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1.
J Korean Med Sci ; 37(22): e174, 2022 Jun 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1879450

ABSTRACT

Global health is evolving as a discipline aiming at exploring needs and offering equitable health services for all people. Over the past four decades, several global initiatives have been introduced to improve the accessibility of primary health care (PHC) and solve most health issues at this level. Historically, the 1978 Alma-Ata and 2018 Astana Declarations were perhaps the most important documents for a comprehensive approach to PHC services across the world. With the introduction of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals in 2015, developments in all spheres of human life and multi-sectoral cooperation became the essential action targets that could contribute to improved health, well-being, and safety of all people. Other global initiatives such as the Riyadh Declaration on Digital Health and São Paulo Declaration on Planetary Health called to urgent action to employ advanced digital technologies, improve health data processing, and invest more in research management. All these initiatives are put to the test in the face of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and other unprecedented threats to humanity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Brazil , COVID-19/epidemiology , Global Health , Humans , Pandemics , Sustainable Development
2.
Hu Li Za Zhi ; 69(3): 4-6, 2022 Jun.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1876095

ABSTRACT

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has received increasing attention in recent decades. The concept of social responsibility is being applied in universities. Because universities have goals that differ significantly from corporations, the notion of university social responsibility (USR) has emerged in the academic field. The Ministry of Education in Taiwan has regularly implemented USR practice plans since 2018 (Executive Yuan, Taiwan, ROC, 2019). The core values of these plans are "local coalition" and "talent cultivation". Moreover, these plans encourage universities to use the power of professional knowledge and creation to minimize the gap between learning and application for students and to integrate local resources and hands-on strategies to better collaborate with universities around the world and expand participation in international academic activities. Sustainable development (SD) is a core objective of both CSR and USR. The United Nations has advocated for sustainable development since 1987 and formalized the five-component paradigm (people, partnership, peace, planet, and prosperity, 5Ps) in 2015. UN Agenda 2030 addresses 17 sustainable development goals (SDGs), 169 targets, and 3,155 actions, encouraging all national governments to establish national SD action plans (United Nations, 2015). Based on the review of the literature and conceptual frameworks related to USR and SD (Bokhari, 2017), we integrate practice experiences and propose three suggestions for universities: 1) diversities universities could create a campus-wide climate of and comprehensive practice for social responsibility using their professional knowledge; 2) the social, economy, and environment are included in universities SD. The curriculum development of universities links to social practice activities to achieve the goals of talent cultivation to meet social needs; 3) The university projects include specific actions and timeline. The impacts and achievements of USR and SD may be appraised by internal and external experts. Fooyin University is a school of science and technology related to "Big Health". Based on the above theoretical frameworks, the outcome evaluation model of the Center for USR, the Ministry of Education, and the UN's SDGs, we implemented the "Time Wheel Sustainable Model of Social Responsibility at Fooyin University" (Figure 1) and began cooperating with private and government organizations. The model is an intervention and evaluation guideline for the time-dynamic wheel, with the target goal of cultivating health promotion and sustainable development talent. The outcomes and impacts of the model comprise four domains and sixteen indicators. Stakeholders of this model are students/alumni, teaching faculties and administration staff, communities, and the public. USR curriculum designs involve the School of Nursing, School of Medical and Health Sciences, School of Environment and Life Sciences, and College of Humanities and Management. In 2020, 718 faculties and 2,012 students participated in USR projects. In 2021, the participation numbers were 679 faculties and 2,303 students. The Fooyin USR is now firmly rooted in thirty communities. Starting in 2022, The Fooyin USR has collaborated with local private companies (CSR) and local youths and communities (regional revitalization, RR) to launch the 3 R formula framework of the USR. The goal of the 3 R action plan is to use artificial intelligence technology to provide innovative, community-based care. The USR operations of university sustainable development around Taiwan are achieving wonderful results, with even better achievements expected. This special column presents case studies of innovative community care and sustainable development within the context of university social responsibility at four universities, including Fooyin University, Siaogang Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, National Cheng Kung University, and Taipei Medical University. Since 2020, nations around the world have fought off COVID-19. The strategies of national prevention have evolved to better respond to disasters and to live with the virus. Therefore, in the post-pandemic period, universities around Taiwan have been implementing sustainable development practices. These universities are making strong efforts to develop innovative care for communities through academic exchange and publishing in order to accomplish social responsibility.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sustainable Development , Adolescent , Artificial Intelligence , Humans , Pandemics , Social Responsibility , Universities
3.
Sci Total Environ ; 838(Pt 2): 156039, 2022 Sep 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1852051

ABSTRACT

The transmission dynamics and health risks of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic are inextricably linked to ineract with environment, climate, air pollution, and meteorological conditions. The spread of COVID-19 infection can thus perturb the 'planetary health' and livelihood by exerting impacts on the temporal and spatial variabilities of environmental pollution. Prioritization of COVID-19 by the health-care sector has been posing a serious threat to economic progress while undermining the efforts to meet the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for environmental sustainability. Here, we review the multifaceted effects of COVID-19 with respect to environmental quality, climatic variables, SDGs, energy resilience, and sustainability programs. It is well perceived that COVID-19 may have long-lasting and profound effects on socio-economic systems, food security, livelihoods, and the 'nexus' indicators. To seek for the solution of these problems, consensus can be drawn to establish and ensure a sound health-care system, a sustainable environment, and a circular bioeconomy. A holistic analysis of COVID-19's effects on multiple sectors should help develop nature-based solutions, cleaner technologies, and green economic recovery plans to help maintain environmental sustainability, ecosystem resilience, and planetary health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Ecosystem , Humans , Pandemics , Sustainable Development , United Nations
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(9)2022 04 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1809924

ABSTRACT

Social movements and the consequences of the current health crisis resulting from COVID-19 have deepened social injustices and inequities, which can be addressed through the benchmarks set by the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This research is related to the perspective of Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) as social transformation agents. The purpose of this research is to create a scale to measure students' perception of the social responsibilities developed by HEIs from the SDGs' perspective. A matrix solution was found after Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) composed of four dimensions. The constructs that form the four dimensions can be used to design strategies which contribute to the SDGs' goals, for which it is necessary to have the opinions of the actors that are part of the educational community. Future research should consider carrying out comparative studies according to sociodemographic variables for a better understanding of the social phenomenon.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sustainable Development , COVID-19/epidemiology , Goals , Humans , Perception , Social Responsibility , Students
5.
Lancet Child Adolesc Health ; 6(5): 345-352, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1795976

ABSTRACT

Although great improvements in child survival were achieved in the past two decades, progress has been uneven within and across countries, and the COVID-19 pandemic threatens to reverse previous advances. Demographic and epidemiological transitions around the world have resulted in shifts in the causes and distribution of child death and diseases, and many children are living with short-term and long-term chronic illnesses and disabilities. These changes, plus global threats such as pandemics, transnational and national security issues, and climate change, mean that regular monitoring of child health and wellbeing is essential if we are to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. This Health Policy describes the three-phased process undertaken by the Child Health Accountability Tracking technical advisory group (CHAT) to develop a core set of indicators on child health and wellbeing for global monitoring purposes, and presents CHAT's research recommendations to address data gaps. CHAT reached consensus on 20 core indicators specific to the health sector, which include 11 impact-level indicators and nine outcome-level indicators that cover the topics of: acute conditions and prevention; health promotion and child development; and chronic conditions, disabilities, injuries, and violence against children. An additional six indicators (three impact and three outcome) that capture information on child health issues such as malaria and HIV are recommended; however, these indicators are only relevant to high-burden regions. CHAT's four research priorities will require investments in health information systems and measurement activities. These investments will help to increase data on children aged 5-9 years; develop standard metadata and data collection processes to enable cross-country comparisons and progress assessments over time; reach a global consensus on essential interventions and associated indicators for monitoring emerging priority areas such as child development, chronic conditions, disabilities, and injuries; and implement strategies to increase the uptake of data on child health to improve evidence-based planning, programming, and advocacy efforts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sustainable Development , Child , Child Health , Chronic Disease , Humans , Pandemics
6.
Nat Microbiol ; 7(4): 467-468, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1795752
7.
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med ; 30(2): 244-246, 2022 Mar.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1791308

ABSTRACT

The article, on the basis of analysis of scientific publications, presents brief overview of principles and technologies of development of cities considering impact on population health. The particular attention is paid to analysis of being built areas and careful use of available resources. The definition of the term "sustainable development of territory" and description of necessary measures for its application in practice are given. The actual trend of "coronavirus" transformation of architectural urban environment is presented, including availability for each family member of one's own space, room, house and flat with terrace, balcony, separate entrances (in case when apartment is located on the first floor), expanded house territory, life outside the city. At that, reduction of social relationships is established. To control effectiveness of city management corresponding indices are presented.


Subject(s)
City Planning , Sustainable Development , Cities
8.
Glob Health Promot ; 28(4): 97-103, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779560

ABSTRACT

In 1986, the World Health Organization (WHO) convened the first Global Conference on Health Promotion held in Ottawa, Canada. This conference yielded the Ottawa Charter which defined health promotion as the process of enabling people to increase control over, and to improve, their health. A series of conferences followed and in 2005, WHO convened the Sixth Global Conference in Bangkok, Thailand, which yielded the Bangkok Charter for Health Promotion. This Charter for the first time expanded the role of health promotion to include addressing social determinants of health. Ministers of Health from 47 countries of the WHO Regional Office for Africa in 2012 endorsed the Health Promotion: Strategy for the African Region. This Strategy highlighted eight priority interventions required to address health risk factors and their determinants. In 2011, the Rio Political Declaration on Addressing Social Determinants of Health was adopted by Health Ministers and civil society groups to address inequalities and inequities within and between populations. The main action areas were good governance to tackle the root causes of health inequities; promoting participation and ownership; community leadership for action on social determinants; global action on social determinants to align priorities and stakeholders; and monitoring progress on implementation of policies and strategies. Health promotion has been prominent as part of disease outbreak response, including for Ebola and COVID-19. It has been an integral part of improving maternal and child health mortality and morbidity as well as TB, HIV/AIDS and malaria; and lately reducing the impact of noncommunicable diseases, namely diabetes, high blood pressure and cancer. While challenges continue in strengthening health promotion, there have been concerted efforts to place health promotion on the development agenda in countries through Health in All Policies (HiAP), capacity strengthening, monitoring and evaluation, and innovative financing policy options using dedicated tax from tobacco and alcohol, and road use.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sustainable Development , Child , Emergencies , Health Policy , Health Promotion , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Thailand
9.
Glob Health Promot ; 28(4): 8-16, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779558

ABSTRACT

Transformative health promotion actions are needed to achieve health equity and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), advance human and planetary wellbeing, and ensure that we build back better post-COVID-19. Health policies and systems need to be aligned with the values, principles and strategies of health promotion and investment made in strengthening essential health promotion functions. This paper considers how transformative health promotion can be advanced, by reflecting critically on what progress needs to be made and the structures and processes that are required to strengthen health promotion at a systems level. Progress in implementing health promotion is variable, and there is a general lack of investment in developing the necessary health promotion systems for substantive progress to be made. Key enablers and system requirements for comprehensive health promotion are examined, including the following critical elements: (i) effective advocacy for the concept and practice of health promotion; (ii) enabling policy structures for universal health promotion actions on a cross-sectoral basis; (iii) effective implementation systems, support mechanisms and workforce capacity for multisectoral health promotion action; (iv) investment in innovative research methods and knowledge translation to inform transformative health promotion approaches. In strengthening capacity to implement transformative health promotion actions, political will needs to be mobilized to ensure that dedicated and sustainable funding is made available, and the organizational and workforce capacity to deliver effective health promotion interventions is in place. The International Union for Health Promotion and Education (IUHPE) plays a central role in advancing transformative health promotion through mobilising and supporting its global members and partners in strengthening health promotion systems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Equity , Global Health , Health Promotion , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Sustainable Development
11.
Front Public Health ; 9: 748845, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775926

ABSTRACT

Sustainable development (SD) has increasingly played a key background role in government policymaking across the world, especially for the least developed countries in Africa. Therefore, the purpose of our research is to study the SD of African countries in public life, education, and welfare, and then to help policy makers better monitor the status of sustainable development and formulate development policies in these aspects. We firstly propose a new method to assess the SD in public life, education, and welfare. Then we assess the SD status in 51 African countries as well as other countries in the world. After that, we also make a comparison between African countries and the countries in other continents.


Subject(s)
Sustainable Development , Africa , Educational Status , Humans , Public Policy
12.
Front Public Health ; 10: 824202, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776021

ABSTRACT

This paper offers an evaluation index system of agricultural green development level based on the Rural Vitalization Strategy. The evaluation index system includes four dimensions: agricultural development, ecological resource protection, environment-friendly, and industrial extension and integration. Then, the paper calculates the level of agricultural green development in the three provinces of Northeast China using the entropy-gray correlation method from 2009 to 2019. The calculation results show that between 2009 and 2019, the level of agricultural green development in the three northeastern provinces of China fluctuates and increases, and there is some variation between them: in terms of the overall level of agricultural green development Heilongjiang Province > Liaoning Province > Jilin Province, in terms of the average change speed of agricultural green development level, Heilongjiang Province > Liaoning Province > Jilin Province; in terms of each dimension, the average level of correlation degree of agricultural development dimension is Liaoning Province > Heilongjiang Province > Jilin Province, the average level of correlation degree of ecological resource protection dimension is Heilongjiang Province > Jilin Province > Liaoning Province, the average level of correlation degree of environment-friendly dimension is Heilongjiang Province > Jilin Province > Liaoning Province, and the average level of correlation degree of industrial extension and integration is Liaoning Province > Heilongjiang Province > Jilin Province. Finally, the basis of the calculation results, combined with the actual situation of agricultural development in the three provinces, the countermeasures, and suggestions for promoting the green development of agriculture are put forward. Specifically, it includes the establishment of an evaluation system for agricultural green development; strengthening the protection of agricultural ecological resources; increasing rural environmental governance; promoting the integrated development of rural tertiary industries; vigorously supporting agricultural scientific and technological innovation; and strengthening regional cooperation and other suggestions.


Subject(s)
Agriculture , Conservation of Natural Resources , Sustainable Development , China , Environmental Policy , Humans
13.
Front Public Health ; 9: 752049, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775940

ABSTRACT

Achieving The United Nations sustainable developments goals by 2030 will be a challenge. Researchers around the world are working toward this aim across the breadth of healthcare. Technology, and more especially artificial intelligence, has the ability to propel us forwards and support these goals but requires careful application. Artificial intelligence shows promise within healthcare and there has been fast development in ophthalmology, cardiology, diabetes, and oncology. Healthcare is starting to learn from commercial industry leaders who utilize fast and continuous testing algorithms to gain efficiency and find the optimum solutions. This article provides examples of how commercial industry is benefitting from utilizing AI and improving service delivery. The article then provides a specific example in eye health on how machine learning algorithms can be purposed to drive service delivery in a resource-limited setting by utilizing the novel study designs in response adaptive randomization. We then aim to provide six key considerations for researchers who wish to begin working with AI technology which include collaboration, adopting a fast-fail culture and developing a capacity in ethics and data science.


Subject(s)
Artificial Intelligence , Algorithms , Humans , Machine Learning , Sustainable Development
14.
Front Public Health ; 9: 732061, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775864

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Breastfeeding support rooms are low-cost interventions that may prolong breastfeeding and improve work performance. Thus, we sought to understand the experiences and perceptions of working women who use breastfeeding support rooms and the potential contribution to sustainable development goals. Methods: Descriptive and exploratory research was conducted through convenience sampling of women working in companies with breastfeeding support rooms in the state of Paraná, Brazil. A semi-structured questionnaire was applied through interviews and online self-completion. Results: Fifty-three women between 28 and 41 years old participated in the study. In addition, 88.7% had graduated from college, and 96% were married. From the women's experiences and perceptions, we identified that breastfeeding support rooms contribute to prolonged breastfeeding, improve physical and emotional well-being, allow women to exercise their professional activities comfortably, contribute to women's professional appreciation for the excellent relationship between employees and employers. Conclusion: In this novel study, we demonstrate how, from a female point of view, breastfeeding support rooms can contribute to 8 of the 17 sustainable development goals and should therefore be encouraged and promoted.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding , Sustainable Development , Adult , Female , Humans , Mothers/psychology , Workplace
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(6)2022 03 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1760586

ABSTRACT

This study uses qualitative research methods of text mining to elucidate the potential and prospects for community-based learning opportunities for raising environmental awareness and bringing about healthy behaviour change among university students and local residents. In particular, we focus on the importance of community-based learning in raising environmental awareness and inspiring action to support healthy living and harmony with nature. The three groups were triangulated using semi-structured questionnaires to model the ways in which education for sustainable development (ESD) can contribute to the promotion of environmental education in local communities. In order to collect in-depth data, the authors themselves were present at the study sites and collected textual data based on semi-structured questionnaires in a participatory observation framework, where they had a common experience to understand the observations. Analysis was carried out using NVivo12. The two community learning initiatives studied were in Okayama and Tokyo, which are leading ESD policy areas. The two case studies are both university student-led projects that aim to raise environmental awareness in local communities through environmentally conscious behaviour change and the creation of a foundation for healthy living. This study focuses on "youth" and "community" among the five priority areas proposed in the 2015 ESD report and discusses the potential and prospects for community learning initiatives and the triggering of the nudge effect on environmentally conscious behaviour change and health behaviours. The results of the textual analysis with triangulation show that, while policymakers and teachers and leaders driving the initiative acknowledge the importance of ESD in a comprehensive way, their attention is more focused on the design of specific projects and curricula. In contrast, university students engaged in ESD activities rated the social education facilities (local community centres, community learning centres) as "lively" and "motivating". It was found that there are high expectations for "public living rooms", which are important as a base for learning to promote healthy and sustainable communities and environmentally conscious behaviour change.


Subject(s)
Health Education , Sustainable Development , Adolescent , Curriculum , Humans , Learning , UNESCO
16.
Lancet ; 399(10331): 1266-1278, 2022 03 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1757951

ABSTRACT

Most countries have made little progress in achieving the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) target 3.4, which calls for a reduction in premature mortality from non-communicable diseases (NCDs) by a third from 2015 to 2030. In this Health Policy paper, we synthesise the evidence related to interventions that can reduce premature mortality from the major NCDs over the next decade and that are feasible to implement in countries at all levels of income. Our recommendations are intended as generic guidance to help 123 low-income and middle-income countries meet SDG target 3.4; country-level applications require additional analyses and consideration of the local implementation and utilisation context. Protecting current investments and scaling up these interventions is especially crucial in the context of COVID-19-related health system disruptions. We show how cost-effectiveness data and other information can be used to define locally tailored packages of interventions to accelerate rates of decline in NCD mortality. Under realistic implementation constraints, most countries could achieve (or almost achieve) the NCD target using a combination of these interventions; the greatest gains would be for cardiovascular disease mortality. Implementing the most efficient package of interventions in each world region would require, on average, an additional US$18 billion annually over 2023-30; this investment could avert 39 million deaths and generate an average net economic benefit of $2·7 trillion, or $390 per capita. Although specific clinical intervention pathways would vary across countries and regions, policies to reduce behavioural risks, such as tobacco smoking, harmful use of alcohol, and excess sodium intake, would be relevant in nearly every country, accounting for nearly two-thirds of the health gains of any locally tailored NCD package. By 2030, ministries of health would need to contribute about 20% of their budgets to high-priority NCD interventions. Our report concludes with a discussion of financing and health system implementation considerations and reflections on the NCD agenda beyond the SDG target 3.4 and beyond the SDG period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Noncommunicable Diseases , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Developing Countries , Global Health , Humans , Noncommunicable Diseases/prevention & control , Sustainable Development
17.
Environ Int ; 163: 107217, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1757319

ABSTRACT

Wastewater-based epidemiology (WBE) emerged as a powerful, actionable health management tool during the COVID-19 pandemic. Hypothesizing future uses, we explored its potential for real-time, tracking of progress in attaining United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) globally as a non-expensive method using existing infrastructure. We inventoried (i) literature-documented sewerage infrastructure, (ii) demographics of populations served, and (iii) WBE markers informative of 9 SDGs. Among the 17 different sustainable development goals listed by the UN 2030 agenda, more than half of these may be monitored by using WBE monitoring at centralized treatment infrastructure as tabulated in this study. Driven mainly by COVID-19, WBE currently is practiced in at least 55 countries, reaching about 300 million people. Expansion of WBE to 109,000 + treatment plants inventoried in 129 countries would increase global coverage 9-fold to 34.7% or 2.7 billion, leaving out 5 billion people not served by centralized sewerage systems. Associations between population demographics and present-day infrastructure are explored, and geospatial regions particularly vulnerable to infectious disease outbreaks are identified. The results suggest that difference in the differential outcomes in well-being is an outcome of the sanitation infrastructure inequalities and lack of sanitation infrastructure creates doubly disadvantaged populations at risk of poor hygiene and cut off from the early-warning benefits of conventional WBE. This is the first study to explore the feasibility and potential barriers to the use of WBE for tracking the attainment of SDGs globally with at least 9 out of 17 SDGs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Wastewater-Based Epidemiological Monitoring , COVID-19/epidemiology , Global Health , Humans , Pandemics , Sustainable Development , United Nations
18.
Lancet ; 399(10327): 803-813, 2022 02 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1747475

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Intimate partner violence against women is a global public health problem with many short-term and long-term effects on the physical and mental health of women and their children. The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) call for its elimination in target 5.2. To monitor governments' progress towards SDG target 5.2, this study aimed to provide global, regional, and country baseline estimates of physical or sexual, or both, violence against women by male intimate partners. METHODS: This study developed global, regional, and country estimates, based on data from the WHO Global Database on Prevalence of Violence Against Women. These data were identified through a systematic literature review searching MEDLINE, Global Health, Embase, Social Policy, and Web of Science, and comprehensive searches of national statistics and other websites. A country consultation process identified additional studies. Included studies were conducted between 2000 and 2018, representative at the national or sub-national level, included women aged 15 years or older, and used act-based measures of physical or sexual, or both, intimate partner violence. Non-population-based data, including administrative data, studies not generalisable to the whole population, studies with outcomes that only provided the combined prevalence of physical or sexual, or both, intimate partner violence with other forms of violence, and studies with insufficient data to allow extrapolation or imputation were excluded. We developed a Bayesian multilevel model to jointly estimate lifetime and past year intimate partner violence by age, year, and country. This framework adjusted for heterogeneous age groups and differences in outcome definition, and weighted surveys depending on whether they were nationally or sub-nationally representative. This study is registered with PROSPERO (number CRD42017054100). FINDINGS: The database comprises 366 eligible studies, capturing the responses of 2 million women. Data were obtained from 161 countries and areas, covering 90% of the global population of women and girls (15 years or older). Globally, 27% (uncertainty interval [UI] 23-31%) of ever-partnered women aged 15-49 years are estimated to have experienced physical or sexual, or both, intimate partner violence in their lifetime, with 13% (10-16%) experiencing it in the past year before they were surveyed. This violence starts early, affecting adolescent girls and young women, with 24% (UI 21-28%) of women aged 15-19 years and 26% (23-30%) of women aged 19-24 years having already experienced this violence at least once since the age of 15 years. Regional variations exist, with low-income countries reporting higher lifetime and, even more pronouncedly, higher past year prevalence compared with high-income countries. INTERPRETATION: These findings show that intimate partner violence against women was already highly prevalent across the globe before the COVID-19 pandemic. Governments are not on track to meet the SDG targets on the elimination of violence against women and girls, despite robust evidence that intimate partner violence can be prevented. There is an urgent need to invest in effective multisectoral interventions, strengthen the public health response to intimate partner violence, and ensure it is addressed in post-COVID-19 reconstruction efforts. FUNDING: UK Department for International Development through the UN Women-WHO Joint Programme on Strengthening Violence against Women Data, and UNDP-UN Population Fund-UNICEF-WHO-World Bank Special Programme of Research, Development, and Research Training in Human Reproduction, a cosponsored programme executed by WHO.


Subject(s)
Global Health , Intimate Partner Violence , Public Health , Sexual Partners , Sustainable Development/trends , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19 , Databases, Factual , Female , Humans , Intimate Partner Violence/prevention & control , Intimate Partner Violence/statistics & numerical data , Male , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Sexual Partners/psychology , World Health Organization , Young Adult
19.
East Mediterr Health J ; 28(1): 3-4, 2022 Jan 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1744416

ABSTRACT

The United Nations launched the Sustainable Development Agenda 2030 and its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in 2015, as a more detailed and ambitious follow-up to the Millennium Developments Goals (MDGs). Health and wellbeing of all, at all ages, is addressed by the third SDG (SDG3) and health-related targets of other SDGs. However, progress to date on the health-related SDGs in the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR) is not on track. Although there was progress in over half of the 50 health-related SDG targets and indicators between 2015 and 2019, there is still a long way to go. Progress is required, among others, in reducing maternal, child and neonatal mortality; increasing vaccination coverage; reducing the number of cases of malaria and HIV; and in tackling the increase in mortality rates due to noncommunicable diseases. Much progress is needed in many health-related SDGs considered as important social, economic and environmental determinants of health.


Subject(s)
Insurance Pools , Sustainable Development , Child , Global Health , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Mediterranean Region/epidemiology , United Nations
20.
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