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1.
Neurosciences (Riyadh) ; 27(1): 10-15, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622941

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To assess awareness of the neurological manifestation of COVID-19 on the Saudi population. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study conducted using a Google Form survey to obtain responses randomly from the Saudi population between February and March 2021 using social media. RESULTS: A total of 831 participants completed the questionnaire. The distribution of the identified isolated neurological manifestations of COVOD-19 infections by participants' age was assessed among the respondents. Loss of smell (88.9%), loss of taste (86.8%), and headache (72.6%) were the most identified first manifestations among all the age groups, while stroke (13.4%) was the least identified for all ages with no statistical significance (p>0.05 for all). Regarding COVID-19 related neurological symptoms, the same was reported: loss of smell, taste, and headache were the most identified symptoms among all the age groups, while stroke was the least identified for all ages with no statistical significance (p>0.05 for all). CONCLUSION: The study concluded that awareness of COVID-19's neurological symptoms could help detect an atypical case, which can help in early intervention and its medical treatment. Moreover, the study also suggested conducting educational programs that emphasize the early identification of neurological symptoms of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Br J Nurs ; 31(1): S10-S15, 2022 Jan 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622855

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has created a set of unprecedented challenges for healthcare services and staff. The authors conducted a national online survey of nurses employed to work in HIV services in England, Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland to establish how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted on the professional quality of life of HIV nurses. Professional quality of life was assessed using the ProQOL scale; 132 nurses completed the survey, 99 of whom completed the ProQOL scale. Just over 1 in 3 were redeployed in the first pandemic wave, dropping to 1 in 6 in subsequent waves. In multivariate analysis, redeployment in both waves increased burnout scores by nearly 10 points and decreased compassion satisfaction scores by nearly 5 points, with no effect on secondary traumatic stress scores. A supportive workplace environment will have a key role in supporting the path to recovery.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
Br J Nurs ; 31(1): 8-14, 2022 Jan 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622854

ABSTRACT

With the arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic, outpatient clinics had to adjust and reduce the number of face-to-face appointments. The Cambridge stoma service has a recognised pathway of stoma care but needed to adjust this in line with government guidelines. The team took the opportunity to audit the current pathway and complete a patient experience survey to determine the future of the service and potential adaptations to the pathway in the future. AIM: To determine the need for adaptation and improvement of the standard stoma clinics pathway. METHOD: A survey was conducted using a postal questionnaire to all patients who attended stoma clinics between April and June 2020. FINDINGS: 160 questionnaires were sent and 72 responses returned (45%). All elements of the virtual clinic were rated positive by more than 80% of respondents, with nearly 90% of them feeling that all their stoma care needs were met. When asked to indicate their preferred consultation methods (patients were allowed to choose more than one), face to face received 50 votes, telephone 32 votes and video clinic 5 votes. CONCLUSION: There is a need to adapt the standard clinic pathway to be able to offer standardised care but with flexibility to adjust to circumstances and patients' preferences.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Critical Pathways , Humans , Patient Outcome Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telephone
4.
Arch Ital Urol Androl ; 93(4): 450-454, 2021 Dec 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622683

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Telemedicine has been adopted successfully in various urological scenarios. The aim of the present study was to explore attitudes and perceptions by urology residents toward the use of telementoring in the context of residents-faculty physicians communication for patient-related care. METHODS: An online survey consisting of 19 multiple choice questions was designed including three sections: respondents' demographics, attitudes and perceptions towards the use of telementoring. Invitations to participate in this anonymous survey were e-mailed to urology residents at University of Naples Federico II. RESULTS: In total 60 responses were received (participation rate 86%). The frequency of telementoring use was described as occasional, frequent, very frequent, and rare by 51,3%, 41.0%, 5,1%, and 2,6% of respondents, respectively. WhatsApp messenger was used by 89.5% of respondents and photos were the most common type of media content shared (73.7%). Most of respondents declared a moderate and a strong agreement with respect to the utility of telementoring in improving the communication in relation to the interpretation of clinical, radiological, endoscopic, and functional findings. Overall, 78% of participants individuated risks of information flow distortions and misinterpretations as the major limit of telementoring. CONCLUSIONS: The use of telementoring is widespread and perceived as useful by urology residents in the context of residentsfaculty physicians communication in multiple settings of patientrelated care.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency , Physicians , Urology , Attitude , Communication , Faculty , Humans , Referral and Consultation , Surveys and Questionnaires , Urology/education
5.
J Nurs Educ ; 61(1): 46-49, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622662

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A private university nursing program established the Initiative for Vital Practice in response to increasing levels of compassion fatigue (CF) and burnout among faculty and staff during an undergraduate program revision and accompanying leadership transitions. METHOD: A pilot mixed-method project evaluated self-management practices meant to mitigate CF among faculty and staff. RESULTS: Faculty and staff (N = 34) identified four primary risk factors for CF, including physical symptoms (14 of 34 = 41%); feeling trapped in work (14 of 34 = 41%); lacking time away from work (11 of 34 = 32%); and inability to work hard enough (10 of 34 = 29%). Individual and organizational stressors and alleviators were analyzed; aggregate scores for three Professional Quality of Life scales presented at a "moderate level." CONCLUSION: Preliminary results establish a baseline to measure the effect of burnout and secondary stress and guide further development of our organizational framework and initiative. [J Nurs Educ. 2022;61(1):46-49.].


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Compassion Fatigue , Empathy , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Leadership , Quality of Life , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
BMC Psychiatry ; 22(1): 33, 2022 01 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622219

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A global public health emergency triggered by the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic may have are markable psychological impact on the population. There is still limited psychological research on police officers, especially prison officers in the process of enforcing the law. The present study aims to identify prevalence and influencing factors on mental health status among frontline prison officers in China during the prevention and control of the COVID-19 epidemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey with a sample of 981 frontline prison officers was conducted using snowball sampling approach. The self-administered questionnaire consisted of 4 parts: (i) informed consent form; (ii) socio-demographic section; (iii) work and life situations during the prevention and control of the COVID-19 epidemic; (iv) the Chinese version of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). Univariate analysis and multivariable logistic regression were performed to identify factors influencing mental health status. RESULTS: The prevalence of being prone to mental health problems (GHQ-12 score ≥ 4) was 33.43% among frontline prison officers. The results of GHQ-12 factors analysis indicated that the prison officers suffered from psychological issues was related to anxiety and depression, which main symptoms were unhappy and depressed, lost sleep over worry and constantly under strain. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that male (OR = 1.573, 95% CI:1.385-1.853), lockdown shift inside the prison(OR = 2.203, 95% CI:2.139-2.297), more night shifts (OR = 2.163, 95% CI:2.031-2.317; OR = 2.749, 95% CI:2.194-2.901), more smoking (OR = 1.100, 95% CI:1.037-2.168), poor self-reported physical condition (OR = 1.947, 95% CI:1.478-2.250), chronic or serious illness history(OR = 1.870, 95% CI:1.314-2.660; OR = 2.214, 95% CI:1.460-2.812) were risk factors for mental health among frontline prison officers, while regular diet (OR = 0.779, 95% CI:0.539-0.928), more physical exercise (OR = 0.702, 95% CI:0.548-0.899; OR = 0.641, 95% CI:0.316-0.887), more communication with family members (OR = 0.437, 95% CI:0.295-0.616) were protective factors. CONCLUSION: Chinese frontline prison officers experienced different psychological stress coming from the prevention and control of this epidemic. Therefore, continued surveillance of psychological problems and targeted mental health care for frontline prison officers were urgent.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Prisons , Anxiety , China/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression , Health Status , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
BMJ Open ; 12(1): e050867, 2022 01 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622054

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A COVID-19 outbreak has been contained in China through effective prevention measures with the collaboration of the citizens. However, there is resistance to self-reported symptoms as required in the international student community. This study explored knowledge level and symptoms reporting behaviours toward COVID-19 among international students. METHODS: An online cross-sectional investigation was conducted among 119 international students across Heilongjiang province and questionnaires implemented through WeChat between 1 and 25 March 2020. The results were explained using descriptive Χ2 test and binary logistic regression analysis using SPSS V.20. RESULTS: In total, 119 international students participated, with a response rate of 90.16%. Of the 119 respondents, 96 (80.7%) knew COVID-19 symptoms, 109 (91.6%) took cognisance of questions on the importance of the maintenance of wearing masks and 113 (95%) on questions regarding hand hygiene in the prevention of disease transmission. However, results show that there were still large gaps in knowledge about questions regarding the virus and the treatment methods (many participants incorrectly believed that the virus could be kill by drinking alcohol or smoking). In addition, more than half of the participants declared compliance with positive health behaviours, however 27.7% did not agree with vaccination (if any), and 31.1% did not agree to be quarantined after being diagnosed with COVID-19. Furthermore, 20 participants (16, 80%) expressed an inclination to deliberately withhold symptoms. Variables in the Health Belief Model showed a significant association with behavioural change. CONCLUSION: From our study, we found that there is evident knowledge about COVID-19 among international students, although orientation and sensitisation are still required. Those who were aware of the benefits of reporting, the severity of COVID-19 and the legal consequences of deliberately concealing information showed a greater willingness to report; conversely, those who believed reporting is very inconvenient and feared being quarantined after reporting showed less willingness to report. A study focusing on international students' knowledge and behaviour amid the pandemic will provide information for countries to cut off the chain of disease transmission of all variants of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Belief Model , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Intention , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report , Students , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
J Occup Health ; 64(1): e12311, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1620088

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aims to develop a comprehensive list of stressors relevant to junior doctors and will also report findings exploring the associations between burnout and stressors, which include work and non-work-related stressors as well as pandemic-related stressors. METHODS: An anonymous online questionnaire was sent to 1000 randomly selected junior doctors in the North-West of England. The questionnaire included 37 questions on general and pandemic-specific stressors, and the Maslach Burnout Inventory Health Services Survey. The main outcomes of interest were junior doctor ratings of stressors and scores for burnout (emotional exhaustion [EE], depersonalisation [DP], and personal accomplishment [PA]). Stepwise regression analysis was undertaken to assess associations between stressors and burnout. RESULTS: In total, 326 responses were collected (response rate = 33%). Of the top 10 stressors rated by junior doctors, 60% were related to the pandemic. Multiple stressors were found to be associated with the burnout dimensions. Fatigue (ß = .43), pandemic-related workload increase (ß = .33), and feeling isolated (ß = .24) had the strongest associations with EE, whereas fatigue (ß = .21), uncertainty around COVID-19 information (ß = .22) and doing unproductive tasks (ß = .17) had the strongest associations with DP. Working beyond normal scope due to COVID-19 (ß = -.26), not confident in own ability (ß = -.24) and not feeling valued (ß = -.20) were found to have the strongest associations with PA. CONCLUSIONS: Junior doctors experience a combination of general stressors and additional stressors emerging from the pandemic which significantly impact burnout. Monitoring these stressors and targeting them as part of interventions could help mitigating burnout in junior doctors.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom/epidemiology
9.
J Korean Acad Nurs ; 51(6): 678-688, 2021 Dec.
Article in Korean | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1614085

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to identify factors influencing nurses' performance of care in COVID-19 wards. METHODS: The participants were 132 nurses who worked in COVID-19 wards at three hospitals, and were recruited from April 1 to May 31, 2021. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-test, ANOVA, and multiple regression analysis with SPSS/WIN 24.0 program. RESULTS: Nursing performance was significantly and positively correlated with ethical sensitivity (r = .75, p < .001), nursing professionalism (r = .67, p < .001), and social support (r = .67, p < .001). Nursing professionalism was positively correlated with ethical sensitivity (r = .64, p < .001) and social support (r = .55, p < .001). Multiple regression analysis for nursing performance revealed that the most significant factor was ethical sensitivity (ß = .47, p < .001). Ethical sensitivity, nursing professionalism, and social support explained 66.0% of total variance in nursing performance. CONCLUSION: Ethical sensitiviy, nursing professionalism, and social support significantly influence nurses' performace of care in COVID-19 wards. It suggests that intervention programs should be directed at improving nurses' ethical sensitivity, bolstering social support, and enhancing nursing professionalism.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Hospitals , Humans , Professionalism , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
Nutrients ; 14(1)2021 Dec 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613921

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Home isolation during the coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic lockdown strongly impacted everyday life, affecting, in particular, eating habits and everyday activity. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of the pandemic on behaviors and subsequent changes in body mass index (BMI) in children from Southern Poland. METHODS: The study included 206 participants (104 females and 102 males) with a complete analysis of 177 participants (96 females and 81 males) with a mean age of 12.8 ± 2.6 years admitted to three pediatric endocrinology clinics (Rzeszów, Kraków, and Katowice) due to simple obesity, type 1 diabetes mellitus, somatotropin pituitary deficiency on growth hormone replacement therapy, and other endocrine and metabolic disorders between June and September 2020. The study used a self-prepared questionnaire regarding eating habits, physical activity, screen time, and sleep before and during the lockdown. Anthropometric measurements were performed under clinical settings twice (before the pandemic in January-March 2020, and in June-September 2020). RESULTS: During the lockdown, BMI z-scores increased over the whole group, especially in obese children (0.073 ± 0.18, p = 0.002). The number of children who declared low and high physical activity of more than 60 min per day declined from 41.2% and 18.6% to 31.1% and 6.2% (p = 0.03 and p < 0.001), respectively; sleep times over 8 h increased (46.9% vs. 60.4% p = 0.007); screen times over 5 h daily increased (14.7% to 46.9%, p < 0.001). Eating habits did not change significantly. CONCLUSIONS: Daily physical activity and sleep levels were affected by the pandemic leading to the increase of BMI, especially in obese patients with endocrine disorders. During the COVID-19 pandemic, forward-thinking strategies must be developed to prevent childhood obesity.


Subject(s)
Body Mass Index , COVID-19/prevention & control , Diet/methods , Endocrine System Diseases/epidemiology , Life Style , Pediatric Obesity/epidemiology , Social Isolation , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Poland/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613815

ABSTRACT

Social distancing and the priority given to COVID-19 patients in health services, which caused postponement of appointments and cancer treatment, may have triggered unprecedented levels of distress in cancer patients. The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence of distress and the levels of spiritual well-being of people initiating chemotherapy during the COVID-19 pandemic, identifying the factors associated with distress, and determining if there is a relationship between distress and spiritual well-being. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 91 Brazilians. Data were collected by applying the Spiritual Well-Being Scale (SWBS) and the Distress Thermometer and Problem List for Patients. The prevalence of distress was 59.5%, and the average score of spiritual well-being was 106.54 (±9.06). Emotional issues were the most reported by patients with distress. The Poisson regression showed that male sex (PR = 0.588; 95% CI 0.392-0.881), age (PR = 0.985; 95% CI 0.973-0.996), and spiritual well-being score were predictors of distress (PR = 0.971; 95% CI 0.946-0.996). These findings indicate that distress relief involves implementation of public health programs capable of integrating spiritual interventions into cancer care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Spirituality , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(1)2022 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613768

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on mental health at the level of the population. The current study adds to the evidence base by examining how the prevalence of psychological distress changed in Australia during the pandemic. The study also assesses the psychometric properties of a new single-item measure of mental distress included in a survey program conducted regularly throughout the pandemic. Data are from 1158 respondents in wave 13 (early July 2020) of the nationally representative Taking the Pulse of the Nation (TTPN) Survey. The questionnaire included the six-item Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K6) and a new single-item measure of distress. Results show a significant increase in the prevalence of psychological distress in Australia, from 6.3% pre-pandemic to 17.7% in early July 2020 (unadjusted odds ratio = 3.19; 95% CI (confidence interval) = 2.51 to 4.05). The new single-item measure of distress is highly correlated with the K6. This study provides a snapshot at one point in time about how mental health worsened in Australia during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, by demonstrating the accuracy of the new single-item measure of distress, this analysis also provides a basis for further research examining the trajectories and correlates of distress in Australia across the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Mental Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(1)2022 Jan 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613767

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to identify the mediating effects of perceived health status (PHS) and perceived organizational support (POS) in the association between emotional labor and burnout in public health nurses (PHNs). The participants were 207 PHNs convenience sampled from 30 public health centers and offices in Jeju, Korea. Data regarding emotional labor, PHS, POS, and burnout were collected between February and March 2021 using a structured questionnaire. Collected data were analyzed by Pearson's correlation coefficient and multiple regression analysis. Burnout of PHNs was positively correlated with emotional labor (r = 0.64, p < 0.001) and negatively correlated with PHS (r = -0.51, p < 0.001) and POS (r = -0.51, p < 0.001). In the association between emotional labor and burnout, PHS (B = -1.36, p < 0.001) and POS (B = -0.42, p = 0.001) had a partial mediating effect. Reduction of burnout among PHNs requires not only effective management of emotional labor but also personal and organizational efforts to improve PHS and POS.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nurses, Public Health , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological , Health Status , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(1)2022 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613760

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: Knowledge of COVID-19 prevention among communities is the first step towards protective behaviors. The objective of this study was to assess COVID-19 prevention knowledge among a Middle Eastern and North African community in Houston, Texas. (2) Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using a validated quantitative survey; survey questions consisted of three parts: COVID-19 specific questions, general health questions, and sociodemographic questions. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to determine predictors of perception of knowledge on preventing COVID-19 spread. The outcome of interest comprised of "good/excellent" versus "average and below" knowledge. (3) Results: A total of 366 participants (66.39% males) completed the survey. A univariate analysis demonstrated significant differences in self-reported COVID-19 prevention knowledge among those with and without health insurance, different ages, level of knowledge, and perceived severity of COVID-19 infection. In the multivariate logistic regression, two predictors were identified: those in the 18-25-year-old group were more likely to have "excellent/good" knowledge on COVID-19 spread compared to the ≥40-year-old group (OR: 6.36; 95% CI: 1.38, 29.34). Those who somewhat agree with knowing how to protect themselves from COVID-19 were more likely to have "excellent/good" knowledge of preventing COVID-19 spread compared to those that neither agree nor disagree or disagree (OR: 7.74; 95% CI: 2.58, 23.26). (4) Conclusions: Younger adults reported higher knowledge of COVID-19 prevention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , Perception , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Texas , Young Adult
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(1)2022 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613758

ABSTRACT

Young drivers are generally associated with risky driving behaviors that can lead to crash involvement. Many self-report measurement scales are used to assess such risky behaviors. This study is aimed to understand the risky driving behaviors of young adults in Qatar and how such behaviors are associated with crash involvement. This was achieved through the usage of validated self-report measurement scales adopted for the Arabic context. A nationwide cross-sectional and exploratory study was conducted in Qatar from January to April 2021. Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the survey was conducted online. Therefore, respondents were selected conveniently. Hence, the study adopted a non-probability sampling method in which convenience and snowball sampling were used. A total of 253 completed questionnaires were received, of which 57.3% were female, and 42.7% were male. Approximately 55.8% of these young drivers were involved in traffic accidents after obtaining their driving license. On average, most young drivers do have some risky driving behavior accompanied by a low tendency to violate traffic laws, and their driving style is not significantly controlled by their personality on the road. The older young drivers are more involved in traffic accidents than the younger drivers, i.e., around 1.5 times more likely. Moreover, a young male driver is 3.2 times less likely to be involved in traffic accidents than a female driver. In addition, males are only 0.309 times as likely as females to be involved in an accident and have approximately a 70% lower likelihood of having an accident versus females. The analysis is complemented with the association between young drivers' demographic background and psychosocial-behavioral parameters (linking risky driving behavior, personality, and obligation effects on crash involvement). Some interventions are required to improve driving behavior, such as driving apps that are able to monitor and provide corrective feedback.


Subject(s)
Automobile Driving , COVID-19 , Accidents, Traffic , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Qatar/epidemiology , Risk-Taking , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
16.
Ital J Pediatr ; 48(1): 1, 2022 Jan 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613246

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The role of allergic sensitization seems to be protective against SARS CoV2 infection. The aim of this study was to evaluate, using online surveys, the impact of COVID-19 on Italian allergic children, comparing the prevalence of AR and asthma symptoms between the first and second pandemic wave. METHODS: Both surveys were emailed to Italian pediatricians in April 2020 (first survey) and in March 2021 (second survey). The first one was related to the impact of COVID-19 and the most frequently reported symptoms. The second one was superimposed on the previous one, taking into account some additional aspects in the management of disease. RESULTS: A total of 99 pediatricians participated in the first survey and 267 in the second one. The first survey showed that, asthma and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis prevalence was mostly between 0 and 20% throughout the country. The second survey showed a lower prevalence of both diseases nationwide in comparison to the first one. Comparing the two surveys, statistically significant differences were reported only in the distribution of asthma prevalence in Southern Italy while no differences were highlighted in the North and in the Center. Finally regarding allergic rhinoconjunctivitis prevalence, no differences were noticed nationwide. CONCLUSIONS: Allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma, if under control, did not represent risk factors for the susceptibility to SARS CoV2. Therefore, it is strongly recommended to continue therapies during COVID-19 outbreak, according to the international guidelines. However, being COVID-19 a new disease, actual knowledge will undergo continuous improvements over time.


Subject(s)
Asthma/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Conjunctivitis, Allergic/epidemiology , Rhinitis, Allergic/epidemiology , Asthma/complications , Child , Conjunctivitis, Allergic/complications , Humans , Italy , Prevalence , Rhinitis, Allergic/complications , Risk Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 42, 2022 01 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613230

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has developed into a worldwide pandemic which was accompanied by an «infodemic¼ consisting of much false and misleading information. To cope with these new challenges, health literacy plays an essential role. The aim of this paper is to present the findings of a trend study in Switzerland on corona-specific health literacy, the use of and trust in information sources during the COVID-19 pandemic, and their relationships. METHODS: Three online surveys each with approximately 1'020 individuals living in the German-speaking part of Switzerland (age ≥ 18 years) were conducted at different timepoints during the COVID-19 pandemic, namely spring, fall and winter 2020. For the assessment of corona-specific health literacy, a specifically developed instrument (HLS-COVID-Q22) was used. Descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate data analyses have been conducted. RESULTS: In general, a majority of the Swiss-German population reported sufficient corona-specific health literacy levels which increased during the pandemic: 54.6% participants in spring, 62.4% in fall and 63.3% in winter 2020 had sufficient corona-specific health literacy. Greatest difficulties concerned the appraisal of health information on the coronavirus. The most used information sources were television (used by 73.3% in spring, 70% in fall and 72.3% in winter) and the internet (used by 64.1, 64.8 and 66.5%). Although health professionals, health authorities and the info-hotline were rarely mentioned as sources for information on the coronavirus, respondents had greatest trust in them. On the other hand, social media were considered as the least trustworthy information sources. Respondents generally reporting more trust in the various information sources, tended to have higher corona-specific health literacy levels. CONCLUSIONS: Sufficient health literacy is an essential prerequisite for finding, understanding, appraising, and applying health recommendations, particularly in a situation where there is a rapid spread of a huge amount of information. The population should be supported in their capability in appraising the received information and in assessing the trustworthiness of different information sources.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Literacy , Adolescent , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Trust
18.
Crit Care Nurs Q ; 45(1): 98-106, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1612704

ABSTRACT

Vaccines are effective measures that can mitigate the high burden of diseases. However, vaccine refusal poses serious challenges for achieving coverage for population immunity. With the availability of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) vaccines, limited information is available about the university students' acceptability and attitudes toward COVID-19 vaccines. This article reports study findings regarding factors that influence university students' decision of acceptability to the COVID-19 vaccine in Jordan. Results highlight the continued need for clear and consistent information about the vaccine by health care decision-makers and university administrations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Jordan , SARS-CoV-2 , Students , Surveys and Questionnaires , Universities
20.
JAMA Netw Open ; 5(1): e2142210, 2022 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1611175

ABSTRACT

Importance: A surge of COVID-19 occurred from March to June 2021, in New Delhi, India, linked to the B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant of SARS-CoV-2. COVID-19 vaccines were rolled out for health care workers (HCWs) starting in January 2021. Objective: To assess the incidence density of reinfection among a cohort of HCWs and estimate the effectiveness of the inactivated whole virion vaccine BBV152 against reinfection. Design, Setting, and Participants: This was a retrospective cohort study among HCWs working at a tertiary care center in New Delhi, India. Exposures: Vaccination with 0, 1, or 2 doses of BBV152. Main Outcomes and Measures: The HCWs were categorized as fully vaccinated (with 2 doses and ≥15 days after the second dose), partially vaccinated (with 1 dose or 2 doses with <15 days after the second dose), or unvaccinated. The incidence density of COVID-19 reinfection per 100 person-years was computed, and events from March 3, 2020, to June 18, 2021, were included for analysis. Unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using a Cox proportional hazards model. Estimated vaccine effectiveness (1 - adjusted HR) was reported. Results: Among 15 244 HCWs who participated in the study, 4978 (32.7%) were diagnosed with COVID-19. The mean (SD) age was 36.6 (10.3) years, and 55.0% were male. The reinfection incidence density was 7.26 (95% CI: 6.09-8.66) per 100 person-years (124 HCWs [2.5%], total person follow-up period of 1696 person-years as time at risk). Fully vaccinated HCWs had lower risk of reinfection (HR, 0.14 [95% CI, 0.08-0.23]), symptomatic reinfection (HR, 0.13 [95% CI, 0.07-0.24]), and asymptomatic reinfection (HR, 0.16 [95% CI, 0.05-0.53]) compared with unvaccinated HCWs. Accordingly, among the 3 vaccine categories, reinfection was observed in 60 of 472 (12.7%) of unvaccinated (incidence density, 18.05 per 100 person-years; 95% CI, 14.02-23.25), 39 of 356 (11.0%) of partially vaccinated (incidence density 15.62 per 100 person-years; 95% CI, 11.42-21.38), and 17 of 1089 (1.6%) fully vaccinated (incidence density 2.18 per 100 person-years; 95% CI, 1.35-3.51) HCWs. The estimated effectiveness of BBV152 against reinfection was 86% (95% CI, 77%-92%); symptomatic reinfection, 87% (95% CI, 76%-93%); and asymptomatic reinfection, 84% (95% CI, 47%-95%) among fully vaccinated HCWs. Partial vaccination was not associated with reduced risk of reinfection. Conclusions and Relevance: These findings suggest that BBV152 was associated with protection against both symptomatic and asymptomatic reinfection in HCWs after a complete vaccination schedule, when the predominant circulating variant was B.1.617.2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Reinfection , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , India/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Tertiary Care Centers , Vaccines, Inactivated/administration & dosage , Virion/immunology , Young Adult
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