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1.
Pediatrics ; 149(1)2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595609

ABSTRACT

A 9-year-old girl presented to her primary care pediatrician via telemedicine during the initial months of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic because of 4 days of warmth perceived by her mother, decreased energy, and a new rash on her upper extremities. After 10 additional days of documented fever >38°C, worsening fatigue, and 1 day of nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, she was allowed to schedule an in-person visit with her pediatrician after testing negative for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. She appeared ill on arrival to clinic, and her pediatrician recommended evaluation in an emergency department. Her initial laboratory testing revealed nonspecific elevation in several inflammatory markers and leukopenia, and she responded well to intravenous hydration. Over the next 2 weeks, her fever persisted, constitutional symptoms worsened, and she developed progressively painful cervical lymphadenopathy and pancytopenia. She was evaluated in clinic by several specialists and eventually was urged to present to the emergency department again, at which time she was admitted to the PICU. After consulting additional specialists and waiting for laboratory results, the team reached a definitive diagnosis and initiated therapy; however, she experienced rapid clinical decline shortly thereafter. The specialists who assisted with identification of the underlying etiology of her symptoms were able to work together to manage the subsequent complications.


Subject(s)
Exanthema , Fever , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/diagnosis , Telemedicine , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Child , Disease Progression , Exanthema/diagnosis , Exanthema/etiology , Female , Fever/etiology , Histiocytic Necrotizing Lymphadenitis/diagnosis , Humans , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/blood , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/complications , Lymphadenopathy/diagnosis , Lymphadenopathy/etiology , Pancytopenia/diagnosis , Symptom Assessment , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis
2.
Fam Pract ; 38(5): 549-555, 2021 09 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575306

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Virtual consults have replaced in-person visits for many home-isolated patients with COVID-19 disease. OBJECTIVES: To describe the natural history, clinical management and outcomes of community-dwelling patients with COVID-19, who received support from a family medicine-led, virtual CovidCare@Home program in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. METHODS: Observational, descriptive study conducted by retrospective chart review of 98 patients enrolled during the first 5 weeks of program implementation (8 April-11 May 2020); 73 patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19, with symptom onset ≤ 14 days before initial consult were included for analysis. Patients were classified as mild, moderate or severe based on WHO Criteria. RESULTS: All patients in the program experienced mild (88%) or moderate (12.3%) disease. No patients were hospitalized or died. Patients were mainly female (70%); with mean age of 43.3 years. Most patients (82.2%) worked in higher risk, healthcare settings. Almost 40% had no medical co-morbidities. Common symptoms were cough (65.8%), fatigue (60.3%), headache (42.5%) and myalgia (39.7%), followed by fever (32.9%), sore throat (21.9%), nasal congestion (21.9%) and rhinorrhea (20.5%). Headache (51%) and anosmia (45.1%) were common among females; fever and breathlessness among males (40.9%). Nine patients (12.3%) experienced worsening of symptoms (mainly respiratory) or exacerbation of co-morbidities, which required care outside the virtual service. CONCLUSION: Patients with mild to moderate COVID-19 disease can be managed safely and effectively in a family medicine-led virtual program. Some sex differences in symptoms were observed. Future work should focus on long-term follow up in view of the existence of so-called 'long-haulers'.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Home Care Services/organization & administration , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , Symptom Assessment , Telemedicine , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Ital J Pediatr ; 47(1): 176, 2021 Aug 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561998

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a group of persistent psychological and physiological symptoms due to a traumatic, severe, event. Only few studies focused on the effects of Covid-19 on psychosocial outcomes in children with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) and their parents. AIM OF THE STUDY: The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence PTSD in parents of children with T1D during COVID-19 pandemic lockdown. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In the period between March and May 2020 we submitted the "Impact of Event Scale - Revised" (IES-R) questionnaire to the parents of 34 children with Type 1 Diabetes, asking them to express their emotions about the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic. RESULTS: A total of thirty mothers (mean age 43.0 ± 4.2 years) and 25 fathers (mean age 45.6 ± 5.9 years) participated in the survey and completed the questionnaires. 29.1% of parents had a score that allows to define a clinically relevant level of PTSD; ten mothers and 6 fathers had a PTSD clinically relevant score, corresponding, respectively, to 28.4 and 24% of total mothers and fathers. Finally, mothers and fathers, both express PTSD symptoms mainly in the form of intrusion and hyperarousal. CONCLUSIONS: The present study confirms a high prevalence symptoms related to PTSD in mothers and fathers of children with Type 1 Diabetes. We believe that psychosocial outcomes of the COVID-19 pandemic should be taken into account in the planning of the next future assistance for children with T1D.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/psychology , Fathers/psychology , Mothers/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Child , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Surveys and Questionnaires , Symptom Assessment
4.
BMC Nephrol ; 22(1): 384, 2021 11 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1523286

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hemodialysis patients are among high-risk groups for COVID-19. Africa is the continent with the lowest number of cases in the general population but we have little information about the disease burden in dialysis patients. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to describe the seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in the hemodialysis population of Senegal. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We conducted a multicenter cross-sectional survey, between June and September 2020 involving 10 public dialysis units randomly selected in eight regions of Senegal. After seeking their consent, we included 303 patients aged ≥ 18 years and hemodialysis for ≥ 3 months. Clinical symptoms and biological parameters were collected from medical records. Patients' blood samples were tested with Abbott SARS-CoV-2 Ig G assay using an Architect system. Statistical tests were performed with STATA 12.0. RESULTS: Seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies was 21.1% (95% CI = 16.7-26.1%). We noticed a wide variability in SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence between regions ranging from 5.6 to 51.7%. Among the 38 patients who underwent nasal swab testing, only six had a PCR-confirmed infection and all of them did seroconvert. Suggestive clinical symptoms were reported by 28.1% of seropositive patients and the majority of them presented asymptomatic disease. After multivariate analysis, a previous contact with a confirmed case and living in a high population density region were associated with the presence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies. CONCLUSION: This study presents to our knowledge the first seroprevalence data in African hemodialysis patients. Compared to data from other continents, we found a higher proportion of patients with SARS-CoV-2 antibodies but a lower lethality rate.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , Renal Dialysis , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , Contact Tracing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Educational Status , Female , Geography, Medical , Health Surveys , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Kidney Failure, Chronic/complications , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Population Density , Prevalence , Senegal/epidemiology , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Symptom Assessment , Young Adult
5.
Biomedica ; 41(Sp. 2): 48-61, 2021 10 15.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1478423

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The studies on knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) regarding COVID-19 help to identify erroneous concepts and inadequate practices related to the disease. This baseline information is essential to design effective strategies and improve adherence to prevention measures. OBJECTIVE: To identify the COVID-19-related KAP in Venezuelan patients screened at the Hospital Universitario de Caracas triage tent. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study among 215 patients between April 25th and May 25th, 2020, with in-person interviews using a KAP survey. RESULTS: Most surveyed patients (53.5%) were asymptomatic. Most of them, both from the symptomatic and the asymptomatic groups, had adequate knowledge about the symptoms and transmission of the disease and the majority said they were practicing quarantine, frequent handwashing, and the use of face masks in public areas. However, the daily replacement of cloth face masks was more frequent in the asymptomatic group whereas replacement every three days was more frequent in the symptomatic group. Finally, more than half of the participants admitted having been in crowded places, a common practice among the symptomatic compared to the asymptomatic patients. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first KAP study in Venezuela about COVID-19. Knowledge and practices among Venezuelans could be improved by strengthening education and training programs. This information from the early phase of the pandemic in Venezuela may contribute to the design of COVID-19 promotion and prevention strategies.


Introducción: Los estudios sobre conocimientos, actitudes y prácticas (CAP) sobre COVID-19 ayudan a identificar conceptos erróneos y prácticas inadecuadas relacionadas con la enfermedad. Esta información de referencia es fundamental para diseñar estrategias efectivas y mejorar la adherencia a las medidas de prevención. Objetivo: Identificar la CAP relacionada con COVID-19 en pacientes venezolanos cribados en la carpa de triaje del Hospital Universitario de Caracas. Materiales y métodos: Realizamos un estudio transversal entre 215 pacientes entre el 25 de abril y el 25 de mayo de 2020, con entrevistas en persona utilizando una encuesta KAP. Resultados: La mayoría de los pacientes encuestados (53,5%) se encontraban asintomáticos. La mayoría de ellos, tanto del grupo sintomático como asintomático, tenían un conocimiento adecuado sobre los síntomas y la transmisión de la enfermedad y la mayoría dijo que practicaban la cuarentena, el lavado frecuente de manos y el uso de mascarillas en las áreas públicas. Sin embargo, el reemplazo diario de mascarillas de tela fue más frecuente en el grupo asintomático, mientras que el reemplazo cada tres días fue más frecuente en el grupo sintomático. Finalmente, más de la mitad de los participantes admitieron haber estado en lugares concurridos, una práctica común entre los sintomáticos en comparación con los asintomáticos. Conclusiones: Este es el primer estudio CAP en Venezuela sobre COVID-19. El conocimiento y las prácticas entre los venezolanos podrían mejorarse fortaleciendo los programas de educación y capacitación. Esta información de la fase inicial de la pandemia en Venezuela puede contribuir al diseño de estrategias de promoción y prevención del COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Adult , Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Crowding , Female , Hand Disinfection , Health Surveys/methods , Health Surveys/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Masks/statistics & numerical data , Physical Distancing , Symptom Assessment , Triage , Venezuela/epidemiology
6.
Am J Nurs ; 121(11): 12, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475849

ABSTRACT

Pediatric cases are rising but researchers say symptoms overall are milder than in adults.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Severity of Illness Index , Symptom Assessment
8.
Biochim Biophys Acta Mol Basis Dis ; 1868(1): 166289, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1466061

ABSTRACT

To explore the recovery of renal function in severely ill coronavirus disease (COVID-19) survivors and determine the plasma metabolomic profile of patients with different renal outcomes 3 months after discharge, we included 89 severe COVID-19 survivors who had been discharged from Wuhan Union Hospital for 3 months. All patients had no underlying kidney disease before admission. At patient recruitment, renal function assessment, laboratory examination, chest computed tomography (CT) were performed. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to detect metabolites in the plasma. We analyzed the longitudinally change in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) based on serum creatinine and cystatin-c levels using the CKD-EPI equation and explored the metabolomic differences in patients with different eGFR change patterns from hospitalization to 3 months after discharge. Lung CT showed good recovery; however, the median eGFR significantly decreased at the 3-month follow-up. Among the 89 severely ill COVID-19 patients, 69 (77.5%) showed abnormal eGFR (<90 mL/min per 1.73 m2) at 3 months after discharge. Age (odds ratio [OR] = 1.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.08-1.47, p = 0.003), body mass index (OR = 1.97, 95% CI = 1.20-3.22, p = 0.007), and cystatin-c level (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.07-1.39, p = 0.003) at discharge were independent risk factors for post-discharge abnormal eGFR. Plasma metabolomics at the 3-months follow-up revealed that ß-pseudouridine, uridine, and 2-(dimethylamino) guanosine levels gradually increased with an abnormal degree of eGFR. Moreover, the kynurenine pathway in tryptophan metabolism, vitamin B6 metabolism, cysteine and methionine metabolism, and arginine biosynthesis were also perturbed in survivors with abnormal eGFR.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Energy Metabolism , Glomerular Filtration Rate , Kidney Diseases/etiology , Kidney Diseases/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Kidney Diseases/diagnosis , Kidney Function Tests , Male , Metabolic Networks and Pathways , Metabolome , Metabolomics/methods , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Patient Discharge , Severity of Illness Index , Symptom Assessment
9.
Clin Geriatr Med ; 37(4): 509-522, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1446493

ABSTRACT

In this article, the authors review manifestations of COVID-19 in older adults, normal physiologic changes and frequent comorbidities of aging that increase pathogenicity, factors contributing to overwhelming viral spread among seniors, negative effects on health and well-being resulting from measures to control the virus, and health-system improvements necessary to protect and care for this vulnerable population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Infection Control , Nursing Homes , Age Factors , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Symptom Assessment
11.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 658, 2021 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440917

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Whilst the impact of Covid-19 infection in pregnant women has been examined, there is a scarcity of data on pregnant women in the Middle East. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the impact of Covid-19 infection on pregnant women in the United Arab Emirates population. METHODS: A case-control study was carried out to compare the clinical course and outcome of pregnancy in 79 pregnant women with Covid-19 and 85 non-pregnant women with Covid-19 admitted to Latifa Hospital in Dubai between March and June 2020. RESULTS: Although Pregnant women presented with fewer symptoms such as fever, cough, sore throat, and shortness of breath compared to non-pregnant women; yet they ran a much more severe course of illness. On admission, 12/79 (15.2%) Vs 2/85 (2.4%) had a chest radiograph score [on a scale 1-6] of ≥3 (p-value = 0.0039). On discharge, 6/79 (7.6%) Vs 1/85 (1.2%) had a score ≥3 (p-value = 0.0438). They also had much higher levels of laboratory indicators of severity with values above reference ranges for C-Reactive Protein [(28 (38.3%) Vs 13 (17.6%)] with p < 0.004; and for D-dimer [32 (50.8%) Vs 3(6%)]; with p < 0.001. They required more ICU admissions: 10/79 (12.6%) Vs 1/85 (1.2%) with p=0.0036; and suffered more complications: 9/79 (11.4%) Vs 1/85 (1.2%) with p=0.0066; of Covid-19 infection, particularly in late pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: Pregnant women presented with fewer Covid-19 symptoms but ran a much more severe course of illness compared to non-pregnant women with the disease. They had worse chest radiograph scores and much higher levels of laboratory indicators of disease severity. They had more ICU admissions and suffered more complications of Covid-19 infection, such as risk for miscarriage and preterm deliveries. Pregnancy with Covid-19 infection, could, therefore, be categorised as high-risk pregnancy and requires management by an obstetric and medical multidisciplinary team.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Premature Birth , Radiography, Thoracic , Symptom Assessment , Abortion, Spontaneous/epidemiology , Abortion, Spontaneous/etiology , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , Case-Control Studies , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/prevention & control , Male , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Pregnancy, High-Risk , Premature Birth/epidemiology , Premature Birth/etiology , Radiography, Thoracic/methods , Radiography, Thoracic/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Symptom Assessment/methods , Symptom Assessment/statistics & numerical data , United Arab Emirates/epidemiology
12.
Ghana Med J ; 54(4 Suppl): 97-99, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1436200

ABSTRACT

Computed Tomography (CT) scan of the chest plays an important role in the diagnosis and management of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the disease caused by the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. COVID-19 pneumonia shows typical CT Scan features which can aid diagnoses and therefore help in the early detection and isolation of infected patients. CT scanners are readily available in many parts of Ghana. It is able to show findings typical for COVID-19 infection of the chest, even in instances where Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RTPCR) misses the diagnosis. Little is known about the diagnostic potential of chest CT scan and COVID-19 among physicians even though CT scan offers a high diagnostic accuracy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Symptom Assessment/methods , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , Early Diagnosis , Female , Ghana , Humans , Lung/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity
13.
Ghana Med J ; 54(4 Suppl): 46-51, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1436194

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The novel corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was diagnosed in Wuhan, China in December 2019 and, in Ghana, in March 2020. As of 30th July 2020, Ghana had recorded 35,142 cases. COVID-19 which can be transmitted by both symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals usually manifest as pneumonia with symptoms like fever, cough, dyspnoea and fatigue. The current non-availability of a vaccine or drug for COVID-19 management calls for early detection and isolation of affected individuals. Chest imaging has become an integral part of patient management with chest radiography serving as a primary imaging modality in many centres. Methods: The study was a retrospective study conducted at Ga East Municipal Hospital (GEMH). Chest radiographs of patients with mild to moderate disease managed at GEMH were evaluated. The age, gender, symptom status, comorbidities and chest x-ray findings of the patients were documented. Results: 11.4 % of the patients had some form of respiratory abnormality on chest radiography with 88.9% showing COVID-19 pneumonia features. 93.8% showed ground glass opacities (GGO), with 3.1% each showing consolidation (CN) only and CN with GGO. There was a significant association between COVID-19 radiographic features and patient's age, symptom status and comorbidities but not with gender. Conclusion: Most radiographs were normal with only 11% showing COVID-19-like abnormality. There was a significant association between age, symptom status and comorbidities with the presence of COVID-19 like features but not for gender. There was no association between the extent of the lung changes and patient characteristics. Funding: None declared.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Radiography, Thoracic/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Female , Ghana/epidemiology , Hospitals, Urban , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index , Symptom Assessment/methods , Young Adult
14.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(17): 5556-5560, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1417453

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This paper aims to develop four prediction models for recovered and unrecovered cases using descriptive data of patients and symptoms of CoVID-19 patients. The developed prediction models aim to extract the important variables in predicting recovered cases by using the binary values for recovered cases. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The data were collected from different countries all over the world. The input of the prediction model contains 28 symptoms and four variables of the patient's information. Symptoms of COVID-19 include a high fever, low fever, sore throat, cough, and so on, where patient metadata includes Province, county, sex, and age. The dataset contains 1254 patients with 664 recovered cases. To develop prediction models, four models are used including neural network, support vector machine, CHAID, and QUEST models. To develop prediction models, the dataset is divided into train and test datasets with splitting ratios equal to 70%, and 30%, respectively. RESULTS: The results showed that the neural network model is the most effective model in developing COVID-19 prediction with the highest performance metrics using train and test datasets. The results found that recovered cases are associated with the place of the patients mainly, province of the patient. Besides the results showed that high fever is not strongly associated with recovered cases, where cough and low fever are strongly associated with recovered cases. In addition, the country, sex, and age of the patients have higher importance than other patient's symptoms in COVID-19 development. CONCLUSIONS: The results revealed that the prediction models of the recovered COVID-19 cases can be effectively predicted using patient characteristics and symptoms, besides the neural network model is the most effective model to create a COVID -19 prediction model. Finally, the research provides empirical evidence that recovered cases of COVID-19 are closely related to patients' provinces.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Models, Theoretical , Neural Networks, Computer , SARS-CoV-2 , Support Vector Machine , Symptom Assessment , Humans , Metadata
15.
Med Mal Infect ; 50(3): 243-251, 2020 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1409419

ABSTRACT

Since the first case of human infection by the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in Saudi Arabia in June 2012, more than 2260 cases of confirmed MERS-CoV infection and 803 related deaths have been reported since the 16th of October 2018. The vast majority of these cases (71%) were reported in Saudi Arabia but the epidemic has now spread to 27 countries and has not ceased 6 years later, unlike SARS-CoV that disappeared a little less than 2 years after emerging. Due to the high fatality rate observed in MERS-CoV infected patients (36%), much effort has been put into understanding the origin and pathophysiology of this novel coronavirus to prevent it from becoming endemic in humans. This review focuses in particular on the origin, epidemiology and clinical manifestations of MERS-CoV, as well as the diagnosis and treatment of infected patients. The experience gained over recent years on how to manage the different risks related to this kind of epidemic will be key to being prepared for future outbreaks of communicable disease.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/virology , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/physiology , Animals , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Camelus/virology , Chiroptera/virology , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/epidemiology , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/prevention & control , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/virology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Disease Management , Disease Reservoirs , Epidemics , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Genome, Viral , Global Health , Humans , Hygiene , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/genetics , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/isolation & purification , Risk Factors , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Survival Rate , Symptom Assessment , Travel , Viral Vaccines
16.
Pediatrics ; 148(3)2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394618

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To characterize the demographics, comorbidities, symptoms, in-hospital treatments, and health outcomes among children and adolescents diagnosed or hospitalized with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and to compare them in secondary analyses with patients diagnosed with previous seasonal influenza in 2017-2018. METHODS: International network cohort using real-world data from European primary care records (France, Germany, and Spain), South Korean claims and US claims, and hospital databases. We included children and adolescents diagnosed and/or hospitalized with COVID-19 at age <18 between January and June 2020. We described baseline demographics, comorbidities, symptoms, 30-day in-hospital treatments, and outcomes including hospitalization, pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children, and death. RESULTS: A total of 242 158 children and adolescents diagnosed and 9769 hospitalized with COVID-19 and 2 084 180 diagnosed with influenza were studied. Comorbidities including neurodevelopmental disorders, heart disease, and cancer were more common among those hospitalized with versus diagnosed with COVID-19. Dyspnea, bronchiolitis, anosmia, and gastrointestinal symptoms were more common in COVID-19 than influenza. In-hospital prevalent treatments for COVID-19 included repurposed medications (<10%) and adjunctive therapies: systemic corticosteroids (6.8%-7.6%), famotidine (9.0%-28.1%), and antithrombotics such as aspirin (2.0%-21.4%), heparin (2.2%-18.1%), and enoxaparin (2.8%-14.8%). Hospitalization was observed in 0.3% to 1.3% of the cohort diagnosed with COVID-19, with undetectable (n < 5 per database) 30-day fatality. Thirty-day outcomes including pneumonia and hypoxemia were more frequent in COVID-19 than influenza. CONCLUSIONS: Despite negligible fatality, complications including hospitalization, hypoxemia, and pneumonia were more frequent in children and adolescents with COVID-19 than with influenza. Dyspnea, anosmia, and gastrointestinal symptoms could help differentiate diagnoses. A wide range of medications was used for the inpatient management of pediatric COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Age Distribution , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Databases, Factual , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , France/epidemiology , Germany/epidemiology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Influenza, Human/complications , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Male , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Spain/epidemiology , Symptom Assessment , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , United States/epidemiology
17.
Viruses ; 13(9)2021 09 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1390791

ABSTRACT

While self-reported Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) symptom checklists have been extensively used during the pandemic, they have not been sufficiently validated from a psychometric perspective. We, therefore, used advanced psychometric modelling to explore the construct validity and internal consistency of an online self-reported COVID-19 symptom checklist and suggested adaptations where necessary. Fit to the Rasch model was examined in a sample of 1638 Austrian citizens who completed the checklist on up to 20 days during a lockdown. The items' fatigue', 'headache' and 'sneezing' had the highest likelihood to be affirmed. The longitudinal application of the symptom checklist increased the fit to the Rasch model. The item 'cough' showed a significant misfit to the fundamental measurement model and an additional dependency to 'dry cough/no sputum production'. Several personal factors, such as gender, age group, educational status, COVID-19 test status, comorbidities, immunosuppressive medication, pregnancy and pollen allergy led to systematic differences in the patterns of how symptoms were affirmed. Raw scores' adjustments ranged from ±0.01 to ±0.25 on the metric scales (0 to 10). Except for some basic adaptations that increases the scale's construct validity and internal consistency, the present analysis supports the combination of items. More accurate item wordings co-created with laypersons would lead to a common understanding of what is meant by a specific symptom. Adjustments for personal factors and comorbidities would allow for better clinical interpretations of self-reported symptom data.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Checklist , Psychometrics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Austria/epidemiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , Child , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Psychometrics/methods , Public Health Surveillance , Self Report , Surveys and Questionnaires , Symptom Assessment , Young Adult
18.
Rev Mal Respir ; 37(6): 505-510, 2020 Jun.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1386577

ABSTRACT

The French-language Respiratory Medicine Society (SPLF) proposes a guide for the follow-up of patients who have presented with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia. The proposals are based on known data from previous epidemics, on acute lesions observed in SARS-CoV-2 patients and on expert opinion. This guide proposes a follow-up based on three categories of patients: (1) patients managed outside hospital for possible or proven SARS-CoV-2 infection, referred by their physician for persistent dyspnoea; (2) patients hospitalized for SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia in a medical unit; (3) patients hospitalized for SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia in an intensive care unit. The subsequent follow-up will have to be adapted to the initial assessment. This guide emphasises the possibility of others causes of dyspnoea (cardiac, thromboembolic, hyperventilation syndrome…). These proposals may evolve over time as more knowledge becomes available.


Subject(s)
Aftercare/methods , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Aftercare/standards , Ambulatory Care/methods , Ambulatory Care/standards , COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/rehabilitation , Critical Care/methods , Critical Care/standards , Diagnostic Techniques, Respiratory System/standards , Disease Management , Emergency Medical Services/methods , Emergency Medical Services/standards , Health Priorities , Hospitalization , Humans , Inpatients , Outpatients , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/rehabilitation , Respiratory Therapy/methods , Respiratory Therapy/standards , Symptom Assessment/methods , Symptom Assessment/standards , Thromboembolism/prevention & control , Thrombophilia/drug therapy , Thrombophilia/etiology
19.
J Med Virol ; 92(9): 1681-1683, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384206

ABSTRACT

As an emerging infectious disease, the clinical course and virological course of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection remain to be further investigated. In this case report, we described a case of SARS-CoV-2 infection with the clinical course for more than 2 months. This patient had recovered from pneumonia after treatment. The viral RNA of throat swabs became negative and the viral-specific antibodies were produced during the recovery period. However, the viral RNA reappeared and additionally persisted in throat swabs for more than 40 days. In addition, the viral RNA was detected in multiple types of specimens with extremely high titers in the saliva. In conclusion, these findings indicate that SARS-CoV-2 can cause a long clinical course. The coexistence of viral RNA and viral-specific antibodies may imply an immune evasion of SARS-CoV-2 from the host's immune system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Virus Shedding , Adult , Biomarkers , Disease Management , Humans , Male , Symptom Assessment , Time Factors , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
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