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2.
Swiss Med Wkly ; 152: w30229, 2022 09 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2202464

ABSTRACT

AIMS OF THE STUDY: To estimate the prevalence of occupational burnout among the Swiss working population. METHODS: We interrogated three international databases (Medline (PubMed), EMBASE, and PsycINFO) and the databases of 15 Swiss universities to identify studies reporting the prevalence of occupational burnout in Swiss workers over the last 10 years, before the COVID-19 pandemic. Data were summarised descriptively and quantitatively using random-effects meta-analysis. We investigated between-study heterogeneity by stratifying results according to the type of burnout measurement tool, by occupation and by cut-off values. Three outcomes were considered: clinical/severe burnout, overall burnout and emotional exhaustion. RESULTS: We identified 23 studies about workers in Switzerland and estimated the prevalence of clinical or severe burnout at 4% (95% confidence interval [CI] 2-6%). The average prevalence estimates for overall burnout and emotional exhaustion were similar at 18% (95% CI 12-25%) and 18% (95% CI 15-22%), respectively. When stratified by occupation, the clinical or severe burnout rates were higher among the healthcare workers than the general working population. CONCLUSIONS: These estimates of prepandemic (baseline) prevalence of occupational burnout are comparable with those available in the other countries where it is recognised and treated as a disease. They may prove useful in planning and assessing the effectiveness of interventions for prevention of occupational burnout and in minimising its negative consequences on individuals and on societies during and after the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Prevalence , Switzerland/epidemiology
3.
Swiss Med Wkly ; 152: w30202, 2022 06 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2202460

ABSTRACT

AIMS OF THE STUDY: Wastewater-based epidemiology has contributed significantly to the comprehension of the dynamics of the current COVID-19 pandemic. Its additional value in monitoring SARS-CoV-2 circulation in the population and identifying newly arising variants independently of diagnostic testing is now undisputed. As a proof of concept, we report here correlations between SARS-CoV-2 detection in wastewater and the officially recorded COVID-19 case numbers, as well as the validity of such surveillance to detect emerging variants, exemplified by the detection of the B.1.1.529 variant Omicron in Basel, Switzerland. METHODS: From July 1 to December 31, 2021, wastewater samples were collected six times a week from the inflow of the local wastewater treatment plant that receives wastewater from the catchment area of the city of Basel, Switzerland, comprising 273,075 inhabitants. The number of SARS-CoV-2 RNA copies was determined by reverse transcriptase-quantitative PCR. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients were calculated to determine correlations with the median seven-day incidence of genome copies per litre of wastewater and official case data. To explore delayed correlation effects between the seven-day median number of genome copies/litre wastewater and the median seven-day incidence of SARS-CoV-2 cases, time-lagged Spearman's rank correlation coefficients were calculated for up to 14 days. RNA extracts from daily wastewater samples were used to genotype circulating SARS-CoV-2 variants by next-generation sequencing. RESULTS: The number of daily cases and the median seven-day incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infections in the catchment area showed a high correlation with SARS-CoV-2 measurements in wastewater samples. All correlations between the seven-day median number of genome copies/litre wastewater and the time-lagged median seven-day incidence of SARS-CoV-2 cases were significant (p<0.001) for the investigated lag of up to 14 days. Correlation coefficients declined constantly from the maximum of 0.9395 on day 1 to the minimum of 0.8016 on day 14. The B.1.1.529 variant Omicron was detected in wastewater samples collected on November 21, 2021, before its official acknowledgement in a clinical sample by health authorities. CONCLUSIONS: In this proof-of-concept study, wastewater-based epidemiology proved a reliable and sensitive surveillance approach, complementing routine clinical testing for mapping COVID-19 pandemic dynamics and observing newly circulating SARS-CoV-2 variants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Switzerland/epidemiology , Waste Water/analysis
4.
Int J Public Health ; 67: 1604969, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2199635

ABSTRACT

Objectives: With the application of a systems thinking lens, we aimed to assess the national COVID-19 response across health systems components in Switzerland, Spain, Iran, and Pakistan. Methods: We conducted four case studies on the policy response of national health systems to the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. Selected countries include different health system typologies. We collected data prospectively for the period of January-July 2020 on 17 measures of the COVID-19 response recommended by the WHO that encompassed all health systems domains (governance, financing, health workforce, information, medicine and technology and service delivery). We further monitored contextual factors influencing their adoption or deployment. Results: The policies enacted coincided with a decrease in the COVID-19 transmission. However, there was inadequate communication and a perception that the measures were adverse to the economy, weakening political support for their continuation and leading to a rapid resurgence in transmission. Conclusion: Social pressure, religious beliefs, governance structure and level of administrative decentralization or global economic sanctions played a major role in how countries' health systems could respond to the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Policy , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Pakistan/epidemiology , Pandemics , Spain , Switzerland/epidemiology
6.
J Headache Pain ; 23(1): 142, 2022 Nov 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2153502

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The fully human monoclonal antibody erenumab, which targets the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor, was licensed in Switzerland in July 2018 for the prophylactic treatment of migraine. To complement findings from the pivotal program, this observational study was designed to collect and evaluate clinical data on the impact of erenumab on several endpoints, such as quality of life, migraine-related impairment and treatment satisfaction in a real-world setting. METHODS: An interim analysis was conducted after all patients completed 6 months of erenumab treatment. Patients kept a headache diary and completed questionnaires at follow up visits. The overall study duration comprises 24 months. RESULTS: In total, 172 adults with chronic or episodic migraine from 19 different sites across Switzerland were enrolled to receive erenumab every 4 weeks. At baseline, patients had 16.6 ± 7.2 monthly migraine days (MMD) and 11.6 ± 7.0 acute migraine-specific medication days per month. After 6 months, erenumab treatment reduced Headache Impact Test (HIT-6™) scores by 7.7 ± 8.4 (p < 0.001), the modified Migraine Disability Assessment (mMIDAS) by 14.1 ± 17.8 (p < 0.001), MMD by 7.6 ± 7.0 (p < 0.001) and acute migraine-specific medication days per month by 6.6 ± 5.4 (p < 0.001). Erenumab also reduced the impact of migraine on social and family life, as evidenced by a reduction of Impact of Migraine on Partners and Adolescent Children (IMPAC) scores by 6.1 ± 6.7 (p < 0.001). Patients reported a mean effectiveness of 67.1, convenience of 82.4 and global satisfaction of 72.4 in the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication (TSQM-9). In total, 99 adverse events (AE) and 12 serious adverse events (SAE) were observed in 62 and 11 patients, respectively. All SAE were regarded as not related to the study medication. CONCLUSIONS: Overall quality of life improved and treatment satisfaction was rated high with erenumab treatment in real-world clinical practice. In addition, the reported impact of migraine on spouses and children of patients was reduced. TRIAL REGISTRATION: BASEC ID 2018-02,375 in the Register of All Projects in Switzerland (RAPS).


Subject(s)
Migraine Disorders , Quality of Life , Humans , Adult , Adolescent , Child , Switzerland , Migraine Disorders/drug therapy , Migraine Disorders/prevention & control , Receptors, Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide , Headache , Delivery of Health Care
7.
Global Health ; 18(1): 55, 2022 05 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1866379

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Resilience has become relevant than ever before with the advent of increasing and intensifying shocks on the health system and its amplified effects due to globalization. Using the example of non-state actors based in Switzerland, the aim of this study is to explore how and to what extent NGOs with an interest in global health have dealt with unexpected shocks on the health systems of their partner countries and to reflect on the practical implications of resilience for the multiple actors involved. Consequently, this paper analyses the key attributes of resilience that targeted investments may influence, and the different roles key stakeholders may assume to build resilience. METHODS: This is a descriptive and exploratory qualitative study analysing the perspectives on health system resilience of Swiss-based NGOs through 20 in-depth interviews. Analysis proceeded using a data-driven thematic analysis closely following the framework method. An analytical framework was developed and applied systematically resulting in a complete framework matrix. The results are categorised into the expected role of the governments, the role of the NGOs, and practical future steps for building health system resilience. RESULTS: The following four key 'foundations of resilience' were found to be dominant for unleashing greater resilience attributes regardless of the nature of shocks: 'realigned relationships,' 'foresight,' 'motivation,' and 'emergency preparedness.' The attribute to 'integrate' was shown to be one of the most crucial characteristics of resilience expected of the national governments from the NGOs, which points to the heightened role of governance. Meanwhile, as a key stakeholder group that is becoming inevitably more powerful in international development cooperation and global health governance, non-state actors namely the NGOs saw themselves in a unique position to facilitate knowledge exchange and to support long-term adaptations of innovative solutions that are increasing in demand. The strongest determinant of resilience in the health system was the degree of investments made for building long-term infrastructures and human resource development which are well-functioning prior to any potential crisis. CONCLUSIONS: Health system resilience is a collective endeavour and a result of many stakeholders' consistent and targeted investments. These investments open up new opportunities to seek innovative solutions and to keep diverse actors in global health accountable. The experiences and perspectives of Swiss NGOs in this article highlight the vital role NGOs may play in building resilient health systems in their partner countries. Specifically, strong governance, a bi-directional knowledge exchange, and the focus on leveraging science for impact can draw greater potential of resilience in the health systems. Governments and the NGOs have unique points of contribution in this journey towards resilience and bear the responsibility to support governments to prioritise investing in the key 'foundations of resilience' in order to activate greater attributes of resilience. Resilience building will not only prepare countries for future shocks but bridge the disparate health and development agenda in order to better address the nexus between humanitarian aid and development cooperation.


Subject(s)
Government Programs , Medical Assistance , Global Health , Humans , International Cooperation , Switzerland
8.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(4): e26330, 2021 04 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2141310

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 led to the COVID-19 pandemic starting in January 2020. The Swiss Federal Council prescribed a lockdown of nonessential businesses. Students and employees of higher education institutions had to install home offices and participate in online lectures. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this survey study was to evaluate lifestyle habits, such as physical activity (PA), sitting time, nutritional habits (expressed as median modified Mediterranean Diet Score [mMDS]), alcohol consumption habits, and sleeping behavior during a 2-month period of confinement and social distancing due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Survey participants were students and employees of a Swiss university of applied sciences. METHODS: All students and employees from Bern University of Applied Sciences, Department of Health Professions (ie, nursing, nutrition and dietetics, midwifery, and physiotherapy divisions) were invited to complete an anonymous online survey during the COVID-19 confinement period. Information on the lifestyle dimensions of PA, sitting time, nutritional and alcohol consumption habits, and sleep behavior was gathered using adaptations of validated questionnaires. Frequency analyses and nonparametric statistical methods were used for data analysis. Significance was set at 5% α level of error. RESULTS: Prevalence of non-health-enhancing PA was 37.1%, with participants of the division of physiotherapy showing the lowest prevalence. Prevalence of long sitting time (>8 hours/day) was 36.1%. The median mMDS was 9, where the maximal score was 15, with participants of the division of nutrition and dietetics being more adherent to a Mediterranean diet as compared to the other groups. Prevalence of nonadherence to the Swiss alcohol consumption recommendations was 8.3%. Prevalence of low sleeping quality was 44.7%, while the median sleeping duration was 8 hours, which is considered healthy for adult populations. CONCLUSIONS: In the group analysis, differences in PA, sitting time, and mMDS were observed between different divisions of health professions as well as between Bachelor of Science students, Master of Science students, and employees. Therefore, public health messages regarding healthy lifestyle habits during home confinement should be more group specific. The results of this study may provide support for the implementation of group-specific health promotion interventions at universities in pandemic conditions. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04502108; https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04502108.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Exercise/psychology , Faculty/psychology , Feeding Behavior , Quarantine , Sleep , Students/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Faculty/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Students/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Switzerland/epidemiology , Universities , Young Adult
9.
Rev Med Suisse ; 18(803): 2096-2100, 2022 Nov 09.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2146917

ABSTRACT

Repetitive screening in enterprises was one of the measures recommended in Switzerland in the fight against COVID-19. In the canton of Vaud, 70 companies participated in the program, 73 % of which were small and medium-sized enterprises. The SARS-CoV-2 positivity rate was 0.07 % out of 70'105 tests performed. The impossibility of teleworking and the reduction of transmission were the main motivations for joining the program. The facilitating elements were the availability of the Cantonal Medical Office, the existence of a starter kit and the support of the hierarchy within the companies. The main obstacles were the arrival of vaccination, the multiplicity of screening providers and the workload. The program was a pragmatic action tool for companies rather than a population-based strategy.


Le dépistage en entreprise était une des mesures de lutte contre l'épidémie de Covid-19 promues par la Confédération. Dans le canton de Vaud, 70 entreprises ont participé au programme, dont 73 % de petites et moyennes entreprises. Le taux de positivité au SARS-CoV-2 a été de 0,07 % sur 70 105 tests réalisés. L'impossibilité du télétravail et la réduction de la transmission ont été les principales motivations d'adhésion. Les éléments facilitateurs ont été la disponibilité de l'Office du médecin cantonal, l'existence d'un starter kit et le soutien de la hiérarchie au sein des entreprises. Les freins principaux ont été l'arrivée de la vaccination, la multiplicité des prestataires de dépistage et la charge de travail. Le programme a représenté un outil d'action pragmatique pour les entreprises plutôt qu'une stratégie à visée populationnelle.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Workplace , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Mass Screening , Vaccination , Switzerland/epidemiology
10.
Sci Data ; 9(1): 707, 2022 11 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119212

ABSTRACT

Here we present the design and results of an analytical pipeline for COVID-19 data for Switzerland. It is applied to openly available data from the beginning of the epidemic in 2020 to the present day (august 2022). We analyzed the spatio-temporal patterns of the spread of SARS-CoV2 throughout the country, applying Bayesian inference to estimate population prevalence and hospitalization ratio. We also developed forecasting models to characterize the transmission dynamics for all the country's cantons taking into account their spatial correlations in COVID incidence. The two-week forecasts of new daily hospitalizations showed good accuracy, as reported herein. These analyses' raw data and live results are available on the open-source EpiGraphHub platform to support further studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Switzerland/epidemiology , Bayes Theorem , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 19538, 2022 Nov 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2118473

ABSTRACT

In February 2021, in response to emergence of more transmissible SARS-CoV-2 virus variants, the Canton Grisons launched a unique RNA mass testing program targeting the labour force in local businesses. Employees were offered weekly tests free of charge and on a voluntary basis. If tested positive, they were required to self-isolate for ten days and their contacts were subjected to daily testing at work. Thereby, the quarantine of contact persons could be waved.Here, we evaluate the effects of the testing program on the tested cohorts. We examined 121,364 test results from 27,514 participants during February-March 2021. By distinguishing different cohorts of employees, we observe a noticeable decrease in the test positivity rate and a statistically significant reduction in the associated incidence rate over the considered period. The reduction in the latter ranges between 18 and 50%. The variability is partly explained by different exposures to exogenous infection sources (e.g., contacts with visiting tourists or cross-border commuters). Our analysis provides the first empirical evidence that applying repetitive mass testing to a real population over an extended period of time can prevent spread of COVID-19 pandemic. However, to overcome logistic, uptake, and adherence challenges it is important that the program is carefully designed and that disease incursion from the population outside of the program is considered and controlled.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Incidence , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Switzerland/epidemiology
12.
PLoS Med ; 19(11): e1004125, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2109279

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Knowledge about protection conferred by previous Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and/or vaccination against emerging viral variants allows clinicians, epidemiologists, and health authorities to predict and reduce the future Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) burden. We investigated the risk and symptoms of SARS-CoV-2 (re)infection and vaccine breakthrough infection during the Delta and Omicron waves, depending on baseline immune status and subsequent vaccinations. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In this prospective, multicentre cohort performed between August 2020 and March 2022, we recruited hospital employees from ten acute/nonacute healthcare networks in Eastern/Northern Switzerland. We determined immune status in September 2021 based on serology and previous SARS-CoV-2 infections/vaccinations: Group N (no immunity); Group V (twice vaccinated, uninfected); Group I (infected, unvaccinated); Group H (hybrid: infected and ≥1 vaccination). Date and symptoms of (re)infections and subsequent (booster) vaccinations were recorded until March 2022. We compared the time to positive SARS-CoV-2 swab and number of symptoms according to immune status, viral variant (i.e., Delta-dominant before December 27, 2021; Omicron-dominant on/after this date), and subsequent vaccinations, adjusting for exposure/behavior variables. Among 2,595 participants (median follow-up 171 days), we observed 764 (29%) (re)infections, thereof 591 during the Omicron period. Compared to group N, the hazard ratio (HR) for (re)infection was 0.33 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.22 to 0.50, p < 0.001) for V, 0.25 (95% CI 0.11 to 0.57, p = 0.001) for I, and 0.04 (95% CI 0.02 to 0.10, p < 0.001) for H in the Delta period. HRs substantially increased during the Omicron period for all groups; in multivariable analyses, only belonging to group H was associated with protection (adjusted HR [aHR] 0.52, 95% CI 0.35 to 0.77, p = 0.001); booster vaccination was associated with reduction of breakthrough infection risk in groups V (aHR 0.68, 95% CI 0.54 to 0.85, p = 0.001) and H (aHR 0.67, 95% CI 0.45 to 1.00, p = 0.048), largely observed in the early Omicron period. Group H (versus N, risk ratio (RR) 0.80, 95% CI 0.66 to 0.97, p = 0.021) and participants with booster vaccination (versus nonboosted, RR 0.79, 95% CI 0.71 to 0.88, p < 0.001) reported less symptoms during infection. Important limitations are that SARS-CoV-2 swab results were self-reported and that results on viral variants were inferred from the predominating strain circulating in the community at that time, rather than sequencing. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that hybrid immunity and booster vaccination are associated with a reduced risk and reduced symptom number of SARS-CoV-2 infection during Delta- and Omicron-dominant periods. For previously noninfected individuals, booster vaccination might reduce the risk of symptomatic Omicron infection, although this benefit seems to wane over time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Viral Vaccines , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Prospective Studies , Switzerland/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/methods
13.
Epilepsia ; 63 Suppl 2: 4-272, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097749
14.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 18448, 2022 Nov 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096791

ABSTRACT

The aim of our study was to evaluate the mental health of pregnant individuals during the early COVID-19 pandemic and the potential factors associated. A Swiss online survey was proposed to individuals who gave birth during the pandemic period from March 2020. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7 questions (GAD-7), and Impact Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) were evaluated and used to defined mental health impairment as a composite outcome. From October, 2020 to February, 2021, 736 participants responded. The anxiety GAD-7 score was moderate in 9.6% and severe in 2.0%. The EPDS was moderate in 21.5% and severe in 32.9%. The IES-R was moderate in 10.3% and severe in 3.9%. Mental health impairment was reported in 37.0%. The association between the risk of mental health impairment and foreign nationality was significant (OR = 1.48; 95%CI [1.06-2.05]) as well as fetal and pregnancy worries because of coronavirus (OR = 1.46; 95% CI [1.08-1.98]) and 1.65; 95% CI [1.22-2.24]). Adjusted ORs were significant for foreign nationality (aOR = 1.51; 95%CI [1.07-2.13]) and pregnancy worries because of coronavirus (aOR = 1.62; 95%CI [1.10-2.40]). Pregnant people and especially foreign national have a high risk of mental health impairment during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Female , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mental Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Ethnicity , Switzerland/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology
15.
Int J Public Health ; 67: 1604717, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089973

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To describe COVID-19 information-seeking behavior (CISB) during the first stage of the pandemic in Switzerland and identify its determinants. Methods: We conducted an online cross-sectional survey (4 May to 6 July 2020). Participants self-reported their CISB (information sources and frequency), personal COVID-19 situation (e.g., perception about having had COVID-19), sociodemographic information, and completed validated measures of health literacy, and worry and anxiety. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and logistic regressions. Results: We included 1,505 participants (24.7% male; mean age = 43.0 years, SD = 13.9). Most participants reported searching for information daily (n = 1,023, 68.0%) and referring to multiple information sources (mean 3.7, SD = 1.5). Commonly used sources were official websites (n = 1,129, 75.0%) and newspapers (n = 997, 66.2%). Participants with higher health literacy were more likely to seek information daily and use online resources, but less likely to use personal networks than those with lower health literacy. We did not find any association between CISB and worry and anxiety. Conclusion: More opportunities for personal dialogue and education about reliable online information resources should be encouraged to optimize the CISB of groups with lower health literacy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Literacy , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Information Seeking Behavior , Male , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Switzerland/epidemiology
16.
Int J Prison Health ; ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print)2022 10 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2087989

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Prisons can be epicentres of infectious diseases. However, empirical evidence on the impact of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic in prison is still scarce. This study aims to estimate the seroprevalence rates of anti-SARS-CoV-2 in the largest and most crowded Swiss prison and compare them with the seroprevalence rate in the general population. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: A cross-sectional study was conducted in June 2020, one month after the first wave of SARS-CoV-2 in Switzerland. Groups included: people living in detention (PLDs) detained before the beginning of the pandemic (n = 116), PLDs incarcerated after the beginning of the pandemic (n = 61), prison staff and prison healthcare workers (n = 227) and a sample from the general population in the same time period (n = 3,404). The authors assessed anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies. FINDINGS: PLDs who were incarcerated before the beginning of the pandemic had a significantly lower seroprevalence rate [0.9%, confidence interval (CI)95%: 0.1%-5.9%] compared to the general population (6.3%, CI 95%: 5.6-7.3%) (p = 0.041). The differences between PLDs who were incarcerated before and other groups were marginally significant (PLDs incarcerated after the beginning of the pandemic: 6.6%, CI 95%: 2.5%-16.6%, p = 0.063; prison staff CI 95%: 4.8%, 2.7%-8.6%, p = 0.093). The seroprevalence of prison staff was only slightly and non-significantly lower than that of the general population. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: During the first wave, despite overcrowding and interaction with the community, the prison was not a hotspot of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Preventive measures probably helped avoiding clusters of infection. The authors suggest that preventive measures that impact social welfare could be relaxed when overall circulation in the community is low to prevent the negative impact of isolation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Seroepidemiologic Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Switzerland/epidemiology , Antibodies, Viral , Immunoglobulin G
17.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 17829, 2022 Oct 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2087295

ABSTRACT

The aim of our study was to investigate whether self-reported feeling of loneliness (FoL) and COVID-19-specific health anxiety were associated with the presence of depressive symptoms during the first coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) wave. Questionnaires of 603 persons of the Swiss Multiple Sclerosis Registry (SMSR) were cross-sectionally analyzed using descriptive and multivariable regression methods. The survey response rate was 63.9%. Depressive symptoms were assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory-Fast Screen (BDI-FS). COVID-19-specific health anxiety and FoL were measured using two 5-item Likert scaled pertinent questions. High scoring FoL (2.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) (2.06-2.98)) and/or COVID-19 specific health anxiety (1.36, 95% CI (0.87-1.85)) were significantly associated with depressive symptoms. Further stratification analysis showed that the impact of FoL on depressive symptoms affected all age groups. However, it was more pronounced in younger PwMS, whereas an impact of COVID-19 specific health anxiety on depressive symptoms was particularly observed in middle-aged PwMS. FoL and COVID-19-specific health anxiety were age-dependently associated with depressive symptoms during the first COVID-19 wave in Switzerland. Our findings could guide physicians, health authorities, and self-help groups to better accompany PwMS in times of public health crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis , Middle Aged , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Loneliness , Depression/epidemiology , Multiple Sclerosis/complications , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Switzerland/epidemiology , Anxiety/epidemiology
18.
Schweiz Arch Tierheilkd ; 164(10): 733-739, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2081147

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Outbreaks of equine coronavirus (ECoV) infections have been described in different parts of the world including Europe. The aim of this report was to describe clinical signs, diagnostic work-up and outcome of the first documented outbreak of ECoV in Switzerland in order to raise the awareness for the disease and its various clinical presentations. The outbreak occurred on a farm with 26 horses. Of these, seven horses developed clinical disease ranging from mild signs such as fever and anorexia to severe signs of acute colitis. One horse died due to severe endotoxemia and circulatory shock secondary to severe acute necrotizing enteritis and colitis. Out of the 26 horses, five horses tested positive for ECoV, including two ponies without any clinical signs of infection. The low number of positive cases should nevertheless be interpreted with caution as testing was only performed on one occasion, over a month after the onset of clinical signs in the first suspected case. This report highlights the importance of diagnostic testing and early implementation of biosecurity measures on a farm with an ECoV outbreak. It should furthermore raise the awareness for unspecific and mild clinical signs such as fever and anorexia in affected animals that are potentially able to spread the disease.


INTRODUCTION: Des foyers d'infection à coronavirus équin (ECoV) ont été décrits dans différentes parties du monde, y compris en Europe. L'objectif de ce rapport est de décrire les signes cliniques, le diagnostic et les conséquences du premier foyer d'ECoV documenté en Suisse, afin de sensibiliser le public à cette maladie et à ses différents aspects cliniques. L'épidémie s'est produite dans une écurie comptant 26 chevaux. Parmi ceux-ci, sept chevaux ont développé une forme clinique allant de signes légers tels que la fièvre et l'anorexie à des signes sévères de colite aiguë. Un cheval est mort en raison d'une endotoxémie sévère et d>un choc circulatoire secondaire à une entérite nécrosante aiguë sévère et à une colite. Sur les 26 chevaux, cinq ont été testés positifs à l>ECoV, dont deux poneys sans aucun signe clinique d'infection. Le faible nombre de cas positifs doit néanmoins être interprété avec prudence car les tests n'ont été effectués qu'à une seule occasion, plus d'un mois après l'apparition des signes cliniques chez le premier cas suspect. Ce rapport souligne l'importance des tests de diagnostic et de la mise en œuvre rapide de mesures de biosécurité dans une exploitation où un foyer d'ECoV est détecté. Il devrait en outre sensibiliser à la présence de signes cliniques peu spécifiques et bénins tels que la fièvre et l'anorexie chez les animaux atteints qui sont potentiellement capables de propager la maladie.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus 1 , Colitis , Coronavirus Infections , Horse Diseases , Animals , Anorexia/veterinary , Colitis/epidemiology , Colitis/veterinary , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Disease Outbreaks/veterinary , Feces , Horse Diseases/diagnosis , Horses , Switzerland/epidemiology
19.
Oral Health Prev Dent ; 20(1): 379-384, 2022 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2080085

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To investigate dentists' work conditions, awareness, protective measures, economic effects and perceived stress during the first two waves of the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This cross-sectional survey was conducted among 126 dentists working in the Frenchspeaking part of Switzerland, in particular in the Cantons of Vaud and Geneva. Data consisted of the answers to 40 questions assessing the knowledge, attitudes, workload and mental condition of the dentists during the first 2 waves of the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: Swiss dentists received sufficient information about the COVID-19 pandemic and implemented protective measures. Differences were found between the 1st and the 2nd wave concerning the workload; during the first wave, the workload was low for the majority of dentists (60%), whereas during the second, it was moderate (53.4%) or high (41.3%). During both waves, the mental burden was also important, and was related mainly to financial issues and fear of infection. CONCLUSIONS: This survey reported that Swiss dentists were, in general, satisfied with the transmission of precise operating guidelines during the pandemic. However, a considerable psychological impact, mainly during the first wave, was revealed. With the implementation of proper strategic measures during the COVID-19 outbreak, dental practitioners will be prepared for future global health-care disruptions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Dentists/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Switzerland/epidemiology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Professional Role , Surveys and Questionnaires , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
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