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1.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0263582, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1677590

ABSTRACT

The membrane protein M of the Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus (PEDV) is the most abundant component of the viral envelope. The M protein plays a central role in the morphogenesis and assembly of the virus through protein interactions of the M-M, M-Spike (S) and M-nucleocapsid (N) type. The M protein is known to induce protective antibodies in pigs and to participate in the antagonistic response of the cellular antiviral system coordinated by the type I and type III interferon pathways. The 3D structure of the PEDV M protein is still unknown. The present work exposes a predicted 3D model of the M protein generated using the Robetta protocol. The M protein model is organized into a transmembrane and a globular region. The obtained 3D model of the PEDV M protein was compared with 3D models of the SARS-CoV-2 M protein created using neural networks and with initial machine learning-based models created using trRosetta. The 3D model of the present study predicted four linear B-cell epitopes (RSVNASSGTG and KHGDYSAVSNPSALT peptides are noteworthy), six discontinuous B-cell epitopes, forty weak binding and fourteen strong binding T-cell epitopes in the CV777 M protein. A high degree of conservation of the epitopes predicted in the PEDV M protein was observed among different PEDV strains isolated in different countries. The data suggest that the M protein could be a potential candidate for the development of new treatments or strategies that activate protective cellular mechanisms against viral diseases.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/virology , Coronavirus M Proteins/chemistry , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/chemistry , Swine Diseases/virology , Swine/virology , Amino Acid Sequence , Animals , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Coronavirus M Proteins/immunology , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/chemistry , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/immunology , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/chemistry , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/immunology , Models, Molecular , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/immunology , Protein Conformation , Swine Diseases/immunology
2.
Vet Microbiol ; 264: 109271, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593985

ABSTRACT

Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus (SEZ) is a commensal bacterium of horses and causes infections in mammalian species, including humans. Historically, virulent strains of SEZ caused high mortality in pigs in China and Indonesia, while disease in the U.S. was infrequent. More recently, high mortality events in sows were attributed to SEZ in North America. The SEZ isolates from these mortality events have high genetic similarity to an isolate from an outbreak in China. Taken together, this may indicate SEZ is an emerging threat to swine health. To generate a disease model and evaluate the susceptibility of healthy, conventionally raised pigs to SEZ, we challenged sows and five-month-old pigs with an isolate from a 2019 mortality event. Pigs were challenged with a genetically similar guinea pig isolate or genetically distinct horse isolate to evaluate comparative virulence. The swine isolate caused severe systemic disease in challenged pigs with 100 % mortality. Disease manifestation in sows was similar to field reports: lethargy/depression, fever, reluctance to rise, and high mortality. The guinea pig isolate also caused severe systemic disease; however, most five-month-old pigs recovered. In contrast, the horse isolate did not cause disease and was readily cleared from the respiratory tract. In conclusion, we were able to replicate disease reported in the field. The results indicate differences in virulence between isolates, with the highest virulence associated with the swine isolate. Additionally, we generated a challenge model that can be used in future research to evaluate virulence factors and disease prevention strategies.


Subject(s)
Horse Diseases , Streptococcal Infections , Streptococcus equi , Swine Diseases , Virus Replication , Animals , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Guinea Pigs , Horse Diseases/virology , Horses , Streptococcal Infections/veterinary , Streptococcal Infections/virology , Streptococcus equi/physiology , Swine , Swine Diseases/virology , Virus Replication/physiology
3.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1555020

ABSTRACT

Porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) is a novel coronavirus that causes diarrhea in nursing piglets. Studies showed that PDCoV uses porcine aminopeptidase N (pAPN) as an entry receptor, but the infection of pAPN-knockout cells or pigs with PDCoV revealed that pAPN might be not a critical functional receptor, implying there exists an unidentified receptor involved in PDCoV infection. Herein, we report that sialic acid (SA) can act as an attachment receptor for PDCoV invasion and facilitate its infection. We first demonstrated that the carbohydrates destroyed on the cell membrane using NaIO4 can alleviate the susceptibility of cells to PDCoV. Further study showed that the removal of SA, a typical cell-surface carbohydrate, could influence the PDCoV infectivity to the cells significantly, suggesting that SA was involved in the infection. The results of plaque assay and Western blotting revealed that SA promoted PDCoV infection by increasing the number of viruses binding to SA on the cell surface during the adsorption phase, which was also confirmed by atomic force microscopy at the microscopic level. In in vivo experiments, we found that the distribution levels of PDCoV and SA were closely relevant in the swine intestine, which contains huge amount of trypsin. We further confirmed that SA-binding capacity to PDCoV is related to the pre-treatment of PDCoV with trypsin. In conclusion, SA is a novel attachment receptor for PDCoV infection to enhance its attachment to cells, which is dependent on the pre-treatment of trypsin on PDCoV. This study paves the way for dissecting the mechanisms of PDCoV-host interactions and provides new strategies to control PDCoV infection.


Subject(s)
Deltacoronavirus/physiology , N-Acetylneuraminic Acid/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Trypsin/metabolism , Virus Attachment , Animals , Carbohydrates , Cell Line , Cell Membrane/metabolism , Cell Membrane/virology , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Deltacoronavirus/drug effects , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Intestines/metabolism , Intestines/virology , Periodic Acid/pharmacology , Swine , Swine Diseases/virology , Trypsin/pharmacology
4.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 11(1): 91-94, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1541488

ABSTRACT

In order to assess the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection, transmission and reservoir development in swine, we combined results of an experimental and two observational studies. First, intranasal and intratracheal challenge of eight pigs did not result in infection, based on clinical signs and PCR on swab and lung tissue samples. Two serum samples returned a low positive result in virus neutralization, in line with findings in other infection experiments in pigs. Next, a retrospective observational study was performed in the Netherlands in the spring of 2020. Serum samples (N =417) obtained at slaughter from 17 farms located in a region with a high human case incidence in the first wave of the pandemic. Samples were tested with protein micro array, plaque reduction neutralization test and receptor-binding-domain ELISA. None of the serum samples was positive in all three assays, although six samples from one farm returned a low positive result in PRNT (titers 40-80). Therefore we conclude that serological evidence for large scale transmission was not observed. Finally, an outbreak of respiratory disease in pigs on one farm, coinciding with recent exposure to SARS-CoV-2 infected animal caretakers, was investigated. Tonsil swabs and paired serum samples were tested. No evidence for infection with SARS-CoV-2 was found. In conclusion, Although in both the experimental and the observational study few samples returned low antibody titer results in PRNT infection with SARS-CoV-2 was not confirmed. It was concluded that sporadic infections in the field cannot be excluded, but large-scale SARS-CoV-2 transmission among pigs is unlikely.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/veterinary , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Swine Diseases/epidemiology , Swine Diseases/transmission , Swine Diseases/virology , Animals , Environmental Exposure , Netherlands/epidemiology , Public Health Surveillance , Retrospective Studies , Swine
5.
J Virol ; 95(16): e0018721, 2021 07 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1486048

ABSTRACT

Subversion of the host cell cycle to facilitate viral replication is a common feature of coronavirus infections. Coronavirus nucleocapsid (N) protein can modulate the host cell cycle, but the mechanistic details remain largely unknown. Here, we investigated the effects of manipulation of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) N protein on the cell cycle and the influence on viral replication. Results indicated that PEDV N induced Vero E6 cell cycle arrest at S-phase, which promoted viral replication (P < 0.05). S-phase arrest was dependent on the N protein nuclear localization signal S71NWHFYYLGTGPHADLRYRT90 and the interaction between N protein and p53. In the nucleus, the binding of N protein to p53 maintained consistently high-level expression of p53, which activated the p53-DREAM pathway. The key domain of the N protein interacting with p53 was revealed to be S171RGNSQNRGNNQGRGASQNRGGNN194 (NS171-N194), in which G183RG185 are core residues. NS171-N194 and G183RG185 were essential for N-induced S-phase arrest. Moreover, small molecular drugs targeting the NS171-N194 domain of the PEDV N protein were screened through molecular docking. Hyperoside could antagonize N protein-induced S-phase arrest by interfering with interaction between N protein and p53 and inhibit viral replication (P < 0.05). The above-described experiments were also validated in porcine intestinal cells, and data were in line with results in Vero E6 cells. Therefore, these results reveal the PEDV N protein interacts with p53 to activate the p53-DREAM pathway, and subsequently induces S-phase arrest to create a favorable environment for virus replication. These findings provide new insight into the PEDV-host interaction and the design of novel antiviral strategies against PEDV. IMPORTANCE Many viruses subvert the host cell cycle to create a cellular environment that promotes viral growth. PEDV, an emerging and reemerging coronavirus, has led to substantial economic loss in the global swine industry. Our study is the first to demonstrate that PEDV N-induced cell cycle arrest during the S-phase promotes viral replication. We identified a novel mechanism of PEDV N-induced S-phase arrest, where the binding of PEDV N protein to p53 maintains consistently high levels of p53 expression in the nucleus to mediate S-phase arrest by activating the p53-DREAM pathway. Furthermore, a small molecular compound, hyperoside, targeted the PEDV N protein, interfering with the interaction between the N protein and p53 and, importantly, inhibited PEDV replication by antagonizing cell cycle arrest. This study reveals a new mechanism of PEDV-host interaction and also provides a novel antiviral strategy for PEDV. These data provide a foundation for further research into coronavirus-host interactions.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/chemistry , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/drug effects , Quercetin/analogs & derivatives , Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/chemistry , Amino Acid Sequence , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Binding Sites , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/drug effects , Epithelial Cells/virology , Gene Expression Regulation , High-Throughput Screening Assays , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Molecular Docking Simulation , Nuclear Localization Signals , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/genetics , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/metabolism , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , Quercetin/chemistry , Quercetin/pharmacology , S Phase Cell Cycle Checkpoints/drug effects , S Phase Cell Cycle Checkpoints/genetics , Signal Transduction , Swine , Swine Diseases/drug therapy , Swine Diseases/genetics , Swine Diseases/metabolism , Swine Diseases/virology , Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/antagonists & inhibitors , Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/genetics , Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/metabolism , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/drug effects
6.
Viruses ; 13(10)2021 10 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463827

ABSTRACT

Porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV), an emerging enteropathogenic coronavirus, causes diarrhoea in suckling piglets and has the potential for cross-species transmission. No effective PDCoV vaccines or antiviral drugs are currently available. Here, we successfully generated an infectious clone of PDCoV strain CHN-HN-2014 using a combination of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based reverse genetics system with a one-step homologous recombination. The recued virus (rCHN-HN-2014) possesses similar growth characteristics to the parental virus in vitro. Based on the established infectious clone and CRISPR/Cas9 technology, a PDCoV reporter virus expressing nanoluciferase (Nluc) was constructed by replacing the NS6 gene. Using two drugs, lycorine and resveratrol, we found that the Nluc reporter virus exhibited high sensibility and easy quantification to rapid antiviral screening. We further used the Nluc reporter virus to test the susceptibility of different cell lines to PDCoV and found that cell lines derived from various host species, including human, swine, cattle and monkey enables PDCoV replication, broadening our understanding of the PDCoV cell tropism range. Taken together, our reporter viruses are available to high throughput screening for antiviral drugs and uncover the infectivity of PDCoV in various cells, which will accelerate our understanding of PDCoV.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Deltacoronavirus/genetics , Deltacoronavirus/metabolism , Genes, Reporter/genetics , Luciferases/genetics , A549 Cells , Animals , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Chromosomes, Artificial, Bacterial/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Deltacoronavirus/growth & development , Dogs , Genome, Viral/genetics , Humans , Luciferases/biosynthesis , Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells , Nanostructures , Swine , Swine Diseases/virology , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/genetics
7.
J Virol ; 95(24): e0134521, 2021 11 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441856

ABSTRACT

Porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV), an emerging enteropathogenic coronavirus, causes serious diarrhea in suckling piglets and has the potential for cross-species transmission. Although extensive studies have been reported on the biology and pathogenesis of PDCoV, the mechanisms by which PDCoV enters cells are not well characterized. In this study, we investigated how PDCoV enters IPI-2I cells, a line of porcine intestinal epithelial cells derived from pig ileum. Immunofluorescence assays, small interfering RNA (siRNA) interference, specific pharmacological inhibitors, and dominant negative mutation results revealed that PDCoV entry into IPI-2I cells depended on clathrin, dynamin, and a low-pH environment but was independent of caveolae. Specific inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and the Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE) revealed that PDCoV entry involves macropinocytosis and depends on NHE rather than on PI3K. Additionally, Rab5 and Rab7, but not Rab11, regulated PDCoV endocytosis. This is the first study to demonstrate that PDCoV uses clathrin-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis as alternative endocytic pathways to enter porcine intestinal epithelial cells. We also discussed the entry pathways of PDCoV into other porcine cell lines. Our findings reveal the entry mechanisms of PDCoV and provide new insight into the PDCoV life cycle. IMPORTANCE An emerging enteropathogenic coronavirus, PDCoV, has the potential for cross-species transmission, attracting extensive attenuation. Characterizing the detailed process of PDCoV entry into cells will deepen our understanding of the viral infection and pathogenesis and provide clues for therapeutic intervention against PDCoV. With the objective, we used complementary approaches to dissect the process in PDCoV-infected IPI-2I cells, a line of more physiologically relevant intestinal epithelial cells to PDCoV infection in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that PDCoV enters IPI-2I cells via macropinocytosis, which does not require a specific receptor, and clathrin-mediated endocytosis, which requires a low-pH environment and dynamin, while a caveola-mediated endocytic pathway is used by PDCoV to enter swine testicular (ST) cells and porcine kidney (LLC-PK1) cells. These findings provide a molecular detail of the cellular entry pathways of PDCoV and may direct us toward novel antiviral drug development.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/virology , Deltacoronavirus/physiology , Dynamins/metabolism , Endocytosis , Epithelial Cells/virology , Animals , Cell Line , Cell Survival , Clathrin/metabolism , Coronavirus/genetics , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Ileum/virology , Kidney/virology , Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/metabolism , Pinocytosis , RNA, Small Interfering/metabolism , Swine , Swine Diseases/virology , Virus Internalization , rab5 GTP-Binding Proteins/metabolism
8.
Viruses ; 13(9)2021 09 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1411090

ABSTRACT

The porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is an Alphacoronavirus (α-CoV) that causes high mortality in infected piglets, resulting in serious economic losses in the farming industry. Hypericin is a dianthrone compound that has been shown as an antiviral activity on several viruses. Here, we first evaluated the antiviral effect of hypericin in PEDV and found the viral replication and egression were significantly reduced with hypericin post-treatment. As hypericin has been shown in SARS-CoV-2 that it is bound to viral 3CLpro, we thus established a molecular docking between hypericin and PEDV 3CLpro using different software and found hypericin bound to 3CLpro through two pockets. These binding pockets were further verified by another docking between hypericin and PEDV 3CLpro pocket mutants, and the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay confirmed that hypericin inhibits the PEDV 3CLpro activity. Moreover, the alignments of α-CoV 3CLpro sequences or crystal structure revealed that the pockets mediating hypericin and PEDV 3CLpro binding were highly conserved, especially in transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV). We then validated the anti-TGEV effect of hypericin through viral replication and egression. Overall, our results push forward that hypericin was for the first time shown to have an inhibitory effect on PEDV and TGEV by targeting 3CLpro, and it deserves further attention as not only a pan-anti-α-CoV compound but potentially also as a compound of other coronaviral infections.


Subject(s)
Alphacoronavirus/drug effects , Alphacoronavirus/physiology , Anthracenes/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Perylene/analogs & derivatives , Virus Replication/drug effects , Amino Acid Sequence , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/chemistry , Enzyme Activation/drug effects , Models, Molecular , Perylene/pharmacology , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/drug effects , Recombinant Proteins , Structure-Activity Relationship , Swine , Swine Diseases/virology , Vero Cells
9.
Pol J Vet Sci ; 24(1): 43-49, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1368400

ABSTRACT

In this study, we developed a SYBR Green I real-time PCR method for the rapid and sensitive detection of novel porcine parvovirus 7 (PPV7). Specific primers were designed based on the highly conserved region within the Capsid gene of PPV7. The established method was 1,000 times more sensitive than the conventional PCR method and had a detection limit of 35.6 copies. This method was specific and had no cross-reactions with PCV2, PCV3, PRV, PEDV, PPV1, and PPV6. Experiments testing the intra and interassay precision demonstrated a high reproducibility. Testing the newly established method with 200 clinical samples revealed a detection rate up to 17.5% higher than that of the conventional PCR assay. The established method could provide technical support for clinical diagnosis and epidemiological investigation of PPV7.


Subject(s)
Benzothiazoles , Diamines , Parvoviridae Infections/veterinary , Parvovirus, Porcine/isolation & purification , Quinolines , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Swine Diseases/virology , Animals , Parvoviridae Infections/diagnosis , Parvoviridae Infections/virology , Reproducibility of Results , Sensitivity and Specificity , Swine , Swine Diseases/diagnosis
10.
Transbound Emerg Dis ; 68(4): 1721-1725, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1319349

ABSTRACT

Conventional piglets were inoculated with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) through different routes, including intranasal, intratracheal, intramuscular and intravenous ones. Although piglets were not susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 and lacked lesions or viral RNA in tissues/swabs, seroconversion was observed in pigs inoculated parenterally (intramuscularly or intravenously).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Swine Diseases , Animals , COVID-19/veterinary , Disease Models, Animal , Disease Susceptibility/veterinary , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2 , Swine , Swine Diseases/virology
11.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0254815, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318322

ABSTRACT

African swine fever (ASF) is a serious contagious disease that causes fatal haemorrhagic fever in domestic and wild pigs, with high morbidity. It has caused devastating damage to the swine industry worldwide, necessitating the focus of attention on detection of the ASF pathogen, the African swine fever virus (ASFV). In order to overcome the disadvantages of conventional diagnostic methods (e.g. time-consuming, demanding and unintuitive), quick detection tools with higher sensitivity need to be explored. In this study, based on the conserved p72 gene sequence of ASFV, we combined the Cas12a-based assay with recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) and a fluorophore-quencher (FQ)-labeled reporter assay for rapid and visible detection. Five crRNAs designed for Cas12a-based assay showed specificity with remarkable fluorescence intensity under visual inspection. Within 20 minutes, with an initial concentration of two copies of DNA, the assay can produce significant differences between experimental and negative groups, indicating the high sensitivity and rapidity of the method. Overall, the developed RPA-Cas12a-fluorescence assay provides a fast and visible tool for point-of-care ASFV detection with high sensitivity and specificity, which can be rapidly performed on-site under isothermal conditions, promising better control and prevention of ASF.


Subject(s)
African Swine Fever Virus/isolation & purification , African Swine Fever/diagnosis , Bacterial Proteins/genetics , CRISPR-Associated Proteins/genetics , Endodeoxyribonucleases/genetics , Swine Diseases/diagnosis , African Swine Fever/genetics , African Swine Fever/virology , African Swine Fever Virus/genetics , Animals , Bacterial Proteins/chemistry , CRISPR-Associated Proteins/chemistry , CRISPR-Cas Systems , DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase/chemistry , Endodeoxyribonucleases/chemistry , Molecular Diagnostic Techniques , Point-of-Care Systems , Recombinases/chemistry , Swine , Swine Diseases/genetics , Swine Diseases/pathology , Swine Diseases/virology
12.
J Virol ; 95(18): e0085321, 2021 08 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1299218

ABSTRACT

Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is an enteric coronavirus causing acute intestinal infection in pigs, with high mortality often seen in neonatal pigs. The newborns rely on innate immune responses against invading pathogens because of lacking adaptive immunity. However, how PEDV disables the innate immunity of newborns toward severe infection remains unknown. We found that PEDV infection led to reduced expression of histone deacetylases (HDACs), especially HDAC1, in porcine IPEC-J2 cells. HDACs are considered important regulators of innate immunity. We hypothesized that PEDV interacts with certain host factors to regulate HDAC1 expression in favor of its replication. We show that HDAC1 acted as a negative regulator of PEDV replication in IPEC-J2 cells, as shown by chemical inhibition, gene knockout, and overexpression. A GC-box (GCCCCACCCCC) within the HDAC1 promoter region was identified for Sp1 binding in IPEC-J2 cells. Treatment of the cells with Sp1 inhibitor mithramycin A inhibited HDAC1 expression, indicating direct regulation of HDAC1 expression by Sp1. Of the viral proteins that were overexpressed in IPEC-J2 cells, the N protein was found to be present in the nuclei and more inhibitory to HDAC1 transcription. The putative nuclear localization sequence 261PKKNKSR267 contributed to its nuclear localization. The N protein interacted with Sp1 and interfered with its binding to the promoter region, thereby inhibiting its transcriptional activity for HDAC1 expression. Our findings reveal a novel mechanism of PEDV evasion of the host responses, offering implications for studying the infection processes of other coronaviruses. IMPORTANCE The enteric coronavirus porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) causes fatal acute intestinal infection in neonatal pigs that rely on innate immune responses. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play important roles in innate immune regulation. Our study found PEDV suppresses HDAC1 expression via the interaction of its N protein and porcine Sp1, which identified a novel mechanism of PEDV evasion of the host responses to benefit its replication. This study suggests that other coronaviruses, including SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2, also make use of their N proteins to intercept the host immune responses in favor of their infection.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Epithelial Cells/virology , Histone Deacetylase 1/antagonists & inhibitors , Intestinal Mucosa/virology , Sp1 Transcription Factor/metabolism , Swine Diseases/virology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Virus Replication , Animals , Cells, Cultured , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/pathology , Intestinal Mucosa/metabolism , Intestinal Mucosa/pathology , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/pathogenicity , Sp1 Transcription Factor/genetics , Swine , Swine Diseases/metabolism , Swine Diseases/pathology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics
13.
Virol Sin ; 36(6): 1421-1430, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1296519

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses (CoVs) are important human and animal pathogens that cause respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases. Porcine epidemic diarrhoea (PED), characterized by severe diarrhoea and vomiting in pigs, is a highly lethal disease caused by porcine epidemic diarrhoea virus (PEDV) and causes substantial losses in the swine industry worldwide. However, currently available commercial drugs have not shown great therapeutic effects. In this study, a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based assay was applied to screen a library containing 1,590 compounds and identified two compounds, 3-(aminocarbonyl)-1-phenylpyridinium and 2,3-dichloronaphthoquinone, that target the 3C-like protease (3CLpro) of PEDV. These compounds are of low molecular weight (MW) and greatly inhibited the activity of this enzyme (IC50 values were obtained in this study). Furthermore, these compounds exhibited antiviral capacity against another member of the CoV family, feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV). Here, the inhibitory effects of these compounds against CoVs on Vero cells and feline kidney cells were identified (with EC50 values) and cell viability assays were performed. The results of putative molecular docking models indicate that these compounds, labeled compound 1 and compound 2, contact the conserved active sites (Cys144, Glu165, Gln191) of 3CLpro via hydrogen bonds. These findings provide insight into the antiviral activities of compounds 1 and 2 that may facilitate future research on anti-CoV drugs.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus Infections , Coronavirus, Feline , Swine Diseases , Animals , Cats , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Coronavirus, Feline/drug effects , Molecular Docking Simulation , Swine , Swine Diseases/virology , Vero Cells
14.
Viruses ; 13(6)2021 06 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286941

ABSTRACT

In European countries, autochthonous acute hepatitis E cases are caused by Hepatitis E Virus (HEV) genotype 3 and are usually observed as sporadic cases. In mid/late September 2019, a hepatitis E outbreak caused by HEV genotype 3 was recognized by detection of identical/highly similar HEV sequences in some hepatitis E cases from two Italian regions, Abruzzo and Lazio, with most cases from this latter region showing a link with Abruzzo. Overall, 47 cases of HEV infection were finally observed with onsets from 8 June 2019 to 6 December 2019; they represent a marked increase as compared with just a few cases in the same period of time in the past years and in the same areas. HEV sequencing was successful in 35 cases. The phylogenetic analysis of the viral sequences showed 30 of them grouped in three distinct molecular clusters, termed A, B, and C: strains in cluster A and B were of subtype 3e and strains in cluster C were of subtype 3f. No strains detected in Abruzzo in the past years clustered with the strains involved in the present outbreak. The outbreak curve showed partially overlapped temporal distribution of the three clusters. Analysis of collected epidemiological data identified pork products as the most likely source of the outbreak. Overall, the findings suggest that the outbreak might have been caused by newly and almost simultaneously introduced strains not previously circulating in this area, which are possibly harbored by pork products or live animals imported from outside Abruzzo. This possibility deserves further studies in this area in order to monitor the circulation of HEV in human cases as well as in pigs and wild boars.


Subject(s)
Disease Outbreaks , Genotype , Hepatitis E virus/classification , Hepatitis E virus/genetics , Hepatitis E/epidemiology , Hepatitis E/transmission , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Animals , Female , Hepatitis E/virology , Hepatitis E virus/pathogenicity , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Phylogeny , Pork Meat/virology , RNA, Viral , Risk Factors , Sus scrofa/virology , Swine , Swine Diseases/transmission , Swine Diseases/virology
15.
J Vet Diagn Invest ; 33(3): 457-468, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1264088

ABSTRACT

Every day, thousands of samples from diverse populations of animals are submitted to veterinary diagnostic laboratories (VDLs) for testing. Each VDL has its own laboratory information management system (LIMS), with processes and procedures to capture submission information, perform laboratory tests, define the boundaries of test results (i.e., positive or negative), and report results, in addition to internal business and accounting applications. Enormous quantities of data are accumulated and stored within VDL LIMSs. There is a need for platforms that allow VDLs to exchange and share portions of laboratory data using standardized, reliable, and sustainable information technology processes. Here we report concepts and applications for standardization and aggregation of data from swine submissions to multiple VDLs to detect and monitor porcine enteric coronaviruses by RT-PCR. Oral fluids, feces, and fecal swabs were the specimens submitted most frequently for enteric coronavirus testing. Statistical algorithms were used successfully to scan and monitor the overall and state-specific percentage of positive submissions. Major findings revealed a consistently recurrent seasonal pattern, with the highest percentage of positive submissions detected during December-February for porcine epidemic diarrhea virus, porcine deltacoronavirus, and transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV). After 2014, very few submissions tested positive for TGEV. Monitoring VDL data proactively has the potential to signal and alert stakeholders early of significant changes from expected detection. We demonstrate the importance of, and applications for, data organized and aggregated by using LOINC and SNOMED CTs, as well as the use of customized messaging to allow inter-VDL exchange of information.


Subject(s)
Coronaviridae Infections/veterinary , Coronaviridae/isolation & purification , Laboratories/standards , Swine Diseases/virology , Animals , COVID-19 Testing/veterinary , Coronaviridae Infections/diagnosis , Coronaviridae Infections/virology , Disease Outbreaks , Feces/virology , Reference Standards , Seasons , Swine , Swine Diseases/diagnosis
16.
Viruses ; 13(1)2020 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1025055

ABSTRACT

Bats are often claimed to be a major source for future viral epidemics, as they are associated with several viruses with zoonotic potential. Here we describe the presence and biodiversity of bats associated with intensive pig farms devoted to the production of heavy pigs in northern Italy. Since chiropters or signs of their presence were not found within animal shelters in our study area, we suggest that fecal viruses with high environmental resistance have the highest likelihood for spillover through indirect transmission. In turn, we investigated the circulation of mammalian orthoreoviruses (MRVs), coronaviruses (CoVs) and astroviruses (AstVs) in pigs and bats sharing the same environment. Results of our preliminary study did not show any bat virus in pigs suggesting that spillover from these animals is rare. However, several AstVs, CoVs and MRVs circulated undetected in pigs. Among those, one MRV was a reassortant strain carrying viral genes likely acquired from bats. On the other hand, we found a swine AstV and a MRV strain carrying swine genes in bat guano, indicating that viral exchange at the bat-pig interface might occur more frequently from pigs to bats rather than the other way around. Considering the indoor farming system as the most common system in the European Union (EU), preventive measures should focus on biosecurity rather than displacement of bats, which are protected throughout the EU and provide critical ecosystem services for rural settings.


Subject(s)
Chiroptera , Swine , Animals , Biodiversity , Chiroptera/virology , DNA Viruses/classification , DNA Viruses/genetics , Ecosystem , Phylogeny , RNA Viruses/classification , RNA Viruses/genetics , Reassortant Viruses/genetics , Swine/virology , Swine Diseases/epidemiology , Swine Diseases/transmission , Swine Diseases/virology , Virus Diseases/veterinary
17.
mBio ; 12(2)2021 03 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1160040

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses (CoVs) have caused severe diseases in humans and animals. Endocytic pathways, such as clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) and caveolae-mediated endocytosis (CavME), play an important role for CoVs to penetrate the cell membrane barrier. In this study, a novel CoV entry manner is unraveled in which clathrin and caveolae can cooperatively mediate endocytosis of porcine epidemic diarrhea coronavirus (PEDV). Using multicolor live-cell imaging, the dynamics of the fluorescently labeled clathrin structures, caveolae structures, and PEDV were dissected. During CavME of PEDV, we found that clathrin structures can fuse with caveolae near the cell plasma membrane, and the average time of PEDV penetrating the cell membrane was within ∼3 min, exhibiting a rapid course of PEDV entry. Moreover, based on the dynamic recruitment of clathrin and caveolae structures and viral motility, the direct evidence also shows that about 20% of PEDVs can undergo an abortive entry via CME and CavME. Additionally, the dynamic trafficking of PEDV from clathrin and caveolae structures to early endosomes, and from early endosomes to late endosomes, and viral fusion were directly dissected, and PEDV fusion mainly occurred in late endosomes within ∼6.8 min after the transport of PEDV to late endosomes. Collectively, this work systematically unravels the early steps of PEDV infection, which expands our understanding of the mechanism of CoV infection.IMPORTANCE Emerging and re-emerging coronaviruses cause serious human and animal epidemics worldwide. For many enveloped viruses, including coronavirus, it is evident that breaking the plasma membrane barrier is a pivotal and complex process, which contains multiple dynamic steps. Although great efforts have been made to understand the mechanisms of coronavirus endocytic pathways, the direct real-time imaging of individual porcine epidemic diarrhea coronavirus (PEDV) internalization has not been achieved yet. In this study, we not only dissected the kinetics of PEDV entry via clathrin-mediated endocytosis and caveolae-mediated endocytosis and the kinetics of endosome trafficking and viral fusion but also found a novel productive coronavirus entry manner in which clathrin and caveolae can cooperatively mediate endocytosis of PEDV. Moreover, we uncovered the existence of PEDV abortive endocytosis. In summary, the productive PEDV entry via the cooperation between clathrin and caveolae structures and the abortive endocytosis of PEDV provide new insights into coronavirus penetrating the plasma membrane barrier.


Subject(s)
Caveolae/metabolism , Clathrin/metabolism , Endocytosis/physiology , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/metabolism , Virus Internalization , Animals , Cell Line , Cell Membrane/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Infections , Swine , Swine Diseases/virology , Vero Cells
18.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 3040, 2021 02 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1107304

ABSTRACT

Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) and porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) cause an enteric disease characterized by diarrhea clinically indistinguishable. Both viruses are simultaneously detected in clinical cases, but a study involving the co-infection has not been reported. The study was therefore conducted to investigate the disease severity following a co-infection with PEDV and PDCoV. In the study, 4-day-old pigs were orally inoculated with PEDV and PDCoV, either alone or in combination. Following challenge, fecal score was monitored on a daily basis. Fecal swabs were collected and assayed for the presence of viruses. Three pigs per group were necropsied at 3 and 5 days post inoculation (dpi). Microscopic lesions and villous height to crypt depth (VH:CD) ratio, together with the presence of PEDV and PDCoV antigens, were evaluated in small intestinal tissues. Expressions of interferon alpha (IFN-α) and interleukin 12 (IL12) were investigated in small intestinal mucosa. The findings indicated that coinoculation increased the disease severity, demonstrated by significantly prolonged fecal score and virus shedding and decreasing VH:CD ratio in the jejunum compared with pigs inoculated with either PEDV or PDCoV alone. Notably, in single-inoculated groups, PEDV and PDCoV antigens were detected only in villous enterocytes wile in the coinoculated group, PDCoV antigen was detected in both villous enterocytes and crypts. IFN-α and IL12 were significantly up-regulated in coinoculated groups in comparison with single-inoculated groups. In conclusion, co-infection with PEDV and PDCoV exacerbate clinical signs and have a synergetic on the regulatory effect inflammatory cytokines compared to a single infection with either virus.


Subject(s)
Deltacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Diarrhea/genetics , Interferon-alpha/genetics , Interleukin-12/genetics , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/pathogenicity , Animals , Coinfection/genetics , Coinfection/veterinary , Coinfection/virology , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Deltacoronavirus/genetics , Deltacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Diarrhea/veterinary , Diarrhea/virology , Feces/virology , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/genetics , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Swine , Swine Diseases/genetics , Swine Diseases/virology
19.
Front Immunol ; 11: 596964, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067653

ABSTRACT

We designed the killed swine influenza A virus (SwIAV) H1N2 antigen (KAg) with polyriboinosinic:polyribocytidylic acid [(Poly(I:C)] adsorbed corn-derived Nano-11 particle based nanovaccine called Nano-11-KAg+Poly(I:C), and evaluated its immune correlates in maternally derived antibody (MDA)-positive pigs against a heterologous H1N1 SwIAV infection. Immunologically, in tracheobronchial lymph nodes (TBLN) detected enhanced H1N2-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) in Nano-11-KAg+Poly(I:C) vaccinates, and in commercial vaccinates detected CTLs with mainly IL-17A+ and early effector phenotypes specific to both H1N2 and H1N1 SwAIV. In commercial vaccinates, activated H1N2- and H1N1-specific IFNγ+&TNFα+, IL-17A+ and central memory T-helper/Memory cells, and in Nano-11-KAg+Poly(I:C) vaccinates H1N2-specific central memory, IFNγ+ and IFNγ+&TNFα+, and H1N1-specific IL-17A+ T-helper/Memory cells were observed. Systemically, Nano-11-KAg+Poly(I:C) vaccine augmented H1N2-specific IFNγ+ CTLs and H1N1-specific IFNγ+ T-helper/Memory cells, and commercial vaccine boosted H1N2- specific early effector CTLs and H1N1-specific IFNγ+&TNFα+ CTLs, as well as H1N2- and H1N1-specific T-helper/Memory cells with central memory, IFNγ+&TNFα+, and IL-17A+ phenotypes. Remarkably, commercial vaccine induced an increase in H1N1-specific T-helper cells in TBLN and naive T-helper cells in both TBLN and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), while H1N1- and H1N2-specific only T-helper cells were augmented in Nano-11-KAg+Poly(I:C) vaccinates in both TBLN and PBMCs. Furthermore, the Nano-11-KAg+Poly(I:C) vaccine stimulated robust cross-reactive IgG and secretory IgA (SIgA) responses in lungs, while the commercial vaccine elicited high levels of serum and lung IgG and serum hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titers. In conclusion, despite vast genetic difference (77% in HA gene identity) between the vaccine H1N2 and H1N1 challenge viruses in Nano-11-KAg+Poly(I:C) vaccinates, compared to over 95% identity between H1N1 of commercial vaccine and challenge viruses, the virus load and macroscopic lesions in the lungs of both types of vaccinates were comparable, but the Nano-11-KAg+Poly(I:C) vaccine cleared the virus from the nasal passage better. These data suggested the important role played by Nano-11 and Poly(I:C) in the induction of polyfunctional, cross-protective cell-mediated immunity against SwIAV in MDA-positive pigs.


Subject(s)
Influenza A virus/immunology , Influenza Vaccines/administration & dosage , Influenza Vaccines/immunology , Nanoparticles , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/veterinary , Poly I-C , Swine Diseases/prevention & control , Vaccines, Inactivated , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antigens, Viral/immunology , Cross Reactions , Cytokines/metabolism , Immunity, Cellular , Immunologic Memory , Influenza Vaccines/chemistry , Nanoparticles/chemistry , Poly I-C/chemistry , Swine , Swine Diseases/immunology , Swine Diseases/virology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/metabolism , T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic/metabolism , T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer/metabolism , Viral Load
20.
Prev Vet Med ; 188: 105281, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1051106

ABSTRACT

Pigs (Sus scrofa) may be important surveillance targets for risk assessment and risk-based control planning against emerging zoonoses. Pigs have high contact rates with humans and other animals, transmit similar pathogens as humans including CoVs, and serve as reservoirs and intermediate hosts for notable human pandemics. Wild and domestic pigs both interface with humans and each other but have unique ecologies that demand different surveillance strategies. Three fundamental questions shape any surveillance program: where, when, and how can surveillance be conducted to optimize the surveillance objective? Using theory of mechanisms of zoonotic spillover and data on risk factors, we propose a framework for determining where surveillance might begin initially to maximize a detection in each host species at their interface. We illustrate the utility of the framework using data from the United States. We then discuss variables to consider in refining when and how to conduct surveillance. Recent advances in accounting for opportunistic sampling designs and in translating serology samples into infection times provide promising directions for extracting spatio-temporal estimates of disease risk from typical surveillance data. Such robust estimates of population-level disease risk allow surveillance plans to be updated in space and time based on new information (adaptive surveillance) thus optimizing allocation of surveillance resources to maximize the quality of risk assessment insight.


Subject(s)
Communicable Diseases, Emerging/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Public Health Surveillance/methods , Swine Diseases/epidemiology , Swine Diseases/virology , Zoonoses/epidemiology , Animals , Animals, Wild/virology , Coronavirus/isolation & purification , Disease Reservoirs/virology , Humans , Sus scrofa/virology , Swine/virology , Zoonoses/transmission
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