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1.
Ann R Coll Surg Engl ; 103(7): 496-498, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1288680

ABSTRACT

As the COVID-19 pandemic progressed across the UK and Northern Ireland in March 2020, our otolaryngology department began to make preparations and changes in practice to accommodate for potentially large numbers of patients with COVID-19 related respiratory illness in the hospital. We retrospectively reviewed the number of non-elective admissions to our department between the months of January and May in 2019 and 2020. A significant reduction in admissions of up to 94% during the months of the pandemic was observed. Our practice shifted to manage patients with epistaxis and peritonsillar abscess on an outpatient basis, and while prospectively collecting data on this, we did not observe any significant adverse events. We view this as a positive learning point and change in our practice as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures/trends , COVID-19/prevention & control , Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures/trends , Patient Admission/trends , Surgery Department, Hospital/trends , Ambulatory Surgical Procedures/standards , Ambulatory Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Epistaxis/surgery , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Northern Ireland/epidemiology , Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures/standards , Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Admission/standards , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Peritonsillar Abscess/surgery , Retrospective Studies , Surgery Department, Hospital/standards , Surgery Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data
2.
Ann R Coll Surg Engl ; 103(7): 524-529, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1288677

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, numerous bariatric surgical units globally have halted weight loss surgery. Obesity itself has been shown to be a predictor of poor outcome in people infected with the virus. The aim of this study was to report our experience as a high-volume bariatric institution resuming elective weight loss surgery safely amidst emergency admissions of COVID-19-positive patients. METHODS: A standard operating procedure based on national guidance and altered to accommodate local considerations was initiated across the hospital. Data were collected prospectively for 50 consecutive patients undergoing bariatric surgery following recommencement of elective surgery after the first national lockdown in the UK. RESULTS: Between 28 June and 5 August 2020, a total of 50 patients underwent bariatric surgery of whom 94% were female. Median age was 41 years and median body mass index was 43.8 (interquartile range 40.0-48.8)kg/m2. Half of the patients (n = 25/50) underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and half underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). Of these 50 patients, 9 (18%) had revisional bariatric surgery. Overall median length of hospital stay was 1 day, with 96% of the study population being discharged within 24h of surgery. The overall rate of readmission was 6% and one patient (2%) returned to theatre with an obstruction proximal to jejuno-jejunal anastomosis. None of the patients exhibited symptoms or tested positive for COVID-19. CONCLUSION: With appropriately implemented measures and precautions, resumption of bariatric surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic appears feasible and safe with no increased risk to patients.


Subject(s)
Bariatric Surgery/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Elective Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Obesity, Morbid/surgery , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Adult , Bariatric Surgery/standards , Bariatric Surgery/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Testing/standards , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , Clinical Protocols/standards , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Elective Surgical Procedures/standards , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Enhanced Recovery After Surgery/standards , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity, Morbid/complications , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Readmission/statistics & numerical data , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Surgery Department, Hospital/standards , Surgery Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data
3.
Ann R Coll Surg Engl ; 103(7): 487-492, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1288676

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, our emergency general surgery (EGS) service underwent significant restructuring, including establishing an enhanced ambulatory service and undertaking nonoperative management of selected pathologies. The aim of this study was to compare the activity of our EGS service before and after these changes. METHODS: Patients referred by the emergency department were identified prospectively over a 4-week period beginning from the date our EGS service was reconfigured (COVID) and compared with patients identified retrospectively from the same period the previous year (Pre-COVID), and followed up for 30 days. Data were extracted from handover documents and electronic care records. The primary outcomes were the rate of admission, ambulation and discharge. RESULTS: There were 281 and 283 patients during the Pre-COVID and COVID periods respectively. Admission rate decreased from 78.7% to 41.7%, while there were increased rates of ambulation from 7.1% to 17.3% and discharge from 6% to 22.6% (all p<0.001). For inpatients, mean duration of admission decreased (6.9 to 4.8 days), and there were fewer operative or endoscopic interventions (78 to 40). There were increased ambulatory investigations (11 to 39) and telephone reviews (0 to 39), while early computed tomography scan was increasingly used to facilitate discharge (5% vs 34.7%). There were no differences in 30-day readmission or mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Restructuring of our EGS service in response to COVID-19 facilitated an increased use of ambulatory services and imaging, achieving a decrease of 952 inpatient bed days in this critical period, while maintaining patient safety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Emergency Treatment/statistics & numerical data , General Surgery/organization & administration , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Adult , Aged , Ambulatory Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Conservative Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Service, Hospital/standards , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Treatment/methods , Emergency Treatment/standards , Female , Follow-Up Studies , General Surgery/standards , General Surgery/statistics & numerical data , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infection Control/standards , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Readmission/statistics & numerical data , Patient Safety/standards , Prospective Studies , Referral and Consultation/organization & administration , Referral and Consultation/standards , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surgery Department, Hospital/standards , Surgery Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data
4.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 148(1): 168e-169e, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263729

Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Infection Control/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Surgery, Plastic/organization & administration , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Testing/standards , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 Testing/trends , Egypt/epidemiology , Elective Surgical Procedures/standards , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Elective Surgical Procedures/trends , Health Policy , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Infection Control/trends , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/standards , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/trends , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surgery Department, Hospital/standards , Surgery Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Surgery Department, Hospital/trends , Surgery, Plastic/standards , Surgery, Plastic/statistics & numerical data , Surgery, Plastic/trends , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Tertiary Care Centers/standards , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Care Centers/trends , Triage/organization & administration , Triage/standards , Triage/statistics & numerical data , Triage/trends
5.
Eur J Trauma Emerg Surg ; 47(3): 677-682, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1212849

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To evaluate and analyze the impact of lockdown strategy due to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on emergency general surgery (EGS) in the Milan area at the beginning of pandemic outbreak. METHODS: A survey was distributed to 14 different hospitals of the Milan area to analyze the variation of EGS procedures. Each hospital reported the number of EGS procedures in the same time frame comparing 2019 and 2020. The survey revealed that the number of patients during the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak in 2020 was reduced by 19% when compared with 2019. The decrease was statistically significant only for abdominal wall surgery. Interestingly, in 2020, there was an increase of three procedures: surgical intervention for acute mesenteric ischemia (p = 0.002), drainage of perianal abscesses (p = 0.000285), and cholecystostomy for acute cholecystitis (p = 0.08). CONCLUSIONS: During the first COVID-19 pandemic wave in the metropolitan area of Milan, the number of patients operated for emergency diseases decreased by around 19%. We believe that this decrease is related either to the fear of the population to ask for emergency department (ED) consultation and to a shift towards a more non-operative management in the surgeons 'decision making' process. The increase of acute mesenteric ischaemia and perianal abscess might be related to the modification of dietary habits and reduction of physical activity related to the lockdown.


Subject(s)
Abscess , Anus Diseases , COVID-19 , Cholecystitis, Acute , Infection Control , Mesenteric Ischemia , Surgical Procedures, Operative , Abscess/epidemiology , Abscess/surgery , Adult , Anus Diseases/epidemiology , Anus Diseases/surgery , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Cholecystitis, Acute/epidemiology , Cholecystitis, Acute/surgery , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Female , General Surgery/trends , Health Services Misuse/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Incidence , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Mesenteric Ischemia/epidemiology , Mesenteric Ischemia/surgery , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgery Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Surgical Procedures, Operative/methods , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data
9.
S Afr Med J ; 0(0): 13182, 2020 12 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-984482

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to the implementation of restrictive policies on theatre procedures, with profound impacts on service delivery and theatre output. OBJECTIVES: To quantify these effects at a tertiary hospital in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa. METHODS: A retrospective review of morbidity and mortality data was conducted. The effects on emergency and elective caseload, intensive care unit (ICU) admissions from theatre, theatre cancellations and regional techniques were noted. RESULTS: Theatre caseload decreased by 30% from January to April 2020 (p=0.02), ICU admissions remained constant, and theatre cancellations were proportionally reduced, as were the absolute number of regional techniques. CONCLUSIONS: The resulting theatre case deficit was 1 260 cases. It will take 315 days to clear this deficit if four additional surgeries are performed per day.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Infection Control , Surgery Department, Hospital , Tertiary Healthcare , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Female , Health Policy , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Male , Mortality , Needs Assessment , Organizational Innovation , Safety Management/trends , South Africa/epidemiology , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Surgery Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Healthcare/organization & administration , Tertiary Healthcare/trends
10.
Am Surg ; 86(12): 1629-1635, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-965776

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The role of an acute care surgery (ACS) service during the COVID-19 pandemic is not well established. METHODS: A retrospective review of the ACS service performance in an urban tertiary academic medical center. The study was performed between January and May 2020. The demographics, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of patients treated by the ACS service 2 months prior to the COVID surge (pre-COVID group) and during the first 2 months of the COVID-19 pandemic (surge group) were compared. RESULTS: Trauma and emergency general surgery volumes decreased during the surge by 38% and 57%, respectively; but there was a 64% increase in critically ill patients. The proportion of patients in the Department of Surgery treated by the ACS service increased from 40% pre-COVID to 67% during the surge. The ACS service performed 32% and 57% of all surgical cases in the Department of Surgery during the pre-COVID and surge periods, respectively. The ACS service managed 23% of all critically ill patients in the institution during the surge. Critically ill patients with and without confirmed COVID-19 infection treated by ACS and non-ACS intensive care units during the surge did not differ in demographics, indicators of clinical severity, or hospital mortality:13.4% vs. 13.5% (P = .99) for all critically ill patients; and 13.9% vs. 27.4% (P = .12) for COVID-19 critically ill patients. CONCLUSION: Acute care surgery is an "essential" service during the COVID-19 pandemic, capable of managing critically ill nonsurgical patients while maintaining the provision of trauma and emergent surgical services. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: III. STUDY TYPE: Therapeutic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Care/organization & administration , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Urban/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgery Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Wounds and Injuries/surgery
11.
J Surg Res ; 260: 300-306, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-922084

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has mandated rapid adoption of telehealth for surgical care. However, many surgical providers may be unfamiliar with telehealth. This study evaluates the perspectives of surgical providers practicing telehealth care during COVID-19 to help identify targets for surgical telehealth optimization. MATERIALS AND METHODS: At a single tertiary care center with telehealth capabilities, all department of surgery providers (attending surgeons, residents, fellows, and advanced practice providers) were emailed a voluntary survey focused on telehealth during the pandemic. Descriptive statistics and Mann-Whitney U analyses were performed as appropriate on responses. Text responses were thematically coded to identify key concepts. RESULTS: The completion rate was 41.3% (145/351). Providers reported increased telehealth usage relative to the pandemic (P < 0.001). Of respondents, 80% (116/145) had no formal telehealth training. Providers estimated that new patient video visits required less time than traditional visits (P = 0.001). Satisfaction was high for several aspects of video visits. Comparatively lower satisfaction scores were reported for the ability to perform physical exams (sensitive and nonsensitive) and to break bad news. The largest barriers to effective video visits were limited physical exams (55.6%; 45/81) and lack of provider or patient internet access/equipment/connection (34.6%; 28/81). Other barriers included ineffective communication and difficulty with fostering rapport. Concerns regarding video-to-telephone visit conversion were loss of physical exam/visual cues (34.3%; 24/70), less personal interactions (18.6%; 13/70), and reduced efficiency (18.6%; 13/70). CONCLUSIONS: Telehealth remains a new experience for surgical providers despite its expansion. Optimization strategies should target technology barriers and include specialized virtual exam and communication training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Videoconferencing/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Communication , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Satisfaction , Physical Distancing , Physician-Patient Relations , Quality Improvement , Surgeons/psychology , Surgery Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Surgery Department, Hospital/trends , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/trends , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Care Centers/trends , Videoconferencing/statistics & numerical data , Videoconferencing/trends
12.
Eur J Trauma Emerg Surg ; 47(3): 647-652, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-897943

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of COVID-19 pandemic on general surgical emergencies as well as analyzing the effectiveness of measures taken in reducing the incidence of COVID-19 in patients and healthcare professionals. METHODS: Patients who underwent emergency surgery between the pandemic period of March 14th to May 15th 2020 and within the same period from the previous year were reviewed retrospectively. COVID-19 incidence in patients and health professionals working in the general surgery department during these periods was questioned. RESULTS: Demographic data were similar between the two time periods. The number of patients who underwent surgery in the pandemic group (n = 103) was lower than the control group (n = 252). There was a 59.1% reduction in emergency surgeries. The biggest decreases were the admissions of incarcerated hernia, uncomplicated appendicitis and acute cholecystitis (92%, 81.3%, 47.3%, respectively). During the pandemic, an increase was of patient rates who underwent surgery for complicated appendicitis and AMIO (p = 0.001, p = 0.019, respectively). The rate of mortality was higher in patients who underwent emergency surgery during pandemic (p = 0.049). The results of COVID-19 screening were positive in 6 (6/103, 5.82%) patients undergoing emergency surgery. None of the doctors working in the ward were infected with COVID-19 infection (0/20). The screening tests were positive in only two nurses working on the ward (2/24, 8.33%). CONCLUSION: In this and similar pandemics, we suggest that a new algorithm is necessary to approach emergencies and the results of this study can contribute to that end.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergencies/epidemiology , Infection Control , Surgical Procedures, Operative , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Female , General Surgery/methods , General Surgery/organization & administration , Health Services Needs and Demand , Humans , Incidence , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgery Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Surgical Procedures, Operative/methods , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , Turkey/epidemiology
13.
J Surg Res ; 259: 326-331, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-894081

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As a result of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, many Pediatric Surgery Fellowship programs were forced to convert their normal in-person interviews into virtual interviews. This study sought to determine the perceived value of virtual interviews for Pediatric Surgery Fellowship. METHODS: An anonymous survey was distributed to the applicants and faculty at a university-affiliated, free-standing children's hospital with a Pediatric Surgery fellowship program that conducted one of three interview days using a virtual format. RESULTS: All applicants who responded to the survey had at least one interview that was converted to a virtual interview. Faculty (75%) and applicants (87.5%) preferred in-person interviews over virtual interviews; most applicants (57%) did not feel they got to know the program as well with the virtual format. Applicants and faculty felt that virtual interviews could potentially be used as a screening tool in the future (7/10 Likert) but did not recommend they be used as a complete replacement for in-person interviews (3.5-5/10 Likert). Applicants were more likely than faculty to report that interview type influenced their final rank list (5 versus 3/10 Likert). CONCLUSIONS: Faculty and applicants preferred in-person interviews and did not recommend that virtual interviews replace in-person interviews. As the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic continues, more virtual interviews will be necessary, and innovations may be necessary to ensure an optimal interview process. TYPE OF STUDY: Survey. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: N/A.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Interviews as Topic/methods , Personnel Selection/methods , Specialties, Surgical/education , Videoconferencing , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Faculty/statistics & numerical data , Fellowships and Scholarships/organization & administration , Hospitals, Pediatric/organization & administration , Hospitals, Pediatric/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, University/organization & administration , Hospitals, University/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Interviews as Topic/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personnel Selection/organization & administration , Personnel Selection/statistics & numerical data , Physical Distancing , Specialties, Surgical/organization & administration , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Surgery Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data
14.
In Vivo ; 34(5): 3033-3038, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-740634

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: SARS-CoV-2 pandemic imposed extraordinary restriction measures and a complete reorganization of the Health System. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 on emergency surgical department accesses. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients admitted to surgical emergency departments was retrospectively recorded during the Lockdown (March 11, 2020-May 3, 2020) and compared with the same number of days in 2019 and immediately before Lockdown (January 16, 2020-March 10, 2020). Diagnoses, priority levels, modes of patient's transportation, waiting times and outcomes were analysed. RESULTS: During the lockdown phase, we ob-served a reduction in the access to emergency surgical departments of 84.45% and 79.78%, com-pared with the Pre-Lockdown2019 and Pre-Lockdown2020 groups, respectively. Patient's transportation, hospitalization and patients discharge with indications to an outpatient visit, waiting and total times exhibited a significant difference during the lockdown (p<0.005). CONCLUSION: We observed a reduction of surgical emergency accesses during the lockdown. Implementing the use of the regional systems and preventing overcrowding of emergency departments could be beneficial for reducing waiting times and improving the quality of treatments for patients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Surgery Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Female , Health Systems Plans , Hospitalization , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
16.
J Surg Res ; 256: 76-82, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-658963

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has brought most ongoing clinical trials to a standstill, while at the same time emphasizing the need for new therapeutic treatments and strategies to mitigate the morbidity and mortality related to COVID-19. Recent publication of several observational studies has generated much discussion surrounding efficacy of drugs including hydroxychloroquine, azithromycin, and remdesivir, stressing the need for high-quality prospective, randomized control trials in patients with COVID-19. Ongoing "stay at home" orders and institutional policies mandating "work from home" for nonessential employees, which includes most research personnel, have impacted the ability to implement and conduct clinical studies. This article discusses the approach of an experienced clinical trials unit to make adjustments for ongoing studies and ensure the safety of study participants. At the same time, plans were implemented to continue collection of data to achieve endpoints, safely enroll and follow participants in studies offering potential benefit, and quickly implement new COVID-19 clinical trials. The existence of a Division of Clinical Research with regulatory, budgeting, contracting, and coordinating expertise within a department of surgery can successfully accommodate a crisis situation and rapidly adapt to new requirements for the safe, efficient, and effective conversion to a remote work force without compromising the research process.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Clinical Trials as Topic/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Physical Distancing , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , California , Clinical Trials as Topic/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, University/organization & administration , Hospitals, University/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, University/trends , Humans , Patient Safety , Patient Selection , Surgery Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Surgery Department, Hospital/trends
18.
J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Tech A ; 30(9): 1001-1007, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-616126

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Emergency departments (EDs) during the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic are perceived as possible sources of infection. The effects of COVID-19 on patients presenting to the hospital with surgical complaints remain uncertain. Methods: A single tertiary center retrospective study analysis compared the ED attendance rate and severity of patients with surgical complaints between March 2020 (COVID-19 outbreak) and pre-COVID-19 periods: February 2020 and the same 2 months in 2019 and 2018. Results: Overall, 6,017 patients were included. The mean daily ED visits of patients with nontrauma surgical complaints in the COVID-19 outbreak period declined by 27%-32% (P value <.01) compared with pre-COVID-19 periods. The log number of confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) cases in Israel in March 2020 was negatively correlated with the number of ED visits (Pearson's r = -0.59, P < .01). The proportion of patients requiring hospitalization increased by up to 8% during the outbreak period (P < .01), and there was a higher proportion of tachycardic patients (20% versus 15.5%, P = .01). The percentage of visits to the ED by men declined by 5% (P < .01). The ED diagnosis distribution significantly changed during COVID-19 (P = .013), with an 84% decrease in the number of patients hospitalized for diverticular disease (P < .05). Conclusion: During the COVID-19 outbreak, the overall number of patients presenting at the ED with surgical complaints decreased significantly, and there was a higher admissions ratio. The extent to which the pandemic affects hospital ED attendance can help health care professionals prepare for future such events. ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT04338672.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Surgery Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Female , Health Personnel , Hospitalization , Humans , Intestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Israel/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Tachycardia/epidemiology , Young Adult
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