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1.
BMC Psychol ; 9(1): 55, 2021 Apr 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1181128

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Poor mental health status and associated risk factors of public health workers have been overlooked during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study used the effort-reward imbalance model to investigate the association between work-stress characteristics (effort, over-commitment, reward) and mental health problems (anxiety and depression) among front-line public health workers during the COVID-19 pandemic in China. METHODS: A total of 4850 valid online questionnaires were collected through a self- constructed sociodemographic questionnaire, the adapted ERI questionnaire, the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and the 7-item General Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7). Hierarchical logistic regression analysis was conducted to investigate the association between ERI factors and mental health problems (i.e., depression and anxiety), with reward treated as a potential moderator in such associations. RESULTS: The data showed that effort and over-commitment were positively associated with depression and anxiety, while reward was negatively associated with depression and anxiety. Development and job acceptance were the two dimensions of reward buffered the harmful effect of effort/over-commitment on depression and anxiety, whereas esteem was non-significant. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirmed the harmful effects of effort and over-commitment on mental health among public health workers during the COVID-19 pandemic in China. Such effects could be alleviated through an appropriate reward system, especially the development and job acceptance dimensions of such a system. These findings highlight the importance of establishing an emergency reward system, comprising reasonable work-allocation mechanism, bonuses and honorary titles, a continuous education system and better career-development opportunities.


Subject(s)
Pandemics , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Mental Health , Prevalence , Public Health , Reward , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
JMIR Mhealth Uhealth ; 9(1): e19727, 2021 01 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1177912

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: eHealth and mobile health (mHealth) are an evolving trend in the medical field. The acceptance of digital tools is high, and the need is growing. OBJECTIVE: Young adults (18-40 years) confronted with a cancer diagnosis present unique needs and require special care. They often have a strong affinity and are familiar with modern technology. On that account, we implemented a web-based symptom and quality of life (QoL) assessment to address patients' attitudes and willingness to use mHealth tools. The study also aims to evaluate sociodemographic parameters that could influence patients' opinions. METHODS: A total of 380 young patients aged 18-40 treated with radiotherapy between 2002 and 2017 were included in the trial. We assessed QoL via the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Core 30 (EORTC C30) questionnaire and added general questions about mHealth technology. The added questions inquired patients' opinions regarding general aspects, including technical advances in medicine, mobile and app assistance during cancer treatment, data transfer, and app-specific features. The survey was conducted for 12 months. Participation was voluntary and pseudonymized; prior written consent was obtained. RESULTS: We achieved a participation rate of 57.6% (219/380) and a completion rate of 50.2% (110/219). The median age was 33 years (range 18-40). Of all participants, 89.1% (98/110) considered new technologies in medicine as positive; 10.9% (12/110) answered with neutral. Nearly all patients (96.4%, 106/110) stated that they would send further data via a web-based platform. Of all, 96.4% (106/110) considered the provided pseudonymization of their data as safe. We further asked the patients if they would use a mobile app for symptom and QoL assessment similar to the present web-based system: 74.5% (82/110) answered with yes and 25.5% (28/110) said they would not use a mobile app in the future. We tested the willingness to use an app on several sociodemographic parameters, such as age, gender, education, health insurance status, and cancer-related parameters: tumor stage, time since radiation treatment, and treatment intention. None of these parameters correlated with app use in this group of young adults. Patients who were generally positive regarding using an app rated several possible functions of a future app. The 3 most requested features were appointment reminders (89.0%, 73/82), contact overview of all involved clinics and physicians (87%, 71/82), and making an appointment via app (78%, 64/82). CONCLUSIONS: eHealth and mHealth tools should be available as an integrated part of a comprehensive cancer care approach. It provides automated, thorough documentation of health parameters during therapy and follow-up for doctors, medical staff, and tumor patients to optimize treatment. With this study, we could show that young adults are the ideal patient population to use eHealth/mHealth tools. Such tools offer further digital support and improve the patients' need for constant QoL during cancer care.


Subject(s)
Internet , Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Quality of Life , Telemedicine , Adolescent , Female , Humans , Male , Patient Reported Outcome Measures , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
3.
Soc Sci Med ; 274: 113779, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1176937

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: Severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS CoV-2), the virus that causes COVID-19, and consequent social distancing directives have been observed to negatively impact social relationships but the impact of these changes on the quality of social relationships at a population level has not been explored. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate changes in social relationships in a U.S. population sample during a time of social distancing. METHODS: We deployed a matched, longitudinal survey design of the National Institutes of Health Adult Social Relationship Scales to assess the social aspects of emotional support, instrumental support, friendship, loneliness, perceived hostility, and perceived rejection from a time without social distancing (February 2018) to a time where social distancing directives were active (May 2020). Changes in social relationships were compared using paired t-tests, and generalized linear regression models were constructed to identify subpopulations experiencing differential changes in each subdomain of social relationships during social distancing. RESULTS: Within our sample population, individuals experienced an increased sense of emotional support, instrumental support, and loneliness, and decreased feelings of friendship and perceived hostility during a period of social distancing. Individuals with low self-rated health experienced a decreased sense of emotional support, and females experienced increased feelings of loneliness compared with males. CONCLUSIONS: Social distancing measurably impacts social relationships and may have a disproportionate impact on females and individuals with lower self-rated health. If novel emergent infectious diseases become more commonplace, social interventions may be needed to mitigate the potential adverse impact of social distancing on social relationships.


Subject(s)
/psychology , Interpersonal Relations , Pandemics/prevention & control , Quarantine/psychology , Adult , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
4.
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova ; 121(3): 104-109, 2021.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1175804

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the mental health of health workers during a pandemic. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eight hundred and twelve medical workers took part in a cross-sectional Internet survey. The questionnaire included a socio-demographic block, a block of questionnaires for assessing the level of symptoms of anxiety and depression (PHQ-9 and GAD-7). The data were processed using statistical methods. RESULTS: The prevalence of anxiety and depression among healthcare providers during the pandemic was 48.77% and 57.63% respectively. Subjectively poor quality of sleep was noted by 37.4% of respondents. Cluster analysis distinguished 4 groups of respondents: group 1 was characterized by high scores on PHQ-9 and GAD-7 and a low subjective assessment of sleep quality; group 2 had low scores on PHQ-9 and GAD-7 and a high subjective assessment of sleep quality; respondents from clusters 3 and 4 had average total scores on PHQ-9 and GAD-7, however, group 4 was characterized by significantly lower values of subjective sleep quality assessment. CONCLUSION: The division into clusters makes it possible to understand which groups of medical workers require psychological (psychotherapeutic) support in the first place. Cluster 1 respondents with high levels of anxiety and depression, as well as poor sleep quality, need priority assistance.


Subject(s)
Pandemics , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Humans , Mental Health , Russia/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
J Ethnobiol Ethnomed ; 17(1): 26, 2021 Apr 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1175331

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Medicinal plants are the fundamental unit of traditional medicine system in Nepal. Nepalese people are rich in traditional medicine especially in folk medicine (ethnomedicine), and this system is gaining much attention after 1995. The use of medicinal plants has increased during the COVID-19 pandemic as a private behavior (not under the control of government). A lot of misinterpretations of the use of medicinal plants to treat or prevent COVID-19 have been spreading throughout Nepal which need to be managed proactively. In this context, a research was needed to document medicinal plants used, their priority of use in society, their cultivation status, and the source of information people follow to use them. This study aimed to document the present status of medicinal plant use and make important suggestion to the concerned authorities. METHODS: This study used a web-based survey to collect primary data related to medicinal plants used during COVID-19. A total of 774 respondents took part in the survey. The study calculated the relative frequencies of citation (RFC) for the recorded medicinal plants. The relationship between plants recorded and different covariates (age, gender education, occupation, living place, and treatment methods) was assessed using Kruskal-Wallis test and Wilcoxon test. The relationship between the information sources people follow and the respondent characteristics was assessed using chi-square test. RESULTS: The study found that the use of medicinal plants has increased during COVID-19 and most of the respondents recommended medicinal plants to prevent COVID-19. This study recorded a total of 60 plants belonging to 36 families. The leaves of the plants were the most frequently used. The Zingiber officinale was the most cited species with the frequency of citation 0.398. Most of the people (45.61%) were getting medicinal plants from their home garden. The medicinal plants recorded were significantly associated with the education level, location of home, primary treatment mode, gender, and age class. The information source of plants was significantly associated with the education, gender, method of treatment, occupation, living with family, and location of home during the lockdown caused by COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: People were using more medicinal plants during COVID-19 claiming that they can prevent or cure COVID-19. This should be taken seriously by concerned authorities. The authorities should test the validity of these medicinal plants and control the flow of false information spread through research and awareness programs.


Subject(s)
/prevention & control , Plant Preparations/therapeutic use , Plants, Medicinal , Adult , Aged , Ethnopharmacology , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , Medicine, Traditional , Middle Aged , Nepal , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
6.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 686, 2021 04 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1175314

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The government is the main body in charge of controlling epidemics; hence, expectations from the intention and capacities of the government would affect the flexibility and behaviors of citizens. Given the severity of COVID-19 pandemic and the urgent need for cooperation of people in the prevention and combat processes, understanding the public perspectives would be crucial and instructive. This study aimed to explore such perspectives towards the current pandemic among the Iranian. Indeed, we sought to provide a favorable platform for effective policies in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic through recognizing public expectations. METHODS: This cross-sectional survey used an open-ended online questionnaire to investigate the common perspectives of the Iranian towards the response of government to COVID-19 pandemic. The participants were selected using snowball and convenient sampling techniques across the country. The collected data were analyzed and described using a thematic analysis. RESULTS: In general, 2547 participants agreed to participate in this study and completed the online questionnaire. According to the findings, the Iranian exhibited several expectations regarding the response of the government to COVID-19 pandemic. Three main themes were extracted based on these expectations: (1) health-related expectations, (2) policy-related expectations, and (3) Information-related expectations. In this study, a majority of participants highlighted the need to consider and follow-up the patients and their families, providing the financial and hygiene support during the pandemic, applying strict restrictions, and using close monitoring and controlling procedures. Furthermore, they mentioned that authorities and news agencies should observe the principals honesty and transparency. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings revealed that people expect the government and other responsible institutions to minimize the burden of this pandemic through adopting effective policies. Also, they could help policy-makers become aware of the expectations of people and develop better strategies.


Subject(s)
Government , Pandemics , Public Opinion , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 685, 2021 04 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1175313

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: People with chronic conditions are disproportionately prone to be affected by the COVID-19 pandemic but there are limited data documenting this. We aimed to assess the health, psychosocial and economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on people with chronic conditions in India. METHODS: Between July 29, to September 12, 2020, we telephonically surveyed adults (n = 2335) with chronic conditions across four sites in India. Data on participants' demographic, socio-economic status, comorbidities, access to health care, treatment satisfaction, self-care behaviors, employment, and income were collected using pre-tested questionnaires. We performed multivariable logistic regression analysis to examine the factors associated with difficulty in accessing medicines and worsening of diabetes or hypertension symptoms. Further, a diverse sample of 40 participants completed qualitative interviews that focused on eliciting patient's experiences during the COVID-19 lockdowns and data analyzed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: One thousand seven hundred thirty-four individuals completed the survey (response rate = 74%). The mean (SD) age of respondents was 57.8 years (11.3) and 50% were men. During the COVID-19 lockdowns in India, 83% of participants reported difficulty in accessing healthcare, 17% faced difficulties in accessing medicines, 59% reported loss of income, 38% lost jobs, and 28% reduced fruit and vegetable consumption. In the final-adjusted regression model, rural residence (OR, 95%CI: 4.01,2.90-5.53), having diabetes (2.42, 1.81-3.25) and hypertension (1.70,1.27-2.27), and loss of income (2.30,1.62-3.26) were significantly associated with difficulty in accessing medicines. Further, difficulties in accessing medicines (3.67,2.52-5.35), and job loss (1.90,1.25-2.89) were associated with worsening of diabetes or hypertension symptoms. Qualitative data suggest most participants experienced psychosocial distress due to loss of job or income and had difficulties in accessing in-patient services. CONCLUSION: People with chronic conditions, particularly among poor, rural, and marginalized populations, have experienced difficulties in accessing healthcare and been severely affected both socially and financially by the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Chronic Disease , Pandemics , Aged , /epidemiology , Chronic Disease/epidemiology , Chronic Disease/therapy , Female , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Health Status , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Qualitative Research , Quarantine , Socioeconomic Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Health Secur ; 19(1): 21-30, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1174868

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has created substantial challenges for public health officials who must communicate pandemic-related risks and recommendations to the public. Their efforts have been further hampered by the politicization of the pandemic, including media outlets that question the seriousness and necessity of protective actions. The availability of highly politicized news from online platforms has led to concerns about the notion of "echo chambers," whereby users are exposed only to information that conforms to and reinforces their existing beliefs. Using a sample of 5,000 US residents, we explored their information-seeking tendencies, reliance on conservative and liberal online media, risk perceptions, and mitigation behaviors. The results of our study suggest that risk perceptions may vary across preferences for conservative or liberal bias; however, our results do not support differences in the mitigation behavior across patterns of media use. Further, our findings do not support the notion of echo chambers, but rather suggest that people with lower information-seeking behavior may be more strongly influenced by politicized COVID-19 news. Risk estimates converge at higher levels of information seeking, suggesting that high information seekers consume news from sources across the political spectrum. These results are discussed in terms of their theoretical implications for the study of online echo chambers and their practical implications for public health officials and emergency managers.


Subject(s)
/psychology , Mass Media , Politics , Adult , Communication , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
Am J Clin Nutr ; 112(4): 915-916, 2020 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-746220
10.
J Drugs Dermatol ; 20(2): 215-223, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1171262

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has had significant negative economic ramifications on dermatologic care delivery, including curtailing live on-site physician-pharmaceutical-representative interactions (PPRI). OBJECTIVE: To determine the impact of COVID-19 and pandemic regulations on current and future PPRI. METHODS: Cross-sectional survey-based study that analyzed data from 400 surveyed dermatologists using a pre-validated questionnaire sent via email. Data regarding PPRI were collected over 1 week in July 2020 to compare demographics and practice standards from April 2019, April 2020, July 2020, and predictions for 2021. RESULTS: Virtual-only PPRI increased from 7.8% in April 2019 to 26.5% during April 2020 (mean difference, 18.8%; 95% confidence interval, 13.6%–23.9%). Virtual-only PPRI remained elevated at 24.5% while hybrid PPRI increased, eventually surpassing the April 2019 mark (27.0%). These trends persisted among all studied practice types and levels of experience. Practices predicted no significant percent differences in participation in PPRI (87.3% vs 90.3%; P=0.0834), but a significant shift in method of delivery where the odds ratio of incorporating a virtual component into PPRI in 2021 increased by a factor of 3. LIMITATIONS: Relatively small sample size, especially among subgroups. Responses may have been retrospective estimates. There may also be selection bias given slightly increased representation of more experienced dermatologists. CONCLUSION: PPRI materially decreased during the initial COVID-19 peak but will likely return to baseline volume moving forward with a significant component being hybrid PPRI. Further studies may better elucidate the economic and clinical impact associated with these changes and their effect on dermatologists’ ability to provide patients with samples and educational materials. J Drugs Dermatol. 2021;20(2):215-223. doi:10.36849/JDD.5651.


Subject(s)
Dermatologists , Interprofessional Relations , Pandemics , Pharmacists , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Physicians' Offices , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine
11.
PLoS One ; 16(4): e0249716, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1170008

ABSTRACT

RATIONAL: During pandemics, including the most recent COVID-19 pandemic, the mental health of university healthcare students' is expected to be affected negatively, impacting the students' learning process. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to assess the level of anxiety and depression of healthcare students living in Jordan, and the effect on their learning process during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted via an online survey completed by students studying a healthcare-oriented degree in a university in Jordan. Participants were recruited through social media (Facebook and WhatsApp). The validated previously published Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) questionnaire was used as a part of the online survey to assess students' anxiety/depression scores. Students' responses regarding their learning process during the COVID-19 was also assessed. RESULTS: The mean age of participants was 21.62 (SD = 4.90), with the majority being females (67.1%). The HADs' assessment revealed that 43.8% and 40.0% of participants had normal anxiety and depression scores, while 22.4% showed borderline abnormal anxiety/depression scores (33.8%). Many students (33.8%) were classified to have abnormal anxiety scores, while a smaller proportion (26.2%) was classified to have abnormal depression scores. Smoking (p = 0.022), lower family income (p = 0.039), and use of medications (p = 0.032) were positively associated with higher (worse) anxiety scores. Ranking the learning process during COVID-19 showed that 45.8% of the participants believed it was a 'good/very good/excellent' process. CONCLUSIONS: Anxiety and depression levels amongst university healthcare students in Jordan were found to be high when assessed during the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, the learning process during the pandemic was not accepted by more than half of the students. Implementing psychological interventions for healthcare students during pandemics is strongly recommended in order to optimize students' mental health and their learning process alike.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Learning Health System , Students, Health Occupations/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Jordan , Male , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , Surveys and Questionnaires , Universities , Young Adult
12.
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr ; 87(1): 639-643, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169725

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had unforeseen consequences on the delivery of HIV and sexually transmitted disease (STD) prevention services. However, little is known about how the pandemic has impacted pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP)-using men who have sex with men (MSM). METHODS: Data come from an online cohort of PrEP-using MSM in the Southern United States from October 2019 to July 2020. Participants were administered 10 surveys in total, including 1 ad hoc survey specifically on COVID-19. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of this ad hoc survey (n = 56) and present changes in sexual behaviors and utilization of and access to sexual health services. Using linear mixed-effect regression models, we also analyzed data from the larger cohort and document how sexual behaviors and PrEP use varied longitudinally across several months. RESULTS: A fifth of participants discontinued or changed how often they take PrEP because of COVID-19. A quarter of the cohort documented challenges when attempting to access PrEP, HIV testing, or STD testing. For all sexual behaviors examined longitudinally-number of male sexual partners, anal sex acts, condomless anal sex, and oral sex (all measured in the past 2 weeks)-there was a decrease from February to April followed by an increase from April to June. DISCUSSION: Our findings suggest reduced access to and utilization of STD and HIV services coupled with a continuation of behaviors which confer STD/HIV risk. Ensuring appropriate delivery of STD/HIV prevention services during this pandemic is imperative.


Subject(s)
/epidemiology , Homosexuality, Male/statistics & numerical data , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis/statistics & numerical data , Sexual Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Anti-HIV Agents/therapeutic use , Cohort Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , HIV Infections/drug therapy , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Medication Adherence , Pandemics , Safe Sex , Sexual and Gender Minorities/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
13.
AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses ; 37(4): 304-313, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169606

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted the continuity of care of U.S. adults living with chronic diseases, including immunocompromised adults. Disruption in care may be a barrier to identifying COVID-19 associated sequelae, such as mental health symptoms, among the immunocompromised. Our objectives were to evaluate COVID-19-related preventive behaviors, with a focus on canceling doctor's appointments as a proxy for continuity of care, and to compare COVID-19-related mental health symptoms among the immunocompromised with the general population. We used nationally-representative data of 10,760 U.S. adults from the publicly-available COVID-19 Household Impact Survey. We defined immunocompromised as adults with a self-reported diagnosis of "a compromised immune system" (n = 854, 7.6%). We adherence to self-reported COVID-19 preventive behaviors among immunocompromised adults to others using χ2-tests. We focused on continuity of care and estimated determinants of canceling doctor's appointments among the immunocompromised using multivariable Poisson regression to estimate adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). We evaluated associations of mental health symptoms with being immunocompromised using multinomial logistic regression and estimated conditional odds ratios (cOR) with 95% CIs. Immunocompromised adults were more likely to adhere to recommended COVID-19 preventive behaviors, including washing or sanitizing hands (96.3% vs. 89.8%, χ2 <0.001), maintaining social distance (91.9% vs. 83.7%, χ2 <0.001), and canceling a doctor's appointment (47.1% vs. 29.7%, χ2 <0.001). Hispanic immunocompromised adults (aPR: 1.47, 95% CI: 1.12-1.92) and immunocompromised women (aPR: 1.25, 95% CI: 1.00-1.56) were more likely to cancel doctor's appointments compared to non-Hispanic White immunocompromised adults and men, respectively. Immunocompromised adults reported higher odds of feeling nervous/anxious/on edge (cOR: 1.89, 95% CI: 1.44-2.51), depressed (cOR: 2.81, 95% CI: 2.17-3.64), lonely (cOR: 2.28, 95% CI: 1.74-2.98), and hopeless (cOR: 2.86, 95% CI: 2.21-3.69) 3-7 days in the last week. Immunocompromised adults were more likely to cancel their doctor's appointments and report COVID19-related mental health symptoms. The continuity of care of immunocompromised adults should be prioritized through alternative interventions, such as telehealth.


Subject(s)
/epidemiology , Immunocompromised Host , Mental Disorders/physiopathology , Pandemics , Adolescent , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Poisson Distribution , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
14.
Libyan J Med ; 16(1): 1901438, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169479

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) has caused global mental health impacts, and healthcare workers (HCWs) face an increased risk of exposure to the disease when compared to the general population. This study aimed to assess factors associated with mental health among Lebanese HCWs six months after the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. A cross-sectional study was conducted among HCWs at a tertiary hospital, in Lebanon between June and July 2020. The survey included data on demographics, exposure to COVID-19, preparedness to COVID-19 outbreak, risk perceptions of COVID-19, and mental health dimensions. Chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests were used to understand the association among these variables. One hundred and ninety-three of 1,600 Lebanese HCWs participated. More than 80% reported high preparedness levels towards the COVID-19 outbreak, 69% believed that their job was putting them at risk, and 70% altruistically accepted these risks. Anxiety and depression symptomatology were present in 24% and 23% of HCWs; who were more likely to feel more stress at work (83% vs 60%; p = 0.004; 82% vs 61%; p = 0.01, respectively), feel afraid of falling ill (72% vs 55%; p = 0.03; 77% vs 54%; p = 0.01, respectively), fear death (21% vs 7%; p = 0.01; 25% vs 6%; p ≤ 0.001, respectively), and believed that people avoided their families (39% vs 21%; p = 0.01; 35% vs 65%; p = 0.02, respectively). HCWs who reported signs of depression were less likely to altruistically accept the risks of caring for COVID-19 patients, compared to those who did not (57% vs 74%; p = 0.03). This study aimed to detect factors associated with mental health among Lebanese HCWs during the COVID-19 pandemic. Findings suggested that altruistic acceptance of COVID-19 risks is higher among HCWs with positive exposure history to COVID-19 and those with less depressive symptomatology.


Subject(s)
Health Personnel , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Lebanon/epidemiology , Male , Mental Disorders/etiology , Middle Aged , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Risk Factors , Socioeconomic Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Tertiary Care Centers , Young Adult
15.
Anticancer Res ; 41(4): 1903-1908, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1168332

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: We employed a survey to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) to investigate the management of breast reconstruction across the US during the COVID-19 pandemic. PATIENTS AND METHODS: An electronic survey on breast reconstruction practice demographics, COVID-19-related restrictions on breast reconstruction, and pertinent dates of restrictions was employed. RESULTS: A total of 228 responses were obtained. Demographics were balanced for geography with most respondents located in either urban or suburban settings (91.2%). The majority proceeded with mastectomy/reconstruction as originally planned (39.0%), followed by hormonal/chemotherapy only (22.6%). The most common reconstructive option was tissue expander/implant-based reconstruction (47.7%). Most institutions implemented restrictions between March 11-20th (59%). Almost all respondents (91.8%) reported mandatory pre-operative SARS-Cov-2 testing once cases resumed. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 has forced the breast surgical team to adapt to new conditions to the detriment of women with breast cancer requiring reconstruction. Varying restrictions have limited access to breast reconstruction, carrying consequences yet to be determined.


Subject(s)
/epidemiology , Mammaplasty/statistics & numerical data , Mastectomy/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Breast Implants/statistics & numerical data , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Quarantine , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Tissue Expansion Devices/statistics & numerical data , United States/epidemiology
16.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 70(13): 473-477, 2021 Apr 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1168276

ABSTRACT

Incarcerated and detained persons are at increased risk for acquiring COVID-19. However, little is known about their willingness to receive a COVID-19 vaccination. During September-December 2020, residents in three prisons and 13 jails in four states were surveyed regarding their willingness to receive a COVID-19 vaccination and their reasons for COVID-19 vaccination hesitancy or refusal. Among 5,110 participants, 2,294 (44.9%) said they would receive a COVID-19 vaccination, 498 (9.8%) said they would hesitate to receive it, and 2,318 (45.4%) said they would refuse to receive it. Willingness to receive a COVID-19 vaccination was lowest among Black/African American (Black) (36.7%; 510 of 1,390) persons, participants aged 18-29 years (38.5%; 583 of 1,516), and those who lived in jails versus prisons (43.7%; 1,850 of 4,232). Common reasons reported for COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy were waiting for more information (54.8%) and efficacy or safety concerns (31.0%). The most common reason for COVID-19 vaccination refusal was distrust of health care, correctional, or government personnel or institutions (20.1%). Public health interventions to improve vaccine confidence and trust are needed to increase vaccination acceptance by incarcerated or detained persons.


Subject(s)
/administration & dosage , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Prisoners/psychology , Vaccination/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , /prevention & control , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prisoners/statistics & numerical data , Prisons , Socioeconomic Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
17.
Saudi Med J ; 42(4): 384-390, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1168260

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To measure the Saudi population's sleep quality during the lockdown of COVID-19. METHODS: An internet-based questionnaire that was performed during the lockdown of the COVID-19 pandemic among the Saudi population over 2 weeks from April 1 to April 15, 2020. We used the instant messaging application WhatsApp and Twitter to reach the targeted population. Saudi citizens and non-Saudi residents who can read and understand the questionnaire were recruited. Data were analyzed using Stata and SPSS. RESULTS: A total of 790 responses were included. The majority of participants were the Saudi population 735 (92.9%). The prevalence of insomnia and poor sleep quality were 54.4% and 55.5%, respectively. Saudi citizenship was associated with longer sleep duration (p=0.031). Female gender and being married were associated with worse global PSQI, sleep quality, sleep distribution, sleep latency, and daytime dysfunction. CONCLUSION: Our findings showed that during the COVID-19 pandemic, the Saudi population had a high prevalence of insomnia and poor sleep quality. Routine monitoring of the psychological impact of life-threatening outbreaks and the adoption of effective early mental health actions should be considered.


Subject(s)
Disorders of Excessive Somnolence/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep , Adult , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Educational Status , Female , Humans , Male , Marital Status/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Public Policy , Risk Factors , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Sex Factors , Sleep Latency , Surveys and Questionnaires , Unemployment/statistics & numerical data
18.
Saudi Med J ; 42(4): 377-383, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1168259

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To examine the awareness level of COVID-19 and to highlight the frequency of myths and misconceptions among Saudi Arabia's population. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study from June 13 to 20, 2020 by distributing a 16-item online Google forms questionnaire among adults (18-65 years old) living in Saudi Arabia. We utilized the convenience sampling. Data analysis was performed using Chi-square and multiple regression analysis on Jamovi. RESULTS: A total of 1436 responses were analyzed with 43.5% males and 56.5% females. Most respondents (89.1%) thought that only the elderly above 60 years old are considered at high risk of contracting COVID-19. Most respondents (86.5%) agreed that people with other health conditions could be more affected by COVID-19. Approximately 97.2% agreed that wearing a mask and avoiding touching eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands was the leading preventive action. Most participants (99.4%) chose fever as an associated symptom. Respondents from the healthcare sector presented statistically higher scores than those in non-healthcare sectors (p<0.001). Higher education and higher salary were important predictors of better COVID-19 knowledge. CONCLUSION: Public health officials need to increase awareness measures on COVID-19 to limit myths and misconceptions and reduce psychological distress associated with it.


Subject(s)
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , /physiopathology , /transmission , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hand Disinfection , Humans , Male , Masks , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , Saudi Arabia , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
19.
Pan Afr Med J ; 37: 389, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1168164

ABSTRACT

Introduction: as COVID-19 pandemic is rapidly evolving, there is a whole reorganization in hospitals to concentrate more resources to face the crisis. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 disease on urological activity in Tunisia. To assess the differences in the management of urological conditions between the private and the public field. Methods: a survey was addressed to all certified urologists working in Tunisia in both the public and private sectors (n=194) using the national database of active urologists available and updated. We either called them or looked them up through email or social media. The form was open from March the 28th to April the 3rd. Results were obtained via spreadsheet and analysed using SPSS 23.0. Results: one hundred and twenty urologists have filled in the form. Consultations at the outpatient office were restricted to urgent cases in 66% (n=79). Telemedicine was more used by urologists in private than in public fields p=0.03. Urologists in private sector followed more the sterilization protocol of the hospital/clinic and used more disposable materials whenever possible p=0.011. Elective surgical activity has completely stopped in 85% of the responders (n=102). Elective surgery requiring transfusion or intensive care unit was performed in 38% (n=46) and 26% (n=31) if there was a risk of disease progression. Benign Prostate Hyperplasia (BPH) surgery was more performed as usual in private sector than in public sector p=0.012. It was the only condition managed differently between both sectors. Conclusion: the drop of the urological activity is essential in order to give relevant stakeholders room to act efficiently against the spread of the virus. The context of the pandemic and the hospital´s condition must be taken into consideration without compromising the patient´s outcome.


Subject(s)
Urologic Diseases/therapy , Urologic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Urologists/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Private Sector/statistics & numerical data , Prostatic Hyperplasia/surgery , Public Sector/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Tunisia , Urologic Diseases/physiopathology
20.
J Glob Health ; 11: 09001, 2021 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1168062

ABSTRACT

Background: Crowdsourcing was recognized as having the potential to collect information rapidly, inexpensively and accurately. U-Report is a mobile empowerment platform that connects young people all over the world to information that will change their lives and influence decisions. Previous studies of U-Report's effectiveness highlight strengths in the timeliness, low cost and high credibility for collecting and sending information, however they also highlight areas to improve on concerning data representation. EquityTool has developed a simpler approach to assess the wealth quintiles of respondents based on fewer questions derived from large household surveys such as Multiple Indicators Cluster Surveys (MICS) and Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS). Methods: The methodology of Equity Tool was adopted to assess the socio-economic profile of U-Reporters (ie, enrolled participants of U-Report) in Bangladesh. The RapidPro flow collected the survey responses and scored them against the DHS national wealth index using the EquityTool methodology. This helped placing each U-Reporter who completed all questions into the appropriate wealth quintile. Results: With 19% of the respondents completing all questions, the respondents fell into all 5 wealth quintiles, with 79% in the top-two quintiles and only 21% in the lower-three resulting in an Equity Index of 53/100 where 100 is completely in line with Bangladesh equity distribution and 1 is the least in line. An equitable random sample of 1828 U-Reporters from among the regular and frequent respondents was subsequently created for future surveys and the sample has an Equity Index of 98/100. Conclusions: U-Report in Bangladesh does reach the poorest quintiles while the initial recruitment skews to respondents towards better off families. It is possible to create an equitable random sub-sample of respondents from all five wealth quintiles and thus process information and data for future surveys. Moving forward, U-Reporters from the poorly represented quintiles may be incentivized to recruit peers to increase equity and representation. In times of COVID-19, U-Report in combination with the EquityTool has the potential to enhance the quality of crowdsourced data for statistical analysis.


Subject(s)
Crowdsourcing/standards , Surveys and Questionnaires/standards , Bangladesh , Female , Forecasting , Humans , Male , Socioeconomic Factors
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