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1.
J Laryngol Otol ; 137(6): 691-696, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239757

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: UK head and neck cancer incidence and prevalence in working-age people are increasing. Work is important for individuals and society. Head and neck cancer survivors return to work less than other cancer survivors. Treatment affects physical and psychological functioning long-term. Evidence is limited, with no UK qualitative studies. METHODS: A qualitative study was conducted, underpinned by a critical realism approach, involving semi-structured interviews with working head and neck cancer survivors. Interviews were conducted using the Microsoft Teams communication platform and interpreted using reflexive thematic analysis. RESULTS: Thirteen head and neck cancer survivors participated. Three themes were drawn from the data: changed meaning of work and identity, return-to-work experiences, and the impact of healthcare professionals on returning to work. Physical, speech and psychosocial changes affected workplace interactions, including stigmatising responses by work colleagues. CONCLUSION: Participants were challenged by returning to work. Work interactions and context influenced return-to-work success. Head and neck cancer survivors want return-to-work conversations within healthcare consultations, but perceived these as absent.


Subject(s)
Cancer Survivors , Head and Neck Neoplasms , Humans , Survivors/psychology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/therapy , Return to Work/psychology , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Workplace
2.
Ann Ig ; 35(4): 425-440, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2313928

ABSTRACT

Background: Critically ill patients may develop health problems related to their illness, injury, mechanical ventilation or other treatments. Such problems cannot be totally prevented and can continue after the patient leaves the hospital. Aim: To explore the level of anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress Intensive Care Unit and quality of life in Intensive Care Unit survivors. A comparison analysis between Covid-19 patients and Non-Covid-19 patients was conducted. Methods: A prospective observational study exploring psychological, emotional, and behavioral difficulties experienced in patients admitted to Intensive Care Unit was performed. The study was conducted in an Italian adult 8-bed Intensive Care Unit, from July 2020 to April 2021, and followed-up until 25th May 2022. Data were collected during Intensive Care Unit stay (data collection of demographic and clinical characteristics) and 6 and 12 months after Intensive Care Unit discharge (interviews). Results: A total of 143 patients participated in the study, of which 54 were admitted for Covid-19 (37.76%). Depression symptoms were observed more among Non-Covid-19 patients compared to Covid-19 patients at six months (p= .037) and 12 months (p< .001) after Intensive Care Unit discharge. The quality of life perceived by the Intensive Care Unit patients surveyed improved between 6 and 12 months after discharge (Eq-VAS mean=62.03, + 11.2 vs Eq-VAS mean=66.6, + 9.8) (p=.034). Six months after Intensive Care Unit discharge, the mean of the perception of quality of life, for Covid-19 patients was 63.91 (sd ± 9.30), greater than Non-Covid-19 patients of the same period, which was 60.18 (sd ± 8.63) (p= .038). Conclusions: Within 1 year from the acute infection, most hospital survivors of Covid-19 had good physical and functional recovery over time with better outcomes than other Intensive Care Unit patients and had returned to their original work and life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Humans , Critical Illness/psychology , Quality of Life , Intensive Care Units , Critical Care , Survivors/psychology
3.
BMC Public Health ; 23(1): 725, 2023 04 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2306175

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Globally, 2-14% of women experience intimate partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy. Timely response to IPV is critical to mitigate related adverse health outcomes. Barriers to accessing limited IPV support services are pervasive in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), such as Ethiopia; key barriers include mistrust, stigmatization, and self-blame, and discourage women from disclosing their experiences. Infection control measures for COVID-19 have the potential to further disrupt access to IPV services. METHODS: In-depth qualitative interviews were undertaken from October-November 2020 with 24 women who experienced IPV during recent pregnancy to understand the needs and unmet needs of IPV survivors in Ethiopia amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Trained qualitative interviewers used a structured note-taking tool to allow probing of experiences, while permitting rapid analysis for timely results. Inductive thematic analysis identified emergent themes, which were organized into matrices for synthesis. RESULTS: Qualitative themes center around knowledge of IPV services; experiences of women in seeking services; challenges in accessing services; the impact of COVID-19 on resource access; and persistent unmet needs of IPV survivors. Notably, few women discussed the violence they experienced as unique to pregnancy, with most referring to IPV over an extended period, both prior to and during COVID-19 restrictions. The majority of IPV survivors in our study heavily relied on their informal network of family and friends for protection and assistance in resolving the violence. Though formal IPV services remained open throughout the pandemic, restrictions resulted in the perception that services were not available, and this perception discouraged survivors from seeking help. Survivors further identified lack of integrated and tailored services as enduring unmet needs. CONCLUSIONS: Results reveal a persistent low awareness and utilization of formal IPV support and urge future policy efforts to address unmet needs through expansion of services by reducing socio-cultural barriers. COVID-19 impacted access to both formal and informal support systems, highlighting needs for adaptable, remote service delivery and upstream violence prevention. Public health interventions must strengthen linkages between formal and informal resources to fill the unmet needs of IPV survivors in receiving medical, psychosocial, and legal support in their home communities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intimate Partner Violence , Pregnancy , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Ethiopia/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Intimate Partner Violence/psychology , Survivors/psychology
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(8)2023 04 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2300133

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To assess the prevalence of symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in survivors of COVID-19 Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome that needed ICU care; to investigate risk factors and their impact on the Health-Related Quality of life (HR-QoL). Materials and Methods: This multicenter, prospective, observational study included all patients who were discharged from the ICU. Patients were administered the European Quality of Life 5 Dimensions 5 Level Version (EQ-5D-5L) questionnaire, the Short-Form Health Survey 36Version 2 (SF-36v2), a socioeconomic question set and the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) to assess PTSD. Results: The multivariate logistic regression model found that an International Standard Classification of Education Score (ISCED) higher than 2 (OR 3.42 (95% CI 1.28-9.85)), monthly income less than EUR 1500 (OR 0.36 (95% CI 0.13-0.97)), and more than two comorbidities (OR 4.62 (95% CI 1.33-16.88)) are risk factors for developing PTSD symptoms. Patients with PTSD symptoms are more likely to present a worsening in their quality of life as assessed by EQ-5D-5L and SF-36 scales. Conclusion: The main factors associated with the development of PTSD-related symptoms were a higher education level, a lower monthly income, and more than two comorbidities. Patients who developed symptoms of PTSD reported a significantly lower Health-Related Quality of life as compared to patients without PTSD. Future research areas should be oriented toward recognizing potential psychosocial and psychopathological variables capable of influencing the quality of life of patients discharged from the intensive care unit to better recognize the prognosis and longtime effects of diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Humans , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Quality of Life/psychology , Prospective Studies , Incidence , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Intensive Care Units , Survivors/psychology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/epidemiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Risk Factors
5.
Infect Dis Poverty ; 12(1): 27, 2023 Mar 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2287180

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The global coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has caused many negative effects on physical and mental health of patients who have survived COVID-19. Apart from some long-lasting physical sequelae, those COVID-19 survivors are also suffering stigma and discrimination at different levels around the world. The current study aims to assess the role resilience played in stigma and mental disorders among COVID-19 survivors. METHODS: The cross-sectional study was carried out among former COVID-19 patients in Jianghan District (Wuhan, China) from June 10 to July 25, 2021. The demographic questions, the Impact of Events Scale-Revised, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire, the Patient Health Questionnaire, the Resilience Style Questionnaire and the Short Version of COVID-19 Stigma Scale of 12 items were used to collect relevant information of the participants. Descriptive analyses, Pearson correlation analysis and Structural Equation Modeling were used to make data description and analysis. RESULTS: A total of 1541 out of 1601 COVID-19 survivors (887 females and 654 males) were included in the analysis. Perceived stigma of those COVID-19 survivors correlates significantly with anxiety (r = 0.335, P < 0.001), depression (r = 0.325, P < 0.001) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (r = 0.384, P < 0.001). It has a direct effect on COVID-19 survivors' anxiety (ß = 0.326, P < 0.001), depression (ß = 0.314, P < 0.001), PTSD (ß = 0.385, P < 0.001) and their resilience (ß = - 0.114, P < 0.01). Resilience partially mediated the association between perceived stigma and anxiety (ß = 0.020, P < 0.01), depression (ß = 0.020, P < 0.01), and PTSD (ß = 0.014, P < 0.01) among COVID-19 survivors. CONCLUSION: Stigma has a significant negative impact on mental health, while resilience plays a mediator role in the relationship between stigma and mental health among COVID-19 survivors. Based on our study, we suggested that when designing psychological interventions for COVID-19 survivors, consideration should be taken into account to reduce stigma and improve resilience.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , Male , Female , Humans , COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health , Cross-Sectional Studies , Survivors/psychology , Depression/psychology
6.
Psychiatry Res ; 323: 115161, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2280835

ABSTRACT

This study investigated the longitudinal development of PTSD symptoms and respiratory sequelae among COVID-19 patients one year after hospital discharge. The cumulative occurrence of probable PTSD in COVID-19 survivors (n = 329) was 26.7%, which significantly decreased over the 12-month period (23.1% to 4.3%). Non-severe patients showed marked improvement in all four clusters of PTSD symptoms at 12 months compared to 3 months, while severe patients only showed improvements in re-experiencing and numbing symptoms. Moreover, being female and having respiratory sequelae increased the risk for chronic PTSD. Psychological interventions are required for COVID-19 patients during long-term convalescence.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Humans , Female , Male , Longitudinal Studies , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Disease Progression , Survivors/psychology
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(5)2023 02 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2279083

ABSTRACT

The present study aimed to investigate the effects of a multi-professional intervention model on the mental health of middle-aged, overweight survivors of COVID-19. A clinical trial study with parallel groups and repeated measures was conducted. For eight weeks, multi-professional interventions were conducted (psychoeducation, nutritional intervention, and physical exercises). One hundred and thirty-five overweight or obese patients aged 46.46 ± 12.77 years were distributed into four experimental groups: mild, moderate, severe COVID, and control group. The instruments were used: mental health continuum-MHC, revised impact scale-IES-r, generalized anxiety disorder-GAD-7, and Patient health questionnaire PHQ-9, before and after eight weeks. The main results indicated only a time effect, with a significant increase in global MHC scores, emotional well-being, social well-being, and psychological well-being, as well as detected a significant reduction in global IES-R scores, intrusion, avoidance, and hyperarousal, in addition to a reduction in GAD-7 and PHQ-9 scores (p < 0.05). In conclusion, it was possible to identify those psychoeducational interventions that effectively reduced anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress symptoms in post-COVID-19 patients, regardless of symptomatology, in addition to the control group. However, moderate and severe post-COVID-19 patients need to be monitored continuously since the results of these groups did not follow the response pattern of the mild and control groups.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Middle Aged , Anxiety/psychology , Depression/psychology , Mental Health , Overweight , Survivors/psychology
8.
Eur J Neurol ; 30(7): 1880-1890, 2023 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2266740

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) affects the brain, leading to long-term complaints. Studies combining brain abnormalities with objective and subjective consequences are lacking. Long-term structural brain abnormalities, neurological and (neuro)psychological consequences in COVID-19 patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) or general ward were investigated. The aim was to create a multidisciplinary view on the impact of severe COVID-19 on functioning and to compare long-term consequences between ICU and general ward patients. METHODS: This multicentre prospective cohort study assessed brain abnormalities (3 T magnetic resonance imaging), cognitive dysfunction (neuropsychological test battery), neurological symptoms, cognitive complaints, emotional distress and wellbeing (self-report questionnaires) in ICU and general ward (non-ICU) survivors. RESULTS: In al, 101 ICU and 104 non-ICU patients participated 8-10 months post-hospital discharge. Significantly more ICU patients exhibited cerebral microbleeds (61% vs. 32%, p < 0.001) and had higher numbers of microbleeds (p < 0.001). No group differences were found in cognitive dysfunction, neurological symptoms, cognitive complaints, emotional distress or wellbeing. The number of microbleeds did not predict cognitive dysfunction. In the complete sample, cognitive screening suggested cognitive dysfunction in 41%, and standard neuropsychological testing showed cognitive dysfunction in 12%; 62% reported ≥3 cognitive complaints. Clinically relevant scores of depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress were found in 15%, 19% and 12%, respectively; 28% experienced insomnia and 51% severe fatigue. CONCLUSION: Coronavirus disease 2019 ICU survivors had a higher prevalence for microbleeds but not for cognitive dysfunction compared to general ward survivors. Self-reported symptoms exceeded cognitive dysfunction. Cognitive complaints, neurological symptoms and severe fatigue were frequently reported in both groups, fitting the post-COVID-19 syndrome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Humans , COVID-19/complications , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Prospective Studies , Patients' Rooms , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome , Depression/epidemiology , Critical Care , Intensive Care Units , Survivors/psychology , Fatigue/etiology , Cerebral Hemorrhage
9.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 70(6): e30291, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2266570

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Caregivers and adolescents and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors may be at greater psychosocial risk from the COVID-19 pandemic than healthy peers due to complex and traumatic medical histories. This study describes COVID-19-related event exposures, impact, and distress among a large sample of caregivers and AYA cancer survivors and the relationship of these variables to demographic and cancer characteristics. PROCEDURE: From May 2020 to December 2021, 422 caregivers and 531 AYA survivors completed the COVID-19 Exposures and Family Impact Survey (CEFIS) and CEFIS-AYA, respectively. Total COVID-19-related exposures, average COVID-19-related impact, and COVID-19-related distress were calculated. Conventional content analysis was used to analyze free-text responses about the negative and positive effects of COVID-19. RESULTS: Caregivers and AYA reported an average of 7.4-7.8 COVID-19 exposures to pandemic-related events and a slightly negative impact of COVID-19 across psychosocial domains, with some positive impacts reported. COVID-19-related distress was moderate and clinically meaningful (4.9-5.2/10) for AYA and caregivers. Racial and ethnically minoritized AYA and caregivers reported higher COVID-19-related distress than non-Hispanic white caregivers. For AYA, distress was also higher among female, college-age (18-22 years), and long-term survivors compared with males, younger AYA, White and those recently off treatment. CEFIS outcomes remained relatively stable over time. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 had a significant and consistent negative impact on caregivers and AYA survivors. Racial and ethnically minoritized families and female, college-age, and long-term AYA survivors may require additional psychosocial support. Assessing for COVID-19 impact and distress is important in pediatric oncology to evaluate adjustment and plan targeted interventions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Male , Humans , Adolescent , Female , Young Adult , Child , Adult , Neoplasms/psychology , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Caregivers/psychology , Pandemics , Quality of Life/psychology , Survivors/psychology
11.
Qual Health Res ; 33(7): 589-600, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2255459

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has highlighted the vulnerability of intensive care unit (ICU) patients and the negative sequelae associated with ICU treatment. While the potentially traumatic impact of ICU is well documented, less is known about the ICU survivor's subjective experience and how it influences life post-discharge. Existential psychology addresses the universal concerns of existence, including death, isolation, and meaninglessness, and offers a holistic view of human experience beyond diagnostic categories. An existential psychological understanding of ICU COVID-19 survivorship may therefore provide a rich account of what it means to be among the worst affected by a global existential crisis. This study employed interpretive phenomenological analysis of qualitative interviews with 10 post-ICU COVID-19 survivors (aged 18-78). Interviews were structured on existential psychology's 'Four Worlds' model that explores the physical, social, personal, and spiritual dimensions of human experience. The essential meaning of ICU COVID-19 survival was conceptualised as 'Trying to Reconnect with a Changed Reality' and consisted of four themes. The first, Between Shifting Realities in ICU, described the liminal nature of ICU and the need to ground oneself. The second, What it Means to Care and Be Cared For, captured the emotive nature of personal interdependence and reciprocity. The third, The Self is Different, described survivors' struggle to reconcile old and new selves. The fourth, A New Relationship with Life, outlined how survivors' experiences shaped their new worldviews. Findings evidence the value of holistic, existentially informed psychological support for ICU survivors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Existentialism , Humans , Existentialism/psychology , Aftercare , Patient Discharge , Survivors/psychology , Intensive Care Units
12.
J Intensive Care Med ; 38(7): 657-667, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2252895

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Critical care survivors sustain a variety of sequelae after intensive care medicine (ICM) admission, and the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has added further challenges. Specifically, ICM memories play a significant role, and delusional memories are associated with poor outcomes post-discharge including a delayed return to work and sleep problems. Deep sedation has been associated with a greater risk of perceiving delusional memories, bringing a move toward lighter sedation. However, there are limited reports on post-ICM memories in COVID-19, and influence of deep sedation has not been fully defined. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate ICM-memory recall in COVID-19 survivors and their relation with deep sedation. Materials/Methods: Adult COVID-19 ICM survivors admitted to a Portuguese University Hospital between October 2020 and April 2021 (second/third "waves") were evaluated 1 to 2 months post-discharge using "ICU Memory Tool," to assess real, emotional, and delusional memories. Results: The study included 132 patients (67% male; median age = 62 years, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation [APACHE]-II = 15, Simplified Acute Physiology Score [SAPS]-II = 35, ICM stay = 9 days). Approximately 42% received deep sedation (median duration = 19 days). Most participants reported real (87%) and emotional (77%) recalls, with lesser delusional memories (36.4%). Deeply sedated patients reported significantly fewer real memories (78.6% vs 93.4%, P = .012) and increased delusional memories (60.7% vs 18.4%, P < .001), with no difference in emotional memories (75% vs 80.4%, P = .468). In multivariate analysis, deep sedation had a significant, independent association with delusional memories, increasing their likelihood by a factor of approximately 6 (OR = 6.274; 95% confidence interval = 1.165-33.773, P = .032), without influencing real (P = .545) or emotional (P = .133) memories. Conclusions: This study contributes to a better understanding of the potential adverse effects of deep sedation on ICM memories in critical COVID-19 survivors, indicating a significant, independent association with the incidence of delusional recalls. Although further studies are needed to support these findings, they suggest that strategies targeted to minimize sedation should be favored, aiming to improve long-term recovery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Deep Sedation , Adult , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Female , Intensive Care Units , Deep Sedation/psychology , Aftercare , Patient Discharge , Critical Care/psychology , Survivors/psychology
13.
Qual Life Res ; 32(8): 2375-2390, 2023 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2251266

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: During the first SARS-CoV-2-infection wave, a deterioration in emotional well-being and increased need for mental health care were observed among patients treated or being treated for breast cancer. In this follow-up study, we assessed patient-reported quality of life (QoL), physical functioning, and psychosocial well-being during the second SARS-CoV-2-infection wave in a large, representative cohort. METHODS: This longitudinal cohort study was conducted within the prospective, multicenter UMBRELLA breast cancer cohort. To assess patient-reported QoL, physical functioning and psychosocial well-being, COVID-19-specific surveys were completed by patients during the first and second SARS-CoV-2-infection waves (April and November 2020, respectively). An identical survey was completed by a comparable reference population during the second SARS-CoV-2-infection waves. All surveys included the validated EORTC-QLQ-C30/BR23, HADS and "De Jong-Gierveld Loneliness" questionnaires. Pre-COVID-19 EORTC-QLQ-C30/BR23 and HADS outcomes were available from UMBRELLA. Response rates were 69.3% (n = 1106/1595) during the first SARS-CoV-2-infection wave and 50.9% (n = 822/1614) during the second wave. A total of 696 patients responded during both SARS-CoV-2-infection waves and were included in the analysis comparing patient-reported outcomes (PROs) during the second SARS-CoV-2-infection wave to PROs during the first wave. Moreover, PROs reported by all patients during the second SARS-CoV-2-infection wave (n = 822) were compared to PROs of a similar non-cancer reference population (n = 241) and to their pre-COVID-19 PROs. RESULTS: Patient-reported QoL, physical functioning, and psychosocial well-being of patients treated or being treated for breast cancer remained stable or improved from the first to the second SARS-CoV-2-infection wave. The proportion of emotional loneliness reduced from 37.6 to 29.9% of patients. Compared to a similar non-cancer reference population, physical, emotional, and cognitive functioning, future perspectives and symptoms of dyspnea and insomnia were worse in patients treated or being treated for breast cancer during the second SARS-CoV-2-infection wave. PROs in the second wave were similar to pre-COVID-19 PROs. CONCLUSION: Although patients scored overall worse than individuals without breast cancer, QoL, physical functioning, and psychosocial well-being did not deteriorate between the first and second wave. During the second wave, PROs were similar to pre-COVID-19 values. Overall, current findings are cautiously reassuring for future mental health of patients treated or being treated for breast cancer.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Humans , Female , Breast Neoplasms/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Mental Health , Longitudinal Studies , Follow-Up Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Survivors/psychology
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(5)2023 02 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2247832

ABSTRACT

High rates of psychological distress among COVID-19 survivors and stigmatisation have been reported in both early and late convalescence. This study aimed to compare the severity of psychological distress and to determine the associations among sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, stigma, and psychological distress among COVID-19 survivors across two different cohorts at two different time points. Data were collected cross-sectionally in two groups at one month and six months post-hospitalisation among COVID-19 patient from three hospitals in Malaysia. This study assessed psychological distress and the level of stigma using the Kessler Screening Scale for Psychological Distress (K6) and the Explanatory Model Interview Catalogue (EMIC) stigma scale, respectively. At one month after discharge, significantly lower psychological distress was found among retirees (B = -2.207, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = -4.139 to -0.068, p = 0.034), those who received up to primary education (B = -2.474, 95% CI = -4.500 to -0.521, p = 0.014), and those who had an income of more than RM 10,000 per month (B = -1.576, 95% CI = -2.714 to -0.505, p = 0.006). Moreover, those with a history of psychiatric illness [one month: (B = 6.363, 95% CI = 2.599 to 9.676, p = 0.002), six months: (B = 2.887, CI = 0.469-6.437, p = 0.038)] and sought counselling services [one month: (B = 1.737, 95% CI = 0.385 to 3.117, p = 0.016), six months: (B = 1.480, CI = 0.173-2.618, p = 0.032)] had a significantly higher severity of psychological distress at one month and six months after discharge from the hospital. The perceived stigma of being infected with COVID-19 contributed to greater severity of psychological distress. (B = 0.197, CI = 0.089-0.300, p = 0.002). Different factors may affect psychological distress at different periods of convalescence after a COVID-19 infection. A persistent stigma contributed to psychological distress later in the convalescence period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Humans , Convalescence , Malaysia , Sociodemographic Factors , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Survivors/psychology
15.
Support Care Cancer ; 31(2): 136, 2023 Jan 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2230971

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To identify physical activity (PA) barriers and facilitators among Black and African American (Black/AA) cancer survivors that should be considered in future PA intervention development for this population. METHODS: A community advisory board (CAB) of Black/AA cancer survivors and patient advocates guided in-depth qualitative interviews (n = 19) that were completed via telephone using a semi-structured interview guide. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, and data were analyzed using directed content analysis to detail a report of PA barriers and facilitators during and after cancer treatment. The CAB reviewed and interpreted these barriers and facilitators to identify the final results. RESULTS: Survivors (n = 19) of nine different types of cancer completed interviews. PA barriers during cancer treatments included physical and psychological suffering. PA barriers after cancer treatments included social and environmental constraints (e.g., lack of access needed for PA, safety concerns, and competing priorities). PA facilitators both during and after cancer treatments included family support, faith, and support from other survivors. PA facilitators during treatment also included feeling better after doing PA, setting realistic and flexible goals, and gaining a sense of control of one's health by striving for PA goals. CONCLUSIONS: To increase PA among Black/AA cancer survivors, PA interventions are needed that address structural barriers, include the role of faith, leverage family support, highlight the psychological benefits of PA, and use goal setting.


Subject(s)
Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Humans , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Black or African American , Exercise/psychology , Survivors/psychology , Qualitative Research , Neoplasms/therapy
16.
Neurol Sci ; 44(5): 1481-1489, 2023 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2229375

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) represents the most recent severe pandemic resulting in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). COVID-19 can damage the central nervous system, requiring admission to intensive care units (ICU) and aggressive treatments (long-term ventilatory assistance and sedation) to stabilize vitals. Most post-COVID-19 patients experience cognitive impairments and mood or stress disorders. We aimed to study the frequency of cognitive deficits in COVID-19 survivors, the relationship between clinical factors in the acute phase and cognitive outcomes, affective states, and quality of life. We explored cognitive reserve (CR) role, as a post-COVID-19 resilience factor. METHODS: Twenty-nine COVID-19 inpatients were assessed using a neuropsychological battery, mood scales, quality of life, and social integration questionnaires. Twenty-five were retained through telephone follow-up to monitor cognitive sequelae, affective states, and reintegration levels roughly 8 months after hospital discharge. We administered the Cognitive Reserve Index questionnaire. RESULTS: We found most patients display no cognitive deficits. When they did, multi-domain impairment occurred most frequently, especially involving executive functions. Results revealed a significant correlation between depression levels and the interval between ICU admission and tracheal tube removal. We found increased levels of depression and anxiety at follow-up, a significant relationship between resuming daily life activities, high CR, and executive functions. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest the importance of psychological support in the long term and the modulating role of cognitive reserve in quality of life after infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Quality of Life , Follow-Up Studies , Intensive Care Units , Survivors/psychology , Hospitals
17.
J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci ; 35(3): 256-261, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2223921

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Limited data are available on posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) among COVID-19 survivors. This study aimed to contribute to this knowledge base. METHODS: PTSS among COVID-19 survivors who had been hospitalized were investigated. Patients were identified as COVID-19 positive at hospital admission. COVID-19 survivors were surveyed with the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist (PCL-5) between March and October 2020 at 5- and 12-month postdischarge follow-up points. RESULTS: Of 411 patients, 331 (81%) survived to hospital discharge. Of these survivors, 83 (25%) completed the PCL-5 at the 5-month follow-up. Of those patients, 12 (14%) screened positive for PTSS. At the 12-month follow-up, four of eight patients remained PTSS positive. Mean age of follow-up participants was 62±15 years; 47% were women, 65% were White, and 63% were Hispanic. PTSS-positive patients were predominantly non-White (67% vs. 30%, p=0.02), and although the differences were not statistically significant, these patients tended to be younger (56 vs. 63 years, p=0.08) and have shorter intensive care unit stays (2.0 vs. 12.5 days, p=0.06). PTSS-positive and PTSS-negative groups did not differ significantly in prehospitalization neurological diagnoses (11% vs. 8%), psychiatric diagnoses (17% vs. 21%), and intensive care admission status (25% vs. 25%). More patients in the PTSS-positive group had returned to the emergency department (50% vs. 14%, p<0.01) and reported fatigue at follow-up (100% vs. 42%, p<0.001). In the multivariate logistic regression model, non-White race (OR=11, 95% CI=2-91) and returning to the emergency department (OR=19, 95% CI=3-252) were associated with PTSS-positive status. CONCLUSION: PTSS were twice as common among hospitalized COVID-19 survivors than among those in the general population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Humans , Female , Middle Aged , Aged , Male , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Aftercare , Patient Discharge , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Survivors/psychology
18.
J Acad Consult Liaison Psychiatry ; 64(3): 226-235, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2210577

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Post-intensive care unit recovery programs for survivors of critical illness related to COVID-19 remain limited, ever-evolving, and under active investigation. Mental health professionals have an emerging role within this multidisciplinary care model. OBJECTIVE: This article explores the design and implementation of an intensive care unit follow-up clinic in New Orleans during the era of COVID-19. Survivors of a critical illness due to COVID-19 were offered multidisciplinary outpatient treatment and systematic psychological screening up to 6 months after the initial clinic visit. METHODS: We implemented a prospective, observational study at a post-intensive care syndrome (PICS) clinic for survivors of a critical illness related to COVID-19 embedded within an academic Veterans Affairs hospital. Our team identified patients at high risk of PICS and offered them a clinic consultation. Patients were provided the following interventions: review of the critical care course, medication reconciliation, primary care, psychopharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, and subspecialty referrals. Patients were followed up at 1- to 3-month intervals. Psychological symptom screening was conducted with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fifth Edition, 9-question Patient Health Questionnaire, and 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder assessments. RESULTS: Seventy-seven total patients were identified to be at high risk of PICS from March to November 2020, and of this cohort, 44 (57.14%) survived their COVID-19 hospitalizations. Of the surviving 44 patients contacted, 21 patients established care in the PICS clinic and returned for at least 1 follow-up visit. At initial evaluation, 66.7% of patients demonstrated clinically meaningful symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. At 3-month follow-up, 9.5% of patients showed significant post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms. Moderate-to-severe symptoms of anxiety were present in 38.1% of patients at initial evaluation and in 4.8% of patients at 3 months. Moderate-to-severe symptoms of depression were present in 33.4% and 4.8% of patients at initial visit and at 3 months, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: A PICS clinic serves as a posthospitalization model of care for COVID-19 intensive care unit survivors. This type of health care infrastructure expands the continuum of care for patients enduring the consequences of a critical illness. We identified a high prevalence of post-traumatic stress, anxiety, and depression, along with other post- intensive care unit complications warranting an intervention. The prevalence of distressing psychological symptoms diminished across all domains by 3 months.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Illness , Humans , Prospective Studies , Critical Illness/therapy , Critical Illness/psychology , Critical Care/psychology , Survivors/psychology
19.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 22218, 2022 Dec 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2186030

ABSTRACT

Perceived discrimination and work impairment are commonly observed in COVID-19 survivors, but their relationship has not been well understood. We aimed to evaluate the role of discrimination in the development of psychological distress and work impairment in COVID-19 survivors. From April 2020 to November 2021, 309 patients were recruited at two designated COVID-19 hospitals in Japan. Participants completed a standardized questionnaire including COVID-19 sequelae, psychological distress, impairments in work performance and perceived discrimination. The majority of participants (62.5%) experienced one or more COVID-19 sequelae. Psychological distress was observed in 36.9% and work impairment in 37.9%. In multivariate logistic regression analyses, COVID-19 sequelae and discrimination were associated with both psychological distress and work impairment. Mediation analysis demonstrated that the direct effect of sequelae on work impairment was non-significant after accounting for psychological distress, suggesting that the effect of sequelae on work impairment was mainly mediated through psychological distress. These findings were replicated in a subgroup analysis limited to patients with mild COVID-19. We conclude that discrimination plays an important role in the development of psychological distress and work impairment, and that both discrimination and psychological distress should be targets of intervention in COVID-19 survivors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Humans , COVID-19/complications , Survivors/psychology , Japan/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology
20.
BMC Public Health ; 23(1): 123, 2023 01 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2196198

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Increased numbers of domestic abuse cases were reported at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Many people experiencing abuse faced barriers to seeking support with service closures affecting the sector. Available evidence suggests women are overrepresented in the reported cases of intimate partner violence (IPV) and we aimed to learn more about how their lives were impacted by social distancing restrictions. METHODS: We conducted an online qualitative interview study, using reflexive thematic analysis. Interviews were conducted between April 2021 and March 2022. 18 women in the UK with past experiences of IPV provided informed consent and participated in this study. RESULTS: During the analysis, we identified five themes relating to the impact of lockdown restrictions on participants' lives, including: (1) Lockdown meant being confined to a place where abuse was escalating, (2) Barriers to accessing support, including "cancelled" services and missed opportunities to intervene during interactions in lockdown with frontline workers. (3) Increased feelings of fear, isolation, and loss of control, particularly during the early stages of the pandemic from the combination of abuse and pandemic-related changes to daily life. (4) Some forms of support were more accessible during the pandemic, such as provision of online psychological support and social groups. Participants also accessed new forms of support for the first time during the pandemic, in some cases sparked by posts and content on social media about abuse awareness. (5) For some, psychosocial wellbeing transformed during the pandemic, with several participants using the word "freedom" when reflecting on their experience of simultaneously escaping abuse and living through the COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, we explored the views of female survivors of IPV in the UK during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our results highlight the importance of combined public awareness campaigns and community intervention points for victims to safely seek help during social distancing restrictions. Having the time and space to reflect on healing after escaping abuse was described by women in our study as a benefit from their lives in lockdown, which is a factor that could be incorporated into future initiatives developed to support people subjected to violence and abuse.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intimate Partner Violence , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Physical Distancing , Communicable Disease Control , Intimate Partner Violence/psychology , Survivors/psychology , United Kingdom/epidemiology
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