Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 190
Filter
1.
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc ; 28(6): 1705-1711, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1826407

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Due to the lack of evidence, it was the aim of the study to investigate current possible cutbacks in orthopaedic healthcare due to the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic (COVID-19). METHODS: An online survey was performed of orthopaedic surgeons in the German-speaking Arthroscopy Society (Gesellschaft für Arthroskopie und Gelenkchirurgie, AGA). The survey consisted of 20 questions concerning four topics: four questions addressed the origin and surgical experience of the participant, 12 questions dealt with potential cutbacks in orthopaedic healthcare and 4 questions addressed the influence of the pandemic on the particular surgeon. RESULTS: Of 4234 contacted orthopaedic surgeons, 1399 responded. Regarding arthroscopic procedures between 10 and 30% of the participants stated that these were still being performed-with actual percentages depending on the specific joint and procedure. Only 6.2% of the participants stated that elective total joint arthroplasty was still being performed at their centre. In addition, physical rehabilitation and surgeons' postoperative follow-ups were severely affected. CONCLUSION: Orthopaedic healthcare services in Austria, Germany, and Switzerland are suffering a drastic cutback due to COVID-19. A drastic reduction in arthroscopic procedures like rotator cuff repair and cruciate ligament reconstruction and an almost total shutdown of elective total joint arthroplasty were reported. Long-term consequences cannot be predicted yet. The described disruption in orthopaedic healthcare services has to be viewed as historic. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: V.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Orthopedics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Aftercare/statistics & numerical data , Arthroplasty/statistics & numerical data , Arthroscopy/statistics & numerical data , Austria/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Germany/epidemiology , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Internet , Male , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Rehabilitation/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Switzerland/epidemiology
2.
Front Public Health ; 10: 828584, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785441

ABSTRACT

Background: Non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPI) play an important role in national efforts to control and contain the spread of SARS-CoV-2, but some people do not comply with these public health measures. The aim of this study was thus to describe this group of noncompliant people. Methods: A random sample of 1,157 people was drawn from the adult general population of Switzerland based on a three-stepped quota scheme considering the variables age (18-31, 32-45, 46-59, and ≥60 years), sex (male and female), and language region (German-, French-, and Italian-speaking Switzerland). We assessed a global scale of non-compliance with NPI based on several individual measures such as wearing face masks and social distancing. As predictor variables we included objective sociodemographic variables (e.g., age, sex) and easy measurable constructs (e.g., fears and worries about COVID-19, trust in medical experts). Results: Out of 14 predictor variables tested, seven were statistically significantly associated with increased non-compliance with NPI: male sex, younger age, self-identification as low-risk group, judging the consequences of an infection with SARS-CoV-2 as non-serious, less worries and fears about the pandemic, not obtaining regular information from health authorities, and not trusting in medical experts. The most parsimonious multivariable prediction model included the variables younger age, low appraisal of negative consequences, less fear and worries, not obtaining regular information from health authorities, and not trusting in medical experts. The model accounted for 27.9% of variance explained in non-compliance with NPI. Conclusion: Young adults who perceive COVID-19 as mostly harmless/inconsequential and who ignore and/or mistrust information from health authorities and medical experts, are the population most likely to be noncompliant with NPI. These findings may help to target a group of people at high risk of infection and to efficiently concentrate educational and interventional public health measures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Male , Masks , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Switzerland/epidemiology , Young Adult
3.
Front Public Health ; 10: 768036, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785432

ABSTRACT

Background: We investigated the COVID19-related psychological impact on healthcare workers in Italy and in Italian-speaking regions of Switzerland, three weeks after its outbreak. All professional groups of public hospitals in Italy and Switzerland were asked to complete a 38 questions online survey investigating demographic, marital and working status, presence of stress symptoms and need for psychological support. Results: Within 38 h a total of 3,038 responses were collected. The subgroup analysis identified specific categories at risk according to age, type of work and region of origin. Critical care workers, in particular females, reported an increased number of working hours, decline in confidence in the future, presence of stress symptoms and need for psychological support. Respondents reporting stress symptoms and those with children declared a higher need for psychological support. Conclusions: The large number of participants in such a short time indicates for a high interest on topic among health-care workers. The COVID19 outbreak has been experienced as a repeated trauma for many health-care professionals, especially among female nurses' categories. Early evidence of the need of implementating short and long-term measures to mitigate impact of the emotional burden of COVID-19 pandemic are still relevant.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Bayes Theorem , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Switzerland/epidemiology
4.
PLoS One ; 17(4): e0266612, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779774

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: University students' psychological health is linked to their academic satisfaction. This study aimed to investigate students' psychological health and academic satisfaction in the context of COVID-19 and academic year-end stress. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Standardized self-filled scales for anxiety, depression, stress, psychological well-being, academic satisfaction (subjective assessment of students' quality of life in their educational setting), and an ad-hoc scale for stress on the learning experience due to COVID-19 were used in this cross-sectional study. Participants were first- to third-year students of eight different health-related tracks in Geneva, Switzerland. Descriptive statistics and hierarchical regression analyses were applied. RESULTS: In June 2020, out of 2835 invited students, 433 (15%) completed the survey. Academic satisfaction was a stronger mental health predictor than COVID-19 stress on the learning experience, which mainly predicted stress and anxiety. Lower academic satisfaction scores were significantly associated with stress (ß = -0.53, p < 0.001), depression (ß = -0.26, p < 0.001), anxiety (ß = -0.20, p < 0.001), while higher scores with psychological well-being (ß = 0.48, p < 0.001). Identifying as female was strongly associated with anxiety and stress but not with depression or psychological well-being. Lower age was associated with stress only. The nature of the academic training had a lesser impact on mental health and the academic year had no impact. CONCLUSIONS: Academic satisfaction plays a more substantial role than COVID-19 stress on the learning experience in predicting students' overall mental health status. Training institutions should address the underlying factors that can enhance students' academic satisfaction, especially during the COVID-19 period, in addition to ensuring that they have a continuous and adequate learning experience, as well as access to psychosocial services that help them cope with mental distress and enhance their psychological well-being.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Personal Satisfaction , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Students/psychology , Switzerland/epidemiology , Universities
5.
Soc Sci Med ; 298: 114858, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1773784

ABSTRACT

Continuity of care is important for the health of aging individuals with comorbidities. When initial coronavirus mitigation campaigns involved messaging such as "Stay at home-stay safe," and banned provision of non-urgent care, at-risk patients depending upon regular consultations with general practitioners (GPs) faced confusion about the possibility of seeking non-COVID-19 related healthcare. We employed a sequential explanatory mixed-methods design, consisting of a quantitative component followed by a qualitative component, to understand at-risk patients' health services use during the COVID-19 pandemic in Switzerland. Quantitatively, we used electronic medical records data from 272 GPs and 266,796 patients. Based on pre-pandemic data, we predicted weekly consultation counts as well as weekly measurement counts (blood pressure, glycated hemoglobin, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol) per 100 patients that would be expected in 2020 in absence of a pandemic and compared those to actual observed values. Qualitatively, we conducted 23 semi-structured interviews with 24 GPs (∼45 min) and 37 interviews with at-risk patients (∼35 min). Quantitative results demonstrate a significant decrease in consultation and measurement counts during the first shutdown period, with consultation counts quickly returning to normal and moving within expected values for the rest of 2020. Qualitative data contextualize these findings with GPs describing constantly implementing material, administrative, and communication changes. GPs reported communication gaps with the authorities and noted a lack of clear guidelines delineating how to define "at-risk patients" and what cases were "urgent" to treat during shutdowns. Patient interviews show that patient-level factors, such as fear of contracting coronavirus, perceptions that GPs were overburdened, and a sense of solidarity, influenced patients' decisions to consult less at the beginning of the pandemic. Findings demonstrate communication gaps during pandemic periods and provide valuable lessons for future pandemic preparedness, particularly the need for contingency plans for the overall healthcare system instead of plans focusing only on the infectious agent itself.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Continuity of Patient Care , Humans , Primary Health Care , Switzerland/epidemiology
6.
BMC Geriatr ; 22(1): 90, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1745513

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A pandemic of loneliness is hitting the aging population. As COVID19 forced us to isolate ourselves, we are in a better position to understand consequences of social distancing. The recent literature showed that older incarcerated adults are particularly at risk of health-related complications due to isolation in the prison environment, reducing their social capital. Mental and physical health can be severely affected by loneliness and social isolation, especially in prison. METHODS: Our qualitative study investigates the view of older persons deprieved of their liberty on loneliness and social isolation pertaining to their mental health. We interviewed 57 older participants, including imprisoned individuals and forensic patients, following a semi-structured interview guide. During the data management and data analysis process, we excluded 7 interviews which were of poorer quality. Thereafter, we analyzed the remainders following a thematic approach. RESULTS: Most interviewees experience loneliness following lack of significant human relationships in prison. Making friends appears to be a challenge for all the participants, because, for one thing, they do not find people with similar interests. Also, secure institution setting aggravates isolation due to the restrictions of movement placed such as rules concerning movement between floors, hindering intimate relationship, and separation between friends. Moreover, contact with prison personnel is limited and lack social capital (e.g. trust). CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this study is one of the first to present incarcerated persons' perspective on loneliness, social isolation and poor social capital in the Swiss prison setting. These has been reported to cause health problems both somatic and psychological. Our participants experience these deleterious factors in detention. As prisons have the possibility to become a health-promoting environment through connectedness, friendship, and trust promotion, stakeholders need to better their social capital.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Loneliness , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Loneliness/psychology , Pandemics , Social Isolation/psychology , Switzerland/epidemiology
7.
BMC Infect Dis ; 22(1): 259, 2022 Mar 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1745482

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Many studies in hospital settings exist and have shown healthcare employees to be particularly exposed to SARS-CoV-2. While research focused on hospital staff, little evidence exists for employees in nursing homes and home care. The aims of this study were to assess the seroprevalence in nursing homes and home care employees in the Canton of Zurich, compare it to the general population, assess factors associated with seropositivity and explore the perspective of the employees regarding how the pandemic changed their daily work. METHODS: This cross-sectional study is part of the national Corona Immunitas research program of coordinated, seroprevalence studies in Switzerland. Six nursing homes and six home healthcare organizations providing at home care services in Zurich were selected and 296 and 131 employees were recruited, respectively. Assessments included standardized questionnaires, blood sampling for antibodies, and additional work-specific questions. All participants were recruited between 21st September and 23rd October 2020, before the second wave of the pandemic hit Switzerland, and were possibly exposed to SARS-CoV-2 at their work during the first wave in spring 2020. RESULTS: Seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 was 14.9% (95% CI 11.1%-19.6%; range 3.8% to 24.4%) for nursing home employees and 3.8% (95% CI 1.4-9.1%; range 0% to 10%) for home healthcare employees, compared to the general population of Zurich at 3.5% in September 2020 for those aged 20-64. Nurses were 2.6 times more likely to have SARS-CoV-2 antibodies than those employees who were not nurses (95% CI 1.1-6.2). The employees (nursing homes vs. home healthcare) perceived the implementation of general safety measures (44.9% vs. 57.3%) and wearing masks during work (36.8% vs. 43.5%), especially due to the limited communication with residents/clients, as the most crucial changes. CONCLUSIONS: Nursing home employees who worked through SARS-CoV-2 outbreaks at their work were substantially more affected by SARS-CoV-2 infection compared to the general population and to home healthcare employees who similarly worked through outbreaks in their communities. Employees reported that important resources to cope with the burdensome changes they perceived in their daily work were personal resources and team support. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN18181860 dated 09/07/2020. Retrospectively registered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Home Care Services , Adult , Attitude , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Middle Aged , Nursing Homes , Personnel, Hospital , SARS-CoV-2 , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Switzerland/epidemiology , Young Adult
8.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264655, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1745320

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Isolation is an indispensable measure to contain the SARS-CoV-2 virus, but it may have a negative impact on mental health and overall wellbeing. Evidence on the isolation experience, facilitating and complicating factors is needed to mitigate negative effects. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This observational, population-based cohort study enrolled 1547 adults from the general population with SARS-CoV-2 infection reported to authorities between 27 February 2020 and 19 January 2021 in Zurich, Switzerland. We assessed the proportion of individuals reporting symptoms of depression and anxiety before, during and after isolation (by DASS-21), and queried worries, positive experiences, and difficulties. We analyzed the association of these outcomes with socio-demographics using ordinal regression. Additionally, we report free-text statements by participants to capture most important aspects of isolation. The proportion of participants affected by depression or anxiety increased during isolation from 10·0% to 17·1% and 9·1% to 17·6%, respectively. Ordinal regression showed that taking care of children increased the difficulty of isolation (OR 2·10, CI 1·43-3·08) and risk of non-compliance (OR 1·63, CI 1·05-2·53), especially in younger participants. A facilitating factor that individuals commonly expressed was receiving more support during isolation. CONCLUSION: Isolation due to SARS-CoV-2 presents a mental burden, especially for younger individuals and those taking care of children. Public health authorities need to train personnel and draw from community-based resources to provide targeted support, information, and guidance to individuals during isolation. Such efforts could alleviate the negative impact isolation has on the mental and physical health of individuals and ensure compliance of the population with recommendations.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Social Isolation/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , Cohort Studies , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Compliance/psychology , Patient Compliance/statistics & numerical data , Regression Analysis , Switzerland/epidemiology , Young Adult
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(6)2022 03 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742428

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on treatment demand and supply in children and adolescents with mental disorders during the first year of the pandemic from the perspective of child and adolescent psychiatrists and psychologists in Switzerland. METHODS: The survey was conducted anonymously, in German or French and online in April/May 2021. Mental health professionals working in child and adolescent psychiatry, psychotherapy services or independent practices were contacted by email. RESULTS: N = 454 professionals completed the survey (176 child and adolescent psychiatrists and 276 psychologists). After an initial period of decreased demand during the lockdown in spring 2020, requests for treatment increased, considerably exceeding the demand pre-pandemic and reaching a peak in January/February/March 2021. The vast majority of professionals (78.2%) estimated that there was currently too little supply during the pandemic, which differed from the evaluation of the pre-pandemic situation (37%). A total of 65% of participants indicated that waiting time until the initiation of treatment increased during the pandemic, 41% reported their current workload to be somewhat higher and 44.5% much higher. CONCLUSIONS: For the first pandemic year, youth mental health professionals reported a large increase in the treatment demand and waiting time and a worrisome overload of treatment services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Health Personnel , Humans , Mental Health , Switzerland/epidemiology
10.
Euro Surveill ; 27(10)2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742165

ABSTRACT

BackgroundThroughout the COVID-19 pandemic, SARS-CoV-2 genetic variants of concern (VOCs) have repeatedly and independently arisen. VOCs are characterised by increased transmissibility, increased virulence or reduced neutralisation by antibodies obtained from prior infection or vaccination. Tracking the introduction and transmission of VOCs relies on sequencing, typically whole genome sequencing of clinical samples. Wastewater surveillance is increasingly used to track the introduction and spread of SARS-CoV-2 variants through sequencing approaches.AimHere, we adapt and apply a rapid, high-throughput method for detection and quantification of the relative frequency of two deletions characteristic of the Alpha, Beta, and Gamma VOCs in wastewater.MethodsWe developed drop-off RT-dPCR assays and an associated statistical approach implemented in the R package WWdPCR to analyse temporal dynamics of SARS-CoV-2 signature mutations (spike Δ69-70 and ORF1a Δ3675-3677) in wastewater and quantify transmission fitness advantage of the Alpha VOC.ResultsBased on analysis of Zurich wastewater samples, the estimated transmission fitness advantage of SARS-CoV-2 Alpha based on the spike Δ69-70 was 0.34 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.30-0.39) and based on ORF1a Δ3675-3677 was 0.53 (95% CI: 0.49-0.57), aligning with the transmission fitness advantage of Alpha estimated by clinical sample sequencing in the surrounding canton of 0.49 (95% CI: 0.38-0.61).ConclusionDigital PCR assays targeting signature mutations in wastewater offer near real-time monitoring of SARS-CoV-2 VOCs and potentially earlier detection and inference on transmission fitness advantage than clinical sequencing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Switzerland/epidemiology , Waste Water , Wastewater-Based Epidemiological Monitoring
11.
Euro Surveill ; 27(10)2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742164

ABSTRACT

IntroductionHuman mobility was considerably reduced during the COVID-19 pandemic. To support disease surveillance, it is important to understand the effect of mobility on transmission.AimWe compared the role of mobility during the first and second COVID-19 wave in Switzerland by studying the link between daily travel distances and the effective reproduction number (Rt) of SARS-CoV-2.MethodsWe used aggregated mobile phone data from a representative panel survey of the Swiss population to measure human mobility. We estimated the effects of reductions in daily travel distance on Rt via a regression model. We compared mobility effects between the first (2 March-7 April 2020) and second wave (1 October-10 December 2020).ResultsDaily travel distances decreased by 73% in the first and by 44% in the second wave (relative to February 2020). For a 1% reduction in average daily travel distance, Rt was estimated to decline by 0.73% (95% credible interval (CrI): 0.34-1.03) in the first wave and by 1.04% (95% CrI: 0.66-1.42) in the second wave. The estimated mobility effects were similar in both waves for all modes of transport, travel purposes and sociodemographic subgroups but differed for movement radius.ConclusionMobility was associated with SARS-CoV-2 Rt during the first two epidemic waves in Switzerland. The relative effect of mobility was similar in both waves, but smaller mobility reductions in the second wave corresponded to smaller overall reductions in Rt. Mobility data from mobile phones have a continued potential to support real-time surveillance of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Basic Reproduction Number , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Switzerland/epidemiology
12.
Scand J Public Health ; 50(1): 124-135, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1724282

ABSTRACT

Aims: To assess SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence over the first epidemic wave in the canton of Geneva, Switzerland, as well as risk factors for infection and symptoms associated with IgG seropositivity. Methods: Between April and June 2020, former participants of a representative survey of the 20-74-year-old population of canton Geneva were invited to participate in the study, along with household members aged over 5 years. Blood samples were tested for anti-SARS-CoV-2 immunoglobulin G. Questionnaires were self-administered. We estimated seroprevalence with a Bayesian model accounting for test performance and sampling design. Results: We included 8344 participants, with an overall adjusted seroprevalence of 7.8% (95% credible interval 6.8-8.9). Seroprevalence was highest among 18-49 year-olds (9.5%), and lowest in 5-9-year-old children (4.3%) and individuals >65 years (4.7-5.4%). Odds of seropositivity were significantly reduced for female retirees and unemployed men compared to employed individuals, and smokers compared to non-smokers. We found no significant association between occupation, level of education, neighborhood income and the risk of being seropositive. The symptom most strongly associated with seropositivity was anosmia/dysgeusia. Conclusions: Anti-SARS-CoV-2 population seroprevalence remained low after the first wave in Geneva. Socioeconomic factors were not associated with seropositivity in this sample. The elderly, young children and smokers were less frequently seropositive, although it is not clear how biology and behaviours shape these differences.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Bayes Theorem , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Switzerland/epidemiology , Young Adult
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(4)2022 02 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1708692

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 restrictions and the instructions to stay at home (SaH) may have had an impact on child behavior including physical activity (PA) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in Switzerland. Therefore, we investigated PA and HRQoL during and after the SaH in 57 Swiss school children aged 7 to 12 years (M = 10.44; SD = 1.34). PA was measured using accelerometry (Actigraph GT3X) and HRQoL using the Kid-KINDLR questionnaire. During and post data was compared using paired sample t-tests. Independent t-tests were used to compare the HRQoL of physically active children with non-physically active children. PA in light (d = -0.56), moderate (d = -0.44), moderate-to-vigorous (d = -0.28) as well as overall HRQoL (d = -0.66), psychological well-being (d = -0.48), self-esteem (d = -0.39), friends (d = -0.70) and everyday functioning (d = -0.44), were significantly lower during SaH than afterwards. Children who adhered to PA recommendations (+60 min of moderate-to-vigorous PA) during SaH had a better overall HRQoL (d = 0.61) and psychological well-being (d = 0.56) than those who did not. Since PA levels and HRQoL were lower during SaH compared to afterwards, it seems that the restrictions negatively impacted children's PA and HRQoL. During future SaHs, promoting children's PA and HRQoL seems important.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Accelerometry , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Exercise/psychology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Switzerland/epidemiology
14.
Clin Exp Dent Res ; 8(1): 37-44, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700196

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Data on the injury rate of skiers and snowboarders are currently limited. The aim of this study was, therefore, to assess the frequency of general and dental injuries among snow sports instructors, to investigate the use of protective gear and mouthguards, and to evaluate snow sports instructors' dental first aid know-how. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A questionnaire-based, cross-sectional study comprising 603 ski and snowboard instructors from Austria, Germany, and Switzerland was conducted in the timeframe December 2019 to May 2020. The survey gathered data on general and dental injuries sustained by instructors, protective gear usage, and know-how in dental first aid. The statistical analysis included χ2 tests, Wilcoxon rank-sum and Kruskal-Wallis tests, and linear regression analysis. The level of significance was set at α = .05. RESULTS: Out of the 603 instructors, 326 (54.1%) sustained an injury while skiing or snowboarding. Forty (6.6%) reported a snow sports-related dental injury. The rates of injuries related to skiing and snowboarding showed no significant difference (p = .0952). Compared with snowboarding on slopes, backcountry snowboarding entailed fewer risks of injury for snowboard instructors (p = .012). Knowledge of dental first aid was limited, with 45.8% of instructors uninformed about the possibility of replanting avulsed teeth. 10.1% of instructors were familiar with tooth rescue boxes. None of the instructors surveyed had a tooth rescue box in their first aid equipment. Helmet usage was high (95.6%) among snow sports instructors, whereas mouthguard usage was rare (3.5%). CONCLUSIONS: Protective gear usage among snow sports instructors is high. The risk of dental injury while skiing or snowboarding is lower compared with other sports. Dental first aid know-how ought to be enhanced in snow sports communities to ensure that appropriate first aid is provided in case of a dental injury related to skiing or snowboarding.


Subject(s)
Tooth Injuries , Austria/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires , Switzerland/epidemiology , Tooth Injuries/epidemiology
15.
Swiss Med Wkly ; 151: w30071, 2021 11 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1689916

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting containment measures had and still have a profound impact on everyday life. Both the fear of infection and the imposed restrictions can have biopsychosocial consequences. The aim of the present study was to analyze whether there is a difference in the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of primary school children in 2014/15 compared to in 2020, the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The present study included 1,712 children aged 5 to 11 years who either participated in the baseline assessment of the SOPHYA cohort study in 2014/15 or were newly recruited during follow-up of the cohort in 2020. In both surveys, the children invited for participation were identified based on registry data. HRQoL was assessed with the validated KINDL-R questionnaire, which scores HRQoL along six different dimensions. RESULTS: The overall scores (82.4 [81.8; 83.0] vs. 79.6 [79,1; 80.2]), and in particular the emotional well-being scores (85.6 [84.6; 86.6] vs. 83.3 [82.4; 84.2]), were lower during the year of the pandemic (2020) compared to the survey year 2014/15. The highest decrease between 2014/15 and 2020 in the adjusted models was seen for the youngest age group (-3.9 points), followed by children from families with a high income (-3.2 points), girls (-3.1 points), Swiss citizens (-3.1 points) and children from the German-speaking part of Switzerland (-3.1 points). HRQoL was particularly low during periods with restrictions and at the height of the COVID-19 waves in 2020. CONCLUSION: The SOPHYA-study showed that HRQoL, and especially emotional well-being, was lower in 5 to 11-year-old children in Switzerland during the first year of the pandemic compared to the results from the survey conducted in 2014/15. In the year of the pandemic, the scores were lowest at the height of the COVID-19 waves and their associated restrictions. As it cannot be distinguished whether fear of the disease itself or the restrictions caused this decrease in HRQoL, containment policies should keep COVID-19 infections as low as possible, but still enable children to profit from protective factors such as leisure activities, physical activity and social contact.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools , Surveys and Questionnaires , Switzerland/epidemiology
16.
Swiss Med Wkly ; 151: w30105, 2021 11 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1689912

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: When the periods of time during and after the first wave of the ongoing SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19 pandemic in Europe are compared, the associated COVID-19 mortality seems to have decreased substantially. Various factors could explain this trend, including changes in demographic characteristics of infected persons and the improvement of case management. To date, no study has been performed to investigate the evolution of COVID-19 in-hospital mortality in Switzerland, while also accounting for risk factors. METHODS: We investigated the trends in COVID-19-related mortality (in-hospital and in-intermediate/intensive-care) over time in Switzerland, from February 2020 to June 2021, comparing in particular the first and the second wave. We used data from the COVID-19 Hospital-based Surveillance (CH-SUR) database. We performed survival analyses adjusting for well-known risk factors of COVID-19 mortality (age, sex and comorbidities) and accounting for competing risk. RESULTS: Our analysis included 16,984 patients recorded in CH-SUR, with 2201 reported deaths due to COVID-19 (13.0%). We found that overall in-hospital mortality was lower during the second wave of COVID-19 than in the first wave (hazard ratio [HR] 0.70, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.63- 0.78; p <0.001), a decrease apparently not explained by changes in demographic characteristics of patients. In contrast, mortality in intermediate and intensive care significantly increased in the second wave compared with the first wave (HR 1.25, 95% CI 1.05-1.49; p = 0.029), with significant changes in the course of hospitalisation between the first and the second wave. CONCLUSION: We found that, in Switzerland, COVID-19 mortality decreased among hospitalised persons, whereas it increased among patients admitted to intermediate or intensive care, when comparing the second wave to the first wave. We put our findings in perspective with changes over time in case management, treatment strategy, hospital burden and non-pharmaceutical interventions. Further analyses of the potential effect of virus variants and of vaccination on mortality would be crucial to have a complete overview of COVID-19 mortality trends throughout the different phases of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospital Mortality , Hospitals , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Switzerland/epidemiology
17.
Swiss Med Wkly ; 151: w30116, 2021 12 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1689911

ABSTRACT

AIMS OF THE STUDY: A new emerging severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) was first identified in Wuhan, China, in December 2019 and then spread rapidly, causing a global pandemic. In Europe, the first case was identified in Italy on 21 February 2020, in the Lombardy region bordering on the southern part of Switzerland (Canton Ticino), where 4 days later the first case was identified . Ticino was the most affected canton in Switzerland during the first wave of pandemic. In order to provide a reliable indicator for the spread of the virus in this region and help decision making at the public health level, a seroprevalence study of SARS-CoV-2 was conducted. METHODS: A cohort study was implemented on a randomly selected sample of 1500 persons. The sample is representative of the general population of the Canton of Ticino, stratified by sex and age from 5 years old. Antibodies against the SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein were detected using a rapid qualitative test in 4 data collection periods over the course of 12 months (from May-June 2020 to May-June 2021). RESULTS: The seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 was estimated at 9.0% in spring 2020 (weeks 20-26), 8.4% in summer 2020 (weeks 32-38), 14.1% in autumn 2020 (weeks 45-52) and 22.3% in spring 2021 (weeks 18-23). In none of these four phases was evidence of an association between sex or specific age groups and presence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies detected. For risk factors, the only strong and significant association found was with diabetes in the first three data collection periods but not in the fourth. Among people who participated in all four phases of the study and tested positive anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in the first test, 61.8% were still positive even in the fourth, 12 months later. CONCLUSIONS: The results support the hypothesis that, after one year and despite the severe burden in terms of hospitalisations and deaths experienced by the Canton Ticino, SARS-CoV-2 infection affected only a minority of the population (20%) and also suggest that the anti-nucleocapsid antibodies persist after 12 months in the majority of infected persons.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Viral , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Humans , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Switzerland/epidemiology
18.
Antimicrob Resist Infect Control ; 11(1): 30, 2022 02 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1677540

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Protecting healthcare workers (HCWs) from exposure to SARS-CoV-2 during patient care is central to managing the current pandemic. Higher levels of trust in personal protective equipment (PPE) and infection prevention and control (IPC) strategies have been previously related to lower levels of emotional exhaustion, yet little is known on how to achieve such a perception of safety. We thus sought to identify institutional actions, strategies and policies related to HCWs' safety perception during the early phase of the pandemic at a tertiary care center in Switzerland by interviewing HCWs from different clinics, professions, and positions. METHODS: For this qualitative study, 36 face-to-face semi-structured interviews were performed. Interviews were based on a guide that addressed the perception of institutional strategies and policies during the first phase of the pandemic in March 2020. The participants included doctors (n = 19) and nurses (n = 17) in senior and non-senior positions from eight clinics in the University Hospital Basel, Switzerland, all involved in patient care. All interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis and organized using MAXQDA (VERBI Software GmbH, Berlin). FINDINGS: Five recurring themes were identified to affect HCWs' perception of their safety during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic: (1) transparency and clarity of information, (2) communication on the availability of PPE (with the provision of information alone increasing the feeling of safety even if supplies of PPE were reported as low), (3) uniformity and consistency of guidelines, (4) digital resources to support face-to-face teaching (although personal information transfer is still being considered superior in terms of strengthening safety perception) and (5) support and appreciation for the work performed. CONCLUSIONS: This study identifies institutional policies and actions influencing HCWs' safety perception during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, the most important of which is the factor of transparent communication. This knowledge reveals potential areas of action critical to improving preparedness and management in hospitals faced with an infectious disease threat.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Tertiary Care Centers , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Patient Care , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Switzerland/epidemiology
19.
Prev Med ; 156: 106987, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1671318

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Health systems around the world continue to navigate through operational challenges surfaced by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic; these have implications for access to healthcare. In this study, we estimate the prevalence and reasons for forgoing healthcare during the pandemic in Geneva, Switzerland; a country with a universal and mandatory private health insurance coverage. METHODS: Participants from a randomly selected population-based sample of the adult population living in the Canton of Geneva completed an online socio-demographic and lifestyle questionnaire between November 2020 and January 2021. The prevalence and reasons for forgoing healthcare since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic were examined descriptively, and logistic regression models were used to assess determinants for forgoing healthcare. RESULTS: The study included 5397 participants, among which 8.0% reported having forgone healthcare since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic; participants with a disadvantaged financial situation (OR = 2.04; 95% CI: 1.56-2.65), and those reporting an average (OR = 2.54; 95% CI: 1.94-3.31) or poor health (OR = 4.40; 95% CI: 2.39-7.67) were more likely to forgo healthcare. The most common reasons to forgo healthcare were appointment cancellations by healthcare providers (53.9%), fear of infection (35.3%), and personal organizational issues (11.1%). CONCLUSION: Our paper highlights the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on access to healthcare and identifies population sub-groups at-risk for forgoing healthcare. These results necessitate public health efforts to ensure equitable and accessible healthcare as the COVID-19 pandemic continues.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Switzerland/epidemiology
20.
BMJ Open ; 12(1): e055515, 2022 01 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662316

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected billions of people around the world both directly through the infection itself and indirectly through its economic, social and sanitary impact. Collecting data over time is essential for the understanding of the disease spread, the incidence of COVID-19-like symptoms, the level and dynamics of immunity, as well as the long-term impact of the pandemic. The objective of the study was to set up a longitudinal follow-up of adult participants of serosurveys carried out in the canton of Geneva, Switzerland, during the COVID-19 pandemic. This follow-up aims at monitoring COVID-19 related symptoms and SARS-CoV-2 seroconversion, as well as the overall impact of the pandemic on several dimensions of health and on socioeconomic factors over a period of at least 2 years. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Serosurvey participants were invited to create an account on the dedicated digital platform Specchio-COVID19 (https://www.specchio-covid19.ch/). On registration, an initial questionnaire assessed sociodemographic and lifestyle characteristics (including housing conditions, physical activity, diet, alcohol and tobacco consumption), anthropometry, general health and experience related to COVID-19 (symptoms, COVID-19 test results, quarantines, hospitalisations). Weekly, participants were invited to fill in a short questionnaire with updates on self-reported COVID-19-compatible symptoms, SARS-CoV-2 infection testing and vaccination. A more detailed questionnaire about mental health, well-being, risk perception and changes in working conditions was proposed monthly. Supplementary questionnaires were proposed at regular intervals to assess more in depth the impact of the pandemic on physical and mental health, vaccination adherence, healthcare consumption and changes in health behaviours. At baseline, serology testing allowed to assess the spread of SARS-CoV-2 infection among the general population and subgroups of workers. Additionally, seropositive participants and a sample of randomly selected participants were invited for serologic testing at regular intervals in order to monitor both the seropersistance of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies and the seroprevalence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in the population of the canton of Geneva. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study was approved by the Cantonal Research Ethics Commission of Geneva, Switzerland (CCER Project ID 2020-00881). Results will be disseminated in a variety of ways, via the Specchio-COVID-19 platform, social media posts, press releases and through regular scientific dissemination methods (open-access articles, conferences).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Cohort Studies , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Switzerland/epidemiology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL