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1.
Oncologist ; 27(6): 512-515, 2022 06 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2190095

ABSTRACT

Our objective was to assess gynecologic cancer survivor preferences for telehealth cancer care. Gynecologic cancer survivors participating in a prospective cohort study were invited to complete a cross-sectional survey regarding their experience with and preferences for telehealth. Of 188 participants, 48.9% had undergone a telehealth visit since March 2020, and 53.7% reported a preference for exclusively in-person visits for their cancer care and surveillance. Furthermore, 80.5% of participants were satisfied with the telehealth care they received and 54.8% would recommend telehealth services to patients with similar conditions. Most participants thought a physical examination was critical to detecting recurrence, and concern that their provider may miss something during telehealth visits was greater among those who preferred in-person visits. With many gynecologic cancer survivors preferring in-person care, building a future care model that includes telehealth elements will require adaptations, careful evaluation of patient concerns, as well as patient education on telehealth.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Genital Neoplasms, Female , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Genital Neoplasms, Female/epidemiology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Perception , Prospective Studies , Survivors
2.
Respir Res ; 22(1): 255, 2021 Sep 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2196282

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: There is relatively little published on the effects of COVID-19 on respiratory physiology, particularly breathing patterns. We sought to determine if there were lasting detrimental effect following hospital discharge and if these related to the severity of COVID-19. METHODS: We reviewed lung function and breathing patterns in COVID-19 survivors > 3 months after discharge, comparing patients who had been admitted to the intensive therapy unit (ITU) (n = 47) to those who just received ward treatments (n = 45). Lung function included spirometry and gas transfer and breathing patterns were measured with structured light plethysmography. Continuous data were compared with an independent t-test or Mann Whitney-U test (depending on distribution) and nominal data were compared using a Fisher's exact test (for 2 categories in 2 groups) or a chi-squared test (for > 2 categories in 2 groups). A p-value of < 0.05 was taken to be statistically significant. RESULTS: We found evidence of pulmonary restriction (reduced vital capacity and/or alveolar volume) in 65.4% of all patients. 36.1% of all patients has a reduced transfer factor (TLCO) but the majority of these (78.1%) had a preserved/increased transfer coefficient (KCO), suggesting an extrapulmonary cause. There were no major differences between ITU and ward lung function, although KCO alone was higher in the ITU patients (p = 0.03). This could be explained partly by obesity, respiratory muscle fatigue, localised microvascular changes, or haemosiderosis from lung damage. Abnormal breathing patterns were observed in 18.8% of subjects, although no consistent pattern of breathing pattern abnormalities was evident. CONCLUSIONS: An "extrapulmonary restrictive" like pattern appears to be a common phenomenon in previously admitted COVID-19 survivors. Whilst the cause of this is not clear, the effects seem to be similar on patients whether or not they received mechanical ventilation or had ward based respiratory support/supplemental oxygen.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Hospitalization/trends , Lung/physiology , Respiratory Mechanics/physiology , Spirometry/trends , Survivors , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Lung Diseases/diagnosis , Lung Diseases/physiopathology , Lung Diseases/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge/trends , Respiratory Function Tests/methods , Respiratory Function Tests/trends , Spirometry/methods , Young Adult
4.
BMJ Open ; 12(11): e066029, 2022 11 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2153001

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: There is concern that survivors of adult cancers may be at increased risk of respiratory infections and of exacerbations of pre-existing respiratory conditions. Considering the high prevalence of respiratory disease in the general population, increased respiratory disease risk in survivors of adult cancers could translate into an important impact on morbidity and mortality. The aim of this systematic review is to summarise and assess the quality of all studies comparing respiratory outcomes between adult cancer survivors and individuals with no history of cancer. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This systematic literature review will be conducted using Medline, EMBASE and Cochrane. We will include cohort or case-control studies that provide a comparative estimate of the risk of a respiratory disease of interest in survivors of adult cancer against a comparator cohort of cancer-free individuals. No geographic, time or language restrictions will be applied. We will assess the risk of bias using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network methodology checklists. Results will be summarised by type of respiratory outcome, cancer type and cancer survivorship definition. If sufficient numbers of homogeneous studies are found, summary measures of association will be calculated using random effects meta-analysis models. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval is not applicable to our study. The results will be used to identify evidence gaps and priorities for future research to understand respiratory morbidity in survivors of adult cancers and identify possible mitigation strategies. Results from this review will be disseminated to clinical audiences and submitted to a peer-reviewed journal when completed. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: This study has been registered on PROSPERO (registration number: CRD42022311557).


Subject(s)
Neoplasms , Respiration Disorders , Adult , Humans , Research Design , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Case-Control Studies , Survivors , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Meta-Analysis as Topic
5.
Psychiatr Danub ; 34(3): 578-586, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2146179

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 pandemic, which still continues to affect the whole world, has led to an increase in PTSD symptoms in societies, especially individuals who have been diagnosed with the disease and recovered are at significant risk for PTSD have been reported. Although it has been observed that PTSD symptoms of individuals who were infected in the past epidemics such as SARS and Ebola continued for a long time even after the epidemic, it is noteworthy that the studies conducted during the COVID-19 process do not focus enough on people who survived the COVID-19 disease. The purpose of this study is to determine the direct and indirect impact of positivity on PTSD symptoms of individuals who have recovered from COVID-19 and the role of rumination and fear of COVID-19 as potential mediators in this effect. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: In the study, the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, Ruminative Response Scale, Positivity Scale, and Fear of COVID-19 Scale were applied to 551 Turkish participants, who survived the COVID-19 disease. SEM-based mediation analysis was used to test hypothesized relationships. RESULTS: Mediating roles of fear of COVID-19 and rumination between positivity and PTSD were tested. Results indicated that rumination and fear of COVID-19 had a full mediating role in the relationship between positivity and PTSD. CONCLUSION: These findings pointed out that positivity might be an indirect protective disposition against COVID-19-related PTSD and might reduce risk factors associated with PTSD among COVID-19 survivors. Mental health practices for COVID-19 patients should aim to increase positive thinking, since they have ruminative thoughts about transmission of the virus and hospitalization process and these thoughts may lead to negative mental health conditions. In this sense, positive psychology-focused implementations can be organized for COVID-19 patients and survivors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Humans , COVID-19/psychology , Fear , Pandemics , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Survivors/psychology
6.
Front Immunol ; 13: 947724, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2141980

ABSTRACT

Background: Asthma patients potentially have impaired adaptive immunity to virus infection. The levels of SARS-CoV-2-specific adaptive immunity between COVID-19 survivors with and without asthma are presently unclear. Methods: COVID-19 survivors (patients with asthma n=11, with allergies n=8, and COVID-19 only n=17) and non-COVID-19 individuals (asthmatic patients n=10 and healthy controls n=9) were included. The COVID-19 patients were followed up at about 8 months and 16 months after discharge. The clinical characteristics, lymphocyte subsets, memory T cells, and humoral immunity including SARS-CoV-2 specific antibodies, SARS-CoV-2 pseudotyped virus neutralization assay, and memory B cells were analyzed in these subjects. Results: The strength of virus-specific T cell response in COVID-19 survivors was positively correlated with the percentage of blood eosinophils and Treg cells (r=0.4007, p=0.0188; and r=0.4435, p=0.0086 respectively) at 8-month follow-up. There were no statistical differences in the levels of SARS-CoV-2-specific T cell response between the COVID-19 survivors with, and without, asthma. Compared to those without asthma, the COVID-19 with asthma survivors had higher levels of SARS-CoV-2-specific neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) at the 8-month follow-up (p<0.05). Moreover, the level of NAbs in COVID-19 survivors was positively correlated with the percentage of Treg and cTfh2 cells (r=0.5037, p=0.002; and r=0.4846, p=0.0141), and negatively correlated with the percentage of Th1 and Th17 cells (r=-0.5701, p=0.0003; and r=-0.3656, p=0.0308), the ratio of Th1/Th2, Th17/Treg, and cTfh1/cTfh2 cell (r=-0.5356, r=-0.5947, r=-0.4485; all p<0.05). The decay rate of NAbs in the COVID-19 survivors with asthma was not significantly different from that of those without asthma at 16-month follow-up. Conclusion: The level of SARS-CoV-2-specific NAbs in COVID-19 survivors with asthma was higher than that of those without asthma at 8-month follow-up. The SARS-CoV-2-specific T cell immunity was associated with blood eosinophils and Treg percentages. The SARS-CoV-2-specific humoral immunity was closely associated with cTfh2/cTfh1 imbalance and Treg/Th17 ratio. According to the findings, asthmatic patients in COVID-19 convalescent period may benefit from an enhanced specific humoral immunity, which associates with skewed Th2/Th1 and Treg/Th17 immune.


Subject(s)
Asthma , COVID-19 , Adaptive Immunity , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Survivors
7.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0277694, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119282

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: This study aims to investigate the health-related quality of life and coping strategies among COVID-19 survivors in Bangladesh. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study of 2198 adult, COVID-19 survivors living in Bangladesh. Data were collected from previously diagnosed COVID-19 participants (confirmed by an RT-PCR test) via door-to-door interviews in the eight different divisions in Bangladesh. For data collection, Bengali-translated Brief COPE inventory and WHO Brief Quality of Life (WHO-QoLBREF) questionnaires were used. The data collection period was from October 2020 to March 2021. RESULTS: Males 72.38% (1591) were more affected by COVID-19 than females 27.62% (607). Age showed significant correlations (p<0.005) with physical, psychological and social relationships, whereas gender showed only a significant correlation with physical health (p<0.001). Marital status, occupation, living area, and co-morbidities showed significant co-relation with all four domains of QoL (p<0.001). Education and affected family members showed significant correlation with physical and social relationship (p<0.001). However, smoking habit showed a significant correlation with both social relationship and environment (p<0.001). Age and marital status showed a significant correlation with avoidant coping strategies (p<0.001); whereas gender and co-morbidities showed a significant correlation with problem-focused coping strategies (p<0.001). Educational qualification, occupation and living area showed significant correlation with all three coping strategies(p<0.001). CONCLUSION: Survivors of COVID-19 showed mixed types of coping strategies; however, the predominant coping strategy was avoidant coping, followed by problem-focused coping, with emotion-focused coping reported as the least prevalent. Marital status, occupation, living area and co-morbidities showed a greater effect on QoL in all participants. This study represents the real scenario of nationwide health-associated quality of life and coping strategies during and beyond the Delta pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Adult , Male , Female , Humans , Quality of Life/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Bangladesh/epidemiology , Adaptation, Psychological , Survivors
8.
BMC Pulm Med ; 22(1): 408, 2022 Nov 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119416

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Dyspnea is common after COVID-19 pneumonia and can be characterized by a defective CO2 diffusion (DLCO) despite normal pulmonary function tests (PFT). Nevertheless, DLCO impairment tends to normalize at 1 year, with no dyspnea regression. The altered regional distribution of ventilation and a dysfunction of the peripheral lung may characterize dyspnea at 1 year after COVID-19 pneumonia. We aimed at assessing the pattern of airway resistance and inflammation and the regional ventilation inhomogeneity in COVID-19 pneumonia survivors at 12-months after hospital discharge. METHODS: We followed up at 1-year patients previously admitted to the respiratory units (intensive care or sub-intensive care unit) for COVID-19 acute respiratory failure at 1-year after hospital discharge. PFT (spirometry, DLCO), impulse oscillometry (IOS), measurements of the exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) and Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) were used to evaluate lung volumes, CO2 diffusion capacity, peripheral lung inflammation/resistances and the regional inhomogeneity of ventilation distribution. A full medical examination was conducted, and symptoms of new onset (not present before COVID-19) were recorded. Patients were therefore divided into two groups based on the presence/absence of dyspnea (defined as mMRC ≥1) compared to evaluate differences in the respiratory function derived parameters. RESULTS: Sixty-seven patients were admitted between October and December 2020. Of them, 42/67 (63%) patients were discharged alive and 33 were evaluated during the follow up. Their mean age was 64 ± 11 years and 24/33 (73%) were males. Their maximum respiratory support was in 7/33 (21%) oxygen, in 4/33 (12%) HFNC, in 14/33 (42%) NIV/CPAP and in 8/33 (24%) invasive mechanical ventilation. During the clinical examination, 15/33 (45%) reported dyspnea. When comparing the two groups, no significant differences were found in PFT, in the peripheral airway inflammation (FENO) or mechanical properties (IOS). However, EIT showed a significantly higher regional inhomogeneity in patients with dyspnea both during resting breathing (0.98[0.96-1] vs 1.1[1-1.1], p = 0.012) and during forced expiration (0.96[0.94-1] vs 1 [0.98-1.1], p = 0.045). CONCLUSIONS: New onset dyspnea characterizes 45% of patients 1 year after COVID-19 pneumonia. In these patients, despite pulmonary function test may be normal, EIT shows a higher regional inhomogeneity both during quiet and forced breathing which may contribute to dyspnea. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT04343053, registration date 13/04/2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Male , Humans , Middle Aged , Aged , Female , COVID-19/complications , Follow-Up Studies , Carbon Dioxide , Lung , Dyspnea/etiology , Survivors , Inflammation
9.
Chron Respir Dis ; 19: 14799731221114271, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2116667

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: A decrease of both diffusion capacity (DLCO) and Quality of Life (QoL) was reported after discharge in hospitalized COVID-19 pneumonia survivors. We studied three and 6 month outcomes in hospitalized and non-hospitalized patients. METHODS: COVID-19 pneumonia survivors (n = 317) were categorized into non-hospitalized "moderate" cases (n = 59), hospitalized "severe" cases (n = 180) and ICU-admitted "critical" cases (n = 39). We studied DLCO and QoL (Short Form SF-36 health survey) 3 and 6 months after discharge. Data were analyzed using (repeated measures) ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis or Chi-square test (p < .05). RESULTS: At 3 months DLCO was decreased in 44% of moderate-, 56% of severe- and 82% of critical cases (p < .003). Mean DLCO in critical cases (64±14%) was lower compared to severe (76 ± 17%) and moderate (81±15%) cases (p < .001). A total of 159/278 patients had a decreased DLCO (<80%), of whom the DLCO improved after 6 months in 45% (71/159). However the DLCO did not normalize in the majority (89%) of the cases (63 ± 10% vs 68±10%; p < .001). At 3 months, compared to critical cases, moderate cases scored lower on SF-36 domain "general health" (p < .05); both moderate and severe cases scored lower on the domain of "health change" (p < .05). At 6 months, there were no differences in SF-36 between the subgroups. Compared to 3 months, in all groups "physical functioning" improved; in contrast all groups scored significantly lower on "non-physical" SF-36 domains. CONCLUSION: Three months after COVID-19 pneumonia, DLCO was still decreased in the more severely affected patients, with an incomplete recovery after 6 months. At 3 months QoL was impaired. At 6 months, while "physical functioning" improved, a decrease in "non-physical" QoL was observed but did not differ between the moderate and severely affected patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Survivors , Lung
10.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0275381, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2109318

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: One of the stages of reproduction of SARS-CoV-2 is the S-protein glycosylation to facilitate penetration into target cells. It has been suggested that SARS-CoV-2 is able to enter erythrocytes, interact with heme and porphyrin, which could influence HbA1c levels. Assessment of HbA1c levels in individuals with acute COVID-19 and after recovery may show clinical relevance of this hypothesis. AIM: To assess HbA1c levels in patients with COVID-19 in the acute phase and in early (6-8 weeks) and late (52±2 weeks) periods after recovery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a multicenter prospective study, which included patients hospitalized in Endocrinology Research Centre and the City Clinical Hospital № 52" diagnosed with COVID-19, virus identified/ not identified. Patients were divided into three groups according to baseline HbA1c level and the presence or absence of previous history of diabetes previous history of diabetes mellitus (DM): HbA1c ≤ 6.0%, HbA1c > 6.0% and patients with DM. Patients were examined during the acute COVID-19 phase and in early (6-8 weeks) and late (52±2 weeks) periods after recovery. Oral glucose tolerance test was performed in the group with initial HbA1c > 6.0% to clarify the diagnosis. RESULTS: We included 194 patients in the study. During the follow-up, 52 patients were examined in 6-8 week period: 7 with HbA1c ≤ 6.0%, 34 with HbA1c > 6.0%, 11-with previously diagnosed DM. Carbohydrate metabolism assessment in the later stages (52±2 weeks) after recovery was performed in 78 patients: 33 patients with HbA1c ≤ 6.0%, 36 patients with HbA1c > 6.0% and 9 patients with previously established diabetes. HbA1c median in patients with HbA1c ≤ 6.0% was 5.7% [5.3;5.8], with HbA1c>6.0% -6.4% [6.2; 6.6], with previously diagnosed DM-7.7% [7.2; 8.9]. Statistically significant decrease in HbA1c over time 6-8 weeks after extracts were obtained in both groups of individuals without a history of DM (Wilcoxon test, p<0.05). After 52±2 weeks we observed HbA1c decrease in all three groups (Fridman test, p<0.05): in patients with HbA1c ≤ 6.0% median HbA1c was 5.5[5.3;5.7], with HbA1c>6.0% - 6.1[6.15;6.54], with previously diagnosed DM-7.8 [5.83; 8.08]. Development of DM after 52±2 weeks was recorded in 7.24% of all examined patients without a history of DM, which is 16.6% of the total number of patients examined in dynamics with HbA1c > 6.0%. CONCLUSION: HbA1c elevation during the acute phase of COVID-19 may be false due to the effect of SARS-CoV-2 on hemoglobin kinetics and/or detection on the surface of the SARS-CoV-2 virion highly glycosylated S-proteins by high performance liquid chromatography determinations. Upon detection HbA1c > 6.0% in patients with COVID-19 in the active phase of the disease without concomitant hyperglycemia re-determine the level of HbA1c after recovery is recommended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Humans , Glycated Hemoglobin A/metabolism , Follow-Up Studies , Prospective Studies , Patient Discharge , SARS-CoV-2 , Hospitals , Survivors
11.
BMJ Open ; 12(11): e059987, 2022 11 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108277

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has posed an unparalleled threat to all dimensions of human health and well-being. The Pan American Health Organization has acknowledged the crucial role of rehabilitation therapies for COVID-19 and emphasised the importance of exercise programmes for COVID-19 survivors. This scoping review outlines our strategy for systematically reviewing published and unpublished literature to investigate the volume of evidence for exercise interventions for COVID-19 survivors. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This scoping review will be conducted based on the framework developed by Arksey and O'Malley. Six databases (PubMed/Medline, Scopus, Web of Science, Cochrane Central, ProQuest and CINAHL) will be searched in August 2022 and articles will be considered for inclusion published till July 2022. Studies will be screened by two independent reviewers at the title/abstract and full-text screening stages, as well as data extraction and critical assessment. Data will be extracted in a data extraction form and presented as figures and tables with narratives. This scoping review will give a thorough understanding of the current literature on exercise interventions for COVID-19 survivors, as well as identify knowledge gaps that will guide future research. Preliminary searches will be conducted after the publication of this scoping review protocol. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: No human or animal participants were involved in this review. Therefore, ethical committee approval is not required. Transparency will be followed at every review stage. Review findings will be disseminated through peer-review publications or through conference presentations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Delivery of Health Care , Survivors , Exercise Therapy , Research Design , Review Literature as Topic
12.
Anatol J Cardiol ; 26(11): 841-848, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100197

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is a multi-systemic infectious disease. Nearly 20%-30% of hospitalized patients have evidence of acute myocardial involvement, portending a poorer prognosis. However, information about the long-term effects of the disease on cardiac functions is sparse. As a result, there is a growing concern about the cardiac sequelae of COVID-19 among survivors. This study aimed to investigate the effects of prior mild-moderate COVID-19 infection on cardiac functions, using speckle tracking echocardiography. METHODS: Patients who have been diagnosed with COVID-19 within the previous 6 months and age-, sex-, and risk factor-matched healthy adults were included. All patients underwent a comprehensive echocardiographic examination. Both conventional and 2-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiographic measurements were performed. Serum cardiac biomarkers were also obtained on the day of the echocardiographic study. RESULTS: Compared with healthy controls, COVID-19 survivors had similar left and right ventricular longitudinal strain values at 6 months. Also, left and right atrial peak systolic strain values did not differ between the groups. CONCLUSION: Our study is valuable in putting forth the unaffected ventricular and atrial functions on long term in uncomplicated COVID-19 cases and may decrease the survivors' anxiety and the number of unnecessary applications to cardiology clinics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Humans , Echocardiography , Heart Ventricles/diagnostic imaging , Systole , Survivors
13.
Curr Oncol ; 29(11): 8431-8441, 2022 Nov 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099385

ABSTRACT

This qualitative study begins to explore cancer survivors' evolving perceptions of "Focus on the Future," a 6-week supportive virtual program led by trained volunteers and health care professionals. Through purposive sampling, participants (n = 10) enrolled in the program were individually interviewed shortly before attending, mid-way through, and at program completion. Interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was used to develop key elements of program expectations and users' perceptions over time. Three themes transpired from the data: (1) Trustworthiness and timeliness of survivorship information and expert guidance, (2) Normalization of survivors' experiences, and (3) Virtual program delivery issues. Some participants' perceptions remained unchanged from pre-program expectations to post-program completion such as appreciating the efficiency of virtual delivery and "health safe" exchanges given the COVID-19 pandemic. In contrast, other perceptions became more polarized including drawbacks related to "more superficial" virtual connections and uneven topic relevance as the program evolved. Program participants appreciated timely information and support from volunteers and experts through virtual means and consecutive weekly sessions. Gauging participants' perceptions across time also offer opportunities to adjust program content and delivery features. Future research should explore key program development strategies to ensure that cancer supportive programs are optimally person-centered, co-designed, and situation-responsive.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Humans , Pandemics , Survivors , Qualitative Research , Neoplasms/therapy
15.
Medwave ; 22(9): e2581, 2022 Oct 25.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2090780

ABSTRACT

Introduction: In March 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared a pandemic for coronavirus 19. Typical symptoms were fever, cough, asthenia, dyspnea, and muscle pain. Pulmonary and central nervous system compromise presented challenging characteristics for healthcare physicians. The objectives of this study were to identify epidemiological and clinical characteristics of SARS-COV-2 infection survivors in a region of Argentina and to determine differences between gender, age groups, year of infection, and evolution time since diagnosis. Methods: A descriptive and analytical cross-sectional observational study was carried out. A self-administered questionnaire was applied, which was available between August and December 2021. Results: Among 1868 individuals included, the mean age was 39.4 ± 13.9 years, and 72.8% were female. Arterial hypertension was the most frequent comorbidity (11.7%). The majority were outpatients (81.9%). The most frequent presentation symptoms at all ages were asthenia (83.7%), fever (54.9%), headache (60.8%), anosmia (64.8%), ageusia (53.2%), cough (54.4%) and myalgias (53.7%). For the 18 to 29 years old age group, the most prevalent presentation symptoms were: headache (69.4%), anosmia (69.1%), ageusia (60.2%), odynophagia (45%), and rhinitis/nasal congestion (46.9%). In the 30 to 64 years old age group, there was a higher prevalence of myalgias (55.8%), arthralgias (41%), and concentration/memory disorder (28.3%). Male showed higher prevalence of fever (64.9% versus 51.1%; p < 0.001) and pneumonia (23.5% versus 13.4%; p < 0.001). After 12 weeks from diagnosis, 38.1% of patients persisted with asthenia, 23.6% with anosmia/dysosmia, and 21.2% with concentration/memory disorders. Conclusions: Systemic symptoms were common to all age groups with coronavirus 19 disease; however, younger, and intermediate age groups presented a higher prevalence of central nervous system symptoms such as anosmia and cognitive disorders, respectively. Symptoms beyond 12 weeks of diagnosis reached slightly more than 10% of the participants.


Introducción: En marzo de 2020 la enfermedad por coronavirus 19 fue declarada pandemia por la Organización Mundial de la Salud. Los síntomas más comunes fueron fiebre, tos, astenia, disnea y dolor muscular. Los compromisos pulmonar y del sistema nervioso central presentaron características desafiantes para los médicos asistenciales. Los objetivos del estudio fueron conocer las características epidemiológicas y clínicas de sobrevivientes a infección por SARS-CoV-2 en una región de Argentina, y determinar las diferencias entre género, grupos etarias, año de contagio, tiempo de evolución desde el diagnóstico. Métodos: Se realizó un estudio observacional descriptivo y analítico de corte transversal. Se aplicó un cuestionario auto administrado, que estuvo disponible entre agosto y diciembre de 2021. Resultados: La media de edad fue de 39,4 ± 13,9 años, el 72,8% fueron mujeres. La comorbilidad más frecuente fue hipertensión arterial (11,7%). La mayoría de los pacientes fueron ambulatorios (81,9%). Los síntomas de presentación más frecuentes a cualquier edad, fueron astenia (83,7%), fiebre (54,9%), cefalea (60,8%), anosmia (64,8%), ageusia (53,2%), tos (54,4%) y mialgias (53,7%). Para el grupo de 18 a 29 años los síntomas de presentación más prevalentes fueron cefalea (69,4%), anosmia 69,1%), ageusia (60,2%), odinofagia (45%) y rinitis/congestión nasal (46,9%). En el grupo de 30 a 64 años se observó mayor prevalencia de mialgias (55,8%), artralgias (41%), falta de concentración/memoria (28,3%). Los hombres mostraron más prevalencia de fiebre (64,9% versus 51,1%; p < 0,001) y neumonía (23,5% versus 13,4%; p < 0,001). Luego de las 12 semanas del diagnóstico 38,1% de los pacientes persistían con astenia, 23,6% con anosmia/disosmia y 21,2% con trastornos de concentración/memoria. Conclusiones: La enfermedad por coronavirus 19 presenta un patrón de síntomas sistémicos común a todos los grupos etarios. No obstante, los grupos más jóvenes presentan más prevalencia de síntomas de afección del sistema nervioso central como la anosmia y los grupos intermedios, mayor prevalencia de trastornos cognitivos. Los síntomas más allá de las 12 semanas del diagnóstico alcanzaron a algo más del 10% de los participantes.


Subject(s)
Ageusia , COVID-19 , Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Adolescent , Young Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Ageusia/diagnosis , Ageusia/epidemiology , Anosmia , SARS-CoV-2 , Cough/epidemiology , Cough/etiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Asthenia , Fever/epidemiology , Fever/etiology , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/etiology , Survivors
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(21)2022 Oct 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2090128

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: People who have experienced a stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) have greater risks of complications from COVID-19. Therefore, vaccine uptake in this vulnerable population is important. To prevent vaccine hesitancy and maximise compliance, we need to better understand individuals' views on the vaccine. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to explore perspectives of the COVID-19 vaccine and influences on its uptake from people who have experienced a stroke or TIA. METHOD: A cross-sectional, electronic survey comprising multiple choice and free text questions. Convenience sampling was used to recruit people who have experienced a stroke/TIA in the UK/Ireland. RESULTS: The survey was completed by 377 stroke/TIA survivors. 87% (328/377) had either received the first vaccine dose or were booked to have it. The vaccine was declined by 2% (7/377) and 3% (11/377) had been offered the vaccine but not yet taken it up. 8% (30/377) had not been offered the vaccine despite being eligible. Some people expressed concerns around the safety of the vaccine (particularly risk of blood clots and stroke) and some were hesitant to have the second vaccine. Societal and personal benefits were motivations for vaccine uptake. There was uncertainty and lack of information about risk of COVID-19 related complications specifically for people who have experienced a stroke or TIA. CONCLUSION: Despite high uptake of the first vaccine, some people with stroke and TIA have legitimate concerns and information needs that should be addressed. Our findings can be used to identify targets for behaviour change to improve vaccine uptake specific to stroke/TIA patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ischemic Attack, Transient , Stroke , Humans , Ischemic Attack, Transient/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/prevention & control , Stroke/complications , Survivors
18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(21)2022 Oct 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2082264

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic poses an unprecedented global burden to the general population and, in particular, to individuals who have been infected with SARS-CoV-2. In the context of the discussion about "post COVID-19", the aim of the study was to advance research on mental health and long-term consequences after COVID-19. In total, 214 COVID-19 survivors (female: 54.2%; hospitalized: 36.7%) participated in the repeated cross-sectional assessment. In addition to demographic data, mental and somatic symptoms, fear of death at the time of infection, and depressive (PHQ-8) and generalized anxiety symptoms (GAD-7) were assessed. Results showed an increased prevalence of depressive symptoms and symptoms of generalized anxiety compared to observations in the general population prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. Psychological symptoms of depression and reported levels of fear of death during the SARS-CoV-2 infection showed a negative association with the time interval since COVID-19 diagnosis. Furthermore, although fear of death during the acute COVID-19 was related to depression and generalized anxiety, this association was predominantly explained by the presence of mental and somatic symptoms. In conclusion, initial fear of death does not impact mental health beyond the overall symptom burden. Furthermore, depressive symptoms appear to vanish across time since infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Medically Unexplained Symptoms , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Pandemics , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Depression/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19 Testing , Anxiety/psychology , Survivors
19.
Genes (Basel) ; 13(11)2022 10 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2081951

ABSTRACT

The aim of the study was to identify the association between four selected COVID-19 polymorphisms of ACE2 and TMPRSS2 receptors genes with the presence of long-COVID symptomatology in COVID-19 survivors. These genes were selected as they associate with the entry of the SARS-CoV-2 virus into the cells, so polymorphisms could be important for the prognoses of long-COVID symptoms. Two hundred and ninety-three (n = 293, 49.5% female, mean age: 55.6 ± 12.9 years) individuals who had been previously hospitalized due to COVID-19 were included. Three potential genotypes of the following single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were obtained from non-stimulated saliva samples of participants: ACE2 (rs2285666), ACE2 (rs2074192), TMPRSS2 (rs12329760), TMPRSS2 (rs2070788). Participants were asked to self-report the presence of any post-COVID defined as a symptom that started no later than one month after SARS-CoV-2 acute infection and whether the symptom persisted at the time of the study. At the time of the study (mean: 17.8, SD: 5.2 months after hospital discharge), 87.7% patients reported at least one symptom. Fatigue (62.8%), pain (39.9%) or memory loss (32.1%) were the most prevalent post-COVID symptoms. Overall, no differences in long-COVID symptoms were dependent on ACE2 rs2285666, ACE2 rs2074192, TMPRSS2 rs12329760, or TMPRSS2 rs2070788 genotypes. The four SNPs assessed, albeit previously associated with COVID-19 severity, do not predispose for developing long-COVID symptoms in people who were previously hospitalized due to COVID-19 during the first wave of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , SARS-CoV-2 , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Survivors
20.
Tomography ; 8(5): 2588-2603, 2022 10 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2071784

ABSTRACT

Long-term pulmonary sequelae in COVID-19 patients are currently under investigation worldwide. Potential relationships between blood sampling and functional and radiological findings are crucial to guide the follow-up. In this study, we collected and evaluated clinical status, namely symptoms and patients' reported outcome, pulmonary function tests (PFT), laboratory tests, and radiological findings at 3- and 12-months post-discharge in patients admitted between 25 February and 2 May 2020, and who survived severe COVID-19 pneumonia. A history of chronic pulmonary disease or COVID-19-unrelated complications were used as exclusion criteria. Unenhanced CTs were analyzed quantitatively (compromising lung volume %) and qualitatively, with main patterns of: ground-glass opacity (GGO), consolidation, and reticular configuration. Patients were subsequently divided into groups based on their radiological trends and according to the evolution in the percentage of compromised lung volume. At 12 months post-discharge, seventy-one patients showed significantly improved laboratory tests and PFT. Among them, 63 patients also underwent CT examination: all patients with negative CT findings at three months (n = 14) had negative CT also at 12 months; among the 49/63 patients presenting CT alterations at three months, 1/49 (2%) normalized, 40/49 (82%) improved, 7/49 (14%) remained stably abnormal, and 1/49 (2%) worsened. D-dimer values were low in patients with normal CT and higher in cases with improved or stably abnormal CT (median values 213 vs. 329 vs. 1000 ng/mL, respectively). The overall compromised lung volume was reduced compared with three months post-discharge (12.3 vs. 14.4%, p &lt; 0.001). In stably abnormal CT, the main pulmonary pattern changed, showing a reduction in GGO and an increase in reticular configuration. To summarize, PFT are normal in most COVID-19 survivors 12 months post-discharge, but CT structural abnormalities persist (although sensibly improved over time) and are associated with higher D-dimer values.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lung Diseases , Humans , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , SARS-CoV-2 , Patient Discharge , Aftercare , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Survivors
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