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1.
Pediatr Rheumatol Online J ; 19(1): 172, 2021 Dec 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1577202

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C) is a rare hyperinflammatory condition that occurs following SARS-CoV-2 infection. There is a paucity of research describing risk factors, optimal management, and outcomes of this life-threatening condition. METHODS: This is a case series of 26 patients diagnosed with MIS-C in a West Michigan pediatric tertiary care center from April 2020 to February 2021. We describe the clinical, imaging, and laboratory characteristics of these patients and detail their treatments and outcomes with comparisons between Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) and non-PICU patients. Categorical testing utilized Chi-square and Fisher's Exact tests. Comparison between groups used T-tests or Kruskal-Wallis. RESULTS: Fifteen patients (57%) required intensive care. There was no statistically significant difference in demographics between PICU and non-PICU patients, however all Black patients required intensive care. Gastrointestinal symptoms were present in 22 patients (84%). Seventeen patients (65%) had Kawasaki-like features and 12 (46%) developed coronary artery dilation. Patients requiring intensive care were less likely to have a reported history of COVID-19 disease or exposure (p = 0.0362). Statistically significant differences were also noted in peak ferritin (p = 0.0075), procalcitonin, and BNP in those who required intensive care. CONCLUSIONS: Although overlap exists with other hyperinflammatory conditions, our study provides further evidence that MIS-C is a distinct, albeit heterogenous, disorder with various degrees of cardiac involvement. Anakinra, in conjunction with steroid use, appears to be effective and safe in the treatment of MIS-C. This report identifies procalcitonin, peak ferritin, and BNP as potentially useful biomarkers for severity of disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/etiology , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/therapy , Child , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric , Male , Michigan/epidemiology , Risk Factors , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , Treatment Outcome
3.
Nat Med ; 27(4): 601-615, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1517636

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the pathogen responsible for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, which has resulted in global healthcare crises and strained health resources. As the population of patients recovering from COVID-19 grows, it is paramount to establish an understanding of the healthcare issues surrounding them. COVID-19 is now recognized as a multi-organ disease with a broad spectrum of manifestations. Similarly to post-acute viral syndromes described in survivors of other virulent coronavirus epidemics, there are increasing reports of persistent and prolonged effects after acute COVID-19. Patient advocacy groups, many members of which identify themselves as long haulers, have helped contribute to the recognition of post-acute COVID-19, a syndrome characterized by persistent symptoms and/or delayed or long-term complications beyond 4 weeks from the onset of symptoms. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the current literature on post-acute COVID-19, its pathophysiology and its organ-specific sequelae. Finally, we discuss relevant considerations for the multidisciplinary care of COVID-19 survivors and propose a framework for the identification of those at high risk for post-acute COVID-19 and their coordinated management through dedicated COVID-19 clinics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Acute Disease , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/ethnology , COVID-19/therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Humans , Patient Advocacy , Syndrome , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control
4.
Viruses ; 13(10)2021 10 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463839

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection in children can trigger cardiovascular manifestations potentially requiring an intensive treatment and defining a new entity named Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C), whose features partially overlap with Kawasaki Disease (KD). A cross-sectional study including all diagnoses of MIS-C and KD from April 2020 to May 2021 in our metropolitan area was conducted evaluating clinical, laboratory (including immunological response, cytokines, and markers of myocardial damage), and cardiac (coronary and non-coronary) features at onset of the diseases. Evolution of ventricular dysfunction, valve regurgitations, and coronary lesions was documented. The severity of the disease was also considered based on the need for inotropic support and ICU admission. Twenty-four MIS-C were diagnosed (14 boys, median age 82 months): 13/24 cases (54.17%) presented left ventricular dysfunction, 12/24 (50%) required inotropic support, and 10/24 (41.67%) developed coronary anomalies (CALs). All patients received steroids and IVIG at a median time of 5 days (IQR1:4, IQR3:6.5) from onset of fever and heart function normalized 6 days (IQR1: 5, IQR3: 7) after therapy, while CALs persisted in one. One patient (12.5%) required infliximab because of refractory disease and still presented CALs 18 days after therapy. During the same study period, 15 KD were diagnosed: none had ventricular dysfunction, while 7/15 (46.67%) developed CALs. Three out of 15 patients (20%) still presented CALs 46 days from onset. Compared to KD, MIS-C pts have significantly higher IL8 and similar lymphocytes subpopulations. Despite a more severe presentation and initial cardiac findings compared to KD, the myocardial injury in MIS-C has a rapid response to immunomodulatory treatment (median time 6 days), in terms of ventricular function, valve regurgitations, and troponin. Incidence of CALs is similar at onset, but it tends to regress in most of the cases of MIS-C differently than in KD where CALs persist in up to 40% in the subacute stage after treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/pathology , Myocardium/pathology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/pathology , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left/pathology , Adolescent , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Interleukin-10/blood , Interleukin-8/blood , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/diagnosis , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left/virology
5.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(9): e2126456, 2021 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1432338

ABSTRACT

Importance: Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in adults (MIS-A) has not been well described. Improved diagnosis and treatment of MIS-A might mitigate COVID-19 morbidity and mortality. Objective: To summarize the descriptive epidemiology and clinical characteristics of MIS-A. Evidence Review: This systematic review identified patients with MIS-A using 3 strategies: (1) literature review from May 1, 2020, to May 25, 2021, by searching MEDLINE, Embase, Global Health, CAB Abstracts, PsycINFO, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), Academic Search Complete, Scopus, World Health Organization Global COVID-19 Literature Database, and Google Scholar; (2) voluntary reports of MIS-A to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); and (3) reports among persons aged 18 to 20 years in the CDC surveillance system for MIS in children. Findings: Of 221 patients with MIS-A, the median age was 21 (interquartile range [IQR], 19-34) years, and 154 of 219 (70%) with data available were men. Sixty of 169 patients (36%) were non-Hispanic Black individuals, and 122 of 209 (58%) had no underlying comorbidity. One hundred two of 149 patients (68%) noted a previous symptomatic COVID-19-like illness (median, 28 [IQR, 20-36] days previously). Most patients with MIS-A presented with fever (197 of 205 [96%]), hypotension (133 of 220 [60%]), cardiac dysfunction (114 of 210 [54%]), shortness of breath (102 of 198 [52%]), and/or diarrhea (102 of 197 [52%]). The median number of organ systems involved was 5 (IQR, 4-6). Median hospital stay was 8 (IQR, 5-12) days; 115 of 201 patients (57%) were admitted to the intensive care unit; 101 of 213 (47%) required respiratory support, and 15 of 220 (7%) died. Most patients (176 of 195 [90%]) had elevated markers of coagulopathy and/or inflammation and a positive SARS-CoV-2 serologic finding (139 of 194 [72%]). Ten patients with MIS-A presented with Kawasaki disease. Conclusions and Relevance: These findings suggest that MIS-A is a serious hyperinflammatory condition that presents approximately 4 weeks after onset of acute COVID-19 with extrapulmonary multiorgan dysfunction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/etiology , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/virology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology , Young Adult
6.
Pediatr Clin North Am ; 68(5): 1093-1101, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1428327

ABSTRACT

This article summarizes clinical observations and management strategies in pediatric type 1 diabetes (T1D) during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Despite initial fears that children with diabetes would, similar to adults with diabetes, be at risk for severe COVID-19, most pediatric patients with a history of T1D who developed COVID-19 had mild disease or were asymptomatic similar to their peers without diabetes. The article also summarizes the use of telemedicine to provide ongoing care for pediatric patients with T1D during the COVID-19 pandemic. Finally, the article highlights important lessons learned about management of pediatric diabetes during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/therapy , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , Telemedicine/methods , Child , Comorbidity , Humans
7.
Pediatr Clin North Am ; 68(5): 1081-1091, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1415700

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has spread rapidly across the world in 2020, affecting both adults and, to a lesser extent, children. In this article, the authors describe the neurologic manifestations of COVID-19 in children, including the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, laboratory and imaging findings, and treatment options. The management of patients with concomitant neuroimmunologic disorders and drug interactions between medications used to treat COVID-19 and other neurologic disorders (especially immune-modifying drugs) is also discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Child Welfare/statistics & numerical data , Nervous System Diseases/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Child , Comorbidity , Humans
9.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 57(2)2021 Jan 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389436

ABSTRACT

Uncertainty analysis is the process of identifying limitations in knowledge and evaluating their implications for scientific conclusions. Uncertainty analysis is a stable component of risk assessment and is increasingly used in decision making on complex health issues. Uncertainties should be identified in a structured way and prioritized according to their likely impact on the outcome of scientific conclusions. Uncertainty is inherent to the rare diseases (RD) area, where research and healthcare have to cope with knowledge gaps due to the rarity of the conditions; yet a systematic approach toward uncertainties is not usually undertaken. The uncertainty issue is particularly relevant to multifactorial RD, whose etiopathogenesis involves environmental factors and genetic predisposition. Three case studies are presented: the newly recognized acute multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children and adolescents associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection; the assessment of risk factors for neural tube defects; and the genotype-phenotype correlation in familial Mediterranean fever. Each case study proposes the initial identification of the main epistemic and sampling uncertainties and their impacts. Uncertainty analysis in RD may present aspects similar to those encountered when conducting risk assessment in data-poor scenarios; therefore, approaches such as expert knowledge elicitation may be considered. The RD community has a main strength in managing uncertainty, as it proactively develops stakeholder involvement, data sharing and open science. The open science approaches can be profitably integrated by structured uncertainty analysis, especially when dealing with multifactorial RD involving environmental and genetic risk factors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Familial Mediterranean Fever/epidemiology , Neural Tube Defects/epidemiology , Rare Diseases/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Uncertainty , Causality , Familial Mediterranean Fever/genetics , Genotype , Humans , Knowledge , Phenotype , Rare Diseases/etiology , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Lancet Child Adolesc Health ; 4(9): 669-677, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1386995

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In April, 2020, clinicians in the UK observed a cluster of children with unexplained inflammation requiring admission to paediatric intensive care units (PICUs). We aimed to describe the clinical characteristics, course, management, and outcomes of patients admitted to PICUs with this condition, which is now known as paediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome temporally associated with SARS-CoV-2 (PIMS-TS). METHODS: We did a multicentre observational study of children (aged <18 years), admitted to PICUs in the UK between April 1 and May 10, 2020, fulfilling the case definition of PIMS-TS published by the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health. We analysed routinely collected, de-identified data, including demographic details, presenting clinical features, underlying comorbidities, laboratory markers, echocardiographic findings, interventions, treatments, and outcomes; serology information was collected if available. PICU admission rates of PIMS-TS were compared with historical trends of PICU admissions for four similar inflammatory conditions (Kawasaki disease, toxic shock syndrome, haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, and macrophage activation syndrome). FINDINGS: 78 cases of PIMS-TS were reported by 21 of 23 PICUs in the UK. Historical data for similar inflammatory conditions showed a mean of one (95% CI 0·85-1·22) admission per week, compared to an average of 14 admissions per week for PIMS-TS and a peak of 32 admissions per week during the study period. The median age of patients was 11 years (IQR 8-14). Male patients (52 [67%] of 78) and those from ethnic minority backgrounds (61 [78%] of 78) were over-represented. Fever (78 [100%] patients), shock (68 [87%]), abdominal pain (48 [62%]), vomiting (49 [63%]), and diarrhoea (50 [64%]) were common presenting features. Longitudinal data over the first 4 days of admission showed a serial reduction in C-reactive protein (from a median of 264 mg/L on day 1 to 96 mg/L on day 4), D-dimer (4030 µg/L to 1659 µg/L), and ferritin (1042 µg/L to 757 µg/L), whereas the lymphocyte count increased to more than 1·0 × 109 cells per L by day 3 and troponin increased over the 4 days (from a median of 157 ng/mL to 358 ng/mL). 36 (46%) of 78 patients were invasively ventilated and 65 (83%) needed vasoactive infusions; 57 (73%) received steroids, 59 (76%) received intravenous immunoglobulin, and 17 (22%) received biologic therapies. 28 (36%) had evidence of coronary artery abnormalities (18 aneurysms and ten echogenicity). Three children needed extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and two children died. INTERPRETATION: During the study period, the rate of PICU admissions for PIMS-TS was at least 11-fold higher than historical trends for similar inflammatory conditions. Clinical presentations and treatments varied. Coronary artery aneurysms appear to be an important complication. Although immediate survival is high, the long-term outcomes of children with PIMS-TS are unknown. FUNDING: None.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric/statistics & numerical data , Patient Admission/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , Adolescent , COVID-19 , Child , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/etiology , United Kingdom/epidemiology
11.
Am J Otolaryngol ; 43(1): 103199, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384898

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is a severe acute respiratory syndrome caused by SARS-CoV-2. OBJECTIVE: To study the demographic and clinical presentations of COVID-19 with their types including MIS-C and Kawasaki among children who were admitted to Doctor Jamal Ahmad Rashid Pediatric Teaching Hospital (DJARPTH) at Sulaimaniyah city, Iraq. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A prospective cohort study was conducted from June to December 2020 in which 50 cases suspected of COVID-19 were enrolled in the study that was admitted at the first visit to the emergency department of DJARPTH and their age ranged between 3 months to 14 years. Then, the collected data were divided into 3 groups: COVID-19, Kawasaki disease (KD), and MIS-C. RESULTS: The fever was the most common presented symptom in all cases with COVID-19 regardless of the severity. COVID-19 may be presented as KD as well as MIS-C. There is an increase in the number of Kawasaki cases since 2019 by 6.7 fold due to the increased number of COVID-19 cases in children. Death was more related to MIS-C and primary COVID-19 diseases. Most COVID-19 cases presented with pericardial effusion; although coronary involvement and LV dysfunction mostly seen with MIS-C cases. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 is not uncommon in pediatric patients and it presents as either primary, MIS-C, and KD. Most of the deaths and ICU outcomes were related to MIS-C presentations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Iraq/epidemiology , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
12.
J Infect Dis ; 224(4): 606-615, 2021 08 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1369104

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) is a severe clinical phenotype of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection that remains poorly understood. METHODS: Hospitalized children <18 years of age with suspected coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) (N = 53) were recruited into a prospective cohort study; 32 had confirmed COVID-19, with 16 meeting the US Centers for Disease Control criteria for MIS-C. Differences in nasopharyngeal viral ribonucleic acid (RNA) levels, SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity, and cytokine/chemokine profiles were examined, including after adjustments for age and sex. RESULTS: The median ages for those with and without MIS-C were 8.7 years (interquartile range [IQR], 5.5-13.9) and 2.2 years (IQR, 1.1-10.5), respectively (P = .18), and nasopharyngeal levels of SARS-CoV-2 RNA did not differ significantly between the 2 groups (median 63 848.25 copies/mL versus 307.1 copies/mL, P = .66); 75% of those with MIS-C were antibody positive compared with 44% without (P = .026). Levels of 14 of 37 cytokines/chemokines (interleukin [IL]-1RA, IL-2RA, IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-10, IL-15, IL-18, monocyte chemoattractant protein [MCP]-1, IP-10, macrophage-inflammatory protein [MIP]-1α, MCP-2, MIP-1ß, eotaxin) were significantly higher in children with MIS-C compared to those without, irrespective of age or sex (false discovery rate <0.05; P < .05). CONCLUSIONS: The distinct pattern of heightened cytokine/chemokine dysregulation observed with MIS-C, compared with acute COVID-19, occurs across the pediatric age spectrum and with similar levels of nasopharyngeal SARS-CoV-2 RNA.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Chemokines/metabolism , Cytokines/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/metabolism , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology , Adolescent , Age Factors , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Biomarkers , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Male , RNA, Viral , Serologic Tests , Severity of Illness Index , Sex Factors , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Viral Load
13.
Med J Aust ; 215(5): 217-221, 2021 09 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1355152

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To examine the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of SARS-CoV-2-positive children in Australia during 2020. DESIGN, SETTING: Multicentre retrospective study in 16 hospitals of the Paediatric Research in Emergency Departments International Collaborative (PREDICT) network; eleven in Victoria, five in four other Australian states. PARTICIPANTS: Children aged 0-17 years who presented to hospital-based COVID-19 testing clinics, hospital wards, or emergency departments during 1 February - 30 September 2020 and who were positive for SARS-CoV-2. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Epidemiological and clinical characteristics of children positive for SARS-CoV-2. RESULTS: A total of 393 SARS-CoV-2-positive children (181 girls, 46%) presented to the participating hospitals (426 presentations, including 131 to emergency departments [31%]), the first on 3 February 2020. Thirty-three children presented more than once (8%), including two who were transferred to participating tertiary centres (0.5%). The median age of the children was 5.3 years (IQR, 1.9-12.0 years; range, 10 days to 17.9 years). Hospital admissions followed 51 of 426 presentations (12%; 44 children), including 17 patients who were managed remotely by hospital in the home. Only 16 of the 426 presentations led to hospital medical interventions (4%). Two children (0.5%) were diagnosed with the paediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome temporally associated with SARS-CoV-2 (PIMS-TS). CONCLUSION: The clinical course for most SARS-CoV-2-positive children who presented to Australian hospitals was mild, and did not require medical intervention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Adolescent , Ambulatory Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Australia , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Retrospective Studies , Symptom Assessment
14.
Pediatr Infect Dis J ; 40(11): e400-e406, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354322

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The incidence of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) varies by race and ethnicity. This study assessed whether disparities in MIS-C in the United States by race and ethnicity exceed known disparities in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) incidence. METHODS: We compared the distribution of race and ethnicity among patients with MIS-C (<21 years of age, termed children) with onset March 2020 to February 2021 to that of children with COVID-19 and in the general population. Analysis was restricted to 369 counties with high completeness of race and ethnicity reporting for MIS-C and COVID-19. For each racial and ethnic group, observed numbers of patients with MIS-C were compared with expected numbers (observed/expected ratio) in children with COVID-19 and in the general population within these counties. RESULTS: Compared with children in the general population, MIS-C was more frequent among Hispanic (139% of expected) and non-Hispanic Black children (183%) and less frequent among non-Hispanic White (64%) and non-Hispanic Asian children (48%). Compared with children with COVID-19, MIS-C was more frequent in non-Hispanic Black children (207% of expected) and less frequent in non-Hispanic White children (68%); however, frequency was not different among Hispanic (102%) and non-Hispanic Asian (74%) children. CONCLUSIONS: Disparities in MIS-C by race and ethnicity exist, even after controlling for COVID-19 disparities and geographic variations. The high proportion of MIS-C among Hispanic children and low proportion among non-Hispanic Asian children align with COVID-19 rates, while the high proportion among non-Hispanic Black children and low proportion among non-Hispanic White children are not explainable by COVID-19 rates.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/etiology , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/history , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , History, 21st Century , Humans , Incidence , Infant , Male , Public Health Surveillance , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/history , United States/epidemiology , United States/ethnology , Young Adult
15.
Lancet Child Adolesc Health ; 5(7): 473-482, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1349610

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Paediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome temporally associated with SARS-CoV-2 (PIMS-TS) is a new, rare, post-infectious complication of SARS-CoV-2 infection in children. We aimed to describe the 6-month outcomes of PIMS-TS. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study comprised children (aged <18 years) who fulfilled the UK Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) diagnostic criteria for PIMS-TS and were admitted to Great Ormond Street Hospital (London, UK) between April 4 and Sept 1, 2020. Patients were followed up by a multidisciplinary team of specialists at 6 weeks and 6 months after admission. Biochemical and functional outcomes were analysed. FINDINGS: 46 children were included in this study. The median age at presentation was 10·2 years (IQR 8·8-13·3), 30 (65%) patients were male and 16 (35%) were female, 37 (80%) were from minority ethnic groups, and eight (17%) had pre-existing comorbidities. All patients had elevated markers of systemic inflammation at baseline. None of the patients died. By 6 months, systemic inflammation was resolved in all but one patient. 38 (90%) of 42 patients who had positive SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies within 6 weeks of admission remained seropositive at 6 months. Echocardiograms were normal in 44 (96%) of 46 patients by 6 months, and gastrointestinal symptoms that were reported in 45 (98%) of 46 patients at onset were present in six (13%) of 46 patients at 6 months. Renal, haematological, and otolaryngological findings largely resolved by 6 months. Although minor abnormalities were identified on neurological examination in 24 (52%) of 46 patients at 6 weeks and in 18 (39%) of 46 at 6 months, we found minimal functional impairment at 6 months (median Expanded Disability Status Scale score 0 [IQR 0-1]). Median manual muscle test-8 scores improved from 53 (IQR 43-64) during hospital admission to 80 (IQR 68-80) at 6 months, but 18 (45%) of 40 patients showed 6-min walk test results below the third centile for their age or sex at 6 months. PedsQL responses revealed severe emotional difficulties at 6 months (seven [18%] of 38 by parental report and eight [22%] of 38 by self report). 45 (98%) of 46 patients were back in full-time education (virtually or face to face) by 6 months. INTERPRETATION: Despite initial severe illness, few organ-specific sequelae were observed at 6 months. Ongoing concerns requiring physical re-conditioning and mental health support remained, and physiotherapy assessments revealed persisting poor exercise tolerance. Longer-term follow-up will help define the extended natural history of PIMS-TS. FUNDING: None.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Adolescent , Child , Cohort Studies , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies , United Kingdom/epidemiology
16.
J Am Soc Echocardiogr ; 34(8): 862-876, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1338389

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) associated with coronavirus disease 2019 causes significant cardiovascular involvement, which can be a determinant of clinical course and outcome. The aim of this study was to investigate whether echocardiographic measures of ventricular function were independently associated with adverse clinical course and cardiac sequelae in patients with MIS-C. METHODS: In a longitudinal observational study of 54 patients with MIS-C (mean age, 6.8 ± 4.4 years; 46% male; 56% African American), measures of ventricular function and morphometry at initial presentation, predischarge, and at a median of 3- and 10-week follow-up were retrospectively analyzed and were compared with those in 108 age- and gender-matched normal control subjects. The magnitude of strain is expressed as an absolute value. Risk stratification for adverse clinical course and outcomes were analyzed among the tertiles of clinical and echocardiographic data using analysis of variance and univariate and multivariate regression. RESULTS: Median left ventricular apical four-chamber peak longitudinal strain (LVA4LS) and left ventricular global longitudinal strain (LVGLS) at initial presentation were significantly decreased in patients with MIS-C compared with the normal cohort (16.2% and 15.1% vs 22.3% and 22.0%, respectively, P < .01). Patients in the lowest LVA4LS tertile (<13%) had significantly higher C-reactive protein and high-sensitivity troponin, need for intensive care, and need for mechanical life support as well as longer hospital length of stay compared with those in the highest tertile (>18.5%; P < .01). Initial LVA4LS and LVGLS were normal in 13 of 54 and 10 of 39 patients, respectively. There was no mortality. In multivariate regression, only LVA4LS was associated with both the need for intensive care and length of stay. At median 10-week follow-up to date, seven of 36 patients (19%) and six of 25 patients (24%) had abnormal LVA4LS and LVGLS, respectively. Initial LVA4LS < 16.2% indicated abnormal LVA4LS at follow-up with 100% sensitivity. CONCLUSION: Impaired LVGLS and LVA4LS at initial presentation independently indicate a higher risk for adverse acute clinical course and persistent subclinical left ventricular dysfunction at 10-week follow-up, suggesting that they could be applied to identify higher risk children with MIS-C.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Echocardiography/methods , Heart Ventricles/diagnostic imaging , Pandemics , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , COVID-19/diagnosis , Child , Child, Preschool , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology
17.
World J Pediatr ; 17(4): 375-384, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1338281

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) among pediatric patients are more common in children less than 1 year of age. Our aim is to address the underlying role of immunity and inflammation conditions among different age groups of pediatric patients. METHODS: We recruited pediatric patients confirmed of moderate COVID-19 symptoms, admitted to Wuhan Children's Hospital from January 28th to April 1st in 2020. Patients were divided into four age groups (≤ 1, 1-6, 7-10, and 11-15 years). Demographic information, clinical characteristics, laboratory results of lymphocyte subsets test, immune and inflammation related markers were all evaluated. RESULTS: Analysis included 217/241 (90.0%) of patients with moderate clinical stage disease. Average recovery time of children more than 6 years old was significantly shorter than of children younger than 6 years (P = 0.001). Reduced neutrophils and increased lymphocytes were significantly most observed among patients under 1 year old (P < 0.01). CD19+ B cells were the only significantly elevated immune cells, especially among patients under 1 year old (cell proportion: n = 12, 30.0%, P < 0.001; cell count: n = 13, 32.5%, P < 0.001). While, low levels of immune related makers, such as immunoglobulin (Ig) G (P < 0.001), IgA (P < 0.001), IgM (P < 0.001) and serum complement C3c (P < 0.001), were also mostly found among patients under 1 year old, together with elevated levels of inflammation related markers, such as tumor necrosis factor γ (P = 0.007), interleukin (IL)-10 (P = 0.011), IL-6 (P = 0.008), lactate dehydrogenase (P < 0.001), and procalcitonin (P = 0.007). CONCLUSION: The higher rate of severe cases and long course of COVID-19 among children under 1 year old may be due to the lower production of antibodies and serum complements of in this age group.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/immunology , Adolescent , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Cytokines/immunology , Female , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , Infant , Lymphocyte Subsets , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Severity of Illness Index , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology
18.
Nat Med ; 27(3): 454-462, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1319036

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic continues to spread relentlessly, associated with a high frequency of respiratory failure and mortality. Children experience largely asymptomatic disease, with rare reports of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C). Identifying immune mechanisms that result in these disparate clinical phenotypes in children could provide critical insights into coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pathogenesis. Using systems serology, in this study we observed in 25 children with acute mild COVID-19 a functional phagocyte and complement-activating IgG response to SARS-CoV-2, similar to the acute responses generated in adults with mild disease. Conversely, IgA and neutrophil responses were significantly expanded in adults with severe disease. Moreover, weeks after the resolution of SARS-CoV-2 infection, children who develop MIS-C maintained highly inflammatory monocyte-activating SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies, distinguishable from acute disease in children but with antibody levels similar to those in convalescent adults. Collectively, these data provide unique insights into the potential mechanisms of IgG and IgA that might underlie differential disease severity as well as unexpected complications in children infected with SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Age of Onset , Aged , Antibodies, Neutralizing/analysis , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/analysis , Asymptomatic Infections , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/pathology , Carrier State/blood , Carrier State/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Immunity/physiology , Immunoglobulin A/blood , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Severity of Illness Index , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/blood , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Young Adult
19.
J Pediatr ; 237: 125-135.e18, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1316558

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess demographic, clinical, and biomarker features distinguishing patients with multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C); compare MIS-C sub-phenotypes; identify cytokine biosignatures; and characterize viral genome sequences. STUDY DESIGN: We performed a prospective observational cohort study of 124 children hospitalized and treated under the institutional MIS-C Task Force protocol from March to September 2020 at Children's National, a quaternary freestanding children's hospital in Washington, DC. Of this cohort, 63 of the patients had the diagnosis of MIS-C (39 confirmed, 24 probable) and 61 were from the same cohort of admitted patients who subsequently had an alternative diagnosis (controls). RESULTS: Median age and sex were similar between MIS-C and controls. Black (46%) and Latino (35%) children were over-represented in the MIS-C cohort, with Black children at greatest risk (OR 4.62, 95% CI 1.151-14.10; P = .007). Cardiac complications were more frequent in critically ill patients with MIS-C (55% vs 28%; P = .04) including systolic myocardial dysfunction (39% vs 3%; P = .001) and valvular regurgitation (33% vs 7%; P = .01). Median cycle threshold was 31.8 (27.95-35.1 IQR) in MIS-C cases, significantly greater (indicating lower viral load) than in primary severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection. Cytokines soluble interleukin 2 receptor, interleukin [IL]-10, and IL-6 were greater in patients with MIS-C compared with controls. Cytokine analysis revealed subphenotype differences between critically ill vs noncritically ill (IL-2, soluble interleukin 2 receptor, IL-10, IL-6); polymerase chain reaction positive vs negative (tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-10, IL-6); and presence vs absence of cardiac abnormalities (IL-17). Phylogenetic analysis of viral genome sequences revealed predominance of GH clade originating in Europe, with no differences comparing patients with MIS-C with patients with primary coronavirus disease 19. Treatment was well tolerated, and no children died. CONCLUSIONS: This study establishes a well-characterized large cohort of MIS-C evaluated and treated following a standardized protocol and identifies key clinical, biomarker, cytokine, viral load, and sequencing features. Long-term follow-up will provide opportunity for future insights into MIS-C and its sequelae.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/immunology , Adolescent , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Case-Control Studies , Child , Child, Preschool , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Pandemics , Phenotype , Phylogeny , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/blood , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology
20.
Pediatrics ; 148(2)2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1315900

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In spring 2020, a novel hyperinflammatory process associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) was described. The long-term impact remains unknown. We report longitudinal outcomes from a New York interdisciplinary follow-up program. METHODS: All children <21 years of age, admitted to NewYork-Presbyterian with MIS-C in 2020, were included. Children were followed at 1 to 4 weeks, 1 to 4 months, and 4 to 9 months postdischarge. RESULTS: In total, 45 children were admitted with MIS-C. The median time to last follow-up was 5.8 months (interquartile range 1.3-6.7). Of those admitted, 76% required intensive care and 64% required vasopressors and/or inotropes. On admission, patients exhibited significant nonspecific inflammation, generalized lymphopenia, and thrombocytopenia. Soluble interleukin (IL) IL-2R, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17, IL-18, and C-X-C Motif Chemokine Ligand 9 were elevated. A total of 80% (n = 36) had at least mild and 44% (n = 20) had moderate-severe echocardiographic abnormalities including coronary abnormalities (9% had a z score of 2-2.5; 7% had a z score > 2.5). Whereas most inflammatory markers normalized by 1 to 4 weeks, 32% (n = 11 of 34) exhibited persistent lymphocytosis, with increased double-negative T cells in 96% of assessed patients (n = 23 of 24). By 1 to 4 weeks, only 18% (n = 7 of 39) had mild echocardiographic findings; all had normal coronaries. At 1 to 4 months, the proportion of double-negative T cells remained elevated in 92% (median 9%). At 4 to 9 months, only 1 child had persistent mild dysfunction. One had mild mitral and/or tricuspid regurgitation. CONCLUSIONS: Although the majority of children with MIS-C present critically ill, most inflammatory and cardiac manifestations in our cohort resolved rapidly.


Subject(s)
Aftercare/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Infant , Male , New York/epidemiology , Patient Discharge/trends , Retrospective Studies
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