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1.
J Bras Pneumol ; 49(3): e20220452, 2023.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20233129

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of impaired pulmonary function on patient-centered outcomes after hospital discharge due to severe COVID-19 in patients without preexisting respiratory disease. METHODS: This is an ongoing prospective cohort study evaluating patients (> 18 years of age) 2-6 months after hospital discharge due to severe COVID-19. Respiratory symptoms, health-related quality of life, lung function, and the six-minute walk test were assessed. A restrictive ventilatory defect was defined as TLC below the lower limit of normal, as assessed by plethysmography. Chest CT scans performed during hospitalization were scored for the presence and extent of parenchymal abnormalities. RESULTS: At a mean follow-up of 17.2 ± 5.9 weeks after the diagnosis of COVID-19, 120 patients were assessed. Of those, 23 (19.2%) reported preexisting chronic respiratory diseases and presented with worse lung function and exertional dyspnea at the follow-up visit in comparison with their counterparts. When we excluded the 23 patients with preexisting respiratory disease plus another 2 patients without lung volume measurements, a restrictive ventilatory defect was observed in 42/95 patients (44%). This subgroup of patients (52.4% of whom were male; mean age, 53.9 ± 11.3 years) showed reduced resting gas exchange efficiency (DLCO), increased daily-life dyspnea, increased exertional dyspnea and oxygen desaturation, and reduced health-related quality of life in comparison with those without reduced TLC (50.9% of whom were male; mean age, 58.4 ± 11.3 years). Intensive care need and higher chest CT scores were associated with a subsequent restrictive ventilatory defect. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of a restrictive ventilatory defect approximately 4 months after severe COVID-19 in patients without prior respiratory comorbidities implies worse clinical outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiration Disorders , Respiratory Insufficiency , Humans , Male , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Infant , Female , Respiratory Function Tests , Prospective Studies , Quality of Life , Dyspnea , Survivors
2.
J Laryngol Otol ; 137(6): 691-696, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239757

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: UK head and neck cancer incidence and prevalence in working-age people are increasing. Work is important for individuals and society. Head and neck cancer survivors return to work less than other cancer survivors. Treatment affects physical and psychological functioning long-term. Evidence is limited, with no UK qualitative studies. METHODS: A qualitative study was conducted, underpinned by a critical realism approach, involving semi-structured interviews with working head and neck cancer survivors. Interviews were conducted using the Microsoft Teams communication platform and interpreted using reflexive thematic analysis. RESULTS: Thirteen head and neck cancer survivors participated. Three themes were drawn from the data: changed meaning of work and identity, return-to-work experiences, and the impact of healthcare professionals on returning to work. Physical, speech and psychosocial changes affected workplace interactions, including stigmatising responses by work colleagues. CONCLUSION: Participants were challenged by returning to work. Work interactions and context influenced return-to-work success. Head and neck cancer survivors want return-to-work conversations within healthcare consultations, but perceived these as absent.


Subject(s)
Cancer Survivors , Head and Neck Neoplasms , Humans , Survivors/psychology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/therapy , Return to Work/psychology , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Workplace
3.
Phys Ther ; 103(5)2023 05 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236116

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to compare high-intensity interval training (HIIT) with moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) for feasibility, safety, adherence, and short- and long-term efficacy in improving functioning and health-related quality of life in survivors of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: COVIDEX is a two-pronged, parallel-group, randomized controlled trial with an 8-week training intervention. The study participants will be 94 patients aged >18 years, admitted to a specialized post-COVID center. Participants will be randomized to HIIT (4 × 4 minutes of high-intensity work periods at 85% to 90% of peak heart rate) and MICT (47 minutes at 70% to 75% peak heart rate) groups for biweekly sessions for 8 weeks. The participants will undergo 2 phases of supervised training (phases 1 and 2) of 4 weeks each, in a public, specialized, post-COVID center. In phase 1, we will assess and compare the feasibility, acceptability, and short-term efficacy of HIIT and MICT intervention. In phase 2, the long-term efficacy of HIIT and MICT will be assessed and compared regarding function and health-related quality of life. To prevent any expectation bias, all study participants and assessors will be blinded to the study hypotheses. Group allocation will be masked during the analysis. All statistical analyses will be conducted following intention-to-treat principles. IMPACT: This study is the first randomized controlled trial that will compare the feasibility, safety, adherence, and efficacy of the HIIT and MICT intervention programs in this population. The findings will potentially provide important information and assist in clinical decision making on exercise to optimize the benefits of clinical health care in survivors of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , High-Intensity Interval Training , Humans , High-Intensity Interval Training/methods , Quality of Life , Exercise/physiology , Survivors , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
4.
J Clin Nurs ; 32(13-14): 4116-4127, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235883

ABSTRACT

AIM: To design a protocol based on the experiences of long-term survivors to facilitate resilience for oesophageal cancer patients in rural China. BACKGROUND: According to the latest Global Cancer Statistics Report, 604,000 new cases of oesophageal cancer were reported, of which over 60% of the disease burden is distributed in China. The incidence of oesophageal cancer in rural China (15.95/100,000) is twice as high as those in urban areas (7.59/100,000). To be sure, resilience can help patients better adapt to post-cancer life. But universal interventions involving improving the resilience of oesophageal cancer patients have much less been explored, especially for rural patients. METHODS: The two-arm, parallel design, non-blinded, randomised controlled trial will be implemented in 86 adults diagnosed with oesophageal cancer and will be randomly assigned to the control group or the intervention group via the blocked randomisation. The intervention group will undergo an intervention with one-on-one guidance from a nurse while viewing a CD of the experiences of long-term survivors with oesophageal cancer in rural areas. Every 2 weeks, a theme session will be introduced, and the entire intervention will continue for 12 weeks. Psychosocial variables (resilience, self-efficacy, coping mode and family support) will be surveyed at baseline, post-intervention and 3 months after the intervention. The paper complies with the Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Intervention Trials 2013 and Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials guidelines for study protocols adapted for designing and reporting parallel group randomised trials. CONCLUSION: The intervention programme transitions from hospitalisation to discharge, which includes one-on-one interventions by medical personnel and a portable CD describing the experiences of long-term survivors with rural oesophageal cancer. Once the intervention's effectiveness is proven, this protocol will provide psychological support for massive oesophageal cancer patients. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The intervention programme may be used as an auxiliary therapy to promote patients' postoperative psychological rehabilitation. This programme has the advantages of being cost-effective, flexible, accessible, and convenient and can be implemented without the limitation of time, place and clinical medical staff. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The Chinese Clinical Trial Registration number is ChiCTR2100050047. Registered on 16 August 2021.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Esophageal Neoplasms , Adult , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Survivors , Cost of Illness , Treatment Outcome , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
5.
J Med Virol ; 95(6): e28819, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235863

ABSTRACT

An understanding of the midterm sequelae in COVID-19 and their association with corticosteroids use are needed. Between March and July 2020, we evaluated 1227 survivors of COVID-19, 3 months posthospitalization, of whom 213 had received corticosteroids within 7 days of admission. Main outcome was any midterm sequelae (oxygen therapy, shortness of breath, one major clinical sign, two minor clinical signs or three minor symptoms). Association between corticosteroids use and midterm sequelae was assessed using inverse propensity-score weighting models. Our sample included 753 (61%) male patients, and 512 (42%) were older than 65 years. We found a higher rate of sequelae among users than nonusers of corticosteroids (42% vs. 35%, odds ratio [OR] 1.40 [1.16-1.69]). Midterm sequelae were more frequent in users of low-dose corticosteroids than nonusers (64% vs. 51%, OR 1.60 [1.10-2.32]), whereas no association between higher doses (≥20 mg/day equivalent of dexamethasone) and sequelae was evidenced (OR 0.95 [0.56-1.61]). Higher risk of sequelae with corticosteroids use was observed among subjects with propensity score below the 90th percentile. Our study suggest that corticosteroids use during hospitalization for COVID-19 is associated with higher risk of midterm sequelae.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Male , Female , SARS-CoV-2 , Prospective Studies , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/adverse effects , Hospitalization , Hospitals , Disease Progression , Survivors
6.
Viruses ; 15(5)2023 05 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235501

ABSTRACT

This multicenter cohort study used Sankey plots and exponential bar plots to visualize the fluctuating evolution and the trajectory of gastrointestinal symptoms in previously hospitalized COVID-19 survivors during the first 18 months after acute SARS-CoV-2 infection. A total of 1266 previously hospitalized COVID-19 survivors were assessed at four points: hospital admission (T0), at 8.4 months (T1), at 13.2 months (T2), and at 18.3 months (T3) after hospitalization. Participants were asked about their overall gastrointestinal symptoms and particularly diarrhea. Clinical and hospitalization data were collected from hospital medical records. The prevalence of overall gastrointestinal post-COVID symptomatology was 6.3% (n = 80) at T1, 3.99% (n = 50) at T2 and 2.39% (n = 32) at T3. The prevalence of diarrhea decreased from 10.69% (n = 135) at hospital admission (T0), to 2.55% (n = 32) at T1, to 1.04% (n = 14) at T2, and to 0.64% (n = 8) at T3. The Sankey plots revealed that just 20 (1.59%) and 4 (0.32%) patients exhibited overall gastrointestinal post-COVID symptoms or diarrhea, respectively, throughout the whole follow-up period. The recovery fitted exponential curves revealed a decreasing prevalence trend, showing that diarrhea and gastrointestinal symptoms recover during the first two or three years after COVID-19 in previously hospitalized COVID-19 survivors. The regression models did not reveal any symptoms to be associated with the presence of gastrointestinal post-COVID symptomatology or post-COVID diarrhea at hospital admission or at T1. The use of Sankey plots revealed the fluctuating evolution of gastrointestinal post-COVID symptoms during the first two years after infection. In addition, exponential bar plots revealed the decreased prevalence of gastrointestinal post-COVID symptomatology during the first three years after infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Diarrhea/epidemiology , Survivors
7.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 102(22): e33960, 2023 Jun 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20240732

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to assess clinical findings, radiological data, pulmonary functions and physical capacity change over time and to investigate factors associated with radiological abnormalities after coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in non-comorbid patients. This prospective cohort study was conducted between April 2020 and June 2020. A total of 62 symptomatic in non-comorbid patients with COVID-19 pneumonia were included in the study. At baseline and the 2nd, 5th and 12th months, patients were scheduled for follow-up. Males represented 51.6% of the participants and overall mean age was 51.60 ±â€…12.45 years. The percentage of patients with radiological abnormalities at 2 months was significantly higher than at 5 months (P < .001). At 12 months, dyspnea frequency (P = .008), 6-minute walk test (6MWT) distance (P = .045), BORG-dyspnea (P < .001) and BORG-fatigue (P < .001) scores was significantly lower, while median SpO2 after 6MWT (P < .001) was significantly higher compared to results at 2 months. The presence of radiological abnormalities at 2 months was associated with the following values measured at 5 months: advanced age (P = .006), lung involvement at baseline (P = .046), low forced expiratory volume in 1 second (P = .018) and low forced vital capacity (P = .006). Even in COVID-19 patients without comorbidities, control computed tomography at 2 months and pulmonary rehabilitation may be beneficial, especially in COVID-19 patients with advanced age and greater baseline lung involvement.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Male , Humans , Adult , Middle Aged , Follow-Up Studies , Prospective Studies , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Dyspnea , Survivors
8.
J Affect Disord ; 336: 106-111, 2023 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2327996

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Depression is common among myocardial infarction (MI) survivors and is strongly associated with poor quality of life (QOL). The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence, correlates and the network structure of depression, and its association with QOL in MI survivors during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This cross-sectional study evaluated depression and QOL in MI survivors with the Chinese version of the nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF), respectively. Univariable analyses, multivariable analyses, and network analyses were performed. RESULTS: The prevalence of depression (PHQ-9 total score ≥ 5) among 565 MI survivors during the COVID-19 pandemic was 38.1 % (95 % CI: 34.1-42.1 %), which was significantly associated with poor QOL. Patients with depression were less likely to consult a doctor regularly after discharge, and more likely to experience more severe anxiety symptoms and fatigue. Item PHQ4 "Fatigue" was the most central symptom in the network, followed by PHQ6 "Guilt" and PHQ2 "Sad mood". The flow network showed that PHQ4 "Fatigue" had the highest negative association with QOL. CONCLUSION: Depression was prevalent among MI survivors during the COVID-19 pandemic and was significantly associated with poor QOL. Those who failed to consult a doctor regularly after discharge or reported severe anxiety symptoms and fatigue should be screened for depression. Effective interventions for MI survivors targeting central symptoms, especially fatigue, are needed to reduce the negative impact of depression and improve QOL.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocardial Infarction , Humans , Quality of Life , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/diagnosis , Prevalence , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Survivors
9.
J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci ; 76(4): e230-e234, 2021 03 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2325271

ABSTRACT

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to affect communities worldwide, this novel disease is leaving many survivors with severe lung damage. Among older patients, advanced lung damage is more likely. Survivors of all ages who have extensive lung impacts are likely to be new to managing those issues. Supporting healthy aging for these patients will require both gathering data about their unique experiences and using the existing evidence basis about adapting to managing obstructive lung disease. This article outlines key priorities for research with COVID-19 survivors aging with permanent lung damage and highlights unique considerations for people older at age of onset. It also outlines the relevance of findings from this research for clinical care supporting people newly aging with advanced lung disease from COVID-19. In the process, it summarizes lessons from established patient populations aging with progressive lung disease-using cystic fibrosis as a prominent example from the author's lived experience-that may enhance the experiences of older COVID-19 survivors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Lung Injury/epidemiology , Survivors/statistics & numerical data , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive , Severity of Illness Index
10.
Support Care Cancer ; 31(6): 348, 2023 May 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2325274

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Light-to-moderate intensity strength training (LMST) improves muscular strength, physical functioning, and some side effects in head and neck cancer survivors (HNCS). Heavy lifting strength training (HLST) may further improve these outcomes; however, it has not been studied in HNCS. The primary aim of the LIFTING trial was to examine the feasibility and safety of a HLST program in HNCS ≥1-year post-surgical neck dissection. METHODS: In this single-arm feasibility study, HNCS were asked to complete a twice weekly, 12-week, supervised HLST program, gradually progressing to lifting heavy loads of 80-90% of 1 repetition maximum (1RM) for barbell squat, bench press, and deadlift. The feasibility outcomes included recruitment rate, 1RM completion rate, program adherence, barriers, and motivation. The preliminary efficacy outcomes included changes in upper and lower body strength. RESULTS: Nine HNCS were recruited over an 8-month period during the COVID-19 pandemic. All 9 (100%) completed the 1RM tests and successfully progressed to heavy loads at approximately 5 weeks. The median attendance was 95.8% (range 71-100%), and few barriers were reported. Weight lifted increased for squat/leg press (median change: +34kg; 95% CI +25 to +47), bench press (median change: +6kg; 95% CI +2 to +10), and deadlift (median change: +12kg; 95% CI +7 to +24). No adverse events were reported and participants were motivated to continue HLST after the study. CONCLUSIONS: HLST appears feasible and safe for HNCS and may result in meaningful improvements in muscular strength. Future research should consider additional recruitment strategies and compare HLST to LMST in this understudied survivor population. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT04554667.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Resistance Training , Humans , Neck Dissection/adverse effects , Feasibility Studies , Lifting , Pandemics , Muscle Strength , Weight Lifting , Survivors , Muscle, Skeletal
11.
Sci Rep ; 13(1): 8116, 2023 05 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2325002

ABSTRACT

Despite advances in clinical research, the long-term effects of COVID-19 on patients are not clear. Many studies revealed persistent long-term signs and symptoms. In a survey study, 259 hospitalized confirmed COVID-19 patients between 18 and 59 years were interviewed. Demographic characteristics and complaints were studied through telephone interviews. Any patient-reported symptoms that continued or developed from 4 weeks up to 12 weeks after the onset of the disease were recorded only if they did not exist prior to infection. The 12-Item General Health Questionnaire was used for screening and assessing mental symptoms and psychosocial well-being. The mean age of participants was 43.8 ± 9.9 years. About 37% had at least one underlying disease. 92.5% showed ongoing symptoms that the most prevalent complications were hair loss (61.4%), fatigue (54.1%), shortness of breath (40.2%), altered smell (34.4%), and aggression (34.4%), respectively. In terms of factors affecting patients' complaints, there were significant differences between age, sex, and underlying disease with long-remaining complications. This study shows a high rate of long COVID-19 conditions that should be considered by physicians, policymakers, and managers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome , Humans , Adult , Middle Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Aggression , Survivors , Health Status
12.
Clin Infect Dis ; 75(4): 596-603, 2022 Sep 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2319267

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is a highly lethal respiratory disease caused by a zoonotic betacoronavirus. The development of effective vaccines and control measures requires a thorough understanding of the immune response to this viral infection. METHODS: We investigated cellular immune responses up to 5 years after infection in a cohort of 59 MERS survivors by performing enzyme-linked immunospot assay and intracellular cytokine staining after stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with synthetic viral peptides. RESULTS: Memory T-cell responses were detected in 82%, 75%, 69%, 64%, and 64% of MERS survivors from 1-5 years post-infection, respectively. Although the frequency of virus-specific interferon gamma (IFN-γ)-secreting T cells tended to be higher in moderately/severely ill patients than in mildly ill patients during the early period of follow-up, there was no significant difference among the different clinical severity groups across all time points. While both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were involved in memory T-cell responses, CD4+ T cells persisted slightly longer than CD8+ T cells. Both memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells recognized the E/M/N proteins better than the S protein and maintained their polyfunctionality throughout the period examined. Memory T-cell responses correlated positively with antibody responses during the initial 3-4 years but not with maximum viral loads at any time point. CONCLUSIONS: These findings advance our understanding of the dynamics of virus-specific memory T-cell immunity after MERS-coronavirus infection, which is relevant to the development of effective T cell-based vaccines.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes , Humans , Immunologic Memory , Leukocytes, Mononuclear , Memory T Cells , Survivors
13.
Eur Psychiatry ; 66(1): e43, 2023 05 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2320067

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is increasing evidence for cognitive function to be negatively impacted by COVID-19. There is, however, limited research evaluating cognitive function pre- and post-COVID-19 using objective measures. METHODS: We examined processing speed, attention, working memory, executive function and memory in adults (≤69 years) with a history of COVID-19 (n = 129, none acutely unwell), compared to those with no known history of COVID-19 (n = 93). We also examined cognitive changes in a sub-group of COVID (n = 30) and non-COVID (n = 33) participants, compared to their pre-COVID-19 pandemic level. RESULTS: Cross-sectionally, the COVID group showed significantly larger intra-individual variability in processing speed, compared to the non-COVID group. The COVID sub-group also showed significantly larger intra-individual variability in processing speed, compared to their pre-COVID level; no significant change occurred in non-COVID participants over the same time scale. Other cognitive indices were not significantly impacted in the cross-sectional or within-subjects investigations, but participants (n = 20) who had needed hospitalisation due to COVID-19 showed poor attention and executive function relative to those who had not required hospitalisation (n = 109). Poor health and long-COVID symptoms correlated with poor cognitive function across domains in the COVID group. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate a limited cognitive impact of COVID-19 with only intra-individual variability in processing speed being significantly impacted in an adult UK sample. However, those who required hospitalisation due to COVID-19 severity and/or experience long-COVID symptoms display multifaceted cognitive impairment and may benefit from repeated cognitive assessments and remediation efforts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cognition Disorders , Adult , Humans , Processing Speed , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Cognition Disorders/psychology , Cognition , Survivors , Neuropsychological Tests
15.
Curr Hematol Malig Rep ; 18(3): 75-82, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2316044

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: With improvement in survival after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), it has become important to focus on the late complications experienced by the survivors that may lead to late mortality and morbidity to be able to provide patient-centered care across the transplant continuum. The goals of this article are to describe the status of literature on late complications in HCT survivors; offer a brief overview of the status of the screening, prevention, and management of these complications; and identify opportunities for future practice and research. RECENT FINDINGS: This is an exciting time for the field with increasing awareness about survivorship issues. Studies are moving beyond description to examining pathogenesis of these late complications and identifying biomarkers. The eventual goal is to promote changes in our transplant techniques to decrease the incidence of these complications as well as help develop interventions targeting these late effects. There is also an emphasis on improving health care delivery models to provide optimal post-HCT management for medical and psychosocial complications through close coordination between multiple stakeholders and leveraging technology to help address the barriers in delivery of care to fulfill the unmet needs in this area. The increasing population of HCT survivors with their burden of late effects underscores the need for concerted efforts to improve long-term medical and psychosocial outcomes for this group.


Subject(s)
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation , Survivorship , Humans , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Survivors , Delivery of Health Care , Biomarkers , Disease Progression
16.
Crit Care ; 27(1): 188, 2023 05 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2314885

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Intensive Care Unit (ICU) COVID-19 survivors may present long-term cognitive and emotional difficulties after hospital discharge. This study aims to characterize the neuropsychological dysfunction of COVID-19 survivors 12 months after ICU discharge, and to study whether the use of a measure of perceived cognitive deficit allows the detection of objective cognitive impairment. We also explore the relationship between demographic, clinical and emotional factors, and both objective and subjective cognitive deficits. METHODS: Critically ill COVID-19 survivors from two medical ICUs underwent cognitive and emotional assessment one year after discharge. The perception of cognitive deficit and emotional state was screened through self-rated questionnaires (Perceived Deficits Questionnaire, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Davidson Trauma Scale), and a comprehensive neuropsychological evaluation was carried out. Demographic and clinical data from ICU admission were collected retrospectively. RESULTS: Out of eighty participants included in the final analysis, 31.3% were women, 61.3% received mechanical ventilation and the median age of patients was 60.73 years. Objective cognitive impairment was observed in 30% of COVID-19 survivors. The worst performance was detected in executive functions, processing speed and recognition memory. Almost one in three patients manifested cognitive complaints, and 22.5%, 26.3% and 27.5% reported anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, respectively. No significant differences were found in the perception of cognitive deficit between patients with and without objective cognitive impairment. Gender and PTSD symptomatology were significantly associated with perceived cognitive deficit, and cognitive reserve with objective cognitive impairment. CONCLUSIONS: One-third of COVID-19 survivors suffered objective cognitive impairment with a frontal-subcortical dysfunction 12 months after ICU discharge. Emotional disturbances and perceived cognitive deficits were common. Female gender and PTSD symptoms emerged as predictive factors for perceiving worse cognitive performance. Cognitive reserve emerged as a protective factor for objective cognitive functioning. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04422444; June 9, 2021.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Cognition , COVID-19/epidemiology , Demography , Intensive Care Units , Patient Discharge , Retrospective Studies , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/complications , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Survivors
17.
Ann Ig ; 35(4): 425-440, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2313928

ABSTRACT

Background: Critically ill patients may develop health problems related to their illness, injury, mechanical ventilation or other treatments. Such problems cannot be totally prevented and can continue after the patient leaves the hospital. Aim: To explore the level of anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress Intensive Care Unit and quality of life in Intensive Care Unit survivors. A comparison analysis between Covid-19 patients and Non-Covid-19 patients was conducted. Methods: A prospective observational study exploring psychological, emotional, and behavioral difficulties experienced in patients admitted to Intensive Care Unit was performed. The study was conducted in an Italian adult 8-bed Intensive Care Unit, from July 2020 to April 2021, and followed-up until 25th May 2022. Data were collected during Intensive Care Unit stay (data collection of demographic and clinical characteristics) and 6 and 12 months after Intensive Care Unit discharge (interviews). Results: A total of 143 patients participated in the study, of which 54 were admitted for Covid-19 (37.76%). Depression symptoms were observed more among Non-Covid-19 patients compared to Covid-19 patients at six months (p= .037) and 12 months (p< .001) after Intensive Care Unit discharge. The quality of life perceived by the Intensive Care Unit patients surveyed improved between 6 and 12 months after discharge (Eq-VAS mean=62.03, + 11.2 vs Eq-VAS mean=66.6, + 9.8) (p=.034). Six months after Intensive Care Unit discharge, the mean of the perception of quality of life, for Covid-19 patients was 63.91 (sd ± 9.30), greater than Non-Covid-19 patients of the same period, which was 60.18 (sd ± 8.63) (p= .038). Conclusions: Within 1 year from the acute infection, most hospital survivors of Covid-19 had good physical and functional recovery over time with better outcomes than other Intensive Care Unit patients and had returned to their original work and life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Humans , Critical Illness/psychology , Quality of Life , Intensive Care Units , Critical Care , Survivors/psychology
18.
J Natl Compr Canc Netw ; 20(10): 1125-1133.e10, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2309492

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The incidence and survival of colorectal cancer (CRC) are increasing. There is an increasing number of long-term survivors, many of whom are elderly and have comorbidities. We conducted a population-based study in Hong Kong to assess the long-term cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence associated with adjuvant fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy among CRC survivors. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Using the population-based electronic medical database of Hong Kong, we identified adults who were diagnosed with high-risk stage II-III CRC and treated with radical surgery followed by adjuvant fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy between 2010 and 2019. We evaluated the cause-specific cumulative incidence of CVD (including ischemic heart disease, heart failure, cardiomyopathy, and stroke) using the flexible parametric competing risk modeling framework. The control group without a history of CVD was selected from among a noncancer random sample from primary care clinics in the same geographic area. RESULTS: We analyzed 1,037 treated patients with CRC and 5,078 noncancer controls. The adjusted cause-specific hazard ratio (HR) for CVD in the cancer cohort compared with the control group was 2.11 (95% CI, 1.39-3.20). The 1-, 5-, and 10-year cause-specific cumulative incidences were 2.0%, 4.5%, and 5.4% in the cancer cohort versus 1.2%, 3.0%, and 3.8% in the control group, respectively. Age at cancer diagnosis (HR per 5-year increase, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.08-1.24), male sex (HR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.06-1.86), comorbidity (HR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.36-2.61 for 1 comorbidity vs none, and HR, 6.61; 95% CI, 4.55-9.60 for ≥2 comorbidities vs none), diabetes (HR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.04-1.84), hypertension (HR, 3.27; 95% CI, 2.39-4.50), and dyslipidemia/hyperlipidemia (HR, 2.53; 95% CI, 1.68-3.81) were associated with incident CVD. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to adjuvant fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy was associated with an increased risk of CVD among survivors of high-risk stage II-III CRC. Cardiovascular risk monitoring of this group throughout cancer survivorship is advisable.


Subject(s)
Cardiovascular Diseases , Colorectal Neoplasms , Adult , Aged , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology , Cohort Studies , Colorectal Neoplasms/complications , Colorectal Neoplasms/epidemiology , Colorectal Neoplasms/therapy , Humans , Incidence , Male , Risk Factors , Survivors
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(8)2023 04 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2300133

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To assess the prevalence of symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in survivors of COVID-19 Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome that needed ICU care; to investigate risk factors and their impact on the Health-Related Quality of life (HR-QoL). Materials and Methods: This multicenter, prospective, observational study included all patients who were discharged from the ICU. Patients were administered the European Quality of Life 5 Dimensions 5 Level Version (EQ-5D-5L) questionnaire, the Short-Form Health Survey 36Version 2 (SF-36v2), a socioeconomic question set and the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) to assess PTSD. Results: The multivariate logistic regression model found that an International Standard Classification of Education Score (ISCED) higher than 2 (OR 3.42 (95% CI 1.28-9.85)), monthly income less than EUR 1500 (OR 0.36 (95% CI 0.13-0.97)), and more than two comorbidities (OR 4.62 (95% CI 1.33-16.88)) are risk factors for developing PTSD symptoms. Patients with PTSD symptoms are more likely to present a worsening in their quality of life as assessed by EQ-5D-5L and SF-36 scales. Conclusion: The main factors associated with the development of PTSD-related symptoms were a higher education level, a lower monthly income, and more than two comorbidities. Patients who developed symptoms of PTSD reported a significantly lower Health-Related Quality of life as compared to patients without PTSD. Future research areas should be oriented toward recognizing potential psychosocial and psychopathological variables capable of influencing the quality of life of patients discharged from the intensive care unit to better recognize the prognosis and longtime effects of diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Humans , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Quality of Life/psychology , Prospective Studies , Incidence , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Intensive Care Units , Survivors/psychology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/epidemiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Risk Factors
20.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1156240, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2298883

ABSTRACT

Stigma refers to devalued stereotypes that create barriers for stigmatized individuals. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the stigmatization of survivors worsened existing inequalities and triggered mass hysteria. The paper delves into the stigmatization experienced by COVID-19 survivors and the role of Marxist criticism in analyzing this issue. The main findings from the empiricist tradition approach suggest that the perception of COVID-19 stigma is higher among those who are older, belong to ethnic minorities, lack social support, have manual occupations, and possess lower levels of education. The proposed destigmatization pathways include psychological counseling services, social support, and health education. Employing a Marxist perspective can aid in illuminating how economic practices and material conditions influence prevalent ideologies related to stigma. The stigmatization of COVID-19 survivors may be perceived as a consequence of social power inequality, although the current emphasis on individual characteristics as triggers for stigma may neglect the wider systemic forces in operation. Thus, it's crucial to establish improved social care policies to combat exploitation and oppression due to power imbalances. The ultimate objective of such an examination is to identify effective approaches to tackle and eradicate stigma regarding health-related concerns. An interdisciplinary approach integrating a pluralistic perspective would benefit investigating how social systems and individual attributes contribute to the exacerbation of social inequality and stigmatization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Social Stigma , Stereotyping , Survivors
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