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1.
Pediatr Rheumatol Online J ; 19(1): 29, 2021 Mar 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1136233

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is mounting evidence on the existence of a Pediatric Inflammatory Multisystem Syndrome-temporally associated to SARS-CoV-2 infection (PIMS-TS), sharing similarities with Kawasaki Disease (KD). The main outcome of the study were to better characterize the clinical features and the treatment response of PIMS-TS and to explore its relationship with KD determining whether KD and PIMS are two distinct entities. METHODS: The Rheumatology Study Group of the Italian Pediatric Society launched a survey to enroll patients diagnosed with KD (Kawasaki Disease Group - KDG) or KD-like (Kawacovid Group - KCG) disease between February 1st 2020, and May 31st 2020. Demographic, clinical, laboratory data, treatment information, and patients' outcome were collected in an online anonymized database (RedCAP®). Relationship between clinical presentation and SARS-CoV-2 infection was also taken into account. Moreover, clinical characteristics of KDG during SARS-CoV-2 epidemic (KDG-CoV2) were compared to Kawasaki Disease patients (KDG-Historical) seen in three different Italian tertiary pediatric hospitals (Institute for Maternal and Child Health, IRCCS "Burlo Garofolo", Trieste; AOU Meyer, Florence; IRCCS Istituto Giannina Gaslini, Genoa) from January 1st 2000 to December 31st 2019. Chi square test or exact Fisher test and non-parametric Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney test were used to study differences between two groups. RESULTS: One-hundred-forty-nine cases were enrolled, (96 KDG and 53 KCG). KCG children were significantly older and presented more frequently from gastrointestinal and respiratory involvement. Cardiac involvement was more common in KCG, with 60,4% of patients with myocarditis. 37,8% of patients among KCG presented hypotension/non-cardiogenic shock. Coronary artery abnormalities (CAA) were more common in the KDG. The risk of ICU admission were higher in KCG. Lymphopenia, higher CRP levels, elevated ferritin and troponin-T characterized KCG. KDG received more frequently immunoglobulins (IVIG) and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) (81,3% vs 66%; p = 0.04 and 71,9% vs 43,4%; p = 0.001 respectively) as KCG more often received glucocorticoids (56,6% vs 14,6%; p < 0.0001). SARS-CoV-2 assay more often resulted positive in KCG than in KDG (75,5% vs 20%; p < 0.0001). Short-term follow data showed minor complications. Comparing KDG with a KD-Historical Italian cohort (598 patients), no statistical difference was found in terms of clinical manifestations and laboratory data. CONCLUSION: Our study suggests that SARS-CoV-2 infection might determine two distinct inflammatory diseases in children: KD and PIMS-TS. Older age at onset and clinical peculiarities like the occurrence of myocarditis characterize this multi-inflammatory syndrome. Our patients had an optimal response to treatments and a good outcome, with few complications and no deaths.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Coronary Artery Disease/physiopathology , Hypotension/physiopathology , Lymphopenia/physiopathology , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/physiopathology , Myocarditis/physiopathology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/physiopathology , Age Distribution , Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Aspirin/therapeutic use , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/therapy , Child , Child, Preschool , Cough/physiopathology , Diarrhea/physiopathology , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Female , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Heart Failure/physiopathology , Humans , Hyperferritinemia/metabolism , Hyperferritinemia/physiopathology , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Infant , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/therapeutic use , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/epidemiology , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/metabolism , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/therapy , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Shock/physiopathology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/metabolism , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , Tachypnea/physiopathology , Troponin T/metabolism , Vomiting/physiopathology
2.
Cardiol Young ; 31(3): 485-487, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1131993

ABSTRACT

A four- and a half-month-old girl with severe dilated cardiomyopathy due to neonatal enterovirus myocarditis, treated with diuretics and milrinone for the past 4 months, was infected with SARS-CoV-2. The disease course was characterised by high fever and gastrointestinal symptoms. Cardiac function, as measured by echocardiography, remained stable. The treatment focused on maintaining a normal heart rate and a stable fluid balance. In children with severe underlying cardiac disease, even a mild SARS-CoV-2 infection can require close monitoring and compound treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Cardiomyopathy, Dilated/physiopathology , Diarrhea/physiopathology , Fever/physiopathology , Tachycardia/physiopathology , Tachypnea/physiopathology , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left/physiopathology , Vomiting/physiopathology , COVID-19/complications , Cardiomyopathy, Dilated/drug therapy , Cardiomyopathy, Dilated/etiology , Cardiomyopathy, Dilated/metabolism , Cardiotonic Agents/therapeutic use , Diuretics/therapeutic use , Echocardiography , Enterovirus Infections/complications , Female , Heart Rate , Heart Transplantation , Humans , Infant , Milrinone/therapeutic use , Myocarditis/complications , Natriuretic Peptide, Brain/metabolism , Peptide Fragments/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Troponin T/metabolism , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left/drug therapy , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left/etiology , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left/metabolism , Waiting Lists , Water-Electrolyte Balance
3.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(3): e211085, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1125122

ABSTRACT

Importance: Solid estimates of the risk of developing symptoms and of progressing to critical disease in individuals infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) are key to interpreting coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) dynamics, identifying the settings and the segments of the population where transmission is more likely to remain undetected, and defining effective control strategies. Objective: To estimate the association of age with the likelihood of developing symptoms and the association of age with the likelihood of progressing to critical illness after SARS-CoV-2 infection. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study analyzed quarantined case contacts, identified between February 20 and April 16, 2020, in the Lombardy region of Italy. Contacts were monitored daily for symptoms and tested for SARS-CoV-2 infection, by either real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction using nasopharyngeal swabs or retrospectively via IgG serological assays. Close contacts of individuals with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 were selected as those belonging to clusters (ie, groups of contacts associated with an index case) where all individuals were followed up for symptoms and tested for SARS-CoV-2 infection. Data were analyzed from February to June 2020. Exposure: Close contact with individuals with confirmed COVID-19 cases as identified by contact tracing operations. Main Outcomes and Measures: Age-specific estimates of the risk of developing respiratory symptoms or fever greater than or equal to 37.5 °C and of experiencing critical disease (defined as requiring intensive care or resulting in death) in SARS-CoV-2-infected case contacts. Results: In total, 5484 case contacts (median [interquartile range] age, 50 [30-61] years; 3086 female contacts [56.3%]) were analyzed, 2824 of whom (51.5%) tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 (median [interquartile range] age, 53 [34-64] years; 1604 female contacts [56.8%]). The proportion of infected persons who developed symptoms ranged from 18.1% (95% CI, 13.9%-22.9%) among participants younger than 20 years to 64.6% (95% CI, 56.6%-72.0%) for those aged 80 years or older. Most infected contacts (1948 of 2824 individuals [69.0%]) did not develop respiratory symptoms or fever greater than or equal to 37.5 °C. Only 26.1% (95% CI, 24.1%-28.2%) of infected individuals younger than 60 years developed respiratory symptoms or fever greater than or equal to 37.5 °C; among infected participants older than 60 years, 6.6% (95% CI, 5.1%-8.3%) developed critical disease. Female patients were 52.7% (95% CI, 24.4%-70.7%) less likely than male patients to develop critical disease after SARS-CoV-2 infection. Conclusions and Relevance: In this Italian cohort study of close contacts of patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, more than one-half of individuals tested positive for the virus. However, most infected individuals did not develop respiratory symptoms or fever. The low proportion of children and young adults who developed symptoms highlights the possible challenges in readily identifying SARS-CoV-2 infections.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Carrier State/epidemiology , Cough/epidemiology , Dyspnea/epidemiology , Fever/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , COVID-19 Serological Testing , Chest Pain/epidemiology , Chest Pain/physiopathology , Child , Child, Preschool , Contact Tracing , Cough/physiopathology , Critical Illness , Disease Progression , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Female , Fever/physiopathology , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pharyngitis/epidemiology , Pharyngitis/physiopathology , Quarantine , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Tachypnea/epidemiology , Tachypnea/physiopathology , Young Adult
4.
Monaldi Arch Chest Dis ; 90(4)2020 Nov 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059803

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a pandemic with over 5 million cases worldwide. The disease has imposed a huge burden on health resources. Evaluation of clinical and epidemiological profiles of such patients can help in understanding and managing the outbreak more efficiently. This study was a prospective observational analysis of 200 diagnosed COVID-19 patients admitted to a tertiary care center from 20th march to 8th May 2020. All these patients were positive for COVID-19 by an oro-nasopharyngeal swab-rtPCR based testing. Analyses of demographic factors, clinical characteristics, comorbidities, laboratory parameters, and the outcomes were performed. The mean age of the population was 40 years with a slight male predominance (116 patients out of 200, 58%). A majority of the patients (147, 73.5 %) were symptomatic, with fever being the most common symptom (109, 54.5%), followed by cough (91, 45.5%). An older age, presence of symptoms and their duration, leukocytosis, a high quick SOFA score, a high modified SOFA score, need for ventilator support, an AST level more than 3 times the upper limit of normal (ULN), and a serum creatinine level of 2 mg/dl or greater were at a significantly higher risk of ICU admission and mortality. Presence of diabetes mellitus, AST > three times ULN, serum creatinine 2 mg/dl or higher, and a qSOFA score of 1 or higher were all associated with significantly greater odds of critical care requirement. Triage and severity assessment helps in deciding the requirement for a hospital stay and ICU admission for COVID-19 which can easily be done using clinical and laboratory parameters. A mild, moderate and severe category approach with defined criteria and treatment guidelines will help in judicious utilization of health-care resources, especially for developing countries like India.   *Other members of the Safdarjung Hospital COVID-19 working group: Balvinder Singh (Microbiology), MK Sen (Pulmonary Medicine), Shibdas Chakrabarti (Pulmonary Medicine), NK Gupta (Pulmonary medicine), AJ Mahendran (Pulmonary Medicine), Ramesh Meena (Medicine), G Usha (Anaesthesiology), Santvana Kohli (Anaesthesiology), Sahil Diwan (Anaesthesiology), Rushika Saksena (Microbiology), Vikramjeet Dutta (Microbiology), Anupam Kr Anveshi (Microbiology).


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Alanine Transaminase/blood , Anemia/blood , Aspartate Aminotransferases/blood , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Comorbidity , Coronary Artery Disease/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Cough/physiopathology , Creatinine/blood , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Female , Fever/physiopathology , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypoxia/physiopathology , India/epidemiology , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Intensive Care Units , Length of Stay , Leukocyte Count , Leukocytosis/blood , Lymphopenia/blood , Lymphopenia/physiopathology , Male , Middle Aged , Myalgia/physiopathology , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Pandemics , Pharyngitis/physiopathology , Platelet Count , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Prospective Studies , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2 , Tachypnea/physiopathology , Tertiary Care Centers , Time Factors , Tuberculosis/epidemiology , Young Adult
5.
Trials ; 22(1): 42, 2021 Jan 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1021412

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: As of December, 1st, 2020, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by SARS-CoV-2, resulted in more than 1 472 917 deaths worldwide and death toll is still increasing exponentially. Many COVID-19 infected people are asymptomatic or experience moderate symptoms and recover without medical intervention. However, older people and those with comorbid hypertension, diabetes, obesity, or heart disease are at higher risk of mortality. Because current therapeutic options for COVID-19 patients are limited specifically for this elderly population at risk, Biophytis is developing BIO101 (20-hydroxyecdysone, a Mas receptor activator) as a new treatment option for managing patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection at the severe stage. The angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) serves as a receptor for SARS-CoV-2. Interaction between ACE2 and SARS-CoV2 spike protein seems to alter the function of ACE2, a key player in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). The clinical picture of COVID-19 includes acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), cardiomyopathy, multiorgan dysfunction and shock, all of which might result from an imbalance of the RAS. We propose that RAS balance could be restored in COVID-19 patients through MasR activation downstream of ACE2 activity, with 20-hydroxyecdysone (BIO101) a non-peptidic Mas receptor (MasR) activator. Indeed, MasR activation by 20-hydroxyecdysone harbours anti-inflammatory, anti-thrombotic, and anti-fibrotic properties. BIO101, a 97% pharmaceutical grade 20-hydroxyecdysone could then offer a new therapeutic option by improving the respiratory function and ultimately promoting survival in COVID-19 patients that develop severe forms of this devastating disease. Therefore, the objective of this COVA study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of BIO101, whose active principle is 20-hydroxyecdysone, in COVID-19 patients with severe pneumonia. TRIAL DESIGN: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-centre, group sequential and adaptive which will be conducted in 2 parts. Part 1: Ascertain the safety and tolerability of BIO101 and obtain preliminary indication of the activity of BIO101, in preventing respiratory deterioration in the target population Part 2: Re-assessment of the sample size needed for the confirmatory part 2 and confirmation of the effect of BIO101 observed in part 1 in the target population. The study is designed as group sequential to allow an efficient run-through, from obtaining an early indication of activity to a final confirmation. And adaptive - to allow accumulation of early data and adapt sample size in part 2 in order to inform the final design of the confirmatory part of the trial. PARTICIPANTS: Inclusion criteria 1. Age: 45 and above 2. A confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19 infection, within the last 14 days, prior to randomization, as determined by PCR or other approved commercial or public health assay, in a specimen as specified by the test used. 3. Hospitalized, in observation or planned to be hospitalized due to COVID-19 infection symptoms with anticipated hospitalization duration ≥3 days 4. With evidence of pneumonia based on all of the following: a. Clinical findings on a physical examination b. Respiratory symptoms developed within the past 7 days 5. With evidence of respiratory decompensation that started not more than 4 days before start of study medication and present at screening, meeting one of the following criteria, as assessed by healthcare staff: a. Tachypnea: ≥25 breaths per minute b. Arterial oxygen saturation ≤92% c. A special note should be made if there is suspicion of COVID-19-related myocarditis or pericarditis, as the presence of these is a stratification criterion 6. Without a significant deterioration in liver function tests: a. ALT and AST ≤ 5x upper limit of normal (ULN) b. Gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) ≤ 5x ULN c. Total bilirubin ≤ 5×ULN 7. Willing to participate and able to sign an informed consent form (ICF). Or, when relevant, a legally authorized representative (LAR) might sign the ICF on behalf of the study participant 8. Female participants should be: at least 5 years post-menopausal (i.e., persistent amenorrhea 5 years in the absence of an alternative medical cause) or surgically sterile; OR a. Have a negative urine pregnancy test at screening b. Be willing to use a contraceptive method as outlined in inclusion criterion 9 from screening to 30 days after last dose. 9. Male participants who are sexually active with a female partner must agree to the use of an effective method of birth control throughout the study and until 3 months after the last administration of the investigational product. (Note: medically acceptable methods of contraception that may be used by the participant and/or partner include combined oral contraceptive, contraceptive vaginal ring, contraceptive injection, intrauterine device, etonogestrel implant, each supplemented with a condom, as well as sterilization and vasectomy). 10. Female participants who are lactating must agree not to breastfeed during the study and up to 14 days after the intervention. 11. Male participants must agree not to donate sperm for the purpose of reproduction throughout the study and until 3 months after the last administration of the investigational product. 12. For France only: Being affiliated with a European Social Security. Exclusion criteria 1. Not needing or not willing to remain in a healthcare facility during the study 2. Moribund condition (death likely in days) or not expected to survive for >7 days - due to other and non-COVID-19 related conditions 3. Participant on invasive mechanical ventilation via an endotracheal tube, or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), or high-flow Oxygen (delivery of oxygen at a flow of ≥16 L/min.). 4. Participant is not able to take medications by mouth (as capsules or as a powder, mixed in water). 5. Disallowed concomitant medication: Consumption of any herbal products containing 20-hydroxyecdysone and derived from Leuzea carthamoides; Cyanotis vaga or Cyanotis arachnoidea is not allowed (e.g. performance enhancing agents). 6. Any known hypersensitivity to any of the ingredients, or excipients of the study medication, BIO101. 7. Renal disease requiring dialysis, or known renal insufficiency (eGFR≤30 mL/min/1.73 m2, based on Cockcroft & Gault formula). 8. In France only: a. Non-affiliation to compulsory French social security scheme (beneficiary or right-holder). b. Being under tutelage or legal guardianship. Participants will be recruited from approximately 30 clinical centres in Belgium, France, the UK, USA and Brazil. Maximum patients' participation in the study will last 28 days. Follow-up of participants discharged from hospital will be performed through post-intervention phone calls at 14 (± 2) and 60 (± 4) days. INTERVENTION AND COMPARATOR: Two treatment arms will be tested in this study: interventional arm 350 mg b.i.d. of BIO101 (AP 20-hydroxyecdysone) and placebo comparator arm 350 mg b.i.d of placebo. Administration of daily dose is the same throughout the whole treatment period. Participants will receive the study medication while hospitalized for up to 28 days or until a clinical endpoint is reached (i.e., 'negative' or 'positive' event). Participants who are officially discharged from hospital care will no longer receive study medication. MAIN OUTCOMES: Primary study endpoint: The proportion of participants with 'negative' events up to 28 days. 'Negative' events are defined as respiratory deterioration and all-cause mortality. For the purpose of this study, respiratory deterioration will be defined as any of the following: Requiring mechanical ventilation (including cases that will not be intubated due to resource restrictions and triage). Requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Requiring high-flow oxygen defined as delivery of oxygen at a flow of ≥16 L/min. Only if the primary endpoint is significant at the primary final analysis the following Key secondary endpoints will be tested in that order: Proportion of participants with events of respiratory failure at Day 28 Proportion of participants with 'positive' events at Day 28. Proportion of participants with events of all-cause mortality at Day 28 A 'positive' event is defined as the official discharge from hospital care by the department due to improvement in participant condition. Secondary and exploratory endpoints: In addition, a variety of functional measures and biomarkers (including the SpO2 / FiO2 ratio, viral load and markers related to inflammation, muscles, tissue and the RAS / MAS pathways) will also be collected. RANDOMIZATION: Randomization is performed using an IBM clinical development IWRS system during the baseline visit. Block-permuted randomization will be used to assign eligible participants in a 1:1 ratio. In part 1, randomization will be stratified by RAS pathway modulator use (yes/no) and co-morbidities (none vs. 1 and above). In Part 2, randomization will be stratified by centre, gender, RAS pathway modulator use (yes/no), co-morbidities (none vs. 1 and above), receiving Continuous Positive Airway Pressure/Bi-level Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP/BiPAP) at study entry (Yes/No) and suspicion of COVID-19 related myocarditis or pericarditis (present or not). BLINDING (MASKING): Participants, caregivers, and the study team assessing the outcomes are blinded to group assignment. All therapeutic units (TU), BIO101 b.i.d. or placebo b.i.d., cannot be distinguished in compliance with the double-blind process. An independent data-monitoring committee (DMC) will conduct 2 interim analyses. A first one based on the data from part 1 and a second from the data from parts 1 and 2. The first will inform about BIO101 safety, to allow the start of recruitment into part 2 followed by an analysis of the efficacydata, to obtain an indication of activity. The second interim analysis will inform about the sample size that will be required for part 2, in order to achieve adequate statistical power. Numbers to be randomised (sample size) Number of participants randomized: up to 465, in total Part 1: 50 (to obtain the proof of concept in COVID-19 patients). Part 2: 310, potentially increased by 50% (up to 465, based on interim analysis 2) (to confirm the effects of BIO101 observed in part 1). TRIAL STATUS: The current protocol Version is V 10.0, dated on 24.09.2020. The recruitment that started on September 1st 2020 is ongoing and is anticipated to finish for the whole study by March2021. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The trial was registered before trial start in trial registries: EudraCT , No. 2020-001498-63, registered May 18, 2020; and Clinicaltrials.gov, identifier NCT04472728 , registered July 15, 2020. FULL PROTOCOL: The full protocol is attached as an additional file, accessible from the Trials website (Additional file 1). In the interest in expediting dissemination of this material, the familiar formatting has been eliminated; this Letter serves as a summary of the key elements of the full protocol.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Ecdysterone/therapeutic use , Respiratory Insufficiency/drug therapy , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/physiopathology , Disease Progression , Double-Blind Method , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization , Humans , Hypoxia/physiopathology , Middle Aged , Mortality , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Proto-Oncogene Proteins/metabolism , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Receptors, Coronavirus/metabolism , Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled/metabolism , Renin-Angiotensin System , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Insufficiency/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Tachypnea/physiopathology , Treatment Outcome
6.
Brain Dev ; 43(2): 230-233, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-856505

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Reversible splenial lesion syndrome (RESLES) is characterized by a temporary lesion in the splenium of the corpus callosum, emerging related to encephalitis, seizures, antiepileptic drug withdrawal, or metabolic disturbances. Among RESLES, mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with reversible splenial lesion (MERS) has been defined as a distinct clinicoradiologic syndrome associated with viral infections. CASE PRESENTATION: We report two children with multisystem inflammatory syndrome-children related to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) who developed RESLES during the disease course. Encephalopathy was the main central nervous system symptom. Both of the children showed a rapid recovery, and brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed complete resolution of the splenial lesion within 1 week. CONCLUSION: The complete resolution of the splenial lesion and rapid recovery from encephalopathy in RESLES associated with SARS CoV-2 were similar to observed in MERS.


Subject(s)
Brain Diseases/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/diagnosis , Corpus Callosum/diagnostic imaging , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnostic imaging , Brain Diseases/drug therapy , Brain Diseases/physiopathology , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/physiopathology , Child , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Electroencephalography , Exanthema/physiopathology , Female , Fever/physiopathology , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Hallucinations/physiopathology , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Neurocognitive Disorders/diagnostic imaging , Neurocognitive Disorders/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/drug therapy , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/physiopathology , Tachypnea/physiopathology
7.
Transpl Infect Dis ; 22(6): e13380, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-610831

ABSTRACT

A heart transplant 62-year-old patient referred for coronavirus-19 disease (COVID-19) pneumonia. At admission, he was febrile, tachypnoeic, and mild hypoxic with dry cough; during hospitalization, a diffuse morbilliform skin rash appeared. He was treated with tocilizumab with symptoms improvement, without a complete pulmonary function recovery. Skin rash, highly suggestive for COVID-19 cutaneous involvement, persisted for ten days despite tocilizumab administration.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Heart Transplantation , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cardiomyopathy, Dilated/complications , Cardiomyopathy, Dilated/surgery , Cough/physiopathology , Diarrhea/physiopathology , Enoxaparin/therapeutic use , Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Exanthema/physiopathology , Fever/physiopathology , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Hypoxia/physiopathology , Immunocompromised Host/immunology , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Male , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Middle Aged , Nausea/physiopathology , Piperacillin, Tazobactam Drug Combination/therapeutic use , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/complications , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Tachypnea/physiopathology , Treatment Outcome
9.
Paediatr Respir Rev ; 35: 9-14, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-548224

ABSTRACT

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome - Coronavirus - 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and its related Coronavirus Disease - 19 (COVID-19) has become a health emergency worldwide. The medical community has been concerned since the beginning of the outbreak about the potential impact of COVID-19 in children, especially in those with underlying chronic diseases. Fortunately, COVID-19 has been reported to be less severe in children than in adults. However, epidemiologic and clinical data are scarce. Children show unique features of SARS-CoV-2 involvement that may account for the low rate of infection and death in this age group. The purpose of this review is to summarize the most relevant evidence of COVID-19 in children highlighting similarities and differences with adults.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Cough/physiopathology , Fever/physiopathology , Pharyngitis/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Tachypnea/physiopathology , Adolescent , Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Diarrhea/physiopathology , Fatigue/physiopathology , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
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