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2.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0261622, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1597835

ABSTRACT

The skill of analyzing and interpreting research data is central to the scientific process, yet it is one of the hardest skills for students to master. While instructors can coach students through the analysis of data that they have either generated themselves or obtained from published articles, the burgeoning availability of preprint articles provides a new potential pedagogical tool. We developed a new method in which students use a cognitive apprenticeship model to uncover how experts analyzed a paper and compare the professional's cognitive approach to their own. Specifically, students first critique research data themselves and then identify changes between the preprint and final versions of the paper that were likely the results of peer review. From this activity, students reported diverse insights into the processes of data presentation, peer review, and scientific publishing. Analysis of preprint articles is therefore a valuable new tool to strengthen students' information literacy and understanding of the process of science.


Subject(s)
Data Analysis , Preprints as Topic , Science/education , Teaching , Communication , Humans , Peer Review , Teaching Materials
3.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1854066, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574662

ABSTRACT

Universities worldwide are pausing in an attempt to contain COVID-19's spread. In February 2019, universities in China took the lead, cancelling all in-person classes and switching to virtual classrooms, with a wave of other institutes globally following suit. The shift to online platform poses serious challenges to medical education so that understanding best practices shared by pilot institutes may help medical educators improve teaching. Provide 12 tips to highlight strategies intended to help on-site medical classes moving completely online under the pandemic. We collected 'best practices' reports from 40 medical schools in China that were submitted to the National Centre for Health Professions Education Development. Experts' review-to-summary cycle was used to finalize the best practices in teaching medical students online that can benefit peer institutions most, under the unprecedented circumstances of the COVID-19 outbreak. The 12 tips presented offer-specific strategies to optimize teaching medical students online under COVID-19, specifically highlighting the tech-based pedagogy, counselling, motivation, and ethics, as well as the assessment and modification. Learning experiences shared by pilot medical schools and customized properly are instructive to ensure a successful transition to e-learning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical/organization & administration , China , Faculty, Medical/education , Faculty, Medical/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics , Problem-Based Learning , SARS-CoV-2 , Staff Development/organization & administration , Teaching
4.
5.
Anasthesiol Intensivmed Notfallmed Schmerzther ; 56(11-12): 782-790, 2021 Dec.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1532178

ABSTRACT

On March 14, 2020, the first Bavaria-wide exit restriction was imposed and university teaching in its familiar form was drastically restricted. For intensive care physicians and anesthetists, there was a special area of tension in many places due to the extraordinary demand for the treatment of critically ill patients and the restructuring and maintenance of teaching. We report on the realignment of the anesthesia seminar in an online flipped classroom and the development towards a hybrid model. As such, an adequate transfer of knowledge could take place under difficult conditions and at the same time the teaching concept could be further developed.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia , Anesthesiology , COVID-19 , Physicians , Anesthesiology/education , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Teaching
6.
Pan Afr Med J ; 40: 42, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513183

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has impacted many facets of everyday daily life, resulting in far-reaching consequences on social interaction, regional and global economies, and healthcare delivery systems. Numerous reports have commented on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on medical education in various world regions. However, we know little about the influence of the pandemic on medical education in Africa. Here, we discuss the potential impact of COVID-19 on teaching and learning in undergraduate medical education in sub-Saharan Africa, illustrating some of the unexpected benefits and challenges the pandemic presents for medical education in sub-Saharan Africa.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Africa South of the Sahara , Humans , Learning , Teaching
7.
GMS J Med Educ ; 38(1): Doc7, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503862

ABSTRACT

Background: Within days, the corona crisis has forced the "Lernzentrum", as well as all other places of training and further education, to discontinue classroom teaching at German universities and vocational schools. In order to start teaching online, tutors had to face the challenge to develop new digital learning formats (virtual classrooms) for the peer teaching of practical skills within a short time. This paper aims at outlining the project of developing e-tutorials with regard to the teaching of practical skills. Methodology: After analyzing the classroom lessons (n=30), some of the tutorials were transformed into digital formats. These so-called "e-tutorials" were held via a digital platform. They have been evaluated continuously with a standardized online questionnaire. The results of this evaluation have been analyzed descriptively. Results: From 27/04/2020 to 17/07/2020 eleven different e-tutorial formats were offered on 246 dates. The evaluation revealed a high degree of acceptance with these course offers as well as with the implementation by the tutors. Interpretation: During the pandemic crisis the substitution of peer teaching into forms of e-tutorials was considered valuable; however, these learning formats present challenges, especially with regard to the interaction between teachers and students. They cannot therefore fully replace the peer teaching of practical skills.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance , Education, Medical , Teaching , Universities , COVID-19 , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical/methods , Education, Medical/standards , Germany , Humans , Peer Group , Surveys and Questionnaires , Teaching/standards
8.
Clin Anat ; 35(1): 129-134, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1499232

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study is to analyze differences in participation, and in the results obtained in the anatomy and histology exams, over two academic years of the Sport Sciences degree course. During the first semester of the academic year 2019/2020 both the lectures and the exam took place face-to-face, while during the academic year 2020/2021 everything was done online. Statistical analysis revealed that the online modality was especially advantageous for the anatomy exam. Students' opinions were also assessed through a short questionnaire. The results showed that teachers involved themselves in both groups. Students needed to interact socially with teachers and colleagues and to ask them questions. Even if the differences were not significant, the difference was greater for face-to-face students in most comparisons. Finally, the most common methods of peer communication were by social media.


Subject(s)
Anatomy , COVID-19 , Anatomy/education , Humans , Pandemics , Peer Group , SARS-CoV-2 , Teaching
9.
Acta odontol. Colomb. (En linea) ; 11(2): 116-126, 2021. ilus, ilus, tab
Article in Spanish | LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1498040

ABSTRACT

La continuidad de la formación del especialista de Ortodoncia, en tiempos de pandemia por la COVID-19, constituye todo un reto para los docentes. Por ello, este ensayo reflexiona y presenta, tomando como referencia el primer año de la mencionada especialidad (debido a su complejidad), la experiencia con la virtualización de la formación posgraduada durante este periodo en Santiago de Cuba. Durante esta experiencia, las alternativas que se han propuesto incluyen a las diferentes habilidades a desarrollar según formas de organización de la enseñanza, las cuales abarcan desde actividades (base de datos, foro, tarea), recursos virtuales (archivo, carpeta o tarea) hasta tipos de evaluación. En todas estas clases, a excepción de la Educación en el Trabajo, se implementó la modalidad de clase invertida. Finalmente, se consideró que esta modalidad se configuró como una alternativa para darle continuidad al proceso de enseñanza aprendizaje y favorecer la adquisición de habilidades de manera independiente y creadora.


Continuing the training of the Orthodontic specialist in times of a COVID-19 pandemic constitutes a challenge for teachers. For this reason, this essay reflects and presents, taking as a reference the first year of the aforementioned specialty (due to its complexity), the experience with the virtualization of postgraduate training during this period in Santiago de Cuba. During this experience, the alternatives that have been proposed include the different skills to be developed according to forms of teaching organization, which range from activities (database, forum, task), virtual resources (file, folder or task) to types of evaluation. In all these classes, with the exception of education at work, the inverted class modality was implemented. Finally, it was considered that this modality was configured as an alternative to give continuity to the teaching-learning process and favor the acquisition of skills in an independent and creative way.


Subject(s)
Humans , Orthodontics/education , COVID-19 , Teaching , Lecture , Education, Distance , Virtual Reality
10.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 540, 2021 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1486574

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Colleges and universities in China have offered courses based on online teaching platforms as required by the Ministry of Education since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. This emergency action was not an expedient measure, but a powerful impetus to improve extant education and implement teaching reform. Oral histopathology is a basic subject in oral medicine education, which combines theory with practice. The course aims to improve the ability of students to observe, think, analyze and identify oral diseases. METHOD: We adjusted and modified the original Bridge-In, Outcomes, Pre-assessment, Participatory Learning, Post-assessment, and Summary (BOPPPS) teaching method to fit the characteristics and needs of oral histopathology. We then combined the characteristics of Small Private Online Courses (SPOCs) and a Flipped class to complete teaching material online, and assessed the effects of such teaching using a questionnaire and interviews. Fifty 5th-year undergraduates in stomatology at the School of Stomatology of Harbin Medical University of China participated in online classes. All were in the junior second half of the semester at the beginning of 2020. Teachers investigated from various medical colleges were responsible for delivering courses associated with stomatology or ophthalmology. RESULT & CONCLUSION: The results showed that the modified BOPPPS combined with SPOC and the Flipped class improved teaching satisfaction. Modified BOPPPS combined with SPOC and the Flipped class is a useful complement to offline teaching on 5th-year undergraduate oral histopathology learning in China during COVID-19, and it can meet the multiple needs of students participating in the course.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , China , Humans , Pandemics , Problem-Based Learning , SARS-CoV-2 , Students , Teaching
11.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 541, 2021 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1486083

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Major disruptions imposed on medical education by the COVID-19 pandemic and the rapid shift to online teaching in medical programs, necessitated need for evaluation of this format. In this study we directly compared knowledge outcomes, social outcomes, and wellbeing of first year student small group teaching in either face to face (f2f) or online format. METHODS: At the end of the first course of our medical program, students were invited to participate in an online questionnaire with 10 quantitative items and 1 qualitative item. These were analysed using Factor Analysis Pattern Matrix and linear regression to group items and assess relatedness. Qualitative responses were thematized using Qualtrics software (Qualtrics, Provo, UT, USA). Summative assessment results were compared, both between current cohorts to historical cohorts. RESULTS: From a cohort of 298 students there was a 77% response rate. Overall, there were no differences in knowledge gains, either between groups or when compared to historical cohorts. Questionnaire items fell reliably into groups that related to either learning outcomes, social outcomes, or wellbeing. Independent T tests showed that format for teaching (online versus f2f) had an impact on social outcomes but no direct impact on learning outcomes. Linear regression revealed that the social outcomes have a direct impact on wellbeing and almost the double the impact on learning outcomes than mode of learning i.e.. F2f or online (ß = .448 and ß = .232 respectively). CONCLUSION: In this study, we were able to show with statistical strength that social outcomes for students such as engaging with peers and facilitator, contributing to the group, and making friends have a direct impact on wellbeing and indirectly impact learning outcomes (such as motivation, satisfaction, integration of knowledge). In a rapidly changing educational landscape, in our opinion, it is vital that these aspects are a focus of design and delivery of medical education. The data from this study supports the notion that activity design and the expertise of the teacher in facilitating the small group activities, has greater impact than the mode of educational delivery itself on students' learning processes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Schools, Medical , Humans , Learning , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Teaching
12.
Neuron ; 109(19): 3034-3035, 2021 10 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1482839

ABSTRACT

In this meeting report, I applaud the Neuromatch community, which runs virtual summer schools and conferences in response to the pandemic. Its members love science, aim to advance our understanding of the brain, and work extremely hard to include everyone.


Subject(s)
Neurosciences/education , Videoconferencing , COVID-19 , Neurosciences/trends , Pandemics , Teaching
14.
Pan Afr Med J ; 40: 28, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1472503

ABSTRACT

Introduction: the Coronavirus Disease 2019 pandemic has affected residency training globally. The aim of this study was to understand how the pandemic affected teaching and learning in residency programs in low resource settings where residents and faculty were working on the front line treating patients with the disease. Methods: this qualitative study enrolled residents and faculty from the Aga Khan University in Tanzania who were providing front line care during the pandemic. Purposeful sampling was used and data was collected using focus group discussions and in-depth interviews between August and September 2020. Analysis was done using qualitative content analysis. Results: twelve residents and six faculty members participated in this study. Two main themes emerged. The first was: "New and unfamiliar teaching and learning experiences." Residents and faculty had to adapt to changes in the learning environment and the academic program. Residents had increased responsibilities, including providing front line care and working with reduced supervision. The second theme was: "Learning opportunities amidst crisis." There were opportunities to improve critical care and procedural skills. They also had opportunities to improve non-technical skills like teamwork and communication. Conclusion: residents and faculty had to adapt to changes in teaching and learning. Residents also had to take up additional responsibilities. Support systems are required to help them adapt to the changes and settle in their new roles. There were opportunities to learn new skills, and training should be restructured to maximize the use of these opportunities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Medical, Graduate/trends , Internship and Residency , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Communication , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Learning , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Tanzania , Teaching
16.
Radiat Oncol ; 16(1): 204, 2021 Oct 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468071

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has stripped many medical students worldwide of their right to quality education. In response, we developed hybrid courses involving aspects of both online and in-person teaching for radiation oncology medical student clerkship. METHODS: We entitled students to customize their own rotation schedule using Google Forms and developed a flipped learning online class, which consisted of at least one video clip on basic knowledge of radiation oncology per day (yonsei-radonc.com). Students were instructed to watch online videos before the next day's discussion session. Required components of the medical education program (e.g., target drawing, site visits to treatment facilities) were also prepared and conducted in accordance with the appropriate level of social distancing measures. Finally, we conducted questionnaire surveys after the completion of the week-long course and clerkship. RESULTS: From March to June 2020, 110 fourth-year medical students undertook a clinical module in our 1-week radiation oncology program course. Each day, students completed the flipped learning prior to meeting with the educator and then participated in the online discussion session and conference. All activities were well performed as scheduled. Students' motivation was high, as was their overall satisfaction with the course. The students were satisfied with the online contents, flipped learning strategy, and instructors. CONCLUSIONS: We successfully integrated open and virtual educational platforms to improve access to and satisfaction with student clerkship. In the future "new normal," minimized face-to-face learning interactions, such as flipped learning, should be actively utilized for medical and other students' education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical , Radiation Oncology/education , SARS-CoV-2 , Virtual Reality , Cross-Sectional Studies , Curriculum , Humans , Program Evaluation , Students, Medical , Teaching , Telemedicine
17.
Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch ; 52(3): 889-898, 2021 07 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462048

ABSTRACT

Purpose The COVID-19 pandemic introduced new educational challenges for students, teachers, and caregivers due to the changed and varied learning environments, use of face masks, and social distancing requirements. These challenges are particularly pronounced for students with hearing loss who often require specific accommodations to allow for equal access to the curriculum. The purpose of this study was to document the potential difficulties that students with hearing loss faced during the pandemic and to generate recommendations to promote learning and engagement based on findings. Method A qualitative survey was designed to document the frequency of various learning situations (i.e., in person, remote virtual, and blended), examine the accessibility of technology and course content, and quantify hearing issues associated with safety measures and technology use in school-age students with hearing loss. Survey questions were informed from key educational issues reported in published articles and guidelines. The survey was completed by 416 educational personnel who work with students with hearing loss. Results Respondents indicated that most of their schools were providing remote or blended (in-person and remote) learning consisting of synchronous and asynchronous learning. Common accommodations for students with hearing loss were only provided some of the time with the exception of sign language interpreters, which were provided for almost all students who required them. According to the respondents, both students and caregivers reported issues or discomfort with the technology required for remote learning. Conclusion To ensure that students with hearing loss are provided equal access to the curriculum, additional accommodations should be considered to address issues arising from pandemic-related changes to school and learning practices including closed captioning, transcripts/notes, recordings of lectures, sign language interpreters, student check-ins, and family-directed resources to assist with technology issues.


Subject(s)
Education of Hearing Disabled , Hearing Loss , Learning , Teaching , Adolescent , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Curriculum , Humans , Male , Masks , Pandemics , Persons With Hearing Impairments , Schools , Students
19.
Neuron ; 109(19): 3028-3030, 2021 10 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1457250

ABSTRACT

In an interview with Neuron, Inbal Goshen discusses a challenging year, managing a research program through her own serious health scare, and a global pandemic. She offers advice for young scientists and expresses admiration for a role model she never met in person.


Subject(s)
Neurosciences/trends , COVID-19 , History, 20th Century , History, 21st Century , Mentors , Pandemics , Teaching , Work-Life Balance
20.
FEMS Microbiol Lett ; 368(18)2021 10 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455295

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 pandemic has demanded modifications to undergraduates' learning experiences and promised a more challenging scientific world in which they will live. Bespoke evidence synthesis and critical appraisal skills modules are an opportunity to utilize our information-saturated world to our advantage. This program of study made use of a virtual journal club, structured literature searches, scoping review methods and a variety of online research tools to navigate and critique the literature. The program design is here outlined with sample learning objectives and reference to the resources used.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical/methods , Teaching , COVID-19/epidemiology , Evidence-Based Medicine , Humans , Journalism, Medical , SARS-CoV-2 , Thinking
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