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2.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 148(3): 462e-474e, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1371774

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had a profound effect on surgical training programs, reflecting decreases in elective surgical cases and emergency restructuring of clinical teams. The effect of these measures on U.S. plastic surgery resident education and wellness has not been characterized. METHODS: An institutional review board-exempted anonymous survey was developed through expert panel discussion and pilot testing. All current U.S. plastic surgery trainees were invited to complete a cross-sectional 28-question survey in April of 2020. Respondents were queried regarding demographic information, educational experiences, and wellness during the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: A total of 668 residents responded to the survey, corresponding to a 56.1 percent response rate. Sex, training program type, postgraduate year, and region were well represented within the sample. Nearly all trainees (97.1 percent) reported restructuring of their clinical teams. One-sixth of respondents were personally redeployed to assist with the care of COVID-19 patients. A considerable proportion of residents felt that the COVID-19 pandemic had a negative impact on their education (58.1 percent) and wellness (84.8 percent). Residents found virtual curriculum effective and meaningful, and viewed an average of 4.2 lectures weekly. Although most residents did not anticipate a change in career path, some reported negative consequences on job prospects or fellowship. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic had a considerable impact on U.S. plastic surgery education and wellness. Although reductions in case volume may be temporary, this may represent a loss of critical, supervised clinical experience. Some effects may be positive, such as the development of impactful virtual lectures that allow for cross-institutional curriculum.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Health Status , Internship and Residency , Students, Medical/psychology , Surgery, Plastic/education , Adult , Career Choice , Cross-Sectional Studies , Curriculum , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Distance/trends , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/trends , Male , Mental Health , Physical Distancing , Social Support , Stress, Psychological , Surgery, Plastic/organization & administration , Surgery, Plastic/trends , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
3.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 148(1): 133e-139e, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284960

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY: The coronavirus disease of 2019 pandemic became a global threat in a matter of weeks, with its future implications yet to be defined. New York City was swiftly declared the epicenter of the pandemic in the United States as case numbers grew exponentially in a matter of days, quickly threatening to overwhelm the capacity of the health care system. This burgeoning crisis led practitioners across specialties to adapt and mobilize rapidly. Plastic surgeons and trainees within the New York University Langone Health system faced uncertainty in terms of future practice, in addition to immediate and long-term effects on undergraduate and graduate medical education. The administration remained vigilant and adaptive, enacting departmental policies prioritizing safety and productivity, with early deployment of faculty for clinical support at the front lines. The authors anticipate that this pandemic will have far-reaching effects on the future of plastic surgery education, trends in the pursuit of elective surgical procedures, and considerable consequences for certain research endeavors. Undoubtedly, there will be substantial impact on the physical and mental well-being of health care practitioners across specialties. Coordinated efforts and clear lines of communication between the Department of Plastic Surgery and its faculty and trainees allowed a concerted effort toward the immediate challenge of tempering the spread of coronavirus disease of 2019 and preserving structure and throughput for education and research. Adaptation and creativity have ultimately allowed for early rebooting of in-person clinical and surgical practice. The authors present their coordinated efforts and lessons gleaned from their experience to inform their community's preparedness as this formidable challenge evolves.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Surgery, Plastic/trends , Academic Medical Centers/standards , Academic Medical Centers/statistics & numerical data , Academic Medical Centers/trends , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Graduate/standards , Education, Medical, Graduate/trends , Elective Surgical Procedures/education , Elective Surgical Procedures/standards , Elective Surgical Procedures/trends , Faculty/organization & administration , Faculty/psychology , Faculty/statistics & numerical data , Forecasting , Humans , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , New York City/epidemiology , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/organization & administration , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/trends , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/education , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/standards , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/trends , Surgeons/organization & administration , Surgeons/psychology , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Surgery, Plastic/education , Surgery, Plastic/organization & administration , Surgery, Plastic/standards , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Uncertainty , Universities/standards , Universities/statistics & numerical data , Universities/trends
4.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 148(1): 168e-169e, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263729

Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Infection Control/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Surgery, Plastic/organization & administration , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Testing/standards , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 Testing/trends , Egypt/epidemiology , Elective Surgical Procedures/standards , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Elective Surgical Procedures/trends , Health Policy , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Infection Control/trends , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/standards , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/trends , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surgery Department, Hospital/standards , Surgery Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Surgery Department, Hospital/trends , Surgery, Plastic/standards , Surgery, Plastic/statistics & numerical data , Surgery, Plastic/trends , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Tertiary Care Centers/standards , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Care Centers/trends , Triage/organization & administration , Triage/standards , Triage/statistics & numerical data , Triage/trends
7.
Orbit ; 40(1): 44-50, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-977307

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The authors aim to characterize oculofacial plastic surgery-related online interest that may be useful in forecasting demand and in designing patient-directed online resources. Methods: The authors queried Google Trends for over 100 oculofacial plastic surgery terms. The main outcome measure was the top 50 oculofacial plastic surgery-related search terms from 2004 to 2020. Secondary outcomes were trends, including seasonality, and search volume changes during the COVID-19 lockdown (March-May 2020) compared to 2018-2019. Terms were analyzed individually and in thematic categories; controlled against generic search terms to account for general internet traffic. Results: Between 2004 and 2020, searches for oculofacial plastic surgery altogether increased, surpassing the rate of internet traffic growth. One thematic category - eyelid malpositions - decreased month-over-month. The top five terms were "face lift," "Bell's palsy," "puffy eyes," "dark circles under eyes," and "chalazion." Eyelid neoplasms searches peaked in summer (R2  = 0.880) whereas cosmetic (R2  = 0.862), symptoms (R 2 = 0.907), and surgeries (R 2 = 0.140) peaked in winter. Overall, oculofacial-related searches decreased during the COVID-19 lockdown, although thyroid eye disease interest increased compared to 2018 or 2019 (+68.6%; adj. p = .005). Oculofacial plastic surgery interest in 2020 was inversely correlated to "COVID-19" searches (r = -0.76, p < .001). Conclusions: Oculofacial plastic surgery searches increased since 2004 at a pace greater than that ascribed to internet traffic growth. The most searched terms were "face lift," "Bell's palsy," "puffy eyes," "dark circles under eyes," and "chalazion." Almost all oculofacial-related searches decreased during the COVID-19 lockdown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Online Systems/trends , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Search Engine/trends , Surgery, Plastic/trends , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Information Seeking Behavior , Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures , Rhytidoplasty
9.
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg ; 74(3): 644-710, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-912071

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 cornovirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has significantly affected referrals of new suspected cancers from primary care to specialist services in the National Health Service (NHS) across the UK.  Amongst the many factors causing delay, such as fear and uncertainty about COVID-19 transmission, reluctance to seek medical attention for cancer sypmtoms and avoiding additional pressure on NHS services, we anticipate a surge in urgent skin cancer referrals to our plastic surgery service as we enter a post-COVID recovery phase.  On the basis of previous referral data and statistical forecasting, we share our predicted numbers against our actual number of urgent skin cancer referrals for the COVID-19 period and, based on this analysis, encourage all cancer services to prepare and allocate resources appropriately for the busy months to follow.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Referral and Consultation , Skin Neoplasms , Surgery, Plastic , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Critical Pathways/trends , Early Detection of Cancer/methods , Early Detection of Cancer/standards , Health Services Misuse/prevention & control , Health Services Misuse/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Needs Assessment , Referral and Consultation/organization & administration , Referral and Consultation/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Skin Neoplasms/diagnosis , Skin Neoplasms/epidemiology , Skin Neoplasms/surgery , Surgery, Plastic/methods , Surgery, Plastic/organization & administration , Surgery, Plastic/trends , United Kingdom/epidemiology
10.
Facial Plast Surg Aesthet Med ; 22(6): 464-470, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-861976

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The objectives of this study among facial plastic and reconstructive surgeons (FPRS), include (1) quantifying the use of telemedicine, (2) examining the impact of novel coronavirus-19 (COVID-19) on telemedicine practices, (3) highlighting the types of telemedicine employed, (4) anticipating how telemedicine will be utilized in the future, and (5) describing FPRS' attitudes and understanding of telemedicine technologies. Study Type: Cross-sectional survey. Methods: A 6-13 question survey was sent to the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery membership. Descriptive analyses were performed, along with a Fisher's exact test. Results: We received 100 responses from a diverse group of surgeons across the United States. Overall, 91% of responders utilize telemedicine, of which 76.9% began during the COVID-19 pandemic. 33.3% of responders thought that their platforms were not Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant or were unsure. Of those that utilize telemedicine, the two biggest concerns were difficulties with physical examination (69.2%) and lack of human connection (44%). 75.8% of telemedicine utilizers plan to incorporate telemedicine into their practice moving forward. Of all responders, 71% believed that telemedicine will have a positive effect on the field of FPRS, although on univariate analysis those in practice >20 years were more likely to believe that there will be no effect or a negative effect (p = 0.014). Conclusions: The COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated the adoption of telemedicine among FPRS in the United States. The great majority of responders plan to incorporate telemedicine into their practice even after the pandemic subsides and believe that telemedicine will have a net positive effect on the field of FPRS.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Perioperative Care/trends , Pneumonia, Viral , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures , Surgery, Plastic/trends , Telemedicine/trends , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Perioperative Care/methods , Surgeons , Surgery, Plastic/methods , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/methods , United States
12.
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg ; 74(2): 401-406, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-778528

ABSTRACT

At the time of writing, coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) has affected 6.42 million people globally and over 380,000 deaths, with the United Kingdom now having the highest death rate in Europe. The plastic surgery department at Leeds Teaching Hospitals put necessary steps in place to maintain an excellent urgent elective and acute service whilst also managing COVID-positive medical patients in the ward. We describe the structures and pathways implemented together with complex decision-making, which has allowed us to respond early and effectively. We hope these lessons will prove a useful tool as we look to open conversations around the recovery of normal activity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospital Departments , Infection Control , Neoplasms/surgery , Surgery, Plastic , Wounds and Injuries/surgery , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , Change Management , Child , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Elective Surgical Procedures , Hospital Departments/methods , Hospital Departments/organization & administration , Hospital Departments/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgery, Plastic/education , Surgery, Plastic/organization & administration , Surgery, Plastic/trends , Teaching/organization & administration , Teaching/trends , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Wounds and Injuries/epidemiology
15.
Aesthetic Plast Surg ; 44(4): 1378-1380, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-695557

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a multitude of effects on daily life. Aesthetic and cosmetic surgery practices have been significantly reduced in their working capacity or closed during this time. We used Google Trends to gauge the public's interest in facial plastic surgery during this pandemic, and how it has changed over the preceding months. As local shelter-in-place orders are being lifted, interest in facial plastic surgery is increasing even in the context of an ongoing national pandemic. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE V: Letter to the Editor.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Esthetics , Marketing of Health Services/trends , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Social Media/trends , Surgery, Plastic/trends , COVID-19 , Decision Making , Humans , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures , Rhinoplasty/trends , Rhytidoplasty/trends
16.
Handchir Mikrochir Plast Chir ; 52(3): 233-241, 2020 Jun.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-599532

ABSTRACT

The first case of a SARS-Cov-2 virus infection was confirmed on January 27th in Munich. For both, plastic and hand surgeons it is crucial to act responsible, minimize the transmission of the virus and aid in reasonable and adequate allocation of resources for the treatment of affected patients during this pandemia. This article aims to provide an overview over the latest developments and insights that affect plastic and hand surgeons. At the same time plastic and hand surgeons are required to participate actively in the discussion of new regulatory measures that on one hand aim to ensure a proper medical care of COVID-19 patients and on the other hand need to guarantee coverage of all other patients. Furthermore exit - strategies after the pandemia need to be discussed by our societies. Naturally, this manuscript provides insight into the current situation, which might undergo changes due to the swift progression of the pandemia.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Hand/surgery , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Surgery, Plastic , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgery, Plastic/trends
18.
Handchir Mikrochir Plast Chir ; 52(3): 221-232, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-307697

ABSTRACT

The present article provides an overview of the current and expected effects of plastic surgery in Europe. It presents the experience of departments for plastic and reconstructive surgery, as evaluated by interviews with members of the Executive Committee (ExCo) of the European Society of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery (ESPRAS). The objective of this overview is to summmarise current information in our area of work and to make this accessible to a broad group of readers. As our knowledge is rapidly increasing during the current pandemic, it is evident that we can only provide a snapshot and this will inevitably be incomplete.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures , Surgery, Plastic , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Europe/epidemiology , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgery, Plastic/trends , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
Orbit ; 39(4): 316-318, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-66227

ABSTRACT

At present, all parts of the world are hit hard by COVID-19. The first confirmed case of COVID-19 in the territory of Hong Kong was announced on January 23, 2020. Since then, oculoplastic surgeons in Hong Kong have been taking every measure to protect all healthcare workers and patients from contracting the disease. This paper aims to share the experiences of and measures taken by local oculoplastic surgeons in combating COVID-19. Three main aspects are discussed, namely clinical, administrative, and training and educational. We hope our experiences would provide reference to fellow oculoplastic colleagues in other parts of the world in fighting this COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Blepharoplasty/methods , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures/methods , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Rhinoplasty/methods , Blepharoplasty/trends , COVID-19 , Female , Hong Kong , Humans , Male , Rhinoplasty/trends , Risk Assessment , Surgery, Plastic/trends
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