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1.
Surg Endosc ; 36(1): 321-327, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1620264

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) remains demanding due to technical difficulties and high risk of perforation. Most of the reported traction methods are initiated after creating a mucosal flap, which is time consuming. To obtain a good visualization at the mucosal incision stage, we developed the early clip-with-line (ECL) method. This method was started immediately after injection of sodium hyaluronate solution into the submucosal layer. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy and the safety of the ECL method for colorectal ESD. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed all cases of colorectal ESDs (41 cases in total) performed from January 2017 to February 2019 in our institution. From January 2017 to August 2018, 27 of these cases were performed using conventional (non-ECL) ESDs, while from September 2018 onwards, the remaining 14 cases were performed using the ECL method. Retrospective comparison between the ECL group and the non-ECL group was conducted in terms of clinical characteristics, treatment outcomes, and adverse events. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in clinical characteristics between two groups. Procedure time (median [range]) was significantly shorter in the ECL group than in the non-ECL group (66 [29-131] min vs 90 [30-410] min; P = 0.03). As for adverse events, no case of perforation occurred in the ECL group, whereas perforation was observed in 7.4% (2/27) cases in the non-ECL group (no significant difference). CONCLUSION: Early clip-with-line method for colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection reduced procedure time.


Subject(s)
Colorectal Neoplasms , Endoscopic Mucosal Resection , Colorectal Neoplasms/surgery , Endoscopic Mucosal Resection/methods , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Surgical Instruments , Traction/methods , Treatment Outcome
2.
J Investig Med High Impact Case Rep ; 9: 23247096211013215, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598539

ABSTRACT

Bronchopleural fistula (BPF) is associated with high morbidity if left untreated. Although rare, the frequency of BPF in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is becoming recognized in medical literature. We present a case of a 64-year-old male with BPF with persistent air leak due to SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia treated with Spiration Valve System endobronchial valve (EBV). An EBV was placed in the right middle lobe with successful cessation of air leak. In conclusion, the use of EBVs for BPF with persistent air leaks in SARS-CoV-2 patients who are poor surgical candidates is effective and safe.


Subject(s)
Bronchial Fistula/surgery , Bronchoscopy , COVID-19/complications , Empyema, Pleural/surgery , Pleural Diseases/surgery , Surgical Instruments , Bronchial Fistula/etiology , Chest Tubes , Empyema, Pleural/etiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pleural Diseases/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Thoracostomy
3.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(10): 848-854, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454702

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The Harmonic Scalpel and Ligasure (Covidien) devices are commonly used in head and neck surgery. Parotidectomy is a complex and intricate surgery that requires careful dissection of the facial nerve. This study aimed to compare surgical outcomes in parotidectomy using these haemostatic devices with traditional scalpel and cautery. METHOD: A systematic review of the literature was performed with subsequent meta-analysis of seven studies that compared the use of haemostatic devices to traditional scalpel and cautery in parotidectomy. Outcome measures included: temporary facial paresis, operating time, intra-operative blood loss, post-operative drain output and length of hospital stay. RESULTS: A total of 7 studies representing 675 patients were identified: 372 patients were treated with haemostatic devices, and 303 patients were treated with scalpel and cautery. Statistically significant outcomes favouring the use of haemostatic devices included operating time, intra-operative blood loss and post-operative drain output. Outcome measures that did not favour either treatment included facial nerve paresis and length of hospital stay. CONCLUSION: Overall, haemostatic devices were found to reduce operating time, intra-operative blood loss and post-operative drain output.


Subject(s)
Dissection/adverse effects , Facial Nerve/surgery , Hemostasis, Surgical/instrumentation , Parotid Gland/surgery , Blood Loss, Surgical/statistics & numerical data , Drainage/trends , Electrocoagulation/adverse effects , Facial Paralysis/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Middle Aged , Operative Time , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Postoperative Period , Surgical Instruments/adverse effects
4.
Mil Med ; 186(12 Suppl 2): 35-39, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1381028

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The global 2019 coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) is setting unprecedented demands on the nation and the military and surgical services. Surgical demands include a large backlog of surgical cases, strain on available resources, and the need for additional measures to prevent exposure. The purpose of this project was to evaluate the feasibility, duration, adverse events, and potential gains associated with using a Turbett Sterilization Pod (TSP) for total joint replacements. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A multidisciplinary team used the Plan-Do-Study-Act model to guide this project. A time-motion study was completed in the operating room (OR) to measure the average time required to set up surgical instrumentation for total joint replacement cases that required 12 or more instrument trays. We compared the amount of time it took to complete the setting up of instrumentation using the traditional method versus the TSP method. The traditional method consisted of unwrapping each surgical tray, checking for holes in the blue wrapper, and placing the tray on the back table. In the case of the TSP, the door of the pod was opened, and the instrument trays were transferred directly to the back table. We measured the time the staff took to perform the task using each of these methods. RESULTS: When compared to the traditional method, the use of the TSP resulted in improved turnover time, decreased room setup time, reduced environmental waste, and eliminated both the effect of damage to wrappers and the time previously spent wrapping surgical trays. CONCLUSION: The TSP minimizes the time needed by the staff to set up an OR suite for a total joint replacement, therefore permitting them to focus more on direct patient care. This time improvement suggests that all surgical specialties, including those requiring greater than 12 traditional instrument sets, may experience reduced turnover time between cases. The use of the TSP is one means to help rectify the OR backlog brought on by COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Military Medicine , Cost Savings , Humans , Operating Rooms , SARS-CoV-2 , Sterilization , Surgical Instruments
5.
Eur Ann Otorhinolaryngol Head Neck Dis ; 138(5): 403-404, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293547

ABSTRACT

Tracheostomy remains a topical surgical procedure. The history of tracheostomy is marked by the development of various instruments, including the three-bladed tracheostomy dilator from the middle of the 19th century. The purpose of this historical note is to recall the use of this unusual instrument.


Subject(s)
Dilatation/instrumentation , Surgical Instruments/history , Tracheostomy/instrumentation , History, 19th Century , Humans
7.
World Neurosurg ; 148: e209-e217, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1003130

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The occurrence of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has overwhelmed the blood supply chain worldwide and severely influenced clinical procedures with potential massive blood loss, such as clipping surgery for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Whether acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH) is safe and effective in aneurysm clipping remains largely unknown. METHODS: Patients with aSAH who underwent clipping surgery within 72 hours from bleeding were included. The patients in the ANH group received 400 mL autologous blood collection, and the blood was returned as needed during surgery. The relationships between ANH and perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion, postoperative outcome, and complications were analyzed. RESULTS: Sixty-two patients with aSAH were included between December 2019 and June 2020 (20 in the ANH group and 42 in the non-ANH group). ANH did not reduce the need of perioperative blood transfusion (3 [15%] vs. 5 [11.9%]; P = 0.734). However, ANH significantly increased serum hemoglobin levels on postoperative day 1 (11.5 ± 2.5 g/dL vs. 10.3 ± 2.0 g/dL; P = 0.045) and day 3 (12.1 ± 2.0 g/dL vs. 10.7 ± 1.3 g/dL; P = 0.002). Multivariable analysis indicated that serum hemoglobin level on postoperative day 1 (odds ratio, 0.895; 95% confidence interval, 0.822-0.973; P = 0.010) was an independent risk factor for unfavorable outcome, and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that it had a comparable predictive power to World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies grade (Z = 0.275; P > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: ANH significantly increased postoperative hemoglobin levels, and it may hold the potential to improve patients' outcomes. Routine use of ANH should be considered in aneurysm clipping surgery.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm, Ruptured/surgery , Blood Transfusion, Autologous/methods , Bloodless Medical and Surgical Procedures/methods , Hemodilution/methods , Intracranial Aneurysm/surgery , Neurosurgical Procedures/methods , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/surgery , Adult , Aged , Blood Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Female , Hemoglobins/metabolism , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Perioperative Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgical Instruments
8.
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther ; 52(5): 366-372, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-983603

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 infection has resulted in thousands of critically ill patients admitted to ICUs and treated with mechanical ventilation. Percutaneous tracheostomy is a well-known technique utilised as a strategy to wean critically ill patients from mechanical ventilation. Worldwide differences exist in terms of methods, operators, and settings, and questions remain regarding timing and indications. If tracheostomy is to be performed in COVID-19 patients, a safe environment is needed for optimal care. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We present a guidewire dilating forceps tracheostomy procedure in COVID-19 patients that was optimised including apnoea-moments, protective clothing, checklists, and clear protocols. We performed a retrospective analysis of the outcome after tracheostomy in COVID-19 patients between March 2020 and May 2020. RESULTS: The follow-up of the first 16 patients, median age 62 years, revealed a median intubation time until tracheostomy of 18 days and median cannulation time of 20 days. The overall perioperative complication rate and complication rate while cannulated was 19%, mainly superficial bleeding. None of the healthcare providers involved in performing the procedure developed any symptoms of the disease. CONCLUSIONS: This COVID-19-centred strategy based on flexibility, preparation, and cooperation between healthcare providers with different backgrounds facilitated percutaneous tracheostomy in COVID-19 patients without an increase in the overall complication rate or evidence of risk to healthcare providers. Our findings provide initial evidence that tracheostomy can be performed safely as a standard of care for COVID-19 patients requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation as was standard practice in ICU patients prior to the COVID-19 pandemic to promote ventilator weaning and patient recovery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/surgery , Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures/methods , Tracheostomy/methods , Aged , Anesthesia , Bronchoscopy , Checklist , Critical Care , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures/instrumentation , Personal Protective Equipment , Postoperative Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Postoperative Hemorrhage/therapy , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , Surgical Instruments , Tracheostomy/instrumentation , Ventilator Weaning
10.
Skeletal Radiol ; 49(11): 1873-1877, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-723995

ABSTRACT

The ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has increased the need for safe and efficient testing as a key containment strategy. Drive-through testing with nasopharyngeal swab has been implemented in many places in the USA as it allows for expeditious testing of large numbers of patients, limits healthcare workers' risk of exposure, and minimizes the use of personal protective equipment. We present a case where the aluminum shaft of the nasopharyngeal swab fractured during specimen collection at a drive-through testing facility and was suspected to have remained in the asymptomatic patient. Initial evaluation with a series of radiographs covering the skull base, neck, chest, and abdomen did not reveal the swab. On further clinical evaluation, the swab was found endoscopically, lodged between the left inferior turbinate and nasal floor, and was removed by an otorhinolaryngologist. Using a phantom model, we aimed to delineate an imaging technique to better visualize the aluminum shaft of the nasopharyngeal swab on radiographs to help in identification. A technique using lower tube voltage (kVp) with tight collimation centered at the nasal bones area produced the best visualization of the aluminum shaft of the swab. Recognition that aluminum foreign bodies may be difficult to visualize radiographically and  optimization of radiograph acquisition technique may help guide clinical management in unusual cases. Further evaluation with computed tomography or endoscopy should be considered in suspected cases where radiographs are negative.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/instrumentation , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Equipment Failure , Foreign Bodies/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Specimen Handling/instrumentation , Aged, 80 and over , Aluminum , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Radiography/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgical Instruments
11.
Rev. Col. Bras. Cir ; 47: e20202558, 2020. graf
Article in Portuguese | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-613684

ABSTRACT

RESUMO A infecção pelo coronavírus determinante da doença COVID-19, também conhecida como SARS-COV2 foi classificada nos últimos meses como pandemia. Essa é potencialmente fatal, representando enorme problema de saúde mundial. A disseminação, após provável origem zoonótica na cidade de Wuhan, China, resultou em colapso do sistema de saúde de diversos países, alguns com enorme impacto social e número grande de mortes descritas na Itália e Espanha. Medidas extremas intra e extra-hospitalares têm sido implementadas a fim de conter a transmissão e disseminação da COVID-19. No âmbito cirúrgico, enorme quantidade de procedimentos considerados não essenciais ou eletivos foram prorrogados ou suspensos até resolução da pandemia. No entanto, cirurgias de urgência e oncológicas não permitem que o paciente espere. Nesta publicação, sugerimos e ensinamos adaptação a ser feita com materiais de uso corriqueiro em laparoscopias para evitar a contaminação ou a disseminação entre as equipes assistenciais e os pacientes.


ABSTRACT The coronavirus infection, also known as SARS-COV2, has proven to be potentially fatal, representing a major global health problem. Its spread after its origin in the city of Wuhan, China has resulted in a pandemic with the collapse of the health system in several countries, some with enormous social impact and expressive number of deaths as seen in Italy and Spain. Extreme intra and extra-hospital measures have been implemented to decrease the transmission and dissemination of the COVID-19. Regarding the surgical practice, a huge number of procedures considered non-essential or elective were cancelled and postponed until the pandemic is resolved. However, urgent and oncological procedures have been carried out. In this publication, we highlight and teach adaptations to be made with commonly used materials in laparoscopy to help prevent the spread and contamination of the healthcare team assisting surgical patients.


Subject(s)
Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Surgical Procedures, Operative/standards , Laparoscopy/methods , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Aerosols/adverse effects , Pandemics/prevention & control , Robotic Surgical Procedures/methods , Operating Rooms/methods , Pneumoperitoneum, Artificial/standards , Protective Devices/standards , Surgical Instruments/standards , Punctures/methods , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Betacoronavirus , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19 , Intraoperative Period
12.
Colorectal Dis ; 22(9): 1028-1029, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-613031
13.
J Laryngol Otol ; 134(7): 642-645, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-604802

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has necessitated rapid adaptations to all levels of clinical practice. Recently produced guidelines have suggested additional considerations for tracheostomy and advocated full personal protective equipment, including filtering facepiece code 3 masks. Air seal with filtering facepiece code 3 masks is often challenging, and full-face respirators and powered air-purifying respirators with hoods need to be employed. The infection prevention benefits of this equipment are accompanied by potential issues in communication. OBJECTIVE: In an attempt to minimise surgical error through miscommunication, the authors sought to introduce a simple sign language system that could be used as an adjunct during surgery. RESULTS: Following evaluation of pre-existing sign language platforms and consideration of multiple surgical factors, 14 bespoke hand signals were ultimately proposed. CONCLUSION: Whilst this novel sign language system aims to bridge the communicative gap created by additional personal protective equipment, further development and validation of the proposed tool might be beneficial.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Health Personnel , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Respiratory Protective Devices , Sign Language , Tracheostomy , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Humans , Patient Care Team , Personal Protective Equipment , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgical Instruments
14.
Head Neck ; 42(7): 1657-1663, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-343070

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Guidelines for ultrasonic devices use are imperative because infectious aerosols arising from airway procedures were a key etiologic factor in prior coronavirus outbreaks. This manuscript aims to summarize the available recommendations and the most relevant concepts about the use of ultrasonic scalpel during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. METHODS: Literature review of manuscripts with patients, animal models, or in vitro studies where the ultrasonic scalpel was used and the plume produced was analyzed in a quantitative and/ or qualitative way. DISCUSSION: Activated devices with tissue produce a biphasic bioaerosol composed (size 68.3-994 nm) of tissue particles, blood, intact and no viable cells, and carcinogenic or irritant hydrocarbons (benzene, ethylbenzene, styrene, toluene, heptene, and methylpropene). CONCLUSION: It is imperative to use an active smoke evacuator, to avoid ultrasonic scalpel use in COVID-19 positive patients and in upper airway surgery, as well as to follow the protection recommendations of the guidelines for management this type of patients.


Subject(s)
Air Pollutants, Occupational/adverse effects , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures/instrumentation , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Ultrasonic Surgical Procedures/instrumentation , COVID-19 , Contraindications, Procedure , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Infection Control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgical Instruments
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