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1.
Int J Public Health ; 68: 1605839, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20241630

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To provide a thorough assessment of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the utilization of inpatient and outpatient mental healthcare in Switzerland. Methods: Retrospective cohort study using nationwide hospital data (n > 8 million) and claims data from a large Swiss health insurer (n > 1 million) in 2018-2020. Incidence proportions of different types of psychiatric inpatient admissions, psychiatric consultations, and psychotropic medication claims were analyzed using interrupted time series models for the general population and for the vulnerable subgroup of young people. Results: Inpatient psychiatric admissions in the general population decreased by 16.2% (95% confidence interval: -19.2% to -13.2%) during the first and by 3.9% (-6.7% to -0.2%) during the second pandemic shutdown, whereas outpatient mental healthcare utilization was not substantially affected. We observed distinct patterns for young people, most strikingly, an increase in mental healthcare utilization among females aged <20 years. Conclusion: Mental healthcare provision for the majority of the population was largely maintained, but special attention should be paid to young people. Our findings highlight the importance of monitoring mental healthcare utilization among different populations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health Services , Humans , Female , Adolescent , Retrospective Studies , Switzerland/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics
2.
J Sports Sci ; 41(5): 441-450, 2023 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20240428

ABSTRACT

It is important to monitor secular trends in children's motor performance, as healthy and physically active children are more likely to become healthy and physically active adults. However, studies with regular and standardized monitoring of motor performance in childhood are scarce. Additionally, the impact of COVID-19 mitigation measures on secular trends is unknown. This study describes secular changes in balancing backwards, jumping sidewards, 20-m sprint, 20-m Shuttle Run Test (SRT) and anthropometric data in 10'953 Swiss first graders from 2014 to 2021. Multilevel mixed-effects models were used to estimate secular trends for boys vs. girls, lean vs. overweight and fit vs. unfit children. The potential influence of COVID-19 was also analysed. Balance performance decreased (2.8% per year), whereas we found improvements for jumping (1.3% per year) and BMI (-0.7% per year). 20-m SRT performance increased by 0.6% per year in unfit children. Children affected by COVID-19 measures had an increased BMI and were more overweight and obese, but motor performance was mostly higher. In our sample, secular changes in motor performance show promising tendencies from 2014 to 2021. The effects of COVID-19 mitigation measures on BMI, overweight and obesity should be monitored in additional birth cohorts and follow-up studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Overweight , Male , Adult , Female , Humans , Child , Overweight/epidemiology , Body Mass Index , Switzerland/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Obesity , Schools
3.
J Immigr Minor Health ; 25(3): 570-579, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20240021

ABSTRACT

Asylum seekers face multiple language, cultural and administrative barriers that could result in the inappropriate implementation of COVID-19 measures. This study aimed to explore their knowledge and attitudes to recommendations about COVID-19. We conducted a cross-sectional survey among asylum seekers living in the canton of Vaud, Switzerland. We used logistic regressions to analyze associations between knowledge about health recommendations, the experience of the pandemic and belief to rumors, and participant sociodemographic characteristics. In total, 242 people participated in the survey, with 63% of men (n = 150) and a median age of 30 years old (IQR 23-40). Low knowledge was associated with linguistic barriers (aOR 0.36, 95% CI 0.14-0.94, p = 0.028) and living in a community center (aOR 0.43, 95% CI 0.22-0.85, p = 0.014). Rejected asylum seekers were more likely to believe COVID-19 rumors (aOR 2.81, 95% CI 1.24-6.36, p = 0.013). This survey underlines the importance of tailoring health recommendations and interventions to reach asylum seekers, particularly those living in community centers or facing language barriers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Refugees , Adult , Humans , Male , Young Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Language , Switzerland/epidemiology , Female
5.
Int J Public Health ; 68: 1605852, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20242242

ABSTRACT

Objectives: We compared socio-demographic characteristics, health-related variables, vaccination-related beliefs and attitudes, vaccination acceptance, and personality traits of individuals who vaccinated against COVID-19 and who did not vaccinate by December 2021. Methods: This cross-sectional study used data of 10,642 adult participants from the Corona Immunitas eCohort, an age-stratified random sample of the population of several cantons in Switzerland. We used multivariable logistic regression models to explore associations of vaccination status with socio-demographic, health, and behavioral factors. Results: Non-vaccinated individuals represented 12.4% of the sample. Compared to vaccinated individuals, non-vaccinated individuals were more likely to be younger, healthier, employed, have lower income, not worried about their health, have previously tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection, express lower vaccination acceptance, and/or report higher conscientiousness. Among non-vaccinated individuals, 19.9% and 21.3% had low confidence in the safety and effectiveness of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, respectively. However, 29.1% and 26.7% of individuals with concerns about vaccine effectiveness and side effects at baseline, respectively vaccinated during the study period. Conclusion: In addition to known socio-demographic and health-related factors, non-vaccination was associated with concerns regarding vaccine safety and effectiveness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Humans , Switzerland/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cross-Sectional Studies , SARS-CoV-2
6.
BMC Geriatr ; 23(1): 303, 2023 05 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2323448

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Worldwide population is ageing, but little is known regarding risk factors associated with increased mortality in subjectively healthy, community-dwelling older adults. We present the updated results of the longest follow-up carried out on Swiss pensioners and we provide results on potential risk factors associated with mortality before the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Within the SENIORLAB study, we collected demographic data, anthropometric measures, medical history, and laboratory parameters of 1467 subjectively healthy, community-dwelling, Swiss adults aged ≥ 60 years over a median follow-up of 8.79 years. The variables considered in the multivariable Cox-proportional hazard model for mortality during follow-up were selected based on prior knowledge. Two separate models for males and females were calculated; moreover, we fitted the old model obtained in 2018 to the complete follow-up data to highlight differences and similarities. RESULTS: The population sample included 680 males and 787 females. Age of participants ranged between 60 and 99 years. We experienced 208 deaths throughout the entire follow-up period; no patients were lost at follow-up. The Cox-proportional hazard regression model included female gender, age, albumin levels, smoking status, hypertension, osteoporosis and history of cancer within predictors of mortality over the follow-up period. Consistent findings were obtained also after gender stratification. After fitting the old model, female gender, hypertension, and osteoporosis still showed statistically significant independent associations with all-cause mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Understanding the predictors of a healthy survival can improve the overall quality of life of the ageing population and simultaneously reduce their global economic burden. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The present study was registered in the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number registry: https://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN53778569 (registration date: 27/05/2015).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension , Osteoporosis , Male , Humans , Female , Aged , Independent Living , Follow-Up Studies , Quality of Life , Switzerland/epidemiology , Pandemics , Risk Factors
7.
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry ; 32(6): 937-949, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2323113

ABSTRACT

This longitudinal, prospective study investigated associations between perceived COVID-19-related stress, coping strategies, and mental health status among adolescents during the first lockdown of the COVID-19 pandemic and one year after the lockdown in Switzerland within a large, national sample. A self-report on-line survey was completed by 553 adolescents (age-range 12-18 years in 2021) in the summers of 2020 and 2021, assessing symptoms of various mental health problems, perceived COVID-19-related stressors, and coping strategies. Overall, participants reported less COVID-19 related stress one year after the lockdown, though mental health status remained stable. 'Challenges at home or with others' were significantly associated with mental health problems in both genders, whereas 'trouble getting medical care or mental health services 'was associated with mental health problems in girls. Perceived stress and pre-existing psychiatric problem were significantly linked to all mental health outcomes at both time points. Parents' poor relationships with partners during the lockdown was associated with increased anxiety symptoms in their children. Using cognitive restructuring to cope with stress was associated with less, while negative coping was associated with more anxiety, depression, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms one year post lockdown. Girls appear to have been more affected by the pandemic than boys, with youths with pre-existing psychiatric problems especially vulnerable to its detrimental effects. Healthcare and school professionals should support to identify high-risk adolescents with negative and avoidant coping strategies and train youths to use positive coping strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child , Humans , Adolescent , Female , Male , COVID-19/psychology , Pandemics , Switzerland/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Longitudinal Studies , Communicable Disease Control , Adaptation, Psychological , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Health Status
8.
PLoS Med ; 20(5): e1004226, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2321856

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Growing evidence suggests an important contribution of airborne transmission to the overall spread of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), in particular via smaller particles called aerosols. However, the contribution of school children to SARS-CoV-2 transmission remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to assess transmission of airborne respiratory infections and the association with infection control measures in schools using a multiple-measurement approach. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We collected epidemiological (cases of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)), environmental (CO2, aerosol and particle concentrations), and molecular data (bioaerosol and saliva samples) over 7 weeks from January to March 2022 (Omicron wave) in 2 secondary schools (n = 90, average 18 students/classroom) in Switzerland. We analyzed changes in environmental and molecular characteristics between different study conditions (no intervention, mask wearing, air cleaners). Analyses of environmental changes were adjusted for different ventilation, the number of students in class, school and weekday effects. We modeled disease transmission using a semi-mechanistic Bayesian hierarchical model, adjusting for absent students and community transmission. Molecular analysis of saliva (21/262 positive) and airborne samples (10/130) detected SARS-CoV-2 throughout the study (weekly average viral concentration 0.6 copies/L) and occasionally other respiratory viruses. Overall daily average CO2 levels were 1,064 ± 232 ppm (± standard deviation). Daily average aerosol number concentrations without interventions were 177 ± 109 1/cm3 and decreased by 69% (95% CrI 42% to 86%) with mask mandates and 39% (95% CrI 4% to 69%) with air cleaners. Compared to no intervention, the transmission risk was lower with mask mandates (adjusted odds ratio 0.19, 95% CrI 0.09 to 0.38) and comparable with air cleaners (1.00, 95% CrI 0.15 to 6.51). Study limitations include possible confounding by period as the number of susceptible students declined over time. Furthermore, airborne detection of pathogens document exposure but not necessarily transmission. CONCLUSIONS: Molecular detection of airborne and human SARS-CoV-2 indicated sustained transmission in schools. Mask mandates were associated with greater reductions in aerosol concentrations than air cleaners and with lower transmission. Our multiple-measurement approach could be used to continuously monitor transmission risk of respiratory infections and the effectiveness of infection control measures in schools and other congregate settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Tract Infections , Child , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Switzerland/epidemiology , Bayes Theorem , Carbon Dioxide , Respiratory Aerosols and Droplets , Schools
9.
Rev Med Suisse ; 18(805): 2249-2250, 2022 11 23.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2323397
10.
Eur Psychiatry ; 63(1): e58, 2020 05 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2317414

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The pandemic caused by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has forced governments to implement strict social mitigation strategies to reduce the morbidity and mortality from acute infections. These strategies, however, carry a significant risk for mental health, which can lead to increased short-term and long-term mortality and is currently not included in modeling the impact of the pandemic. METHODS: We used years of life lost (YLL) as the main outcome measure, applied to Switzerland as an example. We focused on suicide, depression, alcohol use disorder, childhood trauma due to domestic violence, changes in marital status, and social isolation, as these are known to increase YLL in the context of imposed restriction in social contact and freedom of movement. We stipulated a minimum duration of mitigation of 3 months based on current public health plans. RESULTS: The study projects that the average person would suffer 0.205 YLL due to psychosocial consequence of COVID-19 mitigation measures. However, this loss would be entirely borne by 2.1% of the population, who will suffer an average of 9.79 YLL. CONCLUSIONS: The results presented here are likely to underestimate the true impact of the mitigation strategies on YLL. However, they highlight the need for public health models to expand their scope in order to provide better estimates of the risks and benefits of mitigation.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Public Health/statistics & numerical data , Social Isolation/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Risk Assessment , Switzerland/epidemiology , Young Adult
11.
Swiss Med Wkly ; 153: 40068, 2023 05 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2315006

ABSTRACT

AIM OF THE STUDY: The first and second waves of the COVID-19 pandemic led to a tremendous burden of disease and influenced several policy directives, prevention and treatment strategies as well as lifestyle and social behaviours. We aimed to describe trends of hospitalisations with COVID-19 and hospital-associated outcomes in these patients during the first two pandemic waves in Switzerland. METHODS: In this nationwide retrospective cohort study, we used in-hospital claims data of patients hospitalised with COVID-19 in Switzerland between January 1st and December 31st, 2020. First, stratified by wave (first wave: January to May, second wave: June to December), we estimated incidence rates (IR) and rate differences (RD) per 10,000 person-years of COVID-19-related hospitalisations across different age groups (0-9, 10-19, 20-49, 50-69, and ≥70 years). IR was calculated by counting the number of COVID-19 hospitalisations for each patient age stratum paired with the number of persons living in Switzerland during the specific wave period. Second, adjusted odds ratios (aOR) of outcomes among COVID-19 hospitalisations were calculated to assess the association between COVID-19 wave and outcomes, adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS: Of 36,517 hospitalisations with COVID-19, 8,862 (24.3%) were identified during the first and 27,655 (75.7%) during the second wave. IR for hospitalisations with COVID-19 was highest during the second wave and among patients above 50 years (50-69 years: first wave: 31.49 per 10,000 person-years; second wave: 62.81 per 10,000 person-years; RD 31.32 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 29.56 to 33.08] per 10,000 person-years; IRR 1.99 [95% CI: 1.91 to 2.08]; ≥70 years: first wave: 88.59 per 10,000 person-years; second wave: 228.41 per 10,000 person-years; RD 139.83 [95% CI: 135.42 to 144.23] per 10,000 person-years; IRR 2.58 [95% CI: 2.49 to 2.67]). While there was no difference in hospital readmission, when compared with the first wave, patients hospitalised during the second wave had a lower probability of death (aOR 0.88 [95% CI: 0.81 to 0.95], ARDS (aOR 0.56 [95% CI: 0.51 to 0.61]), ICU admission (aOR 0.66 [95% CI: 0.61 to 0.70]), and need for ECMO (aOR 0.60 [95% CI: 0.38 to 0.92]). LOS was -16.1 % (95% CI: -17.8 to -14.2) shorter during the second wave. CONCLUSION: In this nationwide cohort study, rates of hospitalisations with COVID-19 were highest among adults older than 50 years and during the second wave. Except for hospital readmission, the likelihood of adverse outcomes was lower during the second pandemic wave, which may be explained by advances in the understanding of the disease and improved treatment options.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Humans , Aged , Switzerland/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Cost of Illness
12.
Int J Infect Dis ; 133: 18-26, 2023 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2311795

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The correlate(s) of protection against SARS-CoV-2 remain incompletely defined. Additional information regarding the combinations of antibody and T cell-mediated immunity which can protect against (re)infection is needed. METHODS: We conducted a population-based, longitudinal cohort study including 1044 individuals of varying SARS-CoV-2 vaccination and infection statuses. We assessed spike (S)- and nucleocapsid (N)-immunoglobulin(Ig)G and wildtype, Delta, and Omicron-neutralizing antibody (N-Ab) activity. In a subset of 328 individuals, we evaluated S, membrane (M), and N-specific T cells. Three months later, we reassessed Ab (n = 964) and T cell (n = 141) responses and evaluated factors associated with protection from (re)infection. RESULTS: At the study start, >98% of participants were S-IgG seropositive. N-IgG and M/N-T-cell responses increased over time, indicating viral (re)exposure, despite existing S-IgG. Compared to N-IgG, M/N-T cells were a more sensitive measure of viral exposure. High N-IgG titers, Omicron-N-Ab activity, and S-specific-T-cell responses were all associated with a reduced likelihood of (re)infection over time. CONCLUSION: Population-level SARS-CoV-2 immunity is S-IgG-dominated, but heterogeneous. M/N-T-cell responses can distinguish previous infection from vaccination, and monitoring a combination of N-IgG, Omicron-N-Ab, and S-T-cell responses may help estimate protection against SARS-CoV-2 (re)infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , T-Lymphocytes , Humans , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Switzerland/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Longitudinal Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Immunity, Cellular , Reinfection , Immunoglobulin G , Antibodies, Viral
13.
Cell Stress Chaperones ; 28(3): 231-237, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2294575

ABSTRACT

Hsp90 is a molecular chaperone responsible for regulating proteostasis under physiological and pathological conditions. Its central role in a range of diseases and potential as a drug target has focused efforts to understand its mechanisms and biological functions and to identify modulators that may form the basis for therapies. The 10th international conference on the Hsp90 chaperone machine was held in Switzerland in October 2022. The meeting was organized by Didier Picard (Geneva, Switzerland) and Johannes Buchner (Garching, Germany) with an advisory committee of Olivier Genest, Mehdi Mollapour, Ritwick Sawarkar, and Patricija van Oosten-Hawle. This was a much anticipated first in-person meeting of the Hsp90 community since 2018 after the COVID-19 pandemic led to the postponement of the 2020 meeting. The conference remained true to the tradition of sharing novel data ahead of publication, providing unparalleled depth of insight for both experts and newcomers to the field.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Switzerland , Protein Binding , Molecular Chaperones/metabolism , HSP90 Heat-Shock Proteins/metabolism
14.
Mult Scler Relat Disord ; 74: 104707, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2304155

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Despite strong recommendations for coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) vaccination by multiple sclerosis (MS) organizations, some persons with MS (pwMS) remain vaccine hesitant. The Swiss MS Registry conducted a survey to explore Covid-19 vaccine hesitancy, self-reported side effects and changes in MS symptoms following vaccination in adult pwMS. METHODS: Self-reported data were analyzed cross-sectionally. Multivariable logistic regression was used to explore participant characteristics associated with Covid-19 vaccine hesitancy. RESULTS: Of 849 respondents, 73 (8.6%) were unvaccinated. Hesitation to vaccinate was most often a personal preference (N = 42, 57.53%). Factors negatively associated with vaccine hesitancy included older age (OR = 0.97 per year, 95% CI [0.94, 0.99]) and regularly seeing healthcare professionals (OR = 0.25, 95% CI [0.07, 0.85]). A history of confirmed Covid-19 infection (OR = 3.38, 95% CI [1.69, 6.77]) and being underweight (OR = 4.50, 95% CI [1.52, 13.36]) were positively associated with vaccine hesitancy. Of 768 participants who provided information, 320 (41.2%) and 351 (45.2%) reported vaccination side effects after the first and second vaccinations, respectively. Changes in MS symptoms were reported by 49 (6.3%) participants after the first and 67 (9.0%) participants after the second vaccination, and were most often described as increased or new-onset fatigue (N = 17/49 (34.7%) after the first and N = 21/67 (31.3%) after the second dose). CONCLUSIONS: Covid-19 vaccine hesitancy was low among surveyed pwMS. The risk of vaccine hesitancy was higher among younger pwMS, those with a history of Covid-19 infection, and those without regular contact with healthcare professionals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions , Multiple Sclerosis , Adult , Humans , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Cross-Sectional Studies , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Switzerland/epidemiology , Vaccination/adverse effects , Registries
15.
Public Health ; 219: 53-60, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2296441

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This paper about social media platforms of Swiss hospitals refers to the period between 10 February 2020 and 6 July 2020. The study included in-depth insights into the use of platforms, content analyses of posts and resonance of the posts. The study's objective was to get insights into social media post creation by and corresponding resonance in pandemic crisis. STUDY DESIGN: This study included collection and analyses of posts created by a selection of Swiss hospitals during the period of study. All university hospitals and a variety of private and regional hospitals in all regions of Switzerland are represented. The data collection started before the official shutdown in Switzerland. METHODS: This study used mixed method approach and content analysis to evaluate 2,326 posts during the study period related to the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: During the first phase of the pandemic, hospitals used social media platforms more frequently than normal. Especially in the first month, the number of posts rose disproportionally. The numbers dropped back to the initial situation after only 4 months into the COVID-19 pandemic. Most hospitals used Facebook and Twitter, whereas Instagram and YouTube's use were marginal. University hospitals used social media platforms differently than regional hospitals. CONCLUSION: Most posts generated only a very low response with a median of 2. Hospitals were therefore not able to create engagement of their followers. However, hospitals that publish actively were able to build a more active community. Only a small number of posts led to heated discussions in the comments. These viral posts shared information on the illness, the vaccination, children and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , Child , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Switzerland/epidemiology , Hospitals, University
16.
J Immigr Minor Health ; 25(4): 953-957, 2023 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2300392

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic highlighted health inequities for vulnerable populations and the need for more equitable care and access to vaccination. This article described the implementation of a COVID-19 vaccination program for undocumented migrants in a regional academic center of general medicine and public health (Unisanté). The vaccination program's specific components included: triple coordination between the health authorities, the regional center and community partners, a walk-in and free service, no health insurance required, qualified nursing and administrative staff with previous experience with vulnerable populations, translated information materials and interpreters, a guarantee of confidentiality and a widespread communication campaign within the communities. In total, 2'351 undocumented migrants from 97 nationalities received at least one dose of mRNA COVID-19 vaccine (Spikevax) and 2242 were considered fully vaccinated. Although it was hard to assess its global effectiveness, the program vaccinated a significant number of undocumented adult migrants in the Canton of Vaud. The difficulties linked to the pandemic context, the heavy workload for healthcare staff and the limited resources were overcome by strong collaborations between the different actors involved throughout the program. Targeted public health policies, such as vaccination programs for undocumented migrants, are essential to guarantee equitable care, especially in pandemic times.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Transients and Migrants , Adult , Humans , Health Services Accessibility , COVID-19 Vaccines , Public Health , Switzerland , Pandemics , COVID-19/prevention & control
17.
Sci Rep ; 13(1): 6013, 2023 04 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2299634

ABSTRACT

Two successive COVID-19 flares occurred in Switzerland in spring and autumn 2020. During these periods, therapeutic strategies have been constantly adapted based on emerging evidence. We aimed to describe these adaptations and evaluate their association with patient outcomes in a cohort of COVID-19 patients admitted to the hospital. Consecutive patients admitted to the Geneva Hospitals during two successive COVID-19 flares were included. Characteristics of patients admitted during these two periods were compared as well as therapeutic management including medications, respiratory support strategies and admission to the ICU and intermediate care unit (IMCU). A mutivariable model was computed to compare outcomes across the two successive waves adjusted for demographic characteristics, co-morbidities and severity at baseline. The main outcome was in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes included ICU admission, Intermediate care (IMCU) admission, and length of hospital stay. A total of 2'983 patients were included. Of these, 165 patients (16.3%, n = 1014) died during the first wave and 314 (16.0%, n = 1969) during the second (p = 0.819). The proportion of patients admitted to the ICU was lower in second wave compared to first (7.4 vs. 13.9%, p < 0.001) but their mortality was increased (33.6% vs. 25.5%, p < 0.001). Conversely, a greater proportion of patients was admitted to the IMCU in second wave compared to first (26.6% vs. 22.3%, p = 0.011). A third of patients received lopinavir (30.7%) or hydroxychloroquine (33.1%) during the first wave and none during second wave, while corticosteroids were mainly prescribed during second wave (58.1% vs. 9.1%, p < 0.001). In the multivariable analysis, a 25% reduction of mortality was observed during the second wave (HR 0.75; 95% confidence interval 0.59 to 0.96). Among deceased patients, 82.3% (78.2% during first wave and 84.4% during second wave) died without beeing admitted to the ICU. The proportion of patients with therapeutic limitations regarding ICU admission increased during the second wave (48.6% vs. 38.7%, p < 0.001). Adaptation of therapeutic strategies including corticosteroids therapy and higher admission to the IMCU to receive non-invasive respiratory support was associated with a reduction of hospital mortality in multivariable analysis, ICU admission and LOS during the second wave of COVID-19 despite an increased number of admitted patients. More patients had medical decisions restraining ICU admission during the second wave which may reflect better patient selection or implicit triaging.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Tertiary Care Centers , Switzerland/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Length of Stay , Intensive Care Units , Hospital Mortality , Retrospective Studies
18.
Inn Med (Heidelb) ; 64(Suppl 2): 135-143, 2023 Jun.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2298670

ABSTRACT

"The limits of internal medicine" was the congress motto of the 128th Congress of the German Society of Internal Medicine in Wiesbaden in 2022. In his presidential address Prof. Lerch focused on four aspects of this motto: physician-assisted suicide, lessons from the corona pandemic, deficits in the digitalization of the German healthcare system and the German Sonderweg in applying EU regulations for patient data protection. Using data from Canada, Switzerland and the Netherlands, where different forms of physician-assisted suicide are practiced, Prof. Lerch appealed to internists, specifically in family practices, to confront this issue in view of a German Supreme Court ruling. With respect to the development of the corona pandemic he discussed the root causes of the opposition to vaccination in parts of society as well as the question why non-clinically active and only few clinical disciplines have shaped the discussion about corona protection measures in Germany. Another focus of his speech was the insufficient digital maturity of the German healthcare system, which clearly lags behind other countries with respect to digital transformation. Physicians need to become more involved in the digital transformation in order to reorganize the healthcare system for the benefit of the patients. The German Sonderweg in the application of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) requires a new legal framework to enable a pragmatic and progressive use of patient data for medical research and patient safety.


Subject(s)
Physicians , Suicide, Assisted , Male , Humans , Germany , Palliative Care , Switzerland
19.
Swiss Med Wkly ; 151: w20508, 2021 05 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2272094

ABSTRACT

AIMS OF THE STUDY: The COVID-19 pandemic is likely to overlap with the seasonal influenza epidemic, increasing the risk of overextending the health system capacity in Switzerland. Influenza vaccine uptake has remained low in most countries, including Switzerland. The aim of the study was to determine parents’ intentions towards influenza vaccination of their children, as well as themselves, and to assess regional differences. METHODS: Parents presenting to four paediatric emergency departments (Zurich, Bern, Bellinzona, Geneva) were asked to complete an online survey during and after the first lockdown of the COVID-19 pandemic (April to June 2020). The anonymised survey included demographic information, vaccination history and intentions to vaccinate against influenza, as well as attitudes towards future vaccination against COVID-19. RESULTS: The majority of children (92%; 602/654) were up-to-date on their vaccination schedule. In 2019/2020, 7.2% (47/654) were vaccinated against influenza. Children with chronic illnesses were more frequently vaccinated than healthy children (19.2% vs 5.6%; p = 0.002). For the coming winter season, 111 (17%) parents stated they plan to vaccinate their children against influenza, more than double the rate from last year, and 383 (59.2%) parents suggested they will vaccinate against COVID-19 once a vaccine is available. Regional differences between “German” and “Latin” Switzerland were found for parents’ intent to have their children vaccinated against influenza next season (Zurich and Bern 14.3%, Bellinzona and Geneva 27.2%, p <0.001), but not for a hypothetical vaccination against COVID-19 (Zurich and Bern 59.1%, Bellinzona and Geneva 59.7%, p = 0.894). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in a substantial increase of parents’ intention to vaccinate their children against influenza, especially in hard-hit “Latin” Switzerland. The Swiss government and public health organisations can leverage these regional results to promote influenza vaccination among children for the coming seasons.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Influenza Vaccines/therapeutic use , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Parents/psychology , Vaccination/psychology , Adult , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Child , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Intention , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Seasons , Switzerland
20.
Swiss Med Wkly ; 151: w20482, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2271326

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Data about patients in Europe with corona virus disease-2019 (COVID-19) and acute kidney injury (AKI) are scarce. We examined characteristics, presentation and risk factors of AKI in patients hospitalised with COVID-19 in a tertiary hospital in Switzerland. METHODS: We reviewed health records of patients hospitalised with a positive nasopharyngeal polymerase chain reaction test for SARS-CoV2 between 1 February and 30 June 2020, at the University Hospital of Basel. The nadir creatinine of the hospitalisation was used as baseline. AKI was defined according the KDIGO guidelines as a 1.5× increase of baseline creatinine and in-hospital renal recovery as a discharge creatinine <1.25× baseline creatinine. Least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) regression was performed to select predictive variables of AKI. Based on this a final model was chosen. RESULTS: Of 188 patients with COVID-19, 41 (22%) developed AKI, and 11 (6%) required renal replacement therapy. AKI developed after a median of 9 days (interquartile range [IQR] 5-12) after the first symptoms and a median of 1 day (IQR 0-5) after hospital admission. The peak AKI stages were stage 1 in 39%, stage 2 in 24% and stage 3 in 37%. A total of 29 (15%) patients were admitted to the intensive care unit and of these 23 (79%) developed AKI. In-hospital renal recovery at discharge was observed in 61% of all AKI episodes. In-hospital mortality was 27% in patients with AKI and 10% in patients without AKI. Age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.04, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01­1.08; p = 0.024), history of chronic kidney disease (aOR 3.47, 95% CI 1.16­10.49;p = 0.026), C-reactive protein levels (aOR 1.09, 95% CI 1.03­1.06; p = 0.002) and creatinine kinase (aOR 1.03, 95% CI 1.01­1.06; p = 0.002) were associated with development of AKI. CONCLUSIONS: AKI is common in hospitalised patients with COVID-19 and more often seen in patients with severe COVID-19 illness. AKI is associated with a high in-hospital mortality.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/mortality , Acute Kidney Injury/pathology , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , Comorbidity , Creatinine/blood , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Sex Factors , Socioeconomic Factors , Switzerland , Tertiary Care Centers , Time Factors
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