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1.
PLoS Comput Biol ; 16(5): e1007879, 2020 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-638069

ABSTRACT

In this work, we aim to determine the main factors driving self-initiated behavioral changes during the seasonal flu. To this end, we designed and deployed a questionnaire via Influweb, a Web platform for participatory surveillance in Italy, during the 2017 - 18 and 2018 - 19 seasons. We collected 599 surveys completed by 434 users. The data provide socio-demographic information, level of concerns about the flu, past experience with illnesses, and the type of behavioral changes voluntarily implemented by each participant. We describe each response with a set of features and divide them in three target categories. These describe those that report i) no (26%), ii) only moderately (36%), iii) significant (38%) changes in behaviors. In these settings, we adopt machine learning algorithms to investigate the extent to which target variables can be predicted by looking only at the set of features. Notably, 66% of the samples in the category describing more significant changes in behaviors are correctly classified through Gradient Boosted Trees. Furthermore, we investigate the importance of each feature in the classification task and uncover complex relationships between individuals' characteristics and their attitude towards behavioral change. We find that intensity, recency of past illnesses, perceived susceptibility to and perceived severity of an infection are the most significant features in the classification task and are associated to significant changes in behaviors. Overall, the research contributes to the small set of empirical studies devoted to the data-driven characterization of behavioral changes induced by infectious diseases.


Subject(s)
Influenza, Human/psychology , Seasons , Algorithms , Disease Susceptibility , Female , Humans , Italy , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
J Assist Reprod Genet ; 37(7): 1567-1577, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-617321

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The state of limited resource settings that Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has created globally should be taken seriously into account especially in healthcare sector. In oncofertility, patients should receive their fertility preservation treatments urgently even in limited resource settings before initiation of anticancer therapy. Therefore, it is very crucial to learn more about oncofertility practice in limited resource settings such as in developing countries that suffer often from shortage of healthcare services provided to young patients with cancer. METHODS: As an extrapolation during the global crisis of COVID-19 pandemic, we surveyed oncofertility centers from 14 developing countries (Egypt, Tunisia, Brazil, Peru, Panama, Mexico, Colombia, Guatemala, Argentina, Chile, Nigeria, South Africa, Saudi Arabia, and India). Survey questionnaire included questions on the availability and degree of utilization of fertility preservation options in case of childhood cancer, breast cancer, and blood cancer. RESULTS: All surveyed centers responded to all questions. Responses and their calculated oncofertility scores showed different domestic standards for oncofertility practice in case of childhood cancer, breast cancer, and blood cancer in the developing countries under limited resource settings. CONCLUSIONS: Medical practice in limited resource settings has become a critical topic especially after the global crisis of COVID-19 pandemic. Understanding the resources necessary to provide oncofertility treatments is important until the current COVID-19 pandemic resolves. Lessons learned will be valuable to future potential worldwide disruptions due to infectious diseases or other global crises.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Fertility Preservation/methods , Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Delivery of Health Care/economics , Developing Countries , Female , Fertility Preservation/economics , Fertility Preservation/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Neoplasms/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
BMC Med Educ ; 20(1): 206, 2020 Jun 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-617318

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) global pandemic has resulted in unprecedented public health measures. This has impacted the UK education sector with many universities halting campus-based teaching and examinations. The aim of this study is to identify the impact of COVID-19 on final year medical students' examinations and placements in the United Kingdom (UK) and how it might impact their confidence and preparedness going into their first year of foundation training. METHODS: A 10-item online survey was distributed to final year medical students across 33 UK medical schools. The survey was designed by combining dichotomous, multiple choice and likert response scale questions. Participants were asked about the effect that the COVID-19 global pandemic had on final year medical written exams, electives, assistantships and objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs). The survey also explored the student's confidence and preparedness going into their first year of training under these new unprecedented circumstances. RESULTS: Four hundred forty students from 32 UK medical schools responded. 38.4% (n = 169) of respondents had their final OSCEs cancelled while 43.0% (n = 189) had already completed their final OSCEs before restrictions. 43.0% (n = 189) of assistantship placements were postponed while 77.3% (n = 340) had electives cancelled. The impact of COVID-19 on OSCEs, written examinations and student assistantships significantly affected students' preparedness (respectively p = 0.025, 0.008, 0.0005). In contrast, when measuring confidence, only changes to student assistantships had a significant effect (p = 0.0005). The majority of students feel that measures taken during this pandemic to amend their curricula was necessary. Respondents also agree that assisting in hospitals during the outbreak would be a valuable learning opportunity. CONCLUSIONS: The impact on medical student education has been significant, particularly affecting the transition from student to doctor. This study showed the disruptions to student assistantships had the biggest effect on students' confidence and preparedness. For those willing to assist in hospitals to join the front-line workforce, it is crucial to maintain their wellbeing with safeguards such as proper inductions, support and supervision.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Students, Medical/psychology , Attitude of Health Personnel , Clinical Competence , Fear , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom , Young Adult
5.
JMIR Mhealth Uhealth ; 8(8): e19857, 2020 08 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-769046

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic is the greatest public health crisis of the last 100 years. Countries have responded with various levels of lockdown to save lives and stop health systems from being overwhelmed. At the same time, lockdowns entail large socioeconomic costs. One exit strategy under consideration is a mobile phone app that traces the close contacts of those infected with COVID-19. Recent research has demonstrated the theoretical effectiveness of this solution in different disease settings. However, concerns have been raised about such apps because of the potential privacy implications. This could limit the acceptability of app-based contact tracing in the general population. As the effectiveness of this approach increases strongly with app uptake, it is crucial to understand public support for this intervention. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to investigate the user acceptability of a contact-tracing app in five countries hit by the pandemic. METHODS: We conducted a largescale, multicountry study (N=5995) to measure public support for the digital contact tracing of COVID-19 infections. We ran anonymous online surveys in France, Germany, Italy, the United Kingdom, and the United States. We measured intentions to use a contact-tracing app across different installation regimes (voluntary installation vs automatic installation by mobile phone providers) and studied how these intentions vary across individuals and countries. RESULTS: We found strong support for the app under both regimes, in all countries, across all subgroups of the population, and irrespective of regional-level COVID-19 mortality rates. We investigated the main factors that may hinder or facilitate uptake and found that concerns about cybersecurity and privacy, together with a lack of trust in the government, are the main barriers to adoption. CONCLUSIONS: Epidemiological evidence shows that app-based contact tracing can suppress the spread of COVID-19 if a high enough proportion of the population uses the app and that it can still reduce the number of infections if uptake is moderate. Our findings show that the willingness to install the app is very high. The available evidence suggests that app-based contact tracing may be a viable approach to control the diffusion of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Contact Tracing/methods , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Intention , Mobile Applications , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cross-Cultural Comparison , Female , France/epidemiology , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom/epidemiology , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
6.
PLoS One ; 15(8): e0236775, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-768798

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Options to increase the ease of testing for SARS-CoV-2 infection and immune response are needed. Self-collection of diagnostic specimens at home offers an avenue to allow people to test for SARS-CoV-2 infection or immune response without traveling to a clinic or laboratory. Before this study, survey respondents indicated willingness to self-collect specimens for COVID-related tests, but hypothetical willingness can differ from post-collection acceptability after participants collect specimens. METHODS: 153 US adults were enrolled in a study of the willingness and feasibility of patients to self-collect three diagnostic specimens (saliva, oropharyngeal swab (OPS) and dried blood spot (DBS) card) while observed by a clinician through a telehealth session. After the specimens were collected, 148 participants participated in a survey about the acceptability of the collection, packing and shipping process, and their confidence in the samples collected for COVID-related laboratory testing. RESULTS: A large majority of participants (>84%) reported that collecting, packing and shipping of saliva, OPS, and DBS specimens were acceptable. Nearly nine in 10 (87%) reported being confident or very confident that the specimens they collected were sufficient for laboratory analysis.There were no differences in acceptability for any specimen type, packing and shipping, or confidence in samples, by gender, age, race/ethnicity, or educational level. CONCLUSIONS: Self-collection of specimens for SARS-CoV-2 testing, and preparing and shipping specimens for analysis, were acceptable in a diverse group of US adults. Further refinement of materials and instructions to support self-collection of saliva, OPS and DBS specimens for COVID-related testing is needed.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Oropharynx/virology , Patient Compliance , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Saliva/virology , Specimen Handling/methods , Adult , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Dried Blood Spot Testing/methods , Educational Status , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Compliance/ethnology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Self Care , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine
8.
J Craniofac Surg ; 31(6): e661-e663, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-760077

ABSTRACT

Coronavírus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a virus of mass dissemination, with an impact on international public health, leading to hospitalizations and death. The main symptoms of COVID-19 are fever, fatigue, dry cough; however, myalgia and dyspnea and the transmission routes include direct transmission by cough, sneeze, droplet inhalation, or contact transmission with the oral, nasal, or eye mucous membranes. The dental professionals are the main risk group to COVID-19 due to the transmission routes that are directly related to the dental practice. In addition, the oral and maxillofacial surgeons (OMFS) are even more exposed, due to increased contact with the population in hospitals and emergency services. OMFS should be able to identify a suspected case of COVID-19, its symptoms, risk groups, disease severity, laboratorial and computed tomography alterations, and treatment guidelines. In the present study, the authors performed a nationwide survey with Brazilian OMFS to evaluate the knowledge of these professionals about the pandemic status of the COVID-19. A total of 142 OMFS replied the survey and the results brings light to an incomparable health public problem that the OMFS in Brazil are no able to protect itself, diagnose the suspicious and probable cases, request and interpret the correct laboratorial examinations for the treatment of the COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Brazil , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Risk Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
Clin Neuroradiol ; 30(3): 447-452, 2020 Sep.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-754693

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To analyze standard operating procedures (SOP) of acute stroke imaging and interventions during COVID-19 pandemic with special emphasis on chest CT within a multimodal stroke protocol. METHODS: A questionnaire was distributed via email to members of the Professional Organization of German Neuroradiologists (Berufsverband Deutscher Neuroradiologen e.V.). RESULTS: Answers were received from 25 units: eleven of them acquire chest CT, three in any patient and eight, when COVID-19 is suspected due to body temperature increase, patient's history or when the latter cannot be sufficiently obtained. Preliminary data indicate a high sensitivity and moderate negative predictive value. CONCLUSION: Different SOP reflect an uncertainty whether chest CT should be acquired as part of a multimodal stroke protocol. Accuracy of low dose chest CT cannot be determined yet. The strengths and limitations of chest CT are discussed.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Practice Patterns, Physicians' , Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Stroke/virology , Clinical Protocols , Germany , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Selection , Surveys and Questionnaires , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
10.
Braz Oral Res ; 34: e117, 2020 Sep 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-750899

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to assess Brazilian endodontists' level of knowledge about the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and examine its professional repercussions. The link to the online survey that was created for this study was shared with Brazilian endodontists through social networking applications. The questionnaire contained questions that pertained to COVID-19 and its impact on dental practice. The collected data were analyzed using t-test, chi-square analysis, and analysis of variance, and the level of significance was set at 0.05. A total of 2,135 participants responded to the questionnaire, and all five Brazilian regions were represented in the sample. A total of 98.50% of endodontists reported that dental procedures can transmit COVID-19. Complete social distancing was practiced by 96.68% of the participants, and approximately 25% knew someone who had COVID-19. Moreover, in their daily practice, 72.13% of them implemented biosecurity measures that are ineffective in preventing COVID-19. Furthermore, 91.7% of them reportedly suspended elective dental procedures. Only 55.69% of them reported that they performed only emergency procedures in their workplaces. Those who believed that COVID-19 cannot be transmitted during dental procedures were less knowledgeable about the symptoms of COVID-19 (p = 0.0095). Endodontists who believed that personal protective equipment cannot prevent contamination were more knowledgeable about the symptoms of COVID-19 than their counterparts (p = 0.0003). The participating Brazilian endodontists demonstrated adequate knowledge about the risk of contamination during dental procedures and the main symptoms of COVID-19. Only some professionals reported providing emergency dental care during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Endodontists , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , Brazil , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Endodontics , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(8): e21613, 2020 08 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-750812

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The current COVID-19 pandemic is showing negative effects on human health as well as on social and economic life. It is a critical and challenging task to revive public life while minimizing the risk of infection. Reducing interactions between people by social distancing is an effective and prevalent measure to reduce the risk of infection and spread of the virus within a community. Current developments in several countries show that this measure can be technologically accompanied by mobile apps; meanwhile, privacy concerns are being intensively discussed. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine central cognitive variables that may constitute people's motivations for social distancing, using an app, and providing health-related data requested by two apps that differ in their direct utility for the individual user. The results may increase our understanding of people's concerns and convictions, which can then be specifically addressed by public-oriented communication strategies and appropriate political decisions. METHODS: This study refers to the protection motivation theory, which is adaptable to both health-related and technology-related motivations. The concept of social trust was added. The quantitative survey included answers from 406 German-speaking participants who provided assessments of data security issues, trust components, and the processes of threat and coping appraisal related to the prevention of SARS-CoV-2 infection by social distancing. With respect to apps, one central focus was on the difference between a contact tracing app and a data donation app. RESULTS: Multiple regression analyses showed that the present model could explain 55% of the interindividual variance in the participants' motivation for social distancing, 46% for using a contact tracing app, 42% for providing their own infection status to a contact tracing app, and 34% for using a data donation app. Several cognitive components of threat and coping appraisal were related to motivation measurements. Trust in other people's social distancing behavior and general trust in official app providers also played important roles; however, the participants' age and gender did not. Motivations for using and accepting a contact tracing app were higher than those for using and accepting a data donation app. CONCLUSIONS: This study revealed some important cognitive factors that constitute people's motivation for social distancing and using apps to combat the COVID-19 pandemic. Concrete implications for future research, public-oriented communication strategies, and appropriate political decisions were identified and are discussed.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Mobile Applications/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Social Distance , Evaluation Studies as Topic , Humans , Motivation , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
BMC Psychiatry ; 20(1): 436, 2020 09 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745684

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Neurological symptoms are increasingly being noted among COVID-19 patients. Currently, there is little data on the mental health of neurological healthcare workers. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence and influencing factors on anxiety and depression in neurological healthcare workers in Hunan Province, China during the early stage of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak. METHODS: An online cross-sectional study was conducted among neurological doctors and nurses in early February 2020 in Hunan Province. Symptoms of anxiety and depression were assessed by the Chinese version of the Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) (defined as a total score ≥ 50) and Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) (defined as a total score ≥ 53). The prevalences of probable anxiety and depression were compared between different groups, and multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to understand the independent influencing factors on anxiety and depression. RESULTS: The prevalence of probable anxiety and depression in neurological nurses (20.3 and 30.2%, respectively) was higher than that in doctors (12.6 and 20.2%, respectively). Female healthcare workers (18.4%) had a higher proportion of anxiety than males (10.8%). Probable anxiety and depression were more prevalent among nurses, younger workers (≤ 40 years), and medical staff with junior titles. Logistic regression analysis showed that a shortage of protective equipment was independently associated with probable anxiety (OR = 1.980, 95% CI: 1.241-3.160, P = 0.004), while young age was a risk factor for probable depression (OR = 2.293, 95% CI: 1.137-4.623, P = 0.020) among neurological healthcare workers. CONCLUSIONS: Probable anxiety and depression were more prevalent among neurological nurses than doctors in Hunan Province. The shortage of protective equipment led to probable anxiety, and young age led to probable depression in healthcare workers in neurology departments, which merits attention during the battle against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Depressive Disorder/epidemiology , Nurses/psychology , Pandemics , Physicians/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral , Adult , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depressive Disorder/psychology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Hospital Units , Humans , Male , Neurology , Prevalence , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
South Med J ; 113(9): 462-465, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745353

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has drastically changed resident training in the United States. Here, we explore the early perceived effects of COVID-19 on dermatology residents through an electronic sample survey and identify possible areas for targeted improvement in lieu of a possible second wave of COVID-19 cases. METHODS: On April 3, 2020, a survey of link with 25 questions was sent to dermatology program coordinators to be disseminated among dermatology residents in the United States. The survey was closed on April 13, 2020. All of the questions were optional and no personal identifiers were collected. RESULTS: A total of 140 dermatology residents from 50 different residency programs across 26 states responded to the survey. The majority of respondents (85%) reported negative effects of COVID-19 on their overall wellness. Despite the majority of residents (92%) speculating that COVID-19 will have negative long-term effects on the US economy, only 33% agreed or strongly agreed that it will affect their job prospects. Teledermatology was widely implemented following the declaration of a national emergency (96% of represented residencies compared with only 30% before the pandemic), with heavy resident involvement. The majority of residents (99%) reported having virtual didactics and that they found them to be beneficial. Most residents were uncomfortable with the prospect of being reassigned to a nondermatology specialty during the pandemic. In addition, 22% of residents believed that their leadership were not transparent and prompt in addressing changes relating to COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Dermatology residents were affected negatively by COVID-19 in regard to their well-being, clinical training, and education. Several areas of improvement were identified that could improve our preparedness for a second wave of the virus.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Dermatology , Pandemics , Patient Care Management/trends , Pneumonia, Viral , Skin Diseases/therapy , Telemedicine , Adult , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Dermatology/education , Dermatology/methods , Education/methods , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Male , Organizational Innovation , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Care Management/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Social Perception , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/trends , United States
14.
Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 45(6): 649-656, 2020 Jun 28.
Article in English, Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745339

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To understand medical students' mental health, professional pride, and intention to work in the front-line during coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, and provide a reference for psychological intervention. METHODS: We used the depression-anxiety-stress scale and self-designed questionnaire on professional pride, intention to work in the front-line and the extent of family support. Medical students from 4 medical schools in Fujian and Hunan were investigated. Their mental health status, professional pride and first-line work willingness with different characteristics were compared, and the influential factors for professional pride and first-line work willingness were analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 266 valid questionnaires were collected. During the pandemic, there were significant differences in the proportion of depressed students among different college and universities, majors and stages (P<0.05), and the professional pride was significantly different (P<0.001). Medical students with different mental health status showed significant differences in professional pride (P<0.01). Marriage, pressure and extent of family support were the influential factors for their professional pride (P<0.05). The latter two were also influential factors for their intention to work in the front-line (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: During the pandemic, students from college and nursing have relatively better mental health and higher professional pride. The professional pride is low in medical students who married, with abnormal stress or low family support. The intention to work in front-line is decreased in students with abnormal stress or low family support.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Mental Health , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Students, Medical/psychology , Betacoronavirus , China , Family , Humans , Intention , Pandemics , Professionalism , Social Support , Stress, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 45(6): 657-664, 2020 Jun 28.
Article in English, Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745335

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The epidemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) brought psychological stress to the public, especially to patients. This study aims to investigate the mental health of patients with COVID-19 in Changsha. METHODS: We took cross-section investigation for the mental health of 112 patients with COVID-19 via questionnaires. Mann-Whitney U test, Chi-square test, and Fisher's exact test were performed to compare general and clinical data between the slight-ordinary patients and severe patients. Single sample t-tests were used to compare the difference between the factor scores of the Symptom Check-List 90 (SCL-90) in COVID-19 patients with the norm of 2015 and factor scores of SCL-90 in patients with the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). RESULTS: The obsessive-compulsive, depression, sleep and eating disorders had the highest frequency among the positive symptoms of SCL-90 in patients with COVID-19 in Changsha. The factor scores of somatization, depression, anxiety, phobia anxiety, sleep and eating disorders in patients with COVID-19 were higher than those of the norm (P≤0.001 or P<0.05). Slight-ordinary patients with COVID-19 in Changsha showed lower factor scores of somatization, depression, anxiety, and hostility compared with the patients with SARS (P<0.001 or P<0.05). There was no difference in factor scores of SCL-90 between the patients with severe COVID-19 and those with SARS(P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The levels of somatization, depression, anxiety, phobia anxiety, sleep and eating disorders in patients with COVID-19 in Changsha are higher than those of the norm. However, the mental health of slight-ordinary patients with COVID-19 is better than that of patients with SARS. It needs to provide targeting psychological interventions depending on the severity of patients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Health Status , Mental Health , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Anxiety , Betacoronavirus , China , Depression , Feeding and Eating Disorders , Humans , Pandemics , Sleep Wake Disorders , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 45(6): 665-672, 2020 Jun 28.
Article in English, Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745326

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate residents' knowledge, attitude and behavior towards coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Hunan Province, and to explore the factors influencing behaviors. METHODS: A self-designed questionnaire was used to conduct an online survey for 4 139 Hunan residents. The contents included general population information, residents' knowledge, attitude and practice to COVID-19. RESULTS: Mean scores of knowledge, attitude, and behavior were 29.82±3.16, 6.71±1.12, and 14.93±1.45, respectively. Residents had the highest score of major symptoms of COVID-19 (3.96±0.39), but the lowest was the main transmission routes (3.47±0.89). A total of 22.68% of the residents were very or relatively afraid of the outbreak, but 95.22% of the residents had confidence in defeating COVID-19. In behavior dimension, "handling of suspicious symptoms" had the lowest score (3.58±0.75). The behavior implementation rate of "keep the surfaces of household items clean" (80.50%), "doing more exercise, reasonable diet, working and resting regularly" (84.59%), and "avoid hand contacting with eyes, mouth or nose" (89.51%) were relatively low. Pearson correlation coefficient showed that the knowledge, attitude, and practices score were correlated with each other (knowledge vs behavior: r=0.366; knowledge vs attitude: r=0.041; attitude vs behavior: r=0.100; all P<0.05). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the knowledge, attitude and behavior on COVID-19 were mostly influenced by education background (all P<0.05), and the independent factors affecting behavior included knowledge and attitude, gender, permanent residence, education background (all P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Residents in Hunan Province have a good knowledge, attitude, and behavior to COVID-19. Nevertheless there are still weak links to be improved in all dimensions. It is necessary to strengthen knowledge and behavior of family protection, and care for residents' psychological health, especially persons with low education degree, male and rural residents.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Betacoronavirus , China , Humans , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 45(6): 641-648, 2020 Jun 28.
Article in English, Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745314

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To understand the psychological status of the staff in a general hospital during the coronavirus disease 2019 and its influential factors, and to provide references for the mental health services to hospital staff. METHODS: Using star platform of questionnaire, the staff in the general hospital were investigated via Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale (DASS-21), Social Support Rating Scale (SSRS) and Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire (SCSQ). The influential factors were discussed by descriptive analysis, rank sum test, single factor analysis, correlation analysis and multiple factors binary logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: A total of 2 060 valid questionnaires were collected. The negative emotions of nurses and cleaners were the most obvious. The depression scores, anxiety scores and stress scores for nurses and cleaners were 5.06±7.47, 6.36±7.84, 9.75±8.65, and 6.72±8.84, 4.51±6.56, 9.69±9.56, respectively. Multivariate binary logistic regression analysis showed that staff types, education levels, job status, economic situation and concerns on the supplies of protective goods were the main influential factors for depression; staff types, contacting status with infected patients, economic situation, concerns on the supplies of protective goods, history of disease were the main influential factors for anxiety; contacting status with infected patients, economic situation, concerns on the supplies of protective goods were the main influential factors for stress. CONCLUSIONS: There are differences in psychological characteristics among different groups of staff in the general hospital under the outbreak. Thus psychological protection and intervention measures should be formulated according to different groups and work status.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Stress, Psychological , Adaptation, Psychological , Anxiety/diagnosis , Betacoronavirus , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/diagnosis , Disease Outbreaks , Hospitals, General , Humans , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 45(6): 633-640, 2020 Jun 28.
Article in English, Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745309

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To explore the psychological status of medical staff in the epidemic period of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), and to analyze its influential factors. METHODS: A total of 373 medical staff from Xiangya Hospital and the Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University were enrolled for this study. The General Sociological Data Questionnaire, Symptom Check-List 90 (SCL-90), and self-designed public opinion response questionnaire were used to assess general sociological data, mental health scores, and ability to respond to COVID-19 related public opinion information of medical staff. The mental health scores of medical staff with different general sociological data and public opinion information coping abilities were compared. Influential factors of mental health were analyzed. RESULTS: The average score of 10 factors in SCL-90 of 373 medical staff was less than 2 points. 14.21% medical staff had one or more factor scores more than two points, including 11.26% with terror symptoms, 7.77% with compulsive symptoms, and 5.63% with anxiety. The main sources of COVID-19 information for medical staff included WeChat, microblog, Jinri toutiao, TV and radio. 66.22% medical staff regularly verified information about COVID-19 through official websites or formal channels. A great deal of COVID-19 information in WeChat could make medical staff nervous (34.05%), anxious (30.29%), and insecure (29.22%). 68.63% medical staff sometimes were worried about getting infected because they knew information about COVID-19. Different departments of medical staff, getting cough or having a fever recently, and the degree of fear of infection had an impact on the SCL-90 score of medical staff, the differences were all statistically significant (all P<0.05). Stepwise regression analysis showed that the impact of COVID-19 information on their life in WeChat, getting cough or having a fever recently, insomnia-early caused by COVID-19 information in WeChat, different departments, and the degree of fear of infection COVID-19 were the influential factors for the mental health of medical staff (all P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: During the epidemic of COVID-19, medical staff suffered from psychological problems to various degrees. It is necessary to establish a psychological assistance platform and guide the direction of public opinion correctly to promote the mental health of medical staff.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Health Status , Medical Staff/psychology , Mental Health , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Anxiety , Betacoronavirus , China , Compulsive Behavior , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Fear , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
BMC Public Health ; 20(1): 1351, 2020 Sep 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-744980

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 restrictions such as the closure of schools and parks, and the cancellation of youth sports and activity classes around the United States may prevent children from achieving recommended levels of physical activity (PA). This study examined the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on PA and sedentary behavior (SB) in U.S. children. METHOD: Parents and legal guardians of U.S. children (ages 5-13) were recruited through convenience sampling and completed an online survey between April 25-May 16, 2020. Measures included an assessment of their child's previous day PA and SB by indicating time spent in 11 common types of PA and 12 common types of SB for children. Parents also reported perceived changes in levels of PA and SB between the pre-COVID-19 (February 2020) and early-COVID-19 (April-May 2020) periods. Additionally, parents reported locations (e.g., home/garage, parks/trails, gyms/fitness centers) where their children had performed PA and their children's use of remote/streaming services for PA. RESULTS: From parent reports, children (N = 211) (53% female, 13% Hispanic, Mage = 8.73 [SD = 2.58] years) represented 35 states and the District of Columbia. The most common physical activities during the early-COVID-19 period were free play/unstructured activity (e.g., running around, tag) (90% of children) and going for a walk (55% of children). Children engaged in about 90 min of school-related sitting and over 8 h of leisure-related sitting a day. Parents of older children (ages 9-13) vs. younger children (ages 5-8) perceived greater decreases in PA and greater increases in SB from the pre- to early-COVID-19 periods. Children were more likely to perform PA at home indoors or on neighborhood streets during the early- vs. pre-COVID-19 periods. About a third of children used remote/streaming services for activity classes and lessons during the early-COVID-19 period. CONCLUSION: Short-term changes in PA and SB in reaction to COVID-19 may become permanently entrenched, leading to increased risk of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease in children. Programmatic and policy strategies should be geared towards promoting PA and reducing SB over the next 12 months.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Exercise , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Sedentary Behavior , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
20.
Psychiatr Danub ; 32(Suppl 1): 10-14, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-743516

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the times of serious health alarm, as it is happening in the COVID-19 pandemic, burden of healthcare is likely to explode. The current pandemic is having a profound effect on all aspects of society, including mental health and physical health. In a previous study we showed interaction between compassion fatigue, burnout and workload. METHODS: In our study, we have evaluated stress levels in 102 healthcare workers recruited in different rehabilitation departments (psychiatric and multidisciplinary). In particular, we evaluated the fatigue of compassion, vicarious trauma, burnout and hope (hopelessness) in the first two months of lookdown due to the COVID-19. RESULTS: The results obtained after the administration of the following evaluation scales: sCFs, CBI, Pro QOL, HBS, showed an overall increase in the scores in all professional figures. Significant compassion fatigue and burnout percentage is present in several groups. The highest levels of hopelessness in some professional figures, while higher educational levels can protect workers from the risk of developing high levels of work stress. CONCLUSIONS: The data obtained with this study are similar to those of our previous study, although they may indicate that during the period of the coronavirus pandemic the scores of the several scales used are higher.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Compassion Fatigue , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Empathy , Health Personnel/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Betacoronavirus , Hope , Humans , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
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