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2.
PLoS One ; 16(5): e0251410, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604261

ABSTRACT

The objective of this study was to explore the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 epidemic on ongoing and upcoming drug clinical trials. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with clinical trial staff and clinical trial subjects were surveyed by questionnaire in this study. The results of interviews and questionnaire showed that coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has led to many changes in the implementation of drug clinical trials, including: a variety of meetings being held online webinars using various platforms, telemedicine and follow-up by video, A large number of deviations from protocol and losses of follow-up, delivery of clinical trial drugs by express, additional workload caused by screening for coronavirus, and anxiety of subjects. These results suggest that the coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak has hindered the progress and damaged the quality of clinical trials. The online meeting, remote follow-up, express delivery of drugs and remote monitoring in the epidemic environment can ensure the progress of clinical trials to a certain extent, but they cannot fully guarantee the quality as before.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Clinical Trials as Topic , Adult , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patients/psychology , Research Personnel/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine , Young Adult
4.
Orphanet J Rare Dis ; 17(1): 5, 2022 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606674

ABSTRACT

Recent advances in technology and expanding therapeutic opportunities in neuromuscular disorders has resulted in greater interest in and development of remote assessments. Over the past year, the rapid and abrupt COVID-19 shutdowns and stay-at-home orders imposed challenges to routine clinical management and clinical trials. As in-person services were severely limited, clinicians turned to remote assessments through telehealth to allow for continued care. Typically, disease-specific clinical outcome assessments (COAs) for neuromuscular disorders (NMD) are developed over many years through rigorous and iterative processes to fully understand their psychometric properties. While efforts were underway towards developing remote assessments for NMD before the pandemic, few if any were fully developed or validated. These included assessments of strength, respiratory function and patient-reported outcomes, as well as wearable technology and other devices to quantify physical activity and function. Without many choices, clinicians modified COAs for a virtual environment recognizing it was not yet known how they compared to standard in-person administration. Despite being able to quickly adapt to the demands of the COVID-19 pandemic, these experiences with remote assessments uncovered limitations and opportunities. It became clear that existing COAs required modifications for use in a virtual environment limiting the interpretation of the information gathered. Still, the opportunity for real-world evaluation and reduced patient burden were clear benefits to remote assessment and may provide a more robust understanding and characterization of disease impact in NMD. Hence, we propose a roadmap navigating an informed post-pandemic path toward development and implementation of safe and successful use of remote assessments for patients with NMD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neuromuscular Diseases , Telemedicine , Humans , Neuromuscular Diseases/diagnosis , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(47): e27948, 2021 Nov 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1605804

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: South Korean studies on coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) treatment have described the use of community treatment centers (CTCs), which combine elements of the home and hospital, to isolate and treat mild COVID-19 patients. While the number of South Koreans diagnosed with COVID-19 cases has varied greatly by season, the number of confirmed cases in foreign nationals has shown no seasonality, with an average of around 25 to 30 per day. For foreign patients, accommodation arrangements and travel routes may be difficult; they may also have difficulty accessing medical care, so require careful management.We discuss our experience in operating and managing a CTC for foreign COVID-19 patients arriving in South Korea with mild symptoms. We also propose guidelines for efficient use of resources with respect to treating these patients in CTCs.We present the clinical findings of patients treated at the CTC between 7 October and 22 November 2020, and make some recommendations. We quarantined and treated foreign patients with mild symptoms of COVID-19 at the Ansan CTC. Discharge is determined based on clinical symptoms rather than polymerase chain reaction results. Medical and administrative staff use building A, while building B is used for isolating patients. Medical rounds are in the form of twice-daily video calls. Three kinds of foods with medication are served according to the patient's country of origin.In total, 315 patients were admitted to the Ansan CTC between 7 October and 22 November 2020; 145 of them were discharged from the CTC and 26 were transferred to other hospitals.To utilize medical resources efficiently during the pandemic, it is desirable to reserve CTCs exclusively for foreign patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Community Health Centers/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Isolation/methods , Patient Transfer , Telemedicine/methods , Humans , Quarantine/methods , Republic of Korea , SARS-CoV-2
6.
J Public Health Manag Pract ; 28(1): 77-85, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604194

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: During the COVID-19 pandemic, demand for telehealth services increased to reduce disease exposure for patients and providers and to meet preexisting demand for physician services in health resource shortage areas. OBJECTIVE: To estimate self-reported telehealth availability, equipment for accessing telehealth, and telehealth usage among Medicare beneficiaries during the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: We used data from the 2020 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) COVID-19 Fall Supplement Public Use File to estimate the weighted percentages of beneficiaries who had (a) access to telehealth before or during COVID-19; (b) equipment for accessing telehealth; and (c) telehealth visits during COVID-19. We used logistic regression to examine sociodemographic factors associated with telehealth usage. PARTICIPANTS: Beneficiaries who participated in the MCBS COVID-19 Fall Supplements. RESULTS: During October and November 2020, telehealth appointments offered by providers were available to 63.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 61.8-65.9) of Medicare beneficiaries who had accessed medical care by telephone or video. Among those, only 18.0% (95% CI, 16.1-19.9) had been offered telehealth before the pandemic. The majority of beneficiaries (92.2%; 95% CI, 91.2-93.1) had 1 or more types of equipment available for accessing telehealth, but only 44.9% (95% CI, 43.0-46.9) had had a telehealth visit since July 1, 2020. Older adults, minorities, those with a lower income, and non-English speakers had less availability of telehealth equipment. Patient characteristics were significantly (P < .05) associated with telehealth use, including age, sex, race/ethnicity, and equipment availability. CONCLUSION: Telehealth availability for Medicare beneficiaries increased substantially during the COVID-19 pandemic. Even with the improvement in telehealth offerings and use hastened by the pandemic, gaps in access and use still exist. Effectiveness and implementation research can find ways to close gaps in telehealth services between vulnerable and underrepresented populations and counterparts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Aged , Humans , Medicare , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
7.
Br J Hosp Med (Lond) ; 82(12): 1-10, 2021 Dec 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607048

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in an increased burden on all medical services and healthcare professionals are applying new strategies to cope with the added demands. During the pandemic mental healthcare services in many parts of the world have been reorganised to incorporate modern technology and maintain efficient service delivery. Mental health professionals are playing a major role in alleviating the suffering resulting from this pandemic. A selective survey of the literature, including narrative reviews, was carried out to study the implications of digital psychiatry. Historically, epidemics have had a substantial effect on mental health and general health services. Telehealth appears to be the right solution to the present mental health crisis, but technology cannot substitute for human presence and proximity in mental health services, so the newer interventions have advantages and disadvantages. Remote methods of therapy are likely to continue to be used and proper assessment of these new ways of working in psychiatry is required. In the post-pandemic period, the challenge will be to combine digital and in-person therapies. Discussions about digital revolution in the field of psychiatry should be modified to digital evolution.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychiatry , Telemedicine , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Neuromodulation ; 24(2): 337-342, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1599565

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore the utility of deep brain stimulation (DBS) telemedicine in the management of patients with movement disorders from January 2019 to March 2020, covering the main period of the COVID-19 outbreak in China. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We obtained data from 40 hospitals around China that employed DBS tele-programming for their outpatients with Parkinson's disease or dystonia from January 2019 to March 2020. Data were obtained on the number and nature of patients' DBS health care service requests, reasons for their requests, the number of DBS telemedicine sessions subsequently completed, safety issues, and the patients' satisfaction with the DBS tele-programing parameter adjustments made. RESULTS: There were 909 DBS tele-programming health service requests (from 196 patients) completed during the study period. The results showed: 1) the number of DBS telemedicine sessions requested and the number of patients examined increased during the COVID-19 outbreak in February and March 2020 when compared with the monthly numbers in 2019; 2) the most common reason for the patients' health service requests was poor symptom control; 3) the most common DBS tele-programming adjustment made was voltage change; 4) overall, most (89%) DBS tele-programming adjustment sessions were experienced by the patients as satisfactory; and 5) significant adverse events and unexpected treatment interruptions caused by connection failure or other hardware- or software-related problems did not occur. CONCLUSIONS: DBS telemedicine could have a unique role to play in maintaining the delivery of DBS treatment and medical care to outpatients with movement disorders during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Deep Brain Stimulation/methods , Movement Disorders/therapy , Pandemics , Telemedicine/methods , Adult , Aged , Ambulatory Care , China , Deep Brain Stimulation/adverse effects , Deep Brain Stimulation/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Satisfaction , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data
9.
Womens Health (Lond) ; 17: 17455065211013262, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595974

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The 2019 coronavirus disease pandemic poses unique challenges to healthcare delivery. To limit the exposure of providers and patients to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention encourages providers to use telehealth platforms whenever possible. Given the maternal mortality crisis in the United States and the compounding 2019 coronavirus disease public health emergency, continued access to quality preconception, prenatal, intrapartum, and postpartum care are essential to the health and well-being of mother and baby. OBJECTIVE: This commentary explores unique opportunities to optimize virtual obstetric care for low-risk and high-risk mothers at each stage of pregnancy. METHODS: In this review paper, we present evidence-based literature and tools from first-hand experience implementing telemedicine in obstetric care clinics during the pandemic. RESULTS: Using the best evidence-based practices with telemedicine, health care providers can deliver care in the safest, most respectful, and appropriate way possible while providing the critical support necessary in pregnancy. In reviewing the literature, several studies endorse the implementation of specific tools outlined in this article, to facilitate the implementation of telemedicine. From a quality improvement standpoint, evidence-based telemedicine provides a solution for overburdened healthcare systems, greater confidentiality for obstetric services, and a personalized avenue for health care providers to meet maternal health needs in the pandemic. CONCLUSION: During the COVID-19 pandemic, continued access to quality prenatal, intrapartum, and postpartum care are essential to the health and well-being of mother and baby.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Female , Humans , Mothers , Pandemics , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2 , United States , Vital Signs
11.
Front Biosci (Elite Ed) ; 13(2): 291-298, 2021 12 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593500

ABSTRACT

At the end of 2019, patients with pneumonia of unknown etiology appeared in the city of Wuhan (China). After a short time, this infection affected not only the people of China but also the whole world. On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared the disease a pandemic. A viral agent was identified - severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), and the disease itself was named "2019 novel coronavirus infection" (COVID-19). Telemedicine technologies are a form of medical care and training that can counteract the spread of a COVID-19 epidemic by eliminating direct contact of both medical workers with patients and medical workers and patients with each other. Lack of personal protective equipment, the suspension of clinical clerkship and supervision, and a reduction in the number of elective surgical cases inevitably affect medical and surgical education. Interesting solutions using virtual learning, video conferencing, social media, and telemedicine could effectively address the sudden discontinuation of medical education. In fact, it is currently the ideal combination of teleworking and study. Telemedicine can play an important role in this pandemic by minimizing the spread of the virus, leveraging healthcare providers' time, and alleviating the challenges of medical education. The aim of this study was to identify the role of telemedicine services in the management and controlling of diseases as well as on medical education during the COVID-19 outbreak.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physical Distancing , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Medical/methods , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration
12.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0260889, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592578

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Approximately 40-70% of people with Parkinson's disease (PD) fall each year, causing decreased activity levels and quality of life. Current fall-prevention strategies include the use of pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies. To increase the accessibility of this vulnerable population, we developed a multidisciplinary telemedicine program using an Information and Communication Technology (ICT) platform. We hypothesized that the risk for falling in PD would decrease among participants receiving a multidisciplinary telemedicine intervention program added to standard office-based neurological care. OBJECTIVE: To determine the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of a multidisciplinary telemedicine intervention to decrease the incidence of falls in patients with PD. METHODS: Ongoing, longitudinal, randomized, single-blinded, case-control, clinical trial. We will include 76 non-demented patients with idiopathic PD with a high risk of falling and limited access to multidisciplinary care. The intervention group (n = 38) will receive multidisciplinary remote care in addition to standard medical care, and the control group (n = 38) standard medical care only. Nutrition, sarcopenia and frailty status, motor, non-motor symptoms, health-related quality of life, caregiver burden, falls, balance and gait disturbances, direct and non-medical costs will be assessed using validated rating scales. RESULTS: This study will provide a cost-effectiveness assessment of multidisciplinary telemedicine intervention for fall reduction in PD, in addition to standard neurological medical care. CONCLUSION: In this challenging initiative, we will determine whether a multidisciplinary telemedicine intervention program can reduce falls, as an alternative intervention option for PD patients with restricted access to multidisciplinary care. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04694443.


Subject(s)
Accidental Falls/prevention & control , Exercise Therapy/methods , Gait , Parkinson Disease/physiopathology , Patient Care Team/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Case-Control Studies , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Young Adult
13.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0258050, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591781

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Over the last decade, mobile health applications (mHealth App) have evolved exponentially to assess and support our health and well-being. OBJECTIVE: This paper presents an Artificial Intelligence (AI)-enabled mHealth app rating tool, called ACCU3RATE, which takes multidimensional measures such as user star rating, user review and features declared by the developer to generate the rating of an app. However, currently, there is very little conceptual understanding on how user reviews affect app rating from a multi-dimensional perspective. This study applies AI-based text mining technique to develop more comprehensive understanding of user feedback based on several important factors, determining the mHealth app ratings. METHOD: Based on the literature, six variables were identified that influence the mHealth app rating scale. These factors are user star rating, user text review, user interface (UI) design, functionality, security and privacy, and clinical approval. Natural Language Toolkit package is used for interpreting text and to identify the App users' sentiment. Additional considerations were accessibility, protection and privacy, UI design for people living with physical disability. Moreover, the details of clinical approval, if exists, were taken from the developer's statement. Finally, we fused all the inputs using fuzzy logic to calculate the new app rating score. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: ACCU3RATE concentrates on heart related Apps found in the play store and App gallery. The findings indicate the efficacy of the proposed method as opposed to the current device scale. This study has implications for both App developers and consumers who are using mHealth Apps to monitor and track their health. The performance evaluation shows that the proposed mHealth scale has shown excellent reliability as well as internal consistency of the scale, and high inter-rater reliability index. It has also been noticed that the fuzzy based rating scale, as in ACCU3RATE, matches more closely to the rating performed by experts.


Subject(s)
Artificial Intelligence , Mobile Applications , Telemedicine , Humans
14.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(12): e28610, 2021 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591657

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Inequities in access to health services are a global concern and a concern for Canadian populations living in rural areas. Rural children hospitalized at tertiary children's hospitals have higher rates of medical complexity and experience more expensive hospitalizations and more frequent readmissions. The 2 tertiary pediatric hospitals in Alberta, Canada, have already been operating above capacity, but the pediatric beds at regional hospitals are underused. Such imbalance could lead to poor patient safety and increased readmission risk at tertiary pediatric hospitals and diminish the clinical exposure of regional pediatric health care providers, erode their confidence, and compel health systems to further reduce the capacity at regional sites. A Telemedicine Rounding and Consultation for Kids (TRaC-K) model was proposed to enable health care providers at Alberta Children's Hospital to partner with their counterparts at Medicine Hat Regional Hospital to provide inpatient clinical care for pediatric patients who would otherwise have to travel or be transferred to the tertiary site. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to identify perceived barriers and enablers to implementing the TRaC-K model. METHODS: This study was guided by the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) and used qualitative methods. We collected qualitative data from 42 participants from tertiary and regional hospitals through 31 semistructured interviews and 2 focus groups. These data were thematically analyzed to identify major subthemes within each TDF domain. These subthemes were further aggregated and categorized into barriers or enablers to implementing the TRaC-K model and were tabulated separately. RESULTS: Our study identified 31 subthemes in 14 TDF domains, ranging from administrative issues to specific clinical conditions. We were able to merge these subthemes into larger themes and categorize them into 4 barriers and 4 enablers. Our findings showed that the barriers were lack of awareness of telemedicine, skills to provide virtual clinical care, unclear processes and resources to support TRaC-K, and concerns about clear roles and responsibilities. The enablers were health care providers' motivation to provide care closer to home, supporting system resource stewardship, site and practice compatibility, and motivation to strengthen tertiary-regional relationships. CONCLUSIONS: This systematic inquiry into the perceived barriers and enablers to the implementation of TRaC-K helped us to gain insights from various health care providers' and family members' perspectives. We will use these findings to design interventions to overcome the identified barriers and harness the enablers to encourage successful implementation of TRaC-K. These findings will inform the implementation of telemedicine-based interventions in pediatric settings in other parts of Canada and beyond. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): RR2-10.1186/s12913-018-3859-2.


Subject(s)
Telemedicine , Alberta , Child , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , Qualitative Research , Referral and Consultation
15.
BMJ Open Respir Res ; 8(1)2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591159

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Clinicians and policymakers are promoting widespread use of home technology including spirometry to detect disease progression for patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD); the COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated this. Data collating clinicians' views on the potential utility of telehealth in ILD are limited. AIM: This survey investigated clinicians' opinions about contemporary methods and practices used to monitor disease progression in patients with ILD using telehealth. METHODS: Clinicians were invited to participate in a cross-sectional survey (SurveyMonkey) of 13 questions designed by an expert panel. Telehealth was defined as home monitoring of symptoms and physiological parameters with regular automatic transmission of data from the patient's home to the clinician. Data are presented as percentages of respondents. RESULTS: A total of 207 clinicians from 23 countries participated in the survey. A minority (81, 39%) reported using telehealth. 50% (n=41) of these respondents completed a further question about the effectiveness of telehealth. A majority of respondents (32, 70%) rated it to be quite or more effective than face-to-face visit. There were a greater number of respondents using telehealth from Europe (94, 45%) than Asia (51, 25%) and America (24%). Clinicians reported the most useful telehealth monitoring technologies as smartphone apps (59%) and wearable sensors (30%). Telehealth was most frequently used for monitoring disease progression (70%), quality of life (63%), medication use (63%) and reducing the need for in-person visits (63%). Clinicians most often monitored symptoms (93%), oxygen saturation (74%) and physical activity (72%). The equipment perceived to be most effective were spirometers (43%) and pulse oximeters (33%). The primary barriers to clinicians' participation in telehealth were organisational structure (80%), technical challenges (63%) and lack of time and/or workload (63%). Clinicians considered patients' barriers to participation might include lack of awareness (76%), lack of knowledge using smartphones (60%) and lack of confidence in telehealth (56%). CONCLUSION: The ILD clinicians completing this survey who used telehealth to monitor patients (n=81) supported its' clinical utility. Our findings emphasise the need for robust research in telehealth as a mode for the delivery of cost-effective healthcare services in ILD and highlight the need to assess patients' perspectives to improve telehealth utility in patients with ILD.


Subject(s)
Lung Diseases, Interstitial , Telemedicine , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/diagnosis , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/therapy , Quality of Life , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Trials ; 23(1): 5, 2022 Jan 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1590540

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Breastfeeding offers many medical and neurodevelopmental advantages for birthing parents and infants; however, the majority of parents stop breastfeeding before it is recommended. Professional lactation support by the International Board Certified Lactation Consultants (IBCLCs) increases breastfeeding rates; however, many communities lack access to IBCLCs. Black and Latinx parents have lower breastfeeding rates, and limited access to professional lactation support may contribute to this disparity. Virtual "telelactation" consults that use two-way video have the potential to increase access to IBCLCs among disadvantaged populations. We present a protocol for the digital Tele-MILC trial, which uses mixed methods to evaluate the impact of telelactation services on breastfeeding outcomes. The objective of this pragmatic, parallel design randomized controlled trial is to assess the impact of telelactation on breastfeeding duration and exclusivity and explore how acceptability of and experiences with telelactation vary across Latinx, Black, and non-Black and non-Latinx parents to guide future improvement of these services. METHODS: 2400 primiparous, pregnant individuals age > 18 who intend to breastfeed and live in the USA underserved by IBCLCs will be recruited. Recruitment will occur via Ovia, a pregnancy tracker mobile phone application (app) used by over one million pregnant individuals in the USA annually. Participants will be randomized to (1) on-demand telelactation video calls on personal devices or (2) ebook on infant care/usual care. Breastfeeding outcomes will be captured via surveys and interviews and compared across racial and ethnic groups. This study will track participants for 8 months (including 6 months postpartum). Primary outcomes include breastfeeding duration and breastfeeding exclusivity. We will quantify differences in these outcomes across racial and ethnic groups. Both intention-to-treat and as-treated (using instrumental variable methods) analyses will be performed. This study will also generate qualitative data on the experiences of different subgroups of parents with the telelactation intervention, including barriers to use, satisfaction, and strengths and limitations of this delivery model. DISCUSSION: This is the first randomized study evaluating the impact of telelactation on breastfeeding outcomes. It will inform the design and implementation of future digital trials among pregnant and postpartum people, including Black and Latinx populations which are historically underrepresented in clinical trials. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04856163. Registered on April 23, 2021.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding , Telemedicine , Adult , Female , Humans , Infant , Middle Aged , Parents , Postnatal Care , Postpartum Period , Pregnancy , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
17.
Med Sci Monit ; 27: e935496, 2021 Dec 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1599426

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND The COVID-19 pandemic can affect the elderly population's general health. This study aimed to compare the effects of a remote home-based exercise program to improve the mental state, balance, and physical function and to prevent falls in adults aged 65 years and older during the COVID-19 pandemic in Seoul, Korea. MATERIAL AND METHODS Seventy participants were randomly assigned to an experimental group of 35 participants who underwent a remote home-based fall prevention exercise program and a control group of 35 participants. The experimental group performed an exercise program twice weekly for 8 weeks from June 2 to July 21, 2021. The Geriatric Depression Scale, 5 times sit to stand test, grip strength, 10-m walk test, gait analysis, Timed Up and Go test, and static balance test were assessed before and after the 8-week program. RESULTS The group-by-time interaction effect was statistically significant for the Geriatric Depression Scale, five times sit to stand test, grip strength, 10-meter walk, gait speed, step length, stride length, Timed Up and Go test, and static balance test (P<0.05). Compared with the control group, the experimental group showed a significant effect in all dependent variables except dynamic balance (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS In this population, the remote home-based fall prevention exercise program resulted in a significant improvement in physical function, psychological factors, and balance during the COVID-19 pandemic. The findings may have implications for community public health measures to protect the vulnerable during future epidemics and pandemics of infectious disease.


Subject(s)
Accidental Falls/prevention & control , Telemedicine , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Exercise , Exercise Therapy , Female , Geriatric Assessment , Hand Strength , Health Services for the Aged , Humans , Male , Postural Balance , Seoul/epidemiology , Walking Speed
18.
Sensors (Basel) ; 21(24)2021 Dec 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598728

ABSTRACT

Camera-based remote photoplethysmography (rPPG) is a low-cost and casual non-contact heart rate measurement method suitable for telemedicine. Several factors affect the accuracy of measuring the heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV) using rPPG despite HRV being an important indicator for healthcare monitoring. This study aimed to investigate the appropriate setup for precise HRV measurements using rPPG while considering the effects of possible factors including illumination, direction of the light, frame rate of the camera, and body motion. In the lighting conditions experiment, the smallest mean absolute R-R interval (RRI) error was obtained when light greater than 500 lux was cast from the front (among the following conditions-illuminance: 100, 300, 500, and 700 lux; directions: front, top, and front and top). In addition, the RRI and HRV were measured with sufficient accuracy at frame rates above 30 fps. The accuracy of the HRV measurement was greatly reduced when the body motion was not constrained; thus, it is necessary to limit the body motion, especially the head motion, in an actual telemedicine situation. The results of this study can act as guidelines for setting up the shooting environment and camera settings for rPPG use in telemedicine.


Subject(s)
Photoplethysmography , Telemedicine , Algorithms , Heart Rate , Motion
19.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(12): e2141233, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1596574

ABSTRACT

Importance: The COVID-19 pandemic led to the implementation of alternative care modalities (eg, teleconsultations and task shifting) that will continue to be implemented in parallel to traditional care after the pandemic. An ideal balance between alternative and traditional care modalities is unknown. Objectives: To quantify the ideal postpandemic balance between alternative and traditional care modalities among patients with chronic illness and to qualify the circumstances in which patients consider it appropriate to replace traditional care with alternative care. Design, Setting, and Participants: This survey study invited 5999 adults with chronic illness in ComPaRe, a French nationwide e-cohort of adults with chronic conditions who volunteer their time to participate in research projects, to participate in this study, which was performed from January 27 to February 23, 2021. Main Outcomes and Measures: Participants rated the ideal proportion at which they would use 3 alternative care modalities instead of the traditional care equivalent on a 0% to 100% scale (with 0% indicating using alternative care modalities for none of one's future care and 100% indicating using alternative care modalities for all of one's future care) of their overall future care: (1) teleconsultations, (2) online symptom-checkers to react to new symptoms, and (3) remote monitoring to adapt treatment outside consultations. The median ideal proportion of alternative care use was calculated. Perceived appropriate circumstances in which each alternative modality could replace traditional care were collected with open-ended questions. Analyses were performed on a weighted data set representative of patients with chronic illness in France. Results: Of the 5999 invited individuals, 1529 (mean [SD] age, 50.3 [14.7] years; 1072 [70.1%] female) agreed to participate (participation rate, 25.5%). Participants would choose teleconsultations for 50.0% of their future consultations (IQR, 11.0%-52.0%), online symptom-checkers over contacting their physician for 22.0% of new symptoms (IQR, 2.0%-50.0%), and remote monitoring instead of consultations for 52.3% of their treatment adaptations (IQR, 25.4%-85.4%). Participants reported 67 circumstances for which replacing traditional with alternative care modalities was considered appropriate, including 31 care activities (eg, prescription renewal and addressing acute or minor complaints), 25 patient characteristics (eg, stable chronic condition and established patient-physician relationship), and 11 required characteristics of the alternative care modalities (eg, quality assurance). Conclusions and Relevance: Results of this survey study suggest that after the pandemic, patients would choose alternative over traditional care for 22% to 52% of the time across different care needs. Participants proposed 67 criteria to guide clinicians in replacing traditional care with alternative care. These findings provide a guide for redesigning care in collaboration with patients after the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Disease/therapy , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Pandemics , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Patient Preference , Adult , Female , France , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1596216

ABSTRACT

Despite all its promises, telemedicine is still not widely implemented in the care of rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMDs). The aim of this study is to investigate opportunities, barriers, acceptance, and preferences concerning telemedicine among RMD patients and professional stakeholders. From November 2017 to December 2019, a participatory, mixed-methods study was conducted, consisting of (1) expert interviews (n = 27) with RMD patients and professional stakeholders, (2) a national paper-based patient survey (n = 766), and (3) focus groups (n = 2) with patient representatives and rheumatologists. The qualitative findings indicate that patients equate personal contact with physical face-to-face contact, which could be reduced by implementing telemedicine, thus negatively influencing the patient-doctor relationship. Correspondingly "no personal contact with the doctor" is the main reason (64%) why 38% of the surveyed patients refuse to try telemedicine. Professional stakeholders expect telemedicine to contribute to the effective allocation of scarce resources in rheumatology care. The main barriers reported by stakeholders were the scarcity of time resources in RMD care, the absence of physical examinations, and organizational challenges associated with the implementation of telemedicine in RMD care. While the exact integration of telemedicine into routine care has yet to be found, the consequences on the patient-physician relationship must be permanently considered.


Subject(s)
Musculoskeletal Diseases , Rheumatology , Telemedicine , Focus Groups , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires
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