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1.
JAMA Netw Open ; 5(2): e2143151, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1669321

ABSTRACT

Importance: Understanding of SARS-CoV-2 infection in US children has been limited by the lack of large, multicenter studies with granular data. Objective: To examine the characteristics, changes over time, outcomes, and severity risk factors of children with SARS-CoV-2 within the National COVID Cohort Collaborative (N3C). Design, Setting, and Participants: A prospective cohort study of encounters with end dates before September 24, 2021, was conducted at 56 N3C facilities throughout the US. Participants included children younger than 19 years at initial SARS-CoV-2 testing. Main Outcomes and Measures: Case incidence and severity over time, demographic and comorbidity severity risk factors, vital sign and laboratory trajectories, clinical outcomes, and acute COVID-19 vs multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), and Delta vs pre-Delta variant differences for children with SARS-CoV-2. Results: A total of 1 068 410 children were tested for SARS-CoV-2 and 167 262 test results (15.6%) were positive (82 882 [49.6%] girls; median age, 11.9 [IQR, 6.0-16.1] years). Among the 10 245 children (6.1%) who were hospitalized, 1423 (13.9%) met the criteria for severe disease: mechanical ventilation (796 [7.8%]), vasopressor-inotropic support (868 [8.5%]), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (42 [0.4%]), or death (131 [1.3%]). Male sex (odds ratio [OR], 1.37; 95% CI, 1.21-1.56), Black/African American race (OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.06-1.47), obesity (OR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.01-1.41), and several pediatric complex chronic condition (PCCC) subcategories were associated with higher severity disease. Vital signs and many laboratory test values from the day of admission were predictive of peak disease severity. Variables associated with increased odds for MIS-C vs acute COVID-19 included male sex (OR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.33-1.90), Black/African American race (OR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.17-1.77), younger than 12 years (OR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.51-2.18), obesity (OR, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.40-2.22), and not having a pediatric complex chronic condition (OR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.65-0.80). The children with MIS-C had a more inflammatory laboratory profile and severe clinical phenotype, with higher rates of invasive ventilation (117 of 707 [16.5%] vs 514 of 8241 [6.2%]; P < .001) and need for vasoactive-inotropic support (191 of 707 [27.0%] vs 426 of 8241 [5.2%]; P < .001) compared with those who had acute COVID-19. Comparing children during the Delta vs pre-Delta eras, there was no significant change in hospitalization rate (1738 [6.0%] vs 8507 [6.2%]; P = .18) and lower odds for severe disease (179 [10.3%] vs 1242 [14.6%]) (decreased by a factor of 0.67; 95% CI, 0.57-0.79; P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study of US children with SARS-CoV-2, there were observed differences in demographic characteristics, preexisting comorbidities, and initial vital sign and laboratory values between severity subgroups. Taken together, these results suggest that early identification of children likely to progress to severe disease could be achieved using readily available data elements from the day of admission. Further work is needed to translate this knowledge into improved outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Adolescent , Age Distribution , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Comorbidity , Disease Progression , Early Diagnosis , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology , United States/epidemiology , Vital Signs
2.
Nat Immunol ; 23(2): 177-185, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1671601

ABSTRACT

Children and adolescents exhibit a broad range of clinical outcomes from SARS-CoV-2 infection, with the majority having minimal to mild symptoms. Additionally, some succumb to a severe hyperinflammatory post-infectious complication called multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), predominantly affecting previously healthy individuals. Studies characterizing the immunological differences associated with these clinical outcomes have identified pathways important for host immunity to SARS-CoV-2 and innate modulators of disease severity. In this Review, we delineate the immunological mechanisms underlying the spectrum of pediatric immune response to SARS-CoV-2 infection in comparison with that of adults.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Innate , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/immunology , Adolescent , Adolescent Development , Age Factors , Asymptomatic Diseases , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child Development , Comorbidity , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology
3.
APMIS ; 130(2): 101-110, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1650387

ABSTRACT

In the milieu of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), there are increasing reports of paediatric hyperinflammatory conditions (PHICs), including multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), paediatric multisystem inflammatory syndrome temporally associated with SARS-CoV-2 (PIMS-TS) and Kawasaki disease (KD). Few analyses of PHIC prevalence in paediatric and adolescent hospitalized COVID-19 patients exist. The purpose of this study was to perform a meta-analysis to determine a pooled prevalence estimate of PHICs in paediatric and adolescent hospitalized patients admitted for treatment due to COVID-19. Individual studies were retrieved from PubMed/Medline, EMBASE and Cochrane databases. Relevant prevalence, baseline, treatment and outcome data were extracted using a standardized datasheet. The systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted as per the PRISMA and MOOSE guidelines. Overall, 14 studies with 2202 patients admitted for treatment due to COVID-19, among whom 780 were diagnosed with PHICs, were included. The crude estimate of prevalence was 35.42%, and the pooled estimate of prevalence was 29% (random pooled ES = 0.29; 95% CIs = 0.18-0.42; p < 0.0001; z = 7.45). A sizeable proportion of paediatric and adolescent hospitalized patients admitted for treatment due to COVID-19 are diagnosed with a PHIC warranting a high index of clinical suspicion for PHICs. Further studies are required to validate these findings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Infant , Male , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/immunology , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/therapy , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/virology , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/immunology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology
4.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(2)2022 Jan 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613828

ABSTRACT

The appearance of the SARS-CoV-2 virus initiated many studies on the effects of the virus on the human body. So far, its negative influence on the functioning of many morphological and physiological units, including the nervous system, has been demonstrated. Consequently, research has been conducted on the changes that SARS-CoV-2 may cause in the cholinergic system. The aim of this study is to review the latest research from the years 2020/2021 regarding disorders in the cholinergic system caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. As a result of the research, it was found that the presence of the COVID-19 virus disrupts the activity of the cholinergic system, for example, causing the development of myasthenia gravis or a change in acetylcholine activity. The SARS-CoV-2 spike protein has a sequence similar to neurotoxins, capable of binding nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). This may be proof that SARS-CoV-2 can bind nAChR. Nicotine and caffeine have similar structures to antiviral drugs, capable of binding angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE 2) epitopes that are recognized by SARS-CoV-2, with the potential to inhibit the formation of the ACE 2/SARS-CoV-2 complex. The blocking is enhanced when nicotine and caffeine are used together with antiviral drugs. This is proof that nAChR agonists can be used along with antiviral drugs in COVID-19 therapy. As a result, it is possible to develop COVID-19 therapies that use these compounds to reduce cytokine production. Another promising therapy is non-invasive stimulation of the vagus nerve, which soothes the body's cytokine storm. Research on the influence of COVID-19 on the cholinergic system is an area that should continue to be developed as there is a need for further research. It can be firmly stated that COVID-19 causes a dysregulation of the cholinergic system, which leads to a need for further research, because there are many promising therapies that will prevent the SARS-CoV-2 virus from binding to the nicotinic receptor. There is a need for further research, both in vitro and in vivo. It should be noted that in the functioning of the cholinergic system and its connection with the activity of the COVID-19 virus, there might be many promising dependencies and solutions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Cholinergic Neurons/virology , Acetylcholinesterase/metabolism , Animals , Cytokine Release Syndrome/complications , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Humans , Myasthenia Gravis/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology , Vagus Nerve/drug effects , Vagus Nerve/virology
5.
Am J Dermatopathol ; 44(3): 183-189, 2022 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1608833

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: A new entity, which occurs a few weeks after SARS-CoV-2 infection and resembling incomplete Kawasaki disease or toxic shock syndrome, has been defined and named multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C) associated with COVID-19 in children. The aim of our study was to describe histopathological characteristics of skin lesions of MIS-C patients to reveal whether there is a relationship between histopathological features and clinical manifestations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventeen who had skin involvement of 57 patients who were diagnosed with MIS-C between December 2020 and February 2021 were included in this prospective study. Demographic information, laboratory findings, and patients' managements were recorded. Skin biopsies were taken simultaneously of each patient. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded skin samples were examined microscopically. RESULTS: The rate of skin rash was 30% in patients with MIS-C and was predominantly the maculopapular type. The anatomical distribution of the rash was evaluated as localized in 10 and generalized in 7 patients. In patients with myocarditis, C-reactive protein and fibrinogen were found to be significantly higher, and lymphocyte and albumin values were found to be low. Herpes-like inclusions were found in the microscopic examination of 2 patients with a history of zona zoster in themselves or in their mother. There was a significant difference between keratinocyte necrosis and some clinical parameters. DISCUSSION: Localized skin lesions appear to be associated with a more severe inflammatory.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Exanthema/etiology , Skin/pathology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/complications , Adolescent , Biopsy , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Exanthema/immunology , Exanthema/pathology , Female , Humans , Male , Prospective Studies , Skin/immunology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/immunology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology
6.
J Allergy Clin Immunol ; 149(3): 912-922, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1536619

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) is an acute, febrile, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-associated syndrome, often with cardiohemodynamic dysfunction. Insight into mechanism of disease is still incomplete. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to analyze immunologic features of MIS-C patients compared to febrile controls (FC). METHODS: MIS-C patients were defined by narrow criteria, including having evidence of cardiohemodynamic involvement and no macrophage activation syndrome. Samples were collected from 8 completely treatment-naive patients with MIS-C (SARS-CoV-2 serology positive), 3 patients with unclassified MIS-C-like disease (serology negative), 14 FC, and 5 MIS-C recovery (RCV). Three healthy controls (HCs) were used for comparisons of normal range. Using spectral flow cytometry, we assessed 36 parameters in antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and 29 in T cells. We used biaxial analysis and uniform manifold approximation and projection (UMAP). RESULTS: Significant elevations in cytokines including CXCL9, M-CSF, and IL-27 were found in MIS-C compared to FC. Classic monocytes and type 2 dendritic cells (DCs) were downregulated (decreased CD86, HLA-DR) versus HCs; however, type 1 DCs (CD11c+CD141+CLEC9A+) were highly activated in MIS-C patients versus FC, expressing higher levels of CD86, CD275, and atypical conventional DC markers such as CD64, CD115, and CX3CR1. CD169 and CD38 were upregulated in multiple monocyte subtypes. CD56dim/CD57-/KLRGhi/CD161+/CD38- natural killer (NK) cells were a unique subset in MIS-C versus FC without macrophage activation syndrome. CONCLUSION: Orchestrated by complex cytokine signaling, type 1 DC activation and NK dysregulation are key features in the pathophysiology of MIS-C. NK cell findings may suggest a relationship with macrophage activation syndrome, while type 1 DC upregulation implies a role for antigen cross-presentation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Dendritic Cells/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/immunology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology , ADP-ribosyl Cyclase 1/blood , Adolescent , Antigens, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross-Priming , Cytokines/blood , Dendritic Cells/classification , Female , HLA-DR Antigens/blood , Humans , Immunophenotyping , Interferon-gamma/blood , Interleukins/blood , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Male , Membrane Glycoproteins/blood , Models, Immunological , Monocytes/immunology , Sialic Acid Binding Ig-like Lectin 1/blood , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/virology , Up-Regulation
7.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 19458, 2021 09 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1447326

ABSTRACT

Efficacious therapeutics for Ebola virus disease are in great demand. Ebola virus infections mediated by mucosal exposure, and aerosolization in particular, present a novel challenge due to nontypical massive early infection of respiratory lymphoid tissues. We performed a randomized and blinded study to compare outcomes from vehicle-treated and remdesivir-treated rhesus monkeys in a lethal model of infection resulting from aerosolized Ebola virus exposure. Remdesivir treatment initiated 4 days after exposure was associated with a significant survival benefit, significant reduction in serum viral titer, and improvements in clinical pathology biomarker levels and lung histology compared to vehicle treatment. These observations indicate that remdesivir may have value in countering aerosol-induced Ebola virus disease.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Ebolavirus/drug effects , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/drug therapy , Adenosine Monophosphate/administration & dosage , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Administration, Intravenous , Aerosols , Alanine/administration & dosage , Alanine/pharmacology , Animals , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/blood , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Liver/drug effects , Liver/virology , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Lymph Nodes/drug effects , Lymph Nodes/pathology , Lymph Nodes/virology , Macaca mulatta , Male , Random Allocation , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/drug therapy , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology , Viral Load/drug effects , Viremia/drug therapy
8.
Nursing ; 51(10): 32-38, 2021 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440654

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children is a previously unrecognized and potentially catastrophic illness that appears in children who have been exposed to or diagnosed with COVID-19. As healthcare agents and members of the community, nurses are positioned to assist in identifying children who may experience previously unrecognized complications of infection from the SARS-CoV-2 virus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/nursing , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/nursing , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology , COVID-19/virology , Child , Humans , Nursing Diagnosis
9.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(9): e2126456, 2021 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1432338

ABSTRACT

IMPORTANCE: Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in adults (MIS-A) has not been well described. Improved diagnosis and treatment of MIS-A might mitigate COVID-19 morbidity and mortality. OBJECTIVE: To summarize the descriptive epidemiology and clinical characteristics of MIS-A. EVIDENCE REVIEW: This systematic review identified patients with MIS-A using 3 strategies: (1) literature review from May 1, 2020, to May 25, 2021, by searching MEDLINE, Embase, Global Health, CAB Abstracts, PsycINFO, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), Academic Search Complete, Scopus, World Health Organization Global COVID-19 Literature Database, and Google Scholar; (2) voluntary reports of MIS-A to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); and (3) reports among persons aged 18 to 20 years in the CDC surveillance system for MIS in children. FINDINGS: Of 221 patients with MIS-A, the median age was 21 (interquartile range [IQR], 19-34) years, and 154 of 219 (70%) with data available were men. Sixty of 169 patients (36%) were non-Hispanic Black individuals, and 122 of 209 (58%) had no underlying comorbidity. One hundred two of 149 patients (68%) noted a previous symptomatic COVID-19-like illness (median, 28 [IQR, 20-36] days previously). Most patients with MIS-A presented with fever (197 of 205 [96%]), hypotension (133 of 220 [60%]), cardiac dysfunction (114 of 210 [54%]), shortness of breath (102 of 198 [52%]), and/or diarrhea (102 of 197 [52%]). The median number of organ systems involved was 5 (IQR, 4-6). Median hospital stay was 8 (IQR, 5-12) days; 115 of 201 patients (57%) were admitted to the intensive care unit; 101 of 213 (47%) required respiratory support, and 15 of 220 (7%) died. Most patients (176 of 195 [90%]) had elevated markers of coagulopathy and/or inflammation and a positive SARS-CoV-2 serologic finding (139 of 194 [72%]). Ten patients with MIS-A presented with Kawasaki disease. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: These findings suggest that MIS-A is a serious hyperinflammatory condition that presents approximately 4 weeks after onset of acute COVID-19 with extrapulmonary multiorgan dysfunction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/etiology , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/virology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology , Young Adult
10.
Pediatr Infect Dis J ; 40(10): e364-e369, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1414164

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To date, there are only sporadic reports of acute abdomen and appendicitis in children with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C). METHODS: Children 17 years of age or younger assessed in 5 Latin American countries with a diagnosis of microbiologically confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and children fulfilling MIS-C definition were included. For children with acute abdomen, we investigate main radiologic patterns, surgical treatment and intraoperative findings, outcomes. FINDINGS: One-thousand ten children were enrolled. Forty-two children (4.2%) had a clinical diagnosis of acute abdomen. Four (9.5%) were diagnosed with MIS-C and did not undergo surgery. The remaining 38 children (3.8%) underwent abdominal surgery due to suspected appendicitis, 34 of them (89.7%) had an intraoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis (AA), while 4 of them had nonsurgical findings. Eight children died (0.8%), none of them being diagnosed with appendicitis. Children with AA were significantly older than those without (P < 0.0001). Children with complicated appendicitis had more frequently fever (85.7% vs. 60%), intestinal distension on the abdominal radiograph (7.1% vs. none), leukocytosis (85.7% vs. 40%) and high levels of C-reactive protein (35.7% vs. 5%), although differences were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: Our study showed that children may present with acute abdomen during COVID-19 or MIS-C, which is not always associated with intraoperative findings of appendicitis, particularly in case of MIS-C. Further studies are needed to better characterize children with acute abdomen during COVID-19 or MIS-C, to avoid delay in diagnosis of surgical conditions and at the same time, minimize unnecessary surgical approaches.


Subject(s)
Abdomen, Acute/etiology , Abdomen, Acute/virology , Appendicitis/etiology , Appendicitis/virology , COVID-19/complications , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/etiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology , Adolescent , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Latin America , Male , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
11.
Ital J Pediatr ; 47(1): 191, 2021 Sep 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1413462

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Presently, it is known that, even if less frequently than in adults, children can develop a severe new coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Children with the SARS-CoV-2 infection can have neurological signs and symptoms of disease more frequently than previously thought, revealing the involvement of the central nervous system, the peripheral nervous system, or both. Aim of this manuscript is to highlight the neurologic complications associated with SARS-CoV-2 among pediatric patients with COVID-19, suggesting when to monitor carefully neurologic development. MAIN FINDINGS: Children with a severe chronic underlying disease, infants and toddlers and those who develop the so-called multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C) are those with the highest incidence of neurological complications. Fortunately, in most of the cases, neurological manifestations, mainly represented by headache and anosmia, are mild and transient and do not significantly complicate the COVID-19 course. However, in some cases, very severe clinical problems associated with relevant alterations of neuroimaging, electroencephalography, nerve conduction studies and electromyography findings can develop. Generally, almost all the children with COVID-19 and neurological manifestations till now described have made a complete recovery, although in some cases this has occurred after several weeks of treatment. Moreover, COVID-19 infection during pregnancy has been found associated with an increased risk of obstetric complications that can lead to neurological acute and long-term manifestations in neonates. CONCLUSIONS: Based on data showing the neurologic impact of COVID-19 in pediatric age, we suggest monitoring neurological development a few months after healing in pediatric patients who have presented MIS-C, seizures or other neurological manifestations and in children of pregnant women with COVID-19 in order to detect overt and subtle deficits.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Nervous System Diseases/virology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Nervous System Diseases/diagnosis , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures/virology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis
13.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 13840, 2021 07 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1383121

ABSTRACT

To characterize the new SARS-Co-V-2 related multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) among Israeli children and to compare it with Kawasaki disease (KD). We compared, in two medical centers, the clinical and laboratory characteristics of MIS-C, KD and an intermediate group, which met the case definitions of both conditions. MIS-C patients were older, were more likely to be hypotensive, to have significant gastrointestinal symptoms, lymphopenia and thrombocytopenia and to have non-coronary abnormal findings in their echocardiogram. Lymphopenia was an independent predictor of MIS-C. Most of our MIS-C patients responded promptly to corticosteroid therapy. KD incidence in both centers was similar in 2019 and 2020. Although there is clinical overlap between KD and MIS-C, these are separate entities. Lymphopenia clearly differentiates between these entities. MIS-C patients may benefit from corticosteroids as first-line therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , Lymphopenia/pathology , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Adolescent , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Humans , Lymphopenia/diagnosis , Male , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/drug therapy , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/pathology , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/virology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/drug therapy , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/pathology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology , Young Adult
14.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(40): 1450-1456, 2020 Oct 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389856

ABSTRACT

During the course of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, reports of a new multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) have been increasing in Europe and the United States (1-3). Clinical features in children have varied but predominantly include shock, cardiac dysfunction, abdominal pain, and elevated inflammatory markers, including C-reactive protein (CRP), ferritin, D-dimer, and interleukin-6 (1). Since June 2020, several case reports have described a similar syndrome in adults; this review describes in detail nine patients reported to CDC, seven from published case reports, and summarizes the findings in 11 patients described in three case series in peer-reviewed journals (4-6). These 27 patients had cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, dermatologic, and neurologic symptoms without severe respiratory illness and concurrently received positive test results for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or antibody assays indicating recent infection. Reports of these patients highlight the recognition of an illness referred to here as multisystem inflammatory syndrome in adults (MIS-A), the heterogeneity of clinical signs and symptoms, and the role for antibody testing in identifying similar cases among adults. Clinicians and health departments should consider MIS-A in adults with compatible signs and symptoms. These patients might not have positive SARS-CoV-2 PCR or antigen test results, and antibody testing might be needed to confirm previous SARS-CoV-2 infection. Because of the temporal association between MIS-A and SARS-CoV-2 infections, interventions that prevent COVID-19 might prevent MIS-A. Further research is needed to understand the pathogenesis and long-term effects of this newly described condition.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology , Adult , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , United Kingdom/epidemiology , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
15.
Pediatrics ; 148(3)2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1378143

ABSTRACT

Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) is a serious, sometimes life-threatening late complication of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) with multiorgan involvement and evidence of immune activation. The pathogenesis of MIS-C is not known, nor is the pathogenesis of the severe organ damage that is the hallmark of MIS-C. Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), the virus responsible for roseola, is a ubiquitous herpesvirus that causes close to universal infection by the age of 3 years. HHV-6 remains latent for life and can be activated during inflammatory states, by other viruses, and by host cell apoptosis. HHV-6 has been associated with end-organ diseases, including hepatitis, carditis, and encephalitis. In addition, ∼1% of people have inherited chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6 (iciHHV-6), which is HHV-6 that has been integrated into chromosomal telomeric regions and is transmitted through the germ line. iciHHV-6 can be reactivated and has been associated with altered immune responses. We report here a case of MIS-C in which an initial high HHV-6 DNA polymerase chain reaction viral load assay prompted testing for iciHHV-6, which yielded a positive result. Additional research may be warranted to determine if iciHHV-6 is commonly observed in patients with MIS-C and, if so, whether it may play a part in MIS-C pathogenesis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Herpesvirus 6, Human , Roseolovirus Infections/virology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Child , DNA, Viral/isolation & purification , Herpesvirus 6, Human/genetics , Herpesvirus 6, Human/isolation & purification , Humans , Male , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Telomere/virology , Viral Load , Virus Latency
16.
J Infect Dis ; 224(4): 606-615, 2021 08 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1369104

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) is a severe clinical phenotype of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection that remains poorly understood. METHODS: Hospitalized children <18 years of age with suspected coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) (N = 53) were recruited into a prospective cohort study; 32 had confirmed COVID-19, with 16 meeting the US Centers for Disease Control criteria for MIS-C. Differences in nasopharyngeal viral ribonucleic acid (RNA) levels, SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity, and cytokine/chemokine profiles were examined, including after adjustments for age and sex. RESULTS: The median ages for those with and without MIS-C were 8.7 years (interquartile range [IQR], 5.5-13.9) and 2.2 years (IQR, 1.1-10.5), respectively (P = .18), and nasopharyngeal levels of SARS-CoV-2 RNA did not differ significantly between the 2 groups (median 63 848.25 copies/mL versus 307.1 copies/mL, P = .66); 75% of those with MIS-C were antibody positive compared with 44% without (P = .026). Levels of 14 of 37 cytokines/chemokines (interleukin [IL]-1RA, IL-2RA, IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-10, IL-15, IL-18, monocyte chemoattractant protein [MCP]-1, IP-10, macrophage-inflammatory protein [MIP]-1α, MCP-2, MIP-1ß, eotaxin) were significantly higher in children with MIS-C compared to those without, irrespective of age or sex (false discovery rate <0.05; P < .05). CONCLUSIONS: The distinct pattern of heightened cytokine/chemokine dysregulation observed with MIS-C, compared with acute COVID-19, occurs across the pediatric age spectrum and with similar levels of nasopharyngeal SARS-CoV-2 RNA.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Chemokines/metabolism , Cytokines/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/metabolism , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology , Adolescent , Age Factors , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Biomarkers , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Male , RNA, Viral , Serologic Tests , Severity of Illness Index , Sex Factors , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Viral Load
17.
Mayo Clin Proc ; 96(12): 3099-3108, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1364351

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a highly transmissible virus with significant global impact, morbidity, and mortality. The SARS-CoV-2 virus may result in widespread organ manifestations including acute respiratory distress syndrome, acute renal failure, thromboembolism, and myocarditis. Virus-induced endothelial injury may cause endothelial activation, increased permeability, inflammation, and immune response and cytokine storm. Endothelial dysfunction is a systemic disorder that is a precursor of atherosclerotic vascular disease that is associated with cardiovascular risk factors and is highly prevalent in patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular and peripheral disease. Several studies have associated various viral infections including SARS-CoV-2 infection with inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and subsequent innate immune response and cytokine storm. Noninvasive monitoring of endothelial function and identification of high-risk patients who may require specific therapies may have the potential to improve morbidity and mortality associated with subsequent inflammation, cytokine storm, and multiorgan involvement.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Endothelium , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Disease Management , Endothelium/physiopathology , Endothelium/virology , Humans , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Multiple Organ Failure/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/prevention & control , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology
19.
J Endocrinol Invest ; 45(1): 199-208, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1326868

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: COVID-19 disease may result in a severe multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), which in turn may alter thyroid function (TF). We assessed TF in MIS-C, evaluating its impact on disease severity. METHODS: We retrospectively considered children admitted with MIS-C to a single pediatric hospital in Milan (November 2019-January 2021). Non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) was defined as any abnormality in TF tests (FT3, FT4, TSH) in the presence of critical illness and absence of a pre-existing hormonal abnormality. We devised a disease severity score by combining severity scores for each organ involved. Glucose and lipid profiles were also considered. A principal component analysis (PCA) was performed, to characterize the mutual association patterns between TF and disease severity. RESULTS: Of 26 (19 M/7F) patients, median age 10.7 (IQR 5.8-13.3) years, 23 (88.4%) presented with NTIS. A low FT3 level was noted in 15/23 (65.3%), while the other subjects had varying combinations of hormone abnormalities (8/23, 34.7%). Mutually correlated variables related to organ damage and inflammation were represented in the first dimension (PC1) of the PCA. FT3, FT4 and total cholesterol were positively correlated and characterized the second axis (PC2). The third axis (PC3) was characterized by the association of triglycerides, TyG index and HDL cholesterol. TF appeared to be related to lipemic and peripheral insulin resistance profiles. A possible association between catabolic components and severity score was also noted. CONCLUSIONS: A low FT3 level is common among MIS-C. TF may be useful to define the impact of MIS-C on children's health and help delineate long term follow-up management and prognosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Euthyroid Sick Syndromes/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Euthyroid Sick Syndromes/physiopathology , Euthyroid Sick Syndromes/virology , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Thyroid Gland/physiopathology , Thyroid Gland/virology , Thyrotropin/blood , Thyroxine , Triiodothyronine
20.
J Clin Invest ; 131(14)2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1311202

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUNDWeeks after SARS-CoV-2 infection or exposure, some children develop a severe, life-threatening illness called multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C). Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are common in patients with MIS-C, and a severe hyperinflammatory response ensues with potential for cardiac complications. The cause of MIS-C has not been identified to date.METHODSHere, we analyzed biospecimens from 100 children: 19 with MIS-C, 26 with acute COVID-19, and 55 controls. Stools were assessed for SARS-CoV-2 by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR), and plasma was examined for markers of breakdown of mucosal barrier integrity, including zonulin. Ultrasensitive antigen detection was used to probe for SARS-CoV-2 antigenemia in plasma, and immune responses were characterized. As a proof of concept, we treated a patient with MIS-C with larazotide, a zonulin antagonist, and monitored the effect on antigenemia and the patient's clinical response.RESULTSWe showed that in children with MIS-C, a prolonged presence of SARS-CoV-2 in the GI tract led to the release of zonulin, a biomarker of intestinal permeability, with subsequent trafficking of SARS-CoV-2 antigens into the bloodstream, leading to hyperinflammation. The patient with MIS-C treated with larazotide had a coinciding decrease in plasma SARS-CoV-2 spike antigen levels and inflammatory markers and a resultant clinical improvement above that achieved with currently available treatments.CONCLUSIONThese mechanistic data on MIS-C pathogenesis provide insight into targets for diagnosing, treating, and preventing MIS-C, which are urgently needed for this increasingly common severe COVID-19-related disease in children.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Haptoglobins/physiology , Intestinal Mucosa/physiopathology , Protein Precursors/physiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/etiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/physiopathology , Adolescent , Antigens, Viral/blood , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Haptoglobins/antagonists & inhibitors , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Intestinal Mucosa/drug effects , Intestinal Mucosa/virology , Male , Oligopeptides/pharmacology , Permeability/drug effects , Proof of Concept Study , Protein Precursors/antagonists & inhibitors , Protein Precursors/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/blood , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology , Young Adult
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