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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(15)2020 07 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-680173

ABSTRACT

Engaging in social contributions to enhance social participation and attending community experiential service learning or internship courses have become an essential learning experience for university students. On the basis of postmodern education theories, this study adopted images and oral accounts involving personal experiences to construct a postmodern education research scheme by using the method of collaborative ethnography. This study selected and performed the following services: filming a community documentary, administering community health dance classes, and archiving community cultural artifacts in databases. Interviews were also administered to facilitate implementation of the actual services. Community health services commonly seen in Taiwan and abroad were compiled, and the resources required for each service were examined. Subsequently, factor analysis was performed to explore the characteristic of these services in order to recommend feasible services for university students to undertake. The results indicated that the eight resources required for the 59 common community health services were (1) a designated space or venue, (2) materials, (3) monetary resources, (4) human resources, (5) expertise, (6) professional equipment, (7) patience, and (8) empathy. The results revealed three principal components, namely labor services, high-resource services, and professional services, for a total explanatory power of 67.99%; the individual explanatory power of these components accounted for 25.04%, 21.81%, and 21.15%, respectively. Next, community health care services suitable for university students to perform were selected and implemented, and these services were well received. The study results indicated that community and environmental justice can be realized by identifying with the value of community health services and promoting postmodern education theories and social norms. The research results are suitable for implementation after the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Community Health Services , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Public Health , Students , Taiwan , Universities
2.
JAMA Intern Med ; 180(9): 1262, 2020 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-746362
3.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(6): e20586, 2020 06 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-742636

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Frontline health care workers, including physicians, are at high risk of contracting coronavirus disease (COVID-19) owing to their exposure to patients suspected of having COVID-19. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the benefits and feasibility of a double triage and telemedicine protocol in improving infection control in the emergency department (ED). METHODS: In this retrospective study, we recruited patients aged ≥20 years referred to the ED of the National Taiwan University Hospital between March 1 and April 30, 2020. A double triage and telemedicine protocol was developed to triage suggested COVID-19 cases and minimize health workers' exposure to this disease. We categorized patients attending video interviews into a telemedicine group and patients experiencing face-to-face interviews into a conventional group. A questionnaire was used to assess how patients perceived the quality of the interviews and their communication with physicians as well as perceptions of stress, discrimination, and privacy. Each question was evaluated using a 5-point Likert scale. Physicians' total exposure time and total evaluation time were treated as primary outcomes, and the mean scores of the questions were treated as secondary outcomes. RESULTS: The final sample included 198 patients, including 93 cases (47.0%) in the telemedicine group and 105 cases (53.0%) in the conventional group. The total exposure time in the telemedicine group was significantly shorter than that in the conventional group (4.7 minutes vs 8.9 minutes, P<.001), whereas the total evaluation time in the telemedicine group was significantly longer than that in the conventional group (12.2 minutes vs 8.9 minutes, P<.001). After controlling for potential confounders, the total exposure time in the telemedicine group was 4.6 minutes shorter than that in the conventional group (95% CI -5.7 to -3.5, P<.001), whereas the total evaluation time in the telemedicine group was 2.8 minutes longer than that in the conventional group (95% CI -1.6 to -4.0, P<.001). The mean scores of the patient questionnaire were high in both groups (4.5/5 to 4.7/5 points). CONCLUSIONS: The implementation of the double triage and telemedicine protocol in the ED during the COVID-19 pandemic has high potential to improve infection control.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Emergency Service, Hospital , Infection Control/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Telemedicine/methods , Triage/methods , Adult , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Feasibility Studies , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Male , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Retrospective Studies , Taiwan/epidemiology
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(17)2020 08 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-738400

ABSTRACT

The emergence of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) had rapidly spread since FEB/MAR 2020. Policy to prevent transmission of COVDI-19 resulted in multi-dimensional impact on social interaction. We aimed to develop a beneficial survey tool with favorable quality and availability, the Societal Influences Survey Questionnaire (SISQ), to evaluate social influences on people during this pandemic. The SISQ was developed with 15 items and 4-point Likert scales consisting of five factors. These include social distance, social anxiety, social desirability, social information, and social adaptation. Construct validity and reliability were performed to verify the SISQ. A total of 1912 Taiwanese were recruited. The results demonstrated that the SISQ has acceptable reliability, with Cronbach's alphas ranging between 0.57 and 0.76. The SISQ accounted for 58.86% and satisfied the requirement of Kaiser-Mayer-Olkinvalues (0.78) and significant Bartlett's Test of sphericity. Moreover, the confirmatory factor analysis fit indices also indicated the adequacy of the model. As for multiple comparison, females scored higher than males in factor of social distance. Unemployed participants and those without partners scored higher in several domains of factors. The survey method and survey instrument prove reliable and valuable, also providing different categories of assessment results regarding social influences and their impacts. Further studies are warranted to extend the applicability of SISQ.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Social Behavior , Surveys and Questionnaires , Betacoronavirus , Factor Analysis, Statistical , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Psychometrics , Reproducibility of Results , Taiwan
5.
Clin Infect Dis ; 71(15): 858-860, 2020 07 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-719208

ABSTRACT

During major epidemic outbreaks, demand for healthcare workers (HCWs) grows even as the extreme pressures they face cause declining availability. We draw on Taiwan's severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) experience to argue that a modified form of traffic control bundling (TCB) protects HCW safety and by extension strengthens overall coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic control.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Outbreaks , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Taiwan/epidemiology
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(16)2020 08 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-705858

ABSTRACT

This study used data collected from an online survey study on coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Taiwan to examine changes in sex life during the pandemic and the factors affecting such changes. In total, 1954 respondents were recruited from a Facebook advertisement. The survey inquired changes in sex life during the pandemic, including satisfaction with the individual's sex life, frequency of sexual activity, frequency of sex-seeking activity, and frequency of using protection for sex. The associations of change in sex life with risk perception of COVID-19, general anxiety, gender, age, and sexual orientation were also examined. For each aspect of their sex life, 1.4%-13.5% of respondents reported a decrease in frequency or satisfaction, and 1.6%-2.9% reported an increase in frequency or satisfaction. Risk perception of COVID-19 was significantly and negatively associated with frequencies of sexual and sex-seeking activities. Higher general anxiety was significantly and negatively associated with satisfaction of sex life and frequencies of sexual and sex-seeking activities. Sexual minority respondents were more likely to report decreased satisfaction with sex life and frequencies of sexual activity and sex-seeking activities during COVID-19. Health care providers should consider these factors when developing strategies for sexual wellness amid respiratory infection epidemics.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Sexual Behavior/psychology , Socioeconomic Factors , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Risk Assessment , Sex Factors , Sexual and Gender Minorities/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Taiwan/epidemiology , Young Adult
7.
Environ Health Prev Med ; 25(1): 34, 2020 Jul 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-688919

ABSTRACT

In Taiwan, high-risk patients have been identified and tested for preventing community spread of COVID-19. Most sample collection was performed in emergency departments (EDs). Traditional sample collection requires substantial personal protective equipment (PPE), healthcare professionals, sanitation workers, and isolation space. To solve this problem, we established a multifunctional sample collection station (MSCS) for COVID-19 testing in front of our ED. The station is composed of a thick and clear acrylic board (2 cm), which completely separates the patient and medical personnel. Three pairs of gloves (length, 45 cm) are attached and fixed on the outside wall of the MSCS. The gloves are used to conduct sampling of throat/nasal swabs, sputum, and blood from patients. The gap between the board and the building is only 0.2 cm (sealed with silicone sealant). ED personnel communicate with patients using a small two-way broadcast system. Medical waste is put in specific trashcans installed in the table outside the MSCS. With full physical protection, the personnel conducting the sampling procedure need to wear only their N95 mask and gloves. After we activated the station, our PPE, sampling time, and sanitization resources were considerably conserved during the 4-week observation period. The MSCS obviously saved time and PPE. It elevated the efficiency and capacity of the ED for handling potential community infections of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Mass Screening/methods , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Taiwan/epidemiology
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(8)2020 04 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-688452

ABSTRACT

During an epidemic, almost all healthcare facilities restrict the visiting of patients to prevent disease transmission. For hospices with terminally ill patients, the trade-off between compassion and infection control becomes a difficult decision. This study aimed to survey the changes in visiting policy for all 76 hospice wards in Taiwan during the COVID-19 pandemic in March 2020. The altered visiting policies were assessed by the number of visitors per patient allowed at one time, the daily number of visiting slots, the number of hours open daily, and requisites for hospice ward entry. The differences in visiting policies between hospice wards and ordinary wards were also investigated. Data were collected by reviewing the official website of each hospital and were supplemented by phone calls in cases where no information was posted on the website. One quarter (n = 20) of hospice wards had different visiting policies to those of ordinary wards in the same hospital. Only one hospice ward operated an open policy, and in contrast, nine (11.8%) stopped visits entirely. Among the 67 hospice wards that allowed visiting, at most, two visitors at one time per patient were allowed in 46 (68.6%), one visiting time daily was allowed in 32 (47.8%), one hour of visiting per day was allowed in 29 (43.3%), and checking of identity and travel history was carried out in 12 wards (17.9%). During the COVID-19 pandemic, nearly all hospice wards in Taiwan changed their visiting policies, but the degree of restriction varied. Further studies could measure the impacts of visiting policy changes on patients and healthcare professionals.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Hospices/organization & administration , Organizational Policy , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patients' Rooms/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Visitors to Patients , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Health Care Surveys , Hospices/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infection Control , Male , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Taiwan
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(15)2020 07 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-680176

ABSTRACT

This article focuses on the unique needs and concerns of nursing educators and nursing students in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. During social distancing, interacting with other human beings has been restricted. This would undermine the experiential learning of nursing students. Hence, it is important to develop and evaluate an experiential learning program (ELP) for nursing education. A pre-test and post-test design were used. The study was conducted in a university in Central Taiwan. A total of 103 nursing students participated in the study from February to June 2019. The study intervention was the experiential learning program (ELP), including bodily experiences and nursing activities with babies, pregnant women, and the elderly. After the intervention, the students completed the self-reflection and insight scale (SRIS) and Taiwan Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory (TCTDI) as outcome measures. An independent t-test showed that there was a significant difference between pre-test and post-test in both SRIS and TCTDI (p < 0.01). The Pearson product-moment correlation analysis showed that SRIS and TCTDI were significantly positively correlated (p < 0.01). ELP has a significant impact on the self-reflection and critical thinking of first-year nursing students, which can be used as a reference for the education of nursing students. During these turbulent times, it is especially vital for faculties to provide experiential learning instead of the traditional teaching concept.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Education, Nursing/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , Problem-Based Learning , Thinking , Aged , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Pregnancy , Program Evaluation , Students, Nursing , Taiwan
11.
BMC Psychiatry ; 20(1): 376, 2020 07 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-650460

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: It is hypothesized that anxiety and behavioral responses are intense at the beginning of an epidemic. The objective of this study was to investigate anxiety symptoms and use of preventive measures against COVID-19. The study also compared the association between preventive measures and anxiety symptoms during the week immediately preceding the study and those symptoms and measures at the beginning of the outbreak. METHODS: A cross-sectional population survey using an online questionnaire commenced on 14 February 2020. The study participants were residents of Taiwan ages 20 to 70 years. The 6-item state version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-6) was used to assess anxiety symptoms. The questions about preventive measures asked participants about their personal protection, cough etiquette, contact precautions, voluntary quarantine, and prompt reporting. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine the factors influencing an increase in the preventive measures scores. RESULTS: Of a total of 3555 completed responses, a total of 52.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] 50.4-53.7) of the respondents reported moderate to severe levels of anxiety symptoms in the past week, whereas 48.8% (95%CI 47.2-50.5) reported moderate to severe anxiety symptoms at the beginning of the outbreak. With a higher score indicating greater anxiety, the median scores for anxiety symptoms in the past week and at the beginning of the outbreak were 46.7 (IQR [interquartile range] 36.7-53.3) and 43.3 (IQR 36.7-53.3), respectively. The median scores for the preventive measures taken in the past week and at the beginning of the outbreak were 26.0 (IQR 21.0-30.0) and 24.0 (IQR 19.0-28.0), respectively, out of a maximum score of 36. In the multivariable analysis, an increased anxiety symptom score from the beginning of the outbreak to the past week (adjusted OR = 7.38, 95%CI 6.28-8.66) was a strongly significant determinant of an increased preventive measures score in the past week compared with the score at the beginning of the outbreak. CONCLUSIONS: Anxiety and preventive measures scores were high and increased with the epidemic rate. Higher anxiety was associated with an increased use of preventive measures against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Health Behavior , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Quarantine , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Severity of Illness Index , Surveys and Questionnaires , Taiwan/epidemiology , Young Adult
12.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 26(7): 1506-1512, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-645538

ABSTRACT

Because of its proximity to and frequent travelers to and from China, Taiwan faces complex challenges in preventing coronavirus disease (COVID-19). As soon as China reported the unidentified outbreak to the World Health Organization on December 31, 2019, Taiwan assembled a taskforce and began health checks onboard flights from Wuhan. Taiwan's rapid implementation of disease prevention measures helped detect and isolate the country's first COVID-19 case on January 20, 2020. Laboratories in Taiwan developed 4-hour test kits and isolated 2 strains of the coronavirus before February. Taiwan effectively delayed and contained community transmission by leveraging experience from the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome outbreak, prevalent public awareness, a robust public health network, support from healthcare industries, cross-departmental collaborations, and advanced information technology capacity. We analyze use of the National Health Insurance database and critical policy decisions made by Taiwan's government during the first 50 days of the COVID-19 outbreak.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Health Policy , Information Technology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Adult , Female , Humans , Intersectoral Collaboration , Male , Middle Aged , Public Health , Quarantine , Social Norms , Taiwan/epidemiology , Travel
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(13)2020 07 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-639823

ABSTRACT

With the rapid development of the COVID-19 pandemic, countries are trying to cope with increasing medical demands, and, at the same time, to reduce the increase of infected numbers by implementing a number of public health measures, namely non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPIs). These public health measures can include social distancing, frequent handwashing, and personal protective equipment (PPE) at the personal level; at the community and the government level, these measures can range from canceling activities, avoiding mass gatherings, closing facilities, and, at the extreme, enacting national or provincial lockdowns. Rather than completely stopping the infectious disease, the major purpose of these NPIs in facing an emerging infectious disease is to reduce the contact rate within the population, and reduce the spread of the virus until the time a vaccine or reliable medications become available. The idea is to avoid a surge of patients with severe symptoms beyond the capacity of the hospitals' medical resources, which would lead to more mortality and morbidity. While many countries have experienced steep curves in new cases, some, including Hong Kong, Vietnam, South Korea, New Zealand, and Taiwan, seem to have controlled or even eliminated the infection locally. From its first case of COVID-19 on the 21 January until the 12 May, Taiwan had 440 cases, including just 55 local infections, and seven deaths in total, representing 1.85 cases per 100,000 population and a 1.5% death rate (based on the Worldometer 2020 statistics of Taiwan's population of 23.8 million). This paper presents evidence that spread prevention involving mass masking and universal hygiene at the early stage of the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in a 50% decline of infectious respiratory diseases, based on historical data during the influenza season in Taiwan. These outcomes provide potential support for the effectiveness of widely implementing public health precaution measures in controlling COVID-19 without a lockdown policy.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Hand Disinfection , Humans , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Public Health , Taiwan/epidemiology
14.
J Pain Symptom Manage ; 60(3): e1-e6, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-639399

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: Hospice care focuses on improving the quality of end-of-life care and respecting patients' preferences regarding end-of-life treatment. The impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on the utilization of hospice services is unknown. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the utilization of hospice care services before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: All patients (n = 19,900) cared for at Taipei City Hospital from January 2019 to April 2020 were divided into three time points: January-April 2019 (before COVID-19), May-December 2019 (interim), and January-April 2020 (during COVID-19). This cohort study compared the monthly utilization of hospice services before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in hospice home visits (194 vs. 184; P = 0.686) and new enrollments (15 vs. 14; P = 0.743) to hospice home care before and during the pandemic. However, the bed occupancy rate in hospice units in the hospital was significantly reduced from 66.2% before the pandemic to 37.4% during the pandemic (P = 0.029), whereas that in nonhospice units had a nonsignificant decrease from 81.6% before the pandemic to 71.8% during the pandemic (P = 0.086). During the pandemic, the number of inpatient days was affected more severely in hospice units than in nonhospice units (-42.4% vs. -10.9%; P = 0.029). CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that hospice home care services were maintained during the COVID-19 pandemic, while the utilization of hospice inpatient care services reduced. Home care for hospice patients is an essential component of palliative care during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Home Care Services/statistics & numerical data , Hospice Care/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cohort Studies , Facilities and Services Utilization , Female , Humans , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Taiwan
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(13)2020 06 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-635419

ABSTRACT

This study explored awareness, attitudes, and behavior in relation to Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) prevention among Taiwanese citizens and their physical and mental health statuses. Through collection of 2132 questionnaire responses in field research, the present researchers analyzed the data using descriptive statistics and various approaches. In conclusion, the public's high level of willingness to share information, sufficient knowledge of and consensus on epidemic prevention between individuals and families, strict compliance with relevant regulations, effective preventive measures, and adequate public facilities have contributed to control of COVID-19. However, vigilance and awareness of the pandemic in some individuals, epidemic-prevention campaigns, and community-based preventive measures were insufficient. Some citizens subsequently suffered from headaches, anxiety, and mood instability. Furthermore, demographic variables (place of residence, sex, age, and occupation) and physical and mental health status produced various effects on citizens' awareness, attitude, and behavior regarding epidemic prevention as well as the perceived effect of COVID-19 on physical and mental health.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Mental Health , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Adult , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Female , Healthy Volunteers , Humans , Male , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Taiwan/epidemiology
17.
J Chin Med Assoc ; 83(6): 557-560, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-632665

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) had spread rapidly since late December 2019. Personal protective equipment was essential to prevent transmission. Owing to shortage of face masks, Taiwan government began to implement quasi rationing on February 6, 2020, by allowing each resident to purchase two masks in seven days. Taiwan National Health Insurance Administration offered online data with real-time updates on face mask availability in all contracted pharmacies and selected local health centers. Based on the open data, numerous software applications quickly emerged to assist the public in finding sales locations efficiently. METHODS: Up until March 15, 2020, the Public Digital Innovation Space of Taiwan government had recorded 134 software applications of face mask availability, and 24 software applications were excluded due to defect, duplicate, and unavailability. These applications were analyzed according to platform, developer type, and display mode. RESULTS: Of the 110 valid software applications, 67 (60.9%) applications were deployed on websites, followed by 21 (19.1%) on social networking sites, 19 (17.3%) as mobile applications, and 3 (2.7%) in other modes. Nearly two thirds (n = 70) of applications were developed by individuals, one third (n = 37) by commercial companies, only two applications by central and local governments, and one by a nongovernmental organization. With respect to the display mode, 47 (42.7%) applications adopted map-view only, 41 (37.3%) adopted table-view only, and 19 (17.3%) adopted both modes. Of the remaining three applications, two offered voice user interfaces and one used augmented reality. CONCLUSION: Taiwan's open data strategy facilitated rapid development of software applications for information dissemination to the public during the COVID-19 crisis. The transparency of real-time data could help alleviate the panic of the public. The collaborative contributions from the grassroots in disasters were priceless treasures.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Masks , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Software , Humans , Mobile Applications , Social Networking , Surveys and Questionnaires , Taiwan
19.
Paediatr Respir Rev ; 35: 75-80, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-623530

ABSTRACT

The widely diverse impacts of SAR-CoV-2 infection resulting in the COVID-19 pandemic cannot be held in more stark relief when contrasting the devastating impact upon China, Italy, Great Britain, America and Brazil with the considerably milder course in the geographically isolated countries of Australia and New Zealand and the densely populated Vietnam. Children in the Asia-Pacific region, as with children all over the world to date, have fared better than older adults. Other countries in the Asia-Pacific region, including Indonesia and India have struggled to deal with the pandemic because of a lack of health infrastructure, inability to provide sufficient testing and isolation and widespread poverty. This article will provide a snapshot of the impact of COVID-19 upon countries in the Asia-Pacific region in the six months since the first case of the novel zoonotic coronavirus infection appeared in China.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Health Policy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Asia/epidemiology , Australia/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , Child , China/epidemiology , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Cooperative Behavior , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Humans , India/epidemiology , Indonesia/epidemiology , New Zealand/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Isolation , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Public Health , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Severity of Illness Index , Taiwan/epidemiology , Vietnam/epidemiology
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