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1.
Am Surg ; 88(3): 498-506, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582792

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Access to elective surgical procedures has been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We sought to understand the patient experience by developing and distributing an anonymous online survey to those who underwent non-emergency surgery at a large academic tertiary medical center between March and October 2020. RESULTS: The survey was completed by 184 patients; the majority were white (84%), female (74.6%), and ranged from 18 to 88 years old. Patients were likely unaware of case delay as only 23.6% reported a delay, 82% of which agreed with that decision. Conversely, 44% felt that the delay negatively impacted their quality of life. Overall, 82.7% of patients indicated high satisfaction with their care. African American patients more often indicated a "neutral" vs "satisfactory" hospital experience (P < .05) and considered postponing their surgery (P < .01). Interestingly, younger patients (<60) were more likely than older (≥60) patients to note anxiety associated with having surgery during the pandemic (P < .01), feeling unprepared for discharge (P < .02), not being allowed visitors (P < .02), and learning about the spread of COVID-19 from health care providers (P < .02). DISCUSSION: These results suggest that patients are resilient and accepting of changes to health care delivery during the current pandemic; however, certain patient populations may have higher levels of anxiety which could be addressed by their care provider. These findings can help inform and guide ongoing and future health care delivery adaptations in response to care disruptions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Surgical Procedures, Operative/psychology , Adult , African Americans/psychology , African Americans/statistics & numerical data , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety/epidemiology , Elective Surgical Procedures , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Perioperative Period , Quality of Life , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Tertiary Care Centers , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , /statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
2.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(12): e2138038, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1560592

ABSTRACT

Importance: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected every aspect of medical care, including surgical treatment. It is critical to understand the association of government policies and infection burden with surgical access across the United States. Objective: To describe the change in surgical procedure volume in the US after the government-suggested shutdown and subsequent peak surge in volume of patients with COVID-19. Design, Setting, and Participants: This retrospective cohort study was conducted using administrative claims from a nationwide health care technology clearinghouse. Claims from pediatric and adult patients undergoing surgical procedures in 49 US states within the Change Healthcare network of health care institutions were used. Surgical procedure volume during the 2020 initial COVID-19-related shutdown and subsequent fall and winter infection surge were compared with volume in 2019. Data were analyzed from November 2020 through July 2021. Exposures: 2020 policies to curtail elective surgical procedures and the incidence rate of patients with COVID-19. Main Outcomes and Measures: Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were estimated from a Poisson regression comparing total procedure counts during the initial shutdown (March 15 to May 2, 2020) and subsequent COVID-19 surge (October 22, 2020-January 31, 2021) with corresponding 2019 dates. Surgical procedures were analyzed by 11 major procedure categories, 25 subcategories, and 12 exemplar operative procedures along a spectrum of elective to emergency indications. Results: A total of 13 108 567 surgical procedures were identified from January 1, 2019, through January 30, 2021, based on 3498 Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes. This included 6 651 921 procedures in 2019 (3 516 569 procedures among women [52.9%]; 613 192 procedures among children [9.2%]; and 1 987 397 procedures among patients aged ≥65 years [29.9%]) and 5 973 573 procedures in 2020 (3 156 240 procedures among women [52.8%]; 482 637 procedures among children [8.1%]; and 1 806 074 procedures among patients aged ≥65 years [30.2%]). The total number of procedures during the initial shutdown period and its corresponding period in 2019 (ie, epidemiological weeks 12-18) decreased from 905 444 procedures in 2019 to 458 469 procedures in 2020, for an IRR of 0.52 (95% CI, 0.44 to 0.60; P < .001) with a decrease of 48.0%. There was a decrease in surgical procedure volume across all major categories compared with corresponding weeks in 2019. During the initial shutdown, otolaryngology (ENT) procedures (IRR, 0.30; 95% CI, 0.13 to 0.46; P < .001) and cataract procedures (IRR, 0.11; 95% CI, -0.11 to 0.32; P = .03) decreased the most among major categories. Organ transplants and cesarean deliveries did not differ from the 2019 baseline. After the initial shutdown, during the ensuing COVID-19 surge, surgical procedure volumes rebounded to 2019 levels (IRR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.95 to 1.00; P = .10) except for ENT procedures (IRR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.65 to 0.75; P < .001). There was a correlation between state volumes of patients with COVID-19 and surgical procedure volume during the initial shutdown (r = -0.00025; 95% CI, -0.0042 to -0.0009; P = .003), but there was no correlation during the COVID-19 surge (r = -0.00034; 95% CI, -0.0075 to 0.00007; P = .11). Conclusions and Relevance: This study found that the initial shutdown period in March through April 2020, was associated with a decrease in surgical procedure volume to nearly half of baseline rates. After the reopening, the rate of surgical procedures rebounded to 2019 levels, and this trend was maintained throughout the peak burden of patients with COVID-19 in fall and winter; these findings suggest that after initial adaptation, health systems appeared to be able to self-regulate and function at prepandemic capacity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Delivery of Health Care , Pandemics , Policy , Surgical Procedures, Operative , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Child, Preschool , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , Surgical Procedures, Operative/trends , United States
3.
Surg Today ; 52(1): 22-35, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1516860

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The spread of COVID-19 has restricted the delivery of standard medical care to surgical patients dramatically. Surgical triage is performed by considering the type of disease, its severity, the urgency for surgery, and the condition of the patient, in addition to the scale of infectious outbreaks in the region. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the number of surgical procedures performed and whether the effects were more prominent during certain periods of widespread infection and in the affected regions. METHODS: We selected 20 of the most common procedures from each surgical field and compared the weekly numbers of each operation performed in 2020 with the respective numbers in 2018 and 2019, as recorded in the National Clinical Database (NCD). The surgical status during the COVID-19 pandemic as well as the relationship between surgical volume and the degree of regional infection were analyzed extensively. RESULTS: The rate of decline in surgery was at most 10-15%. Although the numbers of most oncological and cardiovascular procedures decreased in 2020, there was no significant change in the numbers of pancreaticoduodenectomy and aortic replacement procedures performed in the same period. CONCLUSION: The numbers of most surgical procedures decreased in 2020 as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic; however, the precise impact of surgical triage on decrease in detection of disease warrants further investigation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , Databases, Factual , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Pandemics
4.
Am Surg ; 88(3): 489-497, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506800

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: COVID-19 has caused significant surgical delays as institutions minimize patient exposure to hospital settings and utilization of health care resources. We aimed to assess changes in surgical case mix and outcomes due to restructuring during the pandemic. METHODS: Patients undergoing surgery at a single tertiary care institution in the Deep South were identified using institutional ACS-NSQIP data. Primary outcome was case mix. Secondary outcomes were post-operative complications. Chi-square, ANOVA, logistic regression, and linear regression were used to compare the control (pre-COVID, Mar 2018-Mar 2020) and case (during COVID, Mar 2020-Mar 2021) groups. RESULTS: Overall, there were 6912 patients (control: 4,800 and case: 2112). Patients were 70% white, 29% black, 60% female, and 39% privately insured. Mean BMI was 30.2 (SD = 7.7) with mean age of 58.3 years (SD = 14.8). Most surgeries were with general surgery (48%), inpatient (68%), and elective (83%). On multivariable logistic regression, patients undergoing surgery during the pandemic were more likely to be male (OR: 1.14) and in SIRS (OR: 2.07) or sepsis (OR: 2.28) at the time of surgery. Patients were less likely to have dyspnea with moderate exertion (OR: .75) and were less dependent on others (partially dependent OR: .49 and totally dependent OR: .15). Surgeries were more likely to be outpatient (OR: 1.15) and with neurosurgery (OR: 1.19). On bivariate analysis, there were no differences in post-operative outcomes. CONCLUSION: Surgeries during the COVID-19 pandemic were more often outpatient without differences in post-operative outcomes. Additional analysis is needed to determine the impact of duration of operative delay on surgical outcomes with restructuring focusing more on outpatient surgeries.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diagnosis-Related Groups , Pandemics , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Alabama , Ambulatory Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Case-Control Studies , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Female , General Surgery/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Regression Analysis , Tertiary Care Centers , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
5.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258537, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477535

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Real-world big data studies using health insurance claims databases require extraction algorithms to accurately identify target population and outcome. However, no algorithm for Crohn's disease (CD) has yet been validated. In this study we aim to develop an algorithm for identifying CD using the claims data of the insurance system. METHODS: A single-center retrospective study to develop a CD extraction algorithm from insurance claims data was conducted. Patients visiting the Kitasato University Kitasato Institute Hospital between January 2015-February 2019 were enrolled, and data were extracted according to inclusion criteria combining the Tenth Revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10) diagnosis codes with or without prescription or surgical codes. Hundred cases that met each inclusion criterion were randomly sampled and positive predictive values (PPVs) were calculated according to the diagnosis in the medical chart. Of all cases, 20% were reviewed in duplicate, and the inter-observer agreement (Kappa) was also calculated. RESULTS: From the 82,898 enrolled, 255 cases were extracted by diagnosis code alone, 197 by the combination of diagnosis and prescription codes, and 197 by the combination of diagnosis codes and prescription or surgical codes. The PPV for confirmed CD cases was 83% by diagnosis codes alone, but improved to 97% by combining with prescription codes. The inter-observer agreement was 0.9903. CONCLUSIONS: Single ICD-code alone was insufficient to define CD; however, the algorithm that combined diagnosis codes with prescription codes indicated a sufficiently high PPV and will enable outcome-based research on CD using the Japanese claims database.


Subject(s)
Algorithms , Crohn Disease/diagnosis , Adult , Crohn Disease/drug therapy , Crohn Disease/surgery , Cross-Sectional Studies , Databases, Factual , Drug Prescriptions/statistics & numerical data , Female , Hospitals, University , Humans , Japan , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data
9.
Pan Afr Med J ; 39: 59, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1357662

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: the rising rate of SARS-CoV-2 infections has caused perceptible strain on the global health system. Indeed, this disease is also a litmus test for the resilience of the structures in the African health system including surgery. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on surgical practice, training and research in Nigeria. METHODS: it was a cross-sectional study conducted over three weeks in Nigeria among doctors in 12 surgery-related specialties. Consenting participants filled a pre-tested online form consisting of 35 questions in 5 sections which assessed demographics, infection control measures, clinical practice, academic training, research program, and future trends. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences Version 20. RESULTS: a total of 384 respondents completed the form. Their mean age was 38.3 years. Lockdown measures were imposed in the state of practice of 89.0% of respondents. Most participants reported a decrease in patient volume in outpatient clinics (95.5%) and elective operations (95.8%) compared to reports for emergency operations (50.2%). They also noted a decrease in academic training [Bedside teaching (92.1%), seminar presentation (91.1%) and journal presentation (91.8%)] and research (80.5%). Except in bedside teaching, those who had other virtual academic programmes were thrice the number of those who used in-person mode for the events. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 pandemic has caused a significant change in pattern and a decrease in the volume of patients seen by surgeons in their practice as well as a decrease in the frequency of academic programs and research activities in Nigeria.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nigeria , Prospective Studies , Research/statistics & numerical data , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Surgical Procedures, Operative/education , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
Am J Infect Control ; 49(2): 151-157, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1336189

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: An outbreak of corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Wuhan, China has spread quickly across the world, the World Health Organization (WHO) has declared this a pandemic. COVID-19 can be transmitted from human to human and cause nosocomial infection that has brought great challenges to infection control in medical institutions. Due to the professional characteristics, the research hospital still received a large number of trauma emergency tasks during the outbreak. It is urgent to establish a graded prevention and control guidance of surgery. METHODS: Review the implementation of surgical grading control measures in this hospital during the epidemic of COVID-19. RESULTS: The surgical prevention measures based on patients with different risks included prescreening and preoperative risk assessment, preparation of operating room, medical staff protection and environmental disinfection measures, etc. From January 20 to March 5, 2020, a total of 4,720 operations had been performed in this hospital, of which 1,565 were emergency operations and 22 for medium-risk and high-risk patients who may have the 2019 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection. And there is no medical staff exposed during the implementation of protective measures. CONCLUSIONS: Through the risk assessment of surgical patients and adopting surgical grading control measures, the risk of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 spread during the surgical process can be reduced greatly.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Risk Management/methods , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/transmission , China/epidemiology , Health Plan Implementation , Humans , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgical Procedures, Operative/adverse effects
11.
World J Emerg Surg ; 16(1): 37, 2021 07 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309917

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of this retrospective comparative study was to assess the impact of COVID-19 and delayed emergency department access on emergency surgery outcomes, by comparing the main clinical outcomes in the period March-May 2019 (group 1) with the same period during the national COVID-19 lockdown in Italy (March-May 2020, group 2). METHODS: A comparison (groups 1 versus 2) and subgroup analysis were performed between patients' demographic, medical history, surgical, clinical and management characteristics. RESULTS: Two-hundred forty-six patients were included, 137 in group 1 and 109 in group 2 (p = 0.03). No significant differences were observed in the peri-operative characteristics of the two groups. A declared delay in access to hospital and preoperative SARS-CoV-2 infection rates were 15.5% and 5.8%, respectively in group 2. The overall morbidity (OR = 2.22, 95% CI 1.08-4.55, p = 0.03) and 30-day mortality (OR = 1.34, 95% CI 0.33-5.50, =0.68) were significantly higher in group 2. The delayed access cohort showed a close correlation with increased morbidity (OR = 3.19, 95% CI 0.89-11.44, p = 0.07), blood transfusion (OR = 5.13, 95% CI 1.05-25.15, p = 0.04) and 30-day mortality risk (OR = 8.00, 95% CI 1.01-63.23, p = 0.05). SARS-CoV-2-positive patients had higher risk of blood transfusion (20% vs 7.8%, p = 0.37) and ICU admissions (20% vs 2.6%, p = 0.17) and a longer median LOS (9 days vs 4 days, p = 0.11). CONCLUSIONS: This article provides enhanced understanding of the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on patient access to emergency surgical care. Our findings suggest that COVID-19 changed the quality of surgical care with poorer prognosis and higher morbidity rates. Delayed emergency department access and a "filter effect" induced by a fear of COVID-19 infection in the population resulted in only the most severe cases reaching the emergency department in time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergencies , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Comorbidity , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Hospitalization/trends , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies
12.
S Afr Med J ; 111(7): 685-688, 2021 05 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1302748

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic reached South Africa (SA) in March 2020. A national lockdown began on 27 March 2020, and health facilities reduced non-essential activity, including many surgical services. PRIMARY OBJECTIVE: to estimate the COVID-19 surgical backlog in Western Cape Province, SA, by comparing 2019 and 2020 general surgery operative volume and proportion at six district and regional hospitals. SECONDARY OBJECTIVE: to compare the operative volume of appendicectomy, laparoscopic cholecystectomy, cancer and trauma between the 2 years. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of general surgery operations from six SA government hospitals in the Western Cape. Data were obtained from electronic operative databases or operative theatre logbooks from 1 April to 31 July 2019 and 1 April to 31 July 2020. RESULTS: Total general surgery operations decreased by 44% between 2019 (n=3 247) and 2020 (n=1 810) (p<0.001). Elective operations decreased by 74% (n=1 379 v. n=362; p<0.001), and one common elective procedure, laparoscopic cholecystectomy, decreased by 68% (p<0.001). Emergency operations decreased by 22% (n=1 868 v. n=1 448; p<0.001) and trauma operations by 42% (n=325 v. n=190; p<0.001). However, non-trauma emergency operations such as appendicectomy and cancer did not decrease. The surgical backlog for elective operations after 4 months from these six hospitals is 1 017 cases, which will take between 4 and 14 months to address if each hospital can do one additional operation per weekday. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has created large backlogs of elective operations that will need to be addressed urgently. Clear and structured guidelines need to be developed in order to streamline the reintroduction of full surgical healthcare services as SA slowly recovers from this unprecedented pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Emergencies , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Female , Hospitals, Public , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies , South Africa , Time Factors
13.
BJS Open ; 5(3)2021 05 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281850

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has had a global impact on all aspects of healthcare including surgical training. This study aimed to quantify the impact of COVID-19 on operative case numbers recorded by surgeons in training, and annual review of competency progression (ARCP) outcomes in the UK. METHODS: Anonymized operative logbook numbers were collated from electronic logbook and ARCP outcome data from the Intercollegiate Surgical Curriculum Programme database for trainees in the 10 surgical specialty training specialties.Operative logbook numbers and awarded ARCP outcomes were compared between predefined dates. Effect sizes are reported as incident rate ratios (IRR) with 95 per cent confidence intervals. RESULTS: Some 5599 surgical trainees in 2019, and 5310 in surgical specialty training in 2020 were included. The IRR was reduced across all specialties as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic (0.62; 95 per cent c.i. 0.60 to 0.64). Elective surgery (0.53; 95 per cent c.i. 0.50 to 0.56) was affected more than emergency surgery (0.85; 95 per cent c.i. 0.84 to 0.87). Regional variation indicating reduced operative activity was demonstrated across all specialties. More than 1 in 8 trainees in the final year of training have had their training extended and more than a quarter of trainees entering their final year of training are behind their expected training trajectory. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a major effect on surgical training in the UK. Urgent, coordinated action is required to minimize the impacts from the reduction in training in 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Pandemics , Specialties, Surgical/education , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom
15.
Sci Prog ; 104(2): 368504211023282, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1277842

ABSTRACT

The surgical theatre is associated with the highest mortality rates since the onslaught of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, Operating Department Practitioners (ODPs) are neglected human resources for health in regards to both professional development and research for patient safety; even though they are key practitioners with respect to infection control during surgeries. Therefore, this study aims to describe challenges faced by ODPs during the pandemic. The secondary aim is to use empirical evidence to inform the public health sector management about both ODP professional development and improvement in surgical procedures, with a specific focus on pandemics. A qualitative study has been conducted. Data collection was based on an interview guide with open-ended questions. Interviews with 39 ODPs in public sector teaching hospitals of Pakistan who have been working during the COVID-19 pandemic were part of the analysis. Content analysis was used to generate themes. Ten themes related to challenges faced by ODPs in delivering services during the pandemic for securing patient safety were identified: (i) Disparity in training for prevention of COVID-19; (ii) Shortcomings in COVID-19 testing; (iii) Supply shortages of personal protective equipment; (iv) Challenges in maintaining physical distance and prevention protocols; (v) Human resource shortages and role burden; (vi) Problems with hospital administration; (vii) Exclusion and hierarchy; (viii) Teamwork limitations and other communication issues; (ix) Error Management; and (x) Anxiety and fear. The public health sector, in Pakistan and other developing regions, needs to invest in the professional development of ODPs and improve resources and structures for surgical procedures, during pandemics and otherwise.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Infection Control/organization & administration , Pandemics , Surgeons/organization & administration , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19 Testing , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pakistan/epidemiology , Personal Protective Equipment/ethics , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surgeons/psychology , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workforce/organization & administration
16.
Minerva Surg ; 76(3): 281-285, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1257463

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the surgical scenario, the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) diffusion worldwide entails on the one hand the need to continue to perform surgery at least in case of emergency or oncologic surgery, in patients with or without COronaVIrus Disease 2019 (COVID-19); and on the other hand, to avoid the pandemic diffusion both between patients and medical and nursing team. The aim of this study was to report our surgical management protocol during the COVID-19 pandemic in an Italian non-referral center. METHODS: Data retrieved during the outbreak for the COVID-19 pandemic, from March 8 to May 4, 2020 (study period) were analyzed and compared to data obtained during the same period in 2019 (control period). RESULTS: During the study period, 41 surgical procedures (24 electives, 17 emergency surgical procedures) underwent surgery in comparison to 99 procedures in the control period. Stratifying the procedures in elective and emergency surgery, and based on the indication for surgery, the only statistically significant difference was observed in the elective surgery regarding the abdominal wall surgery (0 vs. 13 procedures, P=0.0339). Statistically significant differences were not observed regarding the colorectal and the breast oncologic surgery. All stuff members were COVID-19 free. CONCLUSIONS: The present protocol proved to be safe and useful to prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection before and after surgery for both patients and stuff. The pandemic was responsible for the reduction in number of procedures performed, anyway for the oncologic surgery a statistically significant volume reduction in comparison to 2019 was not observed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , Abdominal Wall/surgery , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Testing , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Neoplasms/surgery , Operating Rooms , Retrospective Studies
17.
S Afr Med J ; 111(5): 426-431, 2021 03 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256982

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, surgical operations have been drastically reduced in South Africa (SA). Guidelines on surgical prioritisation during COVID-19 have been published, but are specific to high-income countries. There is a pressing need for context-specific guidelines and a validated tool for prioritising surgical cases during the COVID-19 pandemic. In March 2020, the South African National Surgical Obstetric Anaesthesia Plan Task Team was asked by the National Department of Health to establish a national framework for COVID-19 surgical prioritisation. OBJECTIVES: To develop a national framework for COVID-19 surgical prioritisation, including a set of recommendations and a risk calculatorfor operative care. METHODS: The surgical prioritisation framework was developed in three stages: (i) a literature review of international, national and local recommendations on COVID-19 and surgical care was conducted; (ii) a set of recommendations was drawn up based on the available literature and through consensus of the COVID-19 Task Team; and (iii) a COVID-19 surgical risk calculator was developed and evaluated. RESULTS: A total of 30 documents were identified from which recommendations around prioritisation of surgical care were used to draw up six recommendations for preoperative COVID-19 screening and testing as well as the use of appropriate personal protective equipment. Ninety-nine perioperative practitioners from eight SA provinces evaluated the COVID-19 surgical risk calculator, which had high acceptability and a high level of concordance (81%) with current clinical practice. CONCLUSIONS: This national framework on COVID-19 surgical prioritisation can help hospital teams make ethical, equitable and personalised decisions whether to proceed with or delay surgical operations during this unprecedented epidemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Critical Care/ethics , Intensive Care Units/standards , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , Triage/standards , COVID-19/epidemiology , Consensus , Elective Surgical Procedures , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , South Africa , Surgery Department, Hospital/standards
18.
Laryngoscope ; 131(11): E2749-E2754, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242749

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARSCoV-2) is transmitted by droplet as well as airborne infection. Surgical patients are vulnerable to the infection during their hospital admission. Some surgical procedures are classified as aerosol generating (AGP). STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective observational study of four specialties associates with known AGP's during the 4 months of the first wave of UK COVID-19 epidermic to identify post-surgical cross-infection with SARSCoV-2 within 14 days of a procedure. METHODS: Retrospective observational study in a tertiary healthcare center of four specialties associates with known AGP's during the 4 months of the first wave of UK COVID-19 epidermic to identify post-surgical cross-infection with SARSCoV-2 within 14 days of a procedure. RESULTS: There were 3,410 procedures reported during this period. The overall cross-infection rate from tested patients was 1.3% (4 patients), that is, 0.11% of all operations over 4 months. Ear, nose, and throat carried slightly higher rate of infection (0.4%) than gastroenterology (0.08%). The mortality rate was 0.3% (one gastroenterology patient from 304 positive cases) compared to 0% if surgery performed after recovery from SARSCoV-2 and 37.5% when surgery was conducted during the incubation period of the disease. Routine preoperative rapid screening tests and self-isolation are crucial to avoid the risk of cross-infection. Patients with underlying malignancy or receiving chemotherapy were more prone to pulmonary complications and mortality. CONCLUSION: The risk of SARS-COV-2 cross-infection after surgical procedure is very low. Preoperative screening and self-isolation together with personal protective measures should be in place to minimize the cross-infection. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 4 Laryngoscope, 131:E2749-E2754, 2021.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Surgical Procedures, Operative/adverse effects , Aerosols , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Disease Transmission, Infectious/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Mass Screening/methods , Middle Aged , Mortality/trends , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Particulate Matter/adverse effects , Patient Isolation/methods , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Preoperative Period , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment/methods , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Surgical Procedures, Operative/classification , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , United Kingdom/epidemiology
19.
J Gynecol Obstet Hum Reprod ; 50(9): 102166, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1240456

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study examined the impact of lockdown for SARS-CoV-2 on breast cancer management via an online survey in a French multicentre setting. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This is a multicentre retrospective study, over the strict lockdown period from March 16th to May 11th, 2020 in metropolitan France. 20 centres were solicited, of which 12 responded to the survey. RESULTS: 50% of the centres increased their surgical activity, 33% decreased it and 17% did not change it during containment. Some centres had to cancel (17%) or postpone (33%) patient-requested interventions due to fear of SARS-CoV-2. Four and 6 centres (33% and 50%) respectively cancelled and postponed interventions for medical reasons. In the usual period, 83% of the centres perform their conservative surgeries on an outpatient basis, otherwise the length of hospital stay was 24 to 48 h. All the centres except one performed conservative surgery on an outpatient basis during the lockdown period, for which. 8% performed mastectomies on an outpatient basis during the usual period. During lockdown, 50% of the centres reduced their hospitalization duration (25% outpatient /25% early discharge on Day 1). CONCLUSION: This study explored possibilities for management during the first pandemic lockdown. The COVID-19 pandemic required a total reorganization of the healthcare system, including the care pathways for cancer patients.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , Ambulatory Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Conservative Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Female , France , Humans , Length of Stay , Mammaplasty/statistics & numerical data , Mastectomy/statistics & numerical data , Patient Isolation/methods , Retrospective Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires
20.
BJS Open ; 5(3)2021 05 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238182

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a major impact on healthcare in many countries. This study assessed the effect of a nationwide lockdown in France on admissions for acute surgical conditions and the subsequent impact on postoperative mortality. METHODS: This was an observational analytical study, evaluating data from a national discharge database that collected all discharge reports from any hospital in France. All adult patients admitted through the emergency department and requiring a surgical treatment between 17 March and 11 May 2020, and the equivalent period in 2019 were included. The primary outcome was the change in number of hospital admissions for acute surgical conditions. Mortality was assessed in the matched population, and stratified by region. RESULTS: During the lockdown period, 57 589 consecutive patients were admitted for acute surgical conditions, representing a decrease of 20.9 per cent compared with the 2019 cohort. Significant differences between regions were observed: the decrease was 15.6, 17.2, and 26.8 per cent for low-, intermediate- and high-prevalence regions respectively. The mortality rate was 1.92 per cent during the lockdown period and 1.81 per cent in 2019. In high-prevalence zones, mortality was significantly increased (odds ratio 1.22, 95 per cent c.i. 1.06 to 1.40). CONCLUSION: A marked decrease in hospital admissions for surgical emergencies was observed during the lockdown period, with increased mortality in regions with a higher prevalence of COVID-19 infection. Health authorities should use these findings to preserve quality of care and deliver appropriate messages to the population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , Acute Disease , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Digestive System Diseases/surgery , Emergencies , Female , France/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Admission/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgical Procedures, Operative/mortality , Urinary Calculi/surgery , Wounds and Injuries/surgery
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