Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 13 de 13
Filter
1.
Ther Drug Monit ; 43(4): 455-458, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305444

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: In this article, we present a case of apixaban elimination prolonged by 450% in a patient with coronavirus disease 2019 because of multiple conditions, including drug-drug interaction, severe inflammation, and acute kidney injury. Therapeutic drug monitoring was used to explain unusual routine coagulation assays. This grand round highlights the importance of dialog between the clinician and a therapeutic drug monitoring consultant for optimal patient care.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Drug Monitoring/methods , Pyrazoles/metabolism , Pyridones/metabolism , Renal Elimination/drug effects , Teaching Rounds/methods , Acute Kidney Injury/chemically induced , Acute Kidney Injury/prevention & control , Aged, 80 and over , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Interactions/physiology , Factor Xa Inhibitors/adverse effects , Factor Xa Inhibitors/metabolism , Factor Xa Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Humans , Inflammation/chemically induced , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/prevention & control , Male , Pyrazoles/adverse effects , Pyrazoles/therapeutic use , Pyridones/adverse effects , Pyridones/therapeutic use , Renal Elimination/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , Time Factors
2.
Hosp Pediatr ; 11(6): 636-649, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238799

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: Pediatric family-centered rounds (FCRs) have been shown to have benefits in staff satisfaction, teaching, and rounding efficiency, but no systematic review has been conducted to explicitly examine the humanistic impact of FCRs. OBJECTIVE: The objective with this review is to determine if FCRs promote the core values of humanism in medicine by answering the question, "Do FCRs promote humanistic pediatric care?" DATA SOURCES: Using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines, we conducted a search of PubMed, Web of Science, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and Dissertation Abstracts for peer-reviewed pediatric studies through January 1, 2020. We used search terms including FCRs, communication, humanism, and the specific descriptors in the Gold Foundation's definition of humanism. STUDY SELECTION: Abstracts (n = 1003) were assessed for 5 primary outcomes: empathy, enhanced communication, partnership, respect, and satisfaction and service. We evaluated 158 full-text articles for inclusion, reconciling discrepancies through an iterative process. DATA EXTRACTION: Data abstraction, thematic analysis, and conceptual synthesis were conducted on 29 studies. RESULTS: Pediatric family-centered rounds (FCRs) improved humanistic outcomes within all 5 identified themes. Not all studies revealed improvement within every category. The humanistic benefits of FCRs are enhanced through interventions targeted toward provider-family barriers, such as health literacy. Patients with limited English proficiency or disabilities or who were receiving intensive care gained additional benefits. CONCLUSIONS: Pediatric FCRs promote humanistic outcomes including increased empathy, partnership, respect, service, and communication. Limitations included difficulty in defining humanism, variable implementation, and inconsistent reporting of humanistic outcomes. Future efforts should include highlighting FCR's humanistic benefits, universal implementation, and adapting FCRs to pandemics such as coronavirus disease 2019.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Humanism , Pediatrics/methods , Professional-Family Relations , Teaching Rounds/methods , Child , Child, Hospitalized , Communication , Empathy , Humans
3.
Ther Drug Monit ; 43(4): 455-458, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1205884

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: In this article, we present a case of apixaban elimination prolonged by 450% in a patient with coronavirus disease 2019 because of multiple conditions, including drug-drug interaction, severe inflammation, and acute kidney injury. Therapeutic drug monitoring was used to explain unusual routine coagulation assays. This grand round highlights the importance of dialog between the clinician and a therapeutic drug monitoring consultant for optimal patient care.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Drug Monitoring/methods , Pyrazoles/metabolism , Pyridones/metabolism , Renal Elimination/drug effects , Teaching Rounds/methods , Acute Kidney Injury/chemically induced , Acute Kidney Injury/prevention & control , Aged, 80 and over , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Interactions/physiology , Factor Xa Inhibitors/adverse effects , Factor Xa Inhibitors/metabolism , Factor Xa Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Humans , Inflammation/chemically induced , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/prevention & control , Male , Pyrazoles/adverse effects , Pyrazoles/therapeutic use , Pyridones/adverse effects , Pyridones/therapeutic use , Renal Elimination/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , Time Factors
4.
Ann Emerg Med ; 78(2): 223-228, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1188271

ABSTRACT

Tasked with identifying digital health solutions to support dynamic learning health systems and their response to COVID-19, the US Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response partnered with the University of New Mexico's Project ECHO and more than 2 dozen other organizations and agencies to create a real-time virtual peer-to-peer clinical education opportunity: the COVID-19 Clinical Rounds Initiative. Focused on 3 "pressure points" in the COVID-19 continuum of care-(1) the out-of-hospital and/or emergency medical services setting, (2) emergency departments, and (3) inpatient critical care environments-the initiative has created a massive peer-to-peer learning network for real-time information sharing, engaging participants in all 50 US states and more than 100 countries. One hundred twenty-five learning sessions had been conducted between March 24, 2020 and February 25, 2021, delivering more than 58,000 total learner-hours of contact in the first 11 months of operation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Emergency Medical Services , Teaching Rounds/methods , Humans , Learning Curve , SARS-CoV-2
5.
J Public Health Manag Pract ; 27(Suppl 3): S139-S145, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1159788

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: Preventive medicine residents must train in population medicine (including analytics and population health) and clinical preventive medicine (including screening, behavioral counseling, and chemoprophylaxis). Yet, opportunities to perform both functions concurrently for the same population are scarce. Residents must also master the art of preventive medicine, but they often lack an established community of practice that provides a continuous forum to do so. This project explored Population Health Rounds as a novel vehicle to optimize preventive medicine residency training. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: Modeled after traditional medical rounds, Population Health Rounds consist of a 1-hour weekly meeting engaging preventive medicine residents and supervising attendings at Stony Brook Medicine in both population medicine and clinical preventive medicine concurrently, including patient case discussions and targeted population health analytics. EVALUATION AND RESULTS: Because of the pandemic, the rounds have predominantly focused on COVID-19 and its effects on the hospital employee population. In addition to providing direct patient care to COVID-19-positive and exposed employees, residents have analyzed data on this population and made recommendations to hospital leadership based on COVID-19's institutional epidemiology, including incidence, prevalence, and predictive factors. A formative qualitative survey of resident perceptions offers insights on the value and learning outcomes of this new model. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Factors that may impact the implementation, sustainability, and feasibility of this model are discussed. The preventive medicine residency program is commissioned to address gaps in clinical preventive services for the patient-centered medical home tied to the sponsoring institution's family medicine practice. Additional plans are underway to expand the rounds to other clinical contexts, such as lifestyle medicine in the occupational setting, and for targeted populations, such as the underserved. Replication of the Population Health Rounds model is recommended to determine its effectiveness.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency/methods , Population Health , Preventive Medicine/education , Teaching Rounds/methods , Humans , New York
6.
MedEdPORTAL ; 17: 11106, 2021 03 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154923

ABSTRACT

Introduction: During the COVID-19 pandemic, third-year medical students were temporarily unable to participate in onsite clinical activities. We identified the curricular components of an internal medicine (IM) clerkship that would be compromised if students learned solely from online didactics, case studies, and simulations (i.e., prerounding, oral presentations, diagnostic reasoning, and medical management discussions). Using these guiding principles, we created a virtual rounds (VR) curriculum to provide IM clerkship students with clinical exposure during a virtual learning period. Methods: Held three times a week for 2 weeks, VR consisted of three curricular components. First, clerkship students prerounded on an assigned hospitalized patient by remotely accessing the electronic health record and calling into hospital rounds. Second, each student prepared an oral presentation on their assigned patient. Third, using videoconferencing, students delivered these oral presentations to telemedicine VR small groups consisting of three to four students and three tele-instructors. Tele-instructors then provided feedback on oral presentations and taught clinical concepts. We assessed the effectiveness of VR by anonymously surveying students and tele-instructors. Results: Twenty-nine students and 34 volunteer tele-instructors participated in VR over four blocks. A majority of students felt VR improved their prerounding abilities (86%), oral presentation abilities (93%), and clinical reasoning skills (62%). All students found small group to be useful. Discussion: VR allowed students to practice rounding skills in a supportive team-based setting. The lessons learned from its implementation could facilitate education during future pandemics and could also supplement in-person clerkship education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Clerkship/methods , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Internal Medicine/education , Teaching Rounds/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Clinical Competence , Curriculum , Hospital Medicine/education , Hospital Medicine/trends , Humans , Personal Satisfaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical/psychology , Telemedicine/methods
8.
J Surg Res ; 260: 516-519, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-997219

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has presented unique challenges to medical education. With the lack of in-person away rotations for the 2020-2021 residency application cycle, virtual rotations have surfaced as an alternative. The virtual rotations that the authors participated in allowed for active participation in various resident educational activities such as journal club, grand rounds, and morning conferences. One critical aspect of virtual rotations was the one-on-one meetings with the program leadership. In addition to a virtual tour of the hospital and campus, many programs offered virtual social hours with the residents to converse about the program, the city, and the match process. A few programs even allowed applicants to attend virtually live-streamed surgeries. These rotations offer students, especially those without a corresponding home program, an invaluable opportunity to express their interest in a particular program and gain foundational knowledge about the specialty. Virtual rotations also provide underrepresented minorities and international medical graduates with clinical exposure, mentorship, and networking opportunities, mitigating some of the challenges presented by COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cultural Diversity , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Mentors , Personnel Selection/organization & administration , Personnel Selection/statistics & numerical data , Physical Distancing , Teaching Rounds/methods , Teaching Rounds/organization & administration , Teaching Rounds/statistics & numerical data
10.
Am J Surg ; 221(5): 956-961, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-739730

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has disrupted the 2020-2021 residency application cycle with the cancellation of away rotations and in-person interviews. This study seeks to investigate the feasibility and utility of video conferencing technology (VCT) as an opportunity for applicants to interact with faculty from outside programs. METHODS: 18 prospective urology applicants were randomized to 6 urology programs to give a virtual grand rounds (VGR) talk. Presentations were recorded and analyzed to determine audience engagement. Students were surveyed regarding perceived utility of VGR. Faculty were surveyed to determine system usability of VCT and ability to evaluate the applicant. RESULTS: 17 students completed the survey, reporting a 100% satisfaction rate with VGR. A majority felt this was a useful way to learn about outside programs. 85 physicians completed the faculty survey, with nearly half feeling confident in their ability to evaluate the applicant. Video transcription data shows sessions were interactive with minimal distractions. CONCLUSIONS: VGR can be a useful means for medical students to express interest in programs as well as an additional marker for faculty to evaluate applicants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Internship and Residency , Job Application , Pandemics , Teaching Rounds/methods , Virtual Reality , Adult , Faculty, Medical , Feedback , Female , Humans , Male , Maryland , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...