgery and its faculty and trainees allowed a concerted effort toward the immediate challenge of tempering the spread of coronavirus disease of 2019 and preserving structure and throughput for education and research. Adaptation and creativity have ultimately allowed for early rebooting of in-person clinical and surgical practice. The authors present their coordinated efforts and lessons gleaned from their experience to inform their community's preparedness as this formidable challenge evolves.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Surgery, Plastic/trends , Academic Medical Centers/standards , Academic Medical Centers/statistics & numerical data , Academic Medical Centers/trends , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Graduate/standards , Education, Medical, Graduate/trends , Elective Surgical Procedures/education , Elective Surgical Procedures/standards , Elective Surgical Procedures/trends , Faculty/organization & administration , Faculty/psychology , Faculty/statistics & numerical data , Forecasting , Humans , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , New York City/epidemiology , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/organization & administration , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/trends , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/education , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/standards , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/trends , Surgeons/organization & administration , Surgeons/psychology , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Surgery, Plastic/education , Surgery, Plastic/organization & administration , Surgery, Plastic/standards , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Uncertainty , Universities/standards , Universities/statistics & numerical data , Universities/trends
9.
J Pak Med Assoc ; 71(Suppl 1)(1): S49-S55, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1079957

ABSTRACT

The catastrophic effects of the coronavirus disease-2019 global pandemic have revolutionised human society. The unprecedented impact on surgical training needs to be analysed in detail to achieve an understanding of how to deal with similar situations arising in the foreseeable future. The challenges faced by the surgical community initiated with the suspension of clinical activities and elective practice, and included the lack of appropriate personal protective equipment, and the self-isolation of trainees and reassignment to coronavirus patient-care regions. Together, all these elements had deleterious effects on the psychological health of the professionals. Surgical training irrespective of specialty is equally affected globally by the pandemic. However, the global crisis inadvertently has led to a few constructive adaptations in healthcare systems, including the development of tele-clinics, virtual academic sessions and conferences, and increased usage of simulation. The current review article was planned to highlight the impact of corona virus disease on surgical training and institutions' response to the situation in order to continue surgical training, and lessons learnt from the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , General Surgery , Pandemics , Surgeons , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , General Surgery/education , General Surgery/organization & administration , General Surgery/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Physical Distancing , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgeons/education , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data
10.
Surgery ; 170(2): 587-595, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1213531

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 provided the impetus for unprecedented adoption of telemedicine. This study aimed to understand video visit adoption by plastic surgery providers; and patient and surgeon perceptions about its efficacy, value, accessibility, and long-term viability. A secondary aim was to develop the proposed 'Triage Tool for Video Visits in Plastic Surgery' to help determine visit video eligibility. METHODS: This mixed-methods evaluation assessed provider-level scheduling data from the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Stanford Health Care to quantify telemedicine adoption and semi-structured phone interviews with patients (n = 20) and surgeons (n = 10) to explore stakeholder perspectives on video visits. RESULTS: During the 13-week period after the local stay-at-home orders due to coronavirus disease 2019, 21.4% of preoperative visits and 45.5% of postoperative visits were performed via video. Video visits were considered acceptable by patients and surgeons in plastic surgery in terms of quality of care but were limited by the inability to perform a physical examination. Interviewed clinicians reported that long-term viability needs to be centered around technology (eg, connection, video quality, etc) and physical examinations. Our findings informed a proposed triage tool to determine the appropriateness of video visits for individual patients that incorporates visit type, anesthesia, case, surgeon's role, and patient characteristics. CONCLUSION: Video technology has the potential to facilitate and improve preoperative and postoperative patient care in plastic surgery but the following components are needed: patient education on taking high-quality photos; standardized clinical guidelines for conducting video visits; and an algorithm-assisted triage tool to support scheduling.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Surgery, Plastic/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Satisfaction , Physical Examination , Physician-Patient Relations , Surgeons/psychology , Surgery, Plastic/psychology , Young Adult
11.
Med Princ Pract ; 30(2): 178-184, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1199818

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Many studies have reported insufficient support from surgical services, resulting in nephrologists creating arteriovenous fistulas in many centers. The aim of this study was to compare risk factors of arteriovenous fistula dysfunction in patients whose fistulas were created by nephrologists versus vascular surgeons. METHODS: This was a retrospective, analytical study of interventions by nephrologists and vascular surgeons during a period of 15 years. Out of a total of 1,048 fistulas, 764 (72.9%) were created by nephrologists patients, while vascular surgeons were responsible for 284 (27.1%) fistulae. Laboratory, demographic, and clinical parameters which might affect functioning of these arteriovenous fistulae were analyzed. RESULTS: Patients whose arteriovenous fistula was formed by nephrologists differed significantly from those created by vascular surgeons in relation to the preventive character of the arteriovenous fistula (p = 0.011), lumen of the vein (p < 0.001) and systolic blood pressure (p = 0.047). Multivariate logistic regression of arteriovenous fistula dysfunction showed that risk factors were female gender (odds ratio [OR] = 1.56, 95% CI 1.16-2.07), whether the fistulae were created by vascular surgeons or nephrologists (OR = 1.38; 95% CI 1.01-1.89) and the site of the arteriovenous fistula (OR = 0.64; 95% CI 0.48-0.85). CONCLUSIONS: Arteriovenous fistulae created by vascular surgeons, female gender, and the location are risk factors of dysfunction.


Subject(s)
Arteriovenous Fistula/pathology , Nephrologists/statistics & numerical data , Renal Dialysis/methods , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Age Factors , Aged , Blood Pressure , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Socioeconomic Factors
13.
Surgery ; 170(3): 719-726, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169289

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic led to major changes in health care and education options for all health care employees. The aim of this study is to achieve insight into coronavirus disease-care participation of surgical residents in the Netherlands, the impact of coronavirus disease 2019 on the experienced quality of surgical training, and the influence on Burn-out and Work Engagement compared with the non-coronavirus disease 2019 period in January 2020. METHODS: In this study, we have conducted 2 digital surveys immediately before and 2 months after the start of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. We surveyed a validated Dutch questionnaire 'Utrecht Burn-out Scale,' derived from the Maslach Burn-out Inventory, and also collected the 'Utrecht Work Engagement Scale' measuring work engagement. Additionally, we describe the coronavirus disease-care participation of surgical residents, the impact on how they experienced the quality of their surgical training, and the influence on 'Burn-out and Work Engagement' compared with the pre-coronavirus disease 2019 period for surgical residents in the Netherlands. RESULTS: In January 2020, a total of 317 residents completed the online survey, and in April 2020, a total of 313 residents completed the online survey. Of the responders, 48.6%, in April, participated in coronavirus disease-care in both the coronavirus disease ward as well as the coronavirus disease intensive care unit. Residents experienced that the coronavirus disease 2019 influenced their surgical training in 85.2% of responders. In only 5% of the residents did the pandemic not affect the exposure to surgical training in the operating theater. More burn-out symptoms were noted amongst coronavirus disease ward deployed residents versus no coronavirus disease ward deployment, (16.0% vs 7.6%, P = .06). The Work-Engagement questionnaire showed a significantly lower work engagement score of 4.2 for residents who were deployed in a coronavirus disease-care intensive care unit versus a score of 4.6 for residents scheduled in a coronavirus disease ward (P = .02). CONCLUSION: This study shows a significant impact of the first months of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic on the Dutch surgical trainee program, with a major redistribution of residents with a decrease of surgical exposure and education. We emphasize the need for adequate guidance of all surgical residents and potentially lengthening the surgical training program.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Surgeons/psychology , Work Engagement , Adult , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency , Male , Netherlands/epidemiology , Surgeons/education , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
Anticancer Res ; 41(4): 1903-1908, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1168332

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: We employed a survey to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) to investigate the management of breast reconstruction across the US during the COVID-19 pandemic. PATIENTS AND METHODS: An electronic survey on breast reconstruction practice demographics, COVID-19-related restrictions on breast reconstruction, and pertinent dates of restrictions was employed. RESULTS: A total of 228 responses were obtained. Demographics were balanced for geography with most respondents located in either urban or suburban settings (91.2%). The majority proceeded with mastectomy/reconstruction as originally planned (39.0%), followed by hormonal/chemotherapy only (22.6%). The most common reconstructive option was tissue expander/implant-based reconstruction (47.7%). Most institutions implemented restrictions between March 11-20th (59%). Almost all respondents (91.8%) reported mandatory pre-operative SARS-Cov-2 testing once cases resumed. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 has forced the breast surgical team to adapt to new conditions to the detriment of women with breast cancer requiring reconstruction. Varying restrictions have limited access to breast reconstruction, carrying consequences yet to be determined.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Mammaplasty/statistics & numerical data , Mastectomy/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Breast Implants/statistics & numerical data , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Tissue Expansion Devices/statistics & numerical data , United States/epidemiology
16.
Clin Exp Optom ; 104(6): 705-710, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1109025

ABSTRACT

CLINICAL RELEVANCE: In the last months, the whole world is dealing with an unprecedented public health crisis due to COVID-19 outbreak. Consequently, many governments have implemented lockdowns on a national level, affecting, among others, ophthalmic surgical practice in a globe scale. BACKGROUND: The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of surgical theatre lockdown due to COVID-19 pandemic on the surgical performance of cataract surgeons. METHODS: Intraoperative complications and surgical time of the first 160 cataract surgeries performed by eight consultants (20 cases each) after a two-month lockdown were recorded and analysed in a cross-sectional study. The results were plotted against the last 30 cases of each surgeon before the implementation of the lockdown (240 cases). Cataract surgeons were asked to rate their subjective perspective and difficulties faced after re-opening through a questionnaire. RESULTS: The average duration of all surgeries after the lockdown was 19.1 ± 6.2 minutes showing a 14% increase compared to the one before the lockdown (16.8 ± 5.1 minutes, p = 0.0001). The complications rate was 2.09% (5/240 cases) before the abstention and 3.12% (5/160 cases) after the abstention not yielding any statistically significant difference (p = 0.74). When complicated surgeries were excluded from the analysis, surgical time was still higher after the lockdown (18.9 ± 5.9 minutes) than before (16.6 ± 5.0 minutes, p < 0.0001). 37.5% of consultants (3/8) stated that the two-month abstention from cataract surgeries has affected their surgical skills somewhat or a lot, while 62.5% (5/8) reported being more careful in their first cases after the lockdown. Most complications occurred in the hands of one surgeon who stated to be very anxious upon restart. CONCLUSION: The operating theatres' lockdown due to COVID-19 pandemic did not seem to affect the intraoperative complications rate in cataract surgery. A slight increase of surgical duration was noted, while most surgeons reported being more careful upon restart.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cataract Extraction/trends , Cataract/epidemiology , Quarantine , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Aged , College Fraternities and Sororities , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Spine (Phila Pa 1976) ; 45(18): 1285-1292, 2020 Sep 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1104988

ABSTRACT

STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on the clinical practices of spine surgeons within the Asia Pacific region. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: COVID-19 pandemic had changed spine surgeons' clinical practices and their concerns toward personal and family risk of infection. METHODS: This cross-sectional survey was carried out from May 4, 2020 to June 4, 2020. The questionnaire was administered using REDCAP. The online questionnaire includes four sections. First section includes surgeon's demographics, background, type of clinical practice, and status of pandemic in their country. Second section includes volume and the type of spine surgery practice before the COVID pandemic. Third section includes changes of clinical practice during the pandemic and the last section was regarding their concern on COVID transmission. RESULTS: Total of 222 respondents from 19 countries completed the questionnaire. During the pandemic, 92.3% of the respondents felt their clinical practice was affected. 58.5% respondents reported reduced outpatient clinic hours and 74.6% respondents reported reduced operation theatre hours due to the enforcement by the hospital administration. The mean reduction of clinic volume for all countries was 48.1%. There was a significant reduction in the number of surgeries performed in Japan, Malaysia, India, Philippines, and South Korea. This was due to reduced patient load. More than 60% of respondents were worried being infected by COVID-19 virus and >68% were worried of transmission to their family members. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected the clinical and surgical practice of spine surgeons in the Asia Pacific region. Clinics were closed or the practice hours reduced. Similarly, surgical theaters were closed, reduced, or limited to semi-emergency and emergency surgeries. Spine surgeons were moderately concerned of contracting COVID-19 during their clinical practice but were extremely concerned to transmit this disease to their family members. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 4.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Spine/surgery , Surgeons , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , Asia , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgeons/psychology , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data
18.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 69(3): 706-708, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1089030

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of COVID-19 lockdown on keratoplasty and Eye Banking in India. METHODS: An e-mail survey was conducted among cornea surgeons and eye bankers of India. Participants were asked to report their practice patterns for the management of corneal perforation during lockdown, different preservative media used during and before lockdown, and waiting time and waiting time before COVID-19 lockdown. RESULTS: Eight of 20 eye banks did not collect corneal tissue during April-June 2020; in contrast, 9 eye banks used to collect around 100 corneas per month during pre-COVID-19 time. Two-third of the surgeons (66.1%, n = 41/62) did not perform any corneal tissue transplant between April and June 2020. Cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive application was the most commonly, performed procedure (79%, n = 49/62) for tectonic purpose during this period. Glycerol was the most preferred alternative preservation method considered by both the groups. More than half of the surgeons (64.5%, n = 40/62) had an average waiting time of <1 week for scheduling patients for keratoplasty in pre-COVID-19 period. CONCLUSION: There is was a significant drop in both corneal tissue retrieval and utilization during during COVID-19 lockdown. There was a felt need for an alternate long term storage media.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Corneal Diseases/surgery , Corneal Transplantation/methods , Eye Banks/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine , Tissue Donors/statistics & numerical data , Comorbidity , Corneal Diseases/epidemiology , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
J Pak Med Assoc ; 71(Suppl 1)(1): S18-S22, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1080068

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of coronavirus disease on surgical training. Methods: The cross-sectional study was conducted at the General Surgery Department of Liaquat National Hospital, Karachi, from August 2019 to May 2020, and comprised surgical trainees from year 1 to 4. The subjects were interviewed and inquired about their opinion regarding the impact of coronavirus disease on their training. Data was prospectively collected in two equal phases of 5 months each, separating the phases on the basis of the application of preventive measures and changes relating to coronavirus disease. Data of cases from log books was divided into major and minor cases. RESULTS: Of the 24 surgical trainees available, 18(75%) participated; 12(66.6%) females and 6(33.3%) males. There was a significant difference between the two phases, with the number of surgical case going down drastically in the second phase (p=0.005), affecting the training process. CONCLUSIONS: Considering the ongoing pandemic, it may be worthwhile to look into the possibility of increasing the duration of training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , General Surgery , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Surgeons/education , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , General Surgery/education , General Surgery/organization & administration , General Surgery/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Pakistan , SARS-CoV-2
20.
J Surg Res ; 264: 534-543, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1078051

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare systems and surgical residency training programs have been significantly affected by the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. A shelter-in-place and social distancing mandate went into effect in our county on March 16, 2020, considerably altering clinical and educational operations. Along with the suspension of elective procedures, resident academic curricula transitioned to an entirely virtual platform. We aimed to evaluate the impact of these modifications on surgical training and resident concerns about COVID-19. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We surveyed residents and fellows from all eight surgical specialties at our institution regarding their COVID-19 experiences from March to May 2020. Residents completed the survey via a secure Qualtrics link. A total of 38 questions addressed demographic information and perspectives regarding the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on surgical training, education, and general coping during the pandemic. RESULTS: Of 256 eligible participants across surgical specialties, 146 completed the survey (57.0%). Junior residents comprised 43.6% (n = 61), compared to seniors 37.1% (n = 52) and fellows 19.3% (n = 27). Most participants, 97.9% (n = 138), anticipated being able to complete their academic year on time, and 75.2% (n = 100) perceived virtual learning to be the same as or better than in-person didactic sessions. Participants were most concerned about their ability to have sufficient knowledge and skills to care for patients with COVID-19, and the possibility of exposure to COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Although COVID-19 impacted residents' overall teaching and clinical volume, residency programs may identify novel virtual opportunities to meet their educational and research milestones during these challenging times.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/prevention & control , Internship and Residency/methods , Specialties, Surgical/education , Surgeons/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Clinical Competence , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Distance/standards , Elective Surgical Procedures/education , Elective Surgical Procedures/standards , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/standards , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Physical Distancing , Surgeons/education , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , United States/epidemiology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL