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1.
Front Biosci (Elite Ed) ; 13(2): 291-298, 2021 12 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593500

ABSTRACT

At the end of 2019, patients with pneumonia of unknown etiology appeared in the city of Wuhan (China). After a short time, this infection affected not only the people of China but also the whole world. On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared the disease a pandemic. A viral agent was identified - severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), and the disease itself was named "2019 novel coronavirus infection" (COVID-19). Telemedicine technologies are a form of medical care and training that can counteract the spread of a COVID-19 epidemic by eliminating direct contact of both medical workers with patients and medical workers and patients with each other. Lack of personal protective equipment, the suspension of clinical clerkship and supervision, and a reduction in the number of elective surgical cases inevitably affect medical and surgical education. Interesting solutions using virtual learning, video conferencing, social media, and telemedicine could effectively address the sudden discontinuation of medical education. In fact, it is currently the ideal combination of teleworking and study. Telemedicine can play an important role in this pandemic by minimizing the spread of the virus, leveraging healthcare providers' time, and alleviating the challenges of medical education. The aim of this study was to identify the role of telemedicine services in the management and controlling of diseases as well as on medical education during the COVID-19 outbreak.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physical Distancing , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Medical/methods , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration
2.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20 Suppl 3: 31-38, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587346

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Depression and anxiety are two to four times more prevalent in people with CF (pwCF) than the general population. COVID-19 may exacerbate mental health challenges, increasing demand for psychological services, while decreasing their availability. We assessed the impact of the pandemic on depression and anxiety in pwCF, including how COVID-19 affected the frequency of mental health screening and the types of services provided. METHODS: A 38-item internet survey, completed in June 2020, assessed how COVID-19 affected: 1) the mental health clinician's role and screening processes; 2) barriers to screening and resource needs; 3) impact of COVID-19 on depression and anxiety, and 4) positive outcomes and confidence in sustaining mental health screening and treatment, including telehealth services, after the pandemic. RESULTS: Responses were obtained from 131 of the 289 US CF programs. Overall, 60% of programs (n=79) continued mental health screening and treatment, although less frequently; 50% provided individual tele-mental health interventions, and 9% provided telehealth group therapy. Clinically elevated depression symptoms (PHQ-9≥10; moderate to severe), were found in 12% of 785 pwCF, with 3.1% endorsing suicidal ideation. Similarly, elevated anxiety (moderate to severe; GAD-7≥10) was found in 13% of pwCF (n=779). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic created an opportunity to implement innovative solutions to disruptions in mental health screening and treatment in CF programs. We found that pwCF had increased access to psychological interventions during the pandemic via telehealth, supporting the continued integration of tele-mental health screening and treatment into CF care.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19 , Cystic Fibrosis , Depression , Mental Health , Psychosocial Intervention , Telemedicine , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/physiopathology , Anxiety/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/psychology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/physiopathology , Depression/therapy , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Mass Screening/methods , Needs Assessment , Psychosocial Intervention/methods , Psychosocial Intervention/trends , Psychosocial Support Systems , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration , United States/epidemiology
3.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20 Suppl 3: 3-8, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587345

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Novel therapies have dramatically changed cystic fibrosis (CF) and innovative care delivery systems are needed to meet future patient needs. Telehealth has been shown to be an efficient and desirable form of care delivery. The COVID-19 pandemic caused a rapid shift to telehealth, and this presented a unique opportunity to study facilitators, barriers, and satisfaction with this mode of care delivery. We aim to report survey methods, demographics and telehealth use among CF care programs, patients, and families during the pandemic. METHODS: CF programs completed two surveys between July 29 and September 18, 2020, and between April 19 and May 19, 2021. Patients and families completed a similar survey between August 31 and October 30, 2020. The surveys addressed topics assessing the pandemic's financial impact, telehealth modes and experiences, licensure and reimbursement issues, health screening, and remote monitoring. Quantitative data were analyzed with descriptive statistics and were compared to the CF Foundation Patient Registry. RESULTS: Most programs (278 at timepoint one and 274 at timepoint two) provided telehealth during the pandemic. The percent of visits containing either telephone or video components changed from 45% to 25% over the time periods. Additionally, 424 patients and families from various ages and backgrounds responded to the survey and 81% reported having a telehealth visit. CONCLUSIONS: The pandemic accelerated telehealth adoption and these datasets are a valuable source for exploring telehealth barriers and facilitators, the quality-of-care experience, financial and workforce implications, the impact on underrepresented populations, and implications for coverage and reimbursement.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cystic Fibrosis , Health Services Accessibility , Telemedicine , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communication Barriers , Continuity of Patient Care , Costs and Cost Analysis , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/psychology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Female , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Male , Organizational Innovation , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Quality of Health Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , United States/epidemiology
4.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20 Suppl 3: 9-13, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587343

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis (CF) care programs in the United States rapidly adopted telehealth during the COVID-19 pandemic. Understanding factors that promote or impede telehealth will inform planning for future telehealth-enabled care models. METHODS: Adult, pediatric, and affiliate CF care programs in the United States (n = 287) were surveyed twice eight months apart in 2020-2021 about telehealth use. Programs were asked to describe barriers to and promoters of telehealth. RESULTS: Ninety-seven percent of programs provided telehealth services. In the first CF Care Program State of Care Survey (SoC1), programs estimated that 57% of patients exclusively received in-person care, 36% of patients received telehealth by phone/computer with video, and 8% of patients received telephone-only care. In the second CF Care Program State of Care Survey (SoC2), programs estimated that 80% of visits were in-person and 15% were via audio and video telehealth. Pediatric programs (21%) were less likely than adult (37%) or affiliate (41%) programs to recommend telehealth (p = 0.007). All programs ranked lack of internet access as the highest barrier to patient engagement with telehealth. Promoters of telehealth were increased accessibility and avoidance of infection transmission. Top ranked changes to improve telehealth were expanded provision of remote monitoring devices and technology access. Similar proportions of program types anticipated institutional telehealth expansion. CONCLUSION: During the COVID-19 pandemic, CF programs in the United States identified factors to improve future care delivery via telehealth. Targeting specific barriers and promoters will improve the use and quality of telehealth throughout the care center network.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication Barriers , Cystic Fibrosis , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Health Services Accessibility , Patient Participation , Telemedicine , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/psychology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Female , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Internet Access , Male , Needs Assessment , Patient Participation/methods , Patient Participation/psychology , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , United States/epidemiology
5.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20 Suppl 3: 1-2, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587341

ABSTRACT

The findings of this body of work are presented in the eight articles included in this supplement. The impact and perspectives of adult and pediatric care teams and patient/families are covered with special attention to mental health care, the financial and personnel impacts within care programs, the experiences of vulnerable and underrepresented patient populations, and implementation of remoting monitoring. Commentaries from colleagues provide a broader perspective, offering reflections on the findings and their implications regarding the future CF care model.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cystic Fibrosis , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Continuity of Patient Care , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Organizational Innovation , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , United States/epidemiology
6.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20 Suppl 3: 41-46, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587338

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, CF centers shifted to a telehealth delivery model. Our study aimed to determine how people with CF (PwCF) and their families experienced telehealth and assessed its quality and acceptability for future CF care. METHODS: The CF Patient and Family State of Care Survey (PFSoC) was fielded from August 31-October 30, 2020. The PFSoC explored themes of overall telehealth quality, ease of use, desirability, and preference for a future mix of in-person and telehealth care. Demographic covariates considered included: gender, age, CFTR modulator status, and region of residence. RESULTS: 424 PwCF and parents of PwCF responded (47% parents). Most (81%) reported a telehealth visit which included a MD/APP and nurse team members. 91% found telehealth easy to use, and 66% reported similar/higher quality than in-person care. One-third (34%) reported the highest desire for future telehealth care, with 45% (n =212) desiring 50% or more of visits conducted via telehealth. Adults were more likely than parents to report highest desire for future telehealth (64% vs. 36%). Respondents who perceived telehealth as similar/higher quality were more likely to desire future telehealth compared to those who perceived telehealth as lower quality (96% vs. 50%). Mixed methods analysis revealed themes affecting perceptions of telehealth. CONCLUSIONS: PwCF desire for future telehealth was influenced by perception of quality and age. Several themes emerged that need to be explored as telehealth is adapted into the CF chronic care model, especially when thinking about integration into pediatric care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication Barriers , Consumer Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Cystic Fibrosis , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Telemedicine , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/psychology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Family Health , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Models, Organizational , Patient Participation/methods , Patient Participation/psychology , Pediatrics/methods , Pediatrics/trends , Quality Improvement , Quality of Health Care/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , United States/epidemiology
7.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20 Suppl 3: 49-54, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587337

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, there was an uptake of telehealth in cystic fibrosis care. Previous studies show disparities in telehealth use based on socioeconomic status (SES). We aimed to: (1) understand telehealth use and perceptions and (2) identify the facilitators and barriers to telehealth use among people with CF and their families (PwCF) from diverse racial/ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds. METHODS: We conducted an analysis of the 2020 Cystic Fibrosis State of Care surveys completed by PwCF (PFSoC), CF Care Programs (SoC1) and the CF Foundation Patient Registry (CFFPR). RESULTS: A total of 424 PwCF and 286 programs responded to the PFSoC and SoC1. Among PwCF, 90% self-identified as White, 6% as Hispanic/Latino, and 2% as Black. Racial/ethnic minorities were less likely to have had a telehealth visit (p=.015). This difference was pronounced among the Hispanic/Latino population (p<.01). Telehealth use did not differ by health insurance and was similarly offered independent of financial status. Compared to PwCF who denied financial constraints, those who reported financial difficulties found telehealth more difficult to use (p=.018) and were less likely to think that their concerns (p=.010) or issues that mattered most to them (p=.020) were addressed during telehealth. Programs perceived lack of technology, language barriers, and home conditions as barriers to telehealth in vulnerable populations. CONCLUSION: PFSoC and SoC1 identified differences in telehealth use and care perceptions by ethnicity, race, and socioeconomic characteristics. Further studies are needed to understand how telehealth can change access to CF care in diverse subpopulations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication Barriers , Cystic Fibrosis , Minority Health , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Cystic Fibrosis/economics , Cystic Fibrosis/ethnology , Cystic Fibrosis/psychology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Financial Stress/ethnology , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Healthcare Disparities/ethnology , Healthcare Disparities/standards , Humans , Minority Health/ethnology , Minority Health/standards , Minority Health/statistics & numerical data , Needs Assessment , Organizational Innovation , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , United States/epidemiology , Vulnerable Populations/statistics & numerical data
8.
Ann Med ; 54(1): 98-107, 2022 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1577584

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act led to the rapid implementation of telemedicine across health care office settings. Whether this transition to telemedicine has any impact on missed appointments is yet to be determined. This study examined the relationship between telemedicine usage and missed appointments during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHOD: This retrospective study used appointment-level data from 55 Federally Qualified Health Centre clinics in Texas between March and November 2020. To account for the nested data structure of repeated appointments within each patient, a mixed-effects multivariable logistic regression model was used to examine associations between telemedicine use and missed appointments, adjusting for patient sociodemographic characteristics, geographic classification, past medical history, and clinic characteristics. The independent variable was having a telemedicine appointment, defined as an audiovisual consultation started and finalized via a telemedicine platform. The outcome of interest was having a missed appointment (yes/no) after a scheduled and confirmed medical appointment. Results from this initial model were stratified by appointment type (in-person vs. telemedicine). RESULTS: The analytic sample included 278,171 appointments for 85,413 unique patients. The overall missed appointment rate was 18%, and 25% of all appointments were telemedicine appointments. Compared to in-person visits, telemedicine visits were less likely to result in a missed appointment (OR = 0.87, p < .001). Compared to Whites, Asians were less likely to have a missed appointment (OR = 0.82, p < .001) while African Americans, Hispanics, and American Indians were all significantly more likely to have missed appointments (OR = 1.61, p < .001; OR = 1.19, p = .01; OR = 1.22, p < .01, respectively). Those accessing mental health services (OR = 1.57 for in-person and 0.78 for telemedicine) and living in metropolitan areas (OR = 1.15 for in-person and 0.82 for telemedicine) were more likely to miss in-person appointments but less likely to miss telemedicine appointments. Patients with frequent medical visits or those living with chronic diseases were more likely to miss in-person appointments but less likely to miss telemedicine appointments. CONCLUSIONS: Telemedicine is strongly associated with fewer missed appointments. Although our findings suggest a residual lag in minority populations, specific patient populations, including those with frequent prior visits or chronic conditions, those seeking mental health services, and those living in metropolitan areas were less likely to miss telemedicine appointments than in-person visits. These findings highlight how telemedicine can enable effective and accessible care by reducing missed healthcare appointments.KEY MESSAGESTelemedicine was associated with 13% lower odds of missed appointments.Patients with frequent medical visits or those living with chronic diseases were less likely to miss telemedicine appointments but more likely to miss in-person appointments.Patients seeking mental health services were less likely to miss telemedicine appointments but more likely to miss in-person appointments.Similarly, those living in metropolitan areas were less likely to miss telemedicine appointments but more likely to miss in-person appointments.


Subject(s)
Appointments and Schedules , COVID-19 , Community Health Centers , Pandemics , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Telemedicine/organization & administration
9.
Lancet ; 398(10294): 41-52, 2021 07 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575225

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Little evidence is available on the use of telehealth for antenatal care. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we developed and implemented a new antenatal care schedule integrating telehealth across all models of pregnancy care. To inform this clinical initiative, we aimed to assess the effectiveness and safety of telehealth in antenatal care. METHODS: We analysed routinely collected health data on all women giving birth at Monash Health, a large health service in Victoria (Australia), using an interrupted time-series design. We assessed the impact of telehealth integration into antenatal care from March 23, 2020, across low-risk and high-risk care models. Allowing a 1-month implementation period from March 23, 2020, we compared the first 3 months of telehealth integrated care delivered between April 20 and July 26, 2020, with conventional care delivered between Jan 1, 2018, and March 22, 2020. The primary outcomes were detection and outcomes of fetal growth restriction, pre-eclampsia, and gestational diabetes. Secondary outcomes were stillbirth, neonatal intensive care unit admission, and preterm birth (birth before 37 weeks' gestation). FINDINGS: Between Jan 1, 2018, and March 22, 2020, 20 031 women gave birth at Monash Health during the conventional care period and 2292 women gave birth during the telehealth integrated care period. Of 20 154 antenatal consultations provided in the integrated care period, 10 731 (53%) were delivered via telehealth. Overall, compared with the conventional care period, no significant differences were identified in the integrated care period with regard to the number of babies with fetal growth restriction (birthweight below the 3rd percentile; 2% in the integrated care period vs 2% in the conventional care period, p=0·72, for low-risk care models; 5% in the integrated care period vs 5% in the conventional care period, p=0·50 for high-risk care models), number of stillbirths (1% vs 1%, p=0·79; 2% vs 2%, p=0·70), or pregnancies complicated by pre-eclampsia (3% vs 3%, p=0·70; 9% vs 7%, p=0·15), or gestational diabetes (22% vs 22%, p=0·89; 30% vs 26%, p=0·06). Interrupted time-series analysis showed a significant reduction in preterm birth among women in high-risk models (-0·68% change in incidence per week [95% CI -1·37 to -0·002]; p=0·049), but no significant differences were identified in other outcome measures for low-risk or high-risk care models after telehealth integration compared with conventional care. INTERPRETATION: Telehealth integrated antenatal care enabled the reduction of in-person consultations by 50% without compromising pregnancy outcomes. This care model can help to minimise in-person interactions during the COVID-19 pandemic, but should also be considered in post-pandemic health-care models. FUNDING: None.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications/therapy , Prenatal Care/organization & administration , Telemedicine/economics , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Adult , Female , Humans , Interrupted Time Series Analysis , Pregnancy , Retrospective Studies , Victoria
10.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e22189, 2021 02 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1573845

ABSTRACT

One Digital Health is a proposed unified structure. The conceptual framework of the One Digital Health Steering Wheel is built around two keys (ie, One Health and digital health), three perspectives (ie, individual health and well-being, population and society, and ecosystem), and five dimensions (ie, citizens' engagement, education, environment, human and veterinary health care, and Healthcare Industry 4.0). One Digital Health aims to digitally transform future health ecosystems, by implementing a systemic health and life sciences approach that takes into account broad digital technology perspectives on human health, animal health, and the management of the surrounding environment. This approach allows for the examination of how future generations of health informaticians can address the intrinsic complexity of novel health and care scenarios in digitally transformed health ecosystems. In the emerging hybrid landscape, citizens and their health data have been called to play a central role in the management of individual-level and population-level perspective data. The main challenges of One Digital Health include facilitating and improving interactions between One Health and digital health communities, to allow for efficient interactions and the delivery of near-real-time, data-driven contributions in systems medicine and systems ecology. However, digital health literacy; the capacity to understand and engage in health prevention activities; self-management; and collaboration in the prevention, control, and alleviation of potential problems are necessary in systemic, ecosystem-driven public health and data science research. Therefore, people in a healthy One Digital Health ecosystem must use an active and forceful approach to prevent and manage health crises and disasters, such as the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , One Health , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
11.
Ann Cardiol Angeiol (Paris) ; 70(5): 317-321, 2021 Nov.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525669

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine has been recognized since 2010 as a constitutive element of care, however, it was not until 2016 that the first national experiments were able to be launched with the aim of validating a framework allowing a possible rapid passage in the common right. These experiments, which are due to end in December 2021, have succeeded in involving more than 100,000 patients, mainly suffering from cardiac pathologies. The arrival of COVID-19 has made it possible to measure the usefulness of practices at a distance both from teleconsultation and telemonitoring, with the appearance of organizational and technical innovations that must now be maintained and developed in order to integrate the telemedicine of tomorrow into our actual medicine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Telemedicine/organization & administration , COVID-19/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Patient Satisfaction , Remote Consultation/methods , Remote Consultation/organization & administration , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Telemedicine/economics , Telemedicine/trends
12.
Minerva Pediatr (Torino) ; 73(5): 460-466, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513377

ABSTRACT

Inevitably, along with other healthcare specializations, pediatric surgery was affected by the Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic. Children were reported to manifest mild to moderate symptoms and mortality was primarily observed in patients aged <1 year and having underlying comorbidities. Most of the cases were asymptomatic in children, hence, posing a challenge for pediatric surgery centers to take drastic measures to reduce the virus transmission. Telemedicine was introduced and out-patient consultations were conducted online as out-patient clinics were closed. Elective surgeries were postponed with delayed appointments while the healthcare sector was diverted towards tackling COVID-19. Case urgency was classified and triaged, leading to limited surgeries being performed only in COVID-19 negative patients following an extensive screening process. The screening process consisted of online history taking and RT-PCR tests. Newer practices such as mouth rinse, video laryngoscopy, and anesthesia were introduced to restrict patients from crying, coughing, and sneezing, as an attempt to avoid aerosolization of viral particles and safely conduct pediatric surgeries during the pandemic. Surgical trainees were also affected as the smaller number of surgeries conducted reduced the clinical experience available to medical enthusiasts. There is still room for advanced practices to be introduced in pediatric surgery and restore all kinds of surgeries to improve the quality of life of the patient.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics , Pediatrics , Surgical Procedures, Operative , Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , Child , Child, Preschool , Elective Surgical Procedures , General Surgery/education , Humans , Incidence , Infant , Patient Selection , Pediatrics/education , Preoperative Care/methods , Surgical Procedures, Operative/education , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Triage
13.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(41): e27399, 2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501200

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has intensified globally since its origin in Wuhan, China in December 2019. Many medical groups across the United States have experienced extraordinary clinical and financial pressures due to COVID-19 as a result of a decline in elective inpatient and outpatient surgical procedures and most nonurgent elective physician visits. The current study reports how our medical group in a metropolitan community in Kentucky rebooted our ambulatory and inpatient services following the guidance of our state's phased reopening. Particular attention focused on the transition between the initial COVID-19 surge and post-COVID-19 surge and how our medical group responded to meet community needs. Ten strategies were incorporated in our medical group, including heightened communication; ambulatory telehealth; safe and clean outpatient environment; marketing; physician, other medical provider, and staff compensation; high quality patient experience; schedule optimization; rescheduling tactics; data management; and primary care versus specialty approaches. These methods are applicable to both the current rebooting stage as well as to a potential resurgence of COVID-19 in the future.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/organization & administration , Office Visits/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated/organization & administration , Humans , Kentucky/epidemiology , Pandemics , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2
14.
J Huntingtons Dis ; 10(4): 479-484, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496974

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has increased the need for remote healthcare options among patients with Huntington's disease (HD). However, since not every HD patient is suitable for telehealth, it is important to differentiate who can be seen virtually from who should remain as in-person. Unfortunately, there are no clinical guidelines on how to evaluate HD patients for telehealth eligibility. OBJECTIVE: To standardize the teleneurology selection process in HD by implementing a screening tool that accounts for patient-specific factors. METHODS: We organized various indications and contraindications to teleneurology into a flowchart. If any indications or contraindications were met, patients were assigned to telehealth or maintained as in-person, respectively. If no indications or contraindications were met, patients were given the option of telehealth or in-person for their upcoming appointments. In two implementation cycles, we tested this screening tool among all HD patients scheduled for clinic visits, aided by chart review and phone interview. RESULTS: In a cohort of 81 patients, telehealth acceptance among eligible patients increased from 45.0%to 83.3%. Frequency of telehealth visits increased from a pre-intervention baseline of 12.8%to 28.2%. CONCLUSION: Teleneurology utilization among HD patients more than doubled across our study. Our intervention promotes consistency and patient-centeredness in HD clinical care and streamlines the overall telehealth selection process. Future studies can seek to reduce telehealth no-shows and also evaluate the utility of the motor and psychiatric criteria included in our screening tool.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Huntington Disease/therapy , Neurology/standards , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Patient Preference , Telemedicine/standards , Adult , Ambulatory Care , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cohort Studies , Facilities and Services Utilization , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neurology/organization & administration , Software Design , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Tertiary Care Centers
15.
Ann Med ; 53(1): 1924-1934, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493393

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has forced healthcare providers to reorganize their activities to protect the population from infection, postponing or suspending many medical procedures. Patients affected by chronic conditions were among the most affected. In the case of catastrophes, women have a higher lifetime prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and those with endometriosis have higher anxiety levels, making them fragile in such circumstances. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, conducted in May 2020, we considered all women aged ≥18 years, followed up at our referral centre for endometriosis. Patients were sent an anonymous 6-section questionnaire via email, containing different validated tools for the evaluation of anxiety levels and the risk of PTSD. A multivariable linear regression was performed to assess the impact of patients' characteristics on the distress caused by the SARS-COV-2 pandemic. RESULTS: Among the 468 women recruited, 68.8% were quite-to-extremely worried about not being able to access gynaecologic care, with almost one-third of them scoring ≥33 on the IES-R. Older age and increased levels of anxiety were associated with higher risks of PTSD (age: b = 0.28, 95% CI = 0.12 - 0.44; GAD-7: b = 1.71, 95% CI = 1.38 - 2.05), with up to 71.8% of patients with severe anxiety (GAD-7 > 15) having an IES-R score ≥33 suggestive for PTSD. Women who could leave home to work showed lower levels of PTSD (b = -4.79, 95% CI = -8.44 to - 1.15, ref. unemployed women). The implementation of telemedicine in routine clinical practice was favourably viewed by 75.6% of women. DISCUSSION: Women with endometriosis are particularly exposed to the risk of PTSD during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, especially if they are older or have higher levels of anxiety. Gynaecologists should resort to additional strategies, and telemedicine could represent a feasible tool to help patients cope with this situation.KEY MESSAGESThe COVID-19 pandemic significantly impacted the lives of women with endometriosis, who appeared to have a considerable risk of PTSD.Older age, higher anxiety levels and unemployment were independently associated with the risk of developing PTSD.Clinicians should develop successful alternative strategies to help patients cope with this situation, and telemedicine might represent an applicable and acceptable solution.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Endometriosis/therapy , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Adult , Age Factors , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Cross-Sectional Studies , Endometriosis/psychology , Female , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Humans , Internet/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Prevalence , Risk Management , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , Young Adult
18.
Nursing ; 51(9): 44-47, 2021 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462510

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Substance use treatment inequities among rural populations are well documented and the COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated these inequalities, forcing healthcare providers to be creative in the delivery of treatment. Systematic reviews on the use of telehealth to treat patients with substance use disorder indicate that it is a promising alternative to in-person services. This article examines the evidence supporting the use of telehealth in treating patients with opioid use disorder and explores other promising options that can help overcome pandemic-related barriers to treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Opioid-Related Disorders/nursing , Rural Health Services/organization & administration , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Humans , Opioid-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Systematic Reviews as Topic , United States/epidemiology
19.
BMC Cancer ; 21(1): 1094, 2021 Oct 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463236

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To ensure safe delivery of oncologic care during the COVID-19 pandemic, telemedicine has been rapidly adopted. However, little data exist on the impact of telemedicine on quality and accessibility of oncologic care. This study assessed whether conducting an office visit for thoracic oncology patients via telemedicine affected time to treatment initiation and accessibility. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study of patients with thoracic malignancies seen by a multidisciplinary team during the first surge of COVID-19 cases in Philadelphia (March 1 to June 30, 2020). Patients with an index visit for a new phase of care, defined as a new diagnosis, local recurrence, or newly discovered metastatic disease, were included. RESULTS: 240 distinct patients with thoracic malignancies were seen: 132 patients (55.0%) were seen initially in-person vs 108 (45.0%) via telemedicine. The majority of visits were for a diagnosis of a new thoracic cancer (87.5%). Among newly diagnosed patients referred to the thoracic oncology team, the median time from referral to initial visit was significantly shorter amongst the patients seen via telemedicine vs. in-person (median 5.0 vs. 6.5 days, p < 0.001). Patients received surgery (32.5%), radiation (24.2%), or systemic therapy (30.4%). Time from initial visit to treatment initiation by modality did not differ by telemedicine vs in-person: surgery (22 vs 16 days, p = 0.47), radiation (27.5 vs 27.5 days, p = 0.86, systemic therapy (15 vs 13 days, p = 0.45). CONCLUSIONS: Rapid adoption of telemedicine allowed timely delivery of oncologic care during the initial surge of the COVID19 pandemic by a thoracic oncology multi-disciplinary clinic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Services Accessibility , Pandemics , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Thoracic Neoplasms/therapy , Time-to-Treatment , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Patient Care Team , Philadelphia/epidemiology , Quality of Health Care , Referral and Consultation , Retrospective Studies , Telemedicine/standards , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Thoracic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Thoracic Neoplasms/pathology , Time Factors
20.
Front Health Serv Manage ; 38(1): 32-38, 2021 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455390

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY: Fighting the global COVID-19 pandemic has shifted from immediate response efforts to recognition of the long-term effects on the mental health and well-being of the general population and healthcare workforce. Leaders need to understand the vital role of behavioral health services in a population-based, integrated healthcare framework and address the needs of the behavioral health workforce to successfully deploy services in their organizations and communities.During the ongoing national response to COVID-19, three major trends have emerged: (1) a shift to telehealth and digital care, (2) greater awareness of the impact on the workforce of the shift to digital care, and (3) an open dialogue to counteract the stigma and discrimination related to mental illness and to emphasize mental well-being instead. When they address stigma and discrimination, healthcare leaders embrace a more holistic approach that welcomes behavioral health professionals as equal, vital members of the care team. They help their organizations advance the mental well-being of all.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/therapy , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Promotion/organization & administration , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Social Stigma , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Organizational Objectives , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
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