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1.
J Huntingtons Dis ; 10(4): 479-484, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496974

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has increased the need for remote healthcare options among patients with Huntington's disease (HD). However, since not every HD patient is suitable for telehealth, it is important to differentiate who can be seen virtually from who should remain as in-person. Unfortunately, there are no clinical guidelines on how to evaluate HD patients for telehealth eligibility. OBJECTIVE: To standardize the teleneurology selection process in HD by implementing a screening tool that accounts for patient-specific factors. METHODS: We organized various indications and contraindications to teleneurology into a flowchart. If any indications or contraindications were met, patients were assigned to telehealth or maintained as in-person, respectively. If no indications or contraindications were met, patients were given the option of telehealth or in-person for their upcoming appointments. In two implementation cycles, we tested this screening tool among all HD patients scheduled for clinic visits, aided by chart review and phone interview. RESULTS: In a cohort of 81 patients, telehealth acceptance among eligible patients increased from 45.0%to 83.3%. Frequency of telehealth visits increased from a pre-intervention baseline of 12.8%to 28.2%. CONCLUSION: Teleneurology utilization among HD patients more than doubled across our study. Our intervention promotes consistency and patient-centeredness in HD clinical care and streamlines the overall telehealth selection process. Future studies can seek to reduce telehealth no-shows and also evaluate the utility of the motor and psychiatric criteria included in our screening tool.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Huntington Disease/therapy , Neurology/standards , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Patient Preference , Telemedicine/standards , Adult , Ambulatory Care , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cohort Studies , Facilities and Services Utilization , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neurology/organization & administration , Software Design , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Tertiary Care Centers
2.
Ann Med ; 53(1): 1924-1934, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493393

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has forced healthcare providers to reorganize their activities to protect the population from infection, postponing or suspending many medical procedures. Patients affected by chronic conditions were among the most affected. In the case of catastrophes, women have a higher lifetime prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and those with endometriosis have higher anxiety levels, making them fragile in such circumstances. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, conducted in May 2020, we considered all women aged ≥18 years, followed up at our referral centre for endometriosis. Patients were sent an anonymous 6-section questionnaire via email, containing different validated tools for the evaluation of anxiety levels and the risk of PTSD. A multivariable linear regression was performed to assess the impact of patients' characteristics on the distress caused by the SARS-COV-2 pandemic. RESULTS: Among the 468 women recruited, 68.8% were quite-to-extremely worried about not being able to access gynaecologic care, with almost one-third of them scoring ≥33 on the IES-R. Older age and increased levels of anxiety were associated with higher risks of PTSD (age: b = 0.28, 95% CI = 0.12 - 0.44; GAD-7: b = 1.71, 95% CI = 1.38 - 2.05), with up to 71.8% of patients with severe anxiety (GAD-7 > 15) having an IES-R score ≥33 suggestive for PTSD. Women who could leave home to work showed lower levels of PTSD (b = -4.79, 95% CI = -8.44 to - 1.15, ref. unemployed women). The implementation of telemedicine in routine clinical practice was favourably viewed by 75.6% of women. DISCUSSION: Women with endometriosis are particularly exposed to the risk of PTSD during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, especially if they are older or have higher levels of anxiety. Gynaecologists should resort to additional strategies, and telemedicine could represent a feasible tool to help patients cope with this situation.KEY MESSAGESThe COVID-19 pandemic significantly impacted the lives of women with endometriosis, who appeared to have a considerable risk of PTSD.Older age, higher anxiety levels and unemployment were independently associated with the risk of developing PTSD.Clinicians should develop successful alternative strategies to help patients cope with this situation, and telemedicine might represent an applicable and acceptable solution.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Endometriosis/therapy , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Adult , Age Factors , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Cross-Sectional Studies , Endometriosis/psychology , Female , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Humans , Internet/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Prevalence , Risk Management , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , Young Adult
3.
BMC Cancer ; 21(1): 1094, 2021 Oct 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463236

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To ensure safe delivery of oncologic care during the COVID-19 pandemic, telemedicine has been rapidly adopted. However, little data exist on the impact of telemedicine on quality and accessibility of oncologic care. This study assessed whether conducting an office visit for thoracic oncology patients via telemedicine affected time to treatment initiation and accessibility. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study of patients with thoracic malignancies seen by a multidisciplinary team during the first surge of COVID-19 cases in Philadelphia (March 1 to June 30, 2020). Patients with an index visit for a new phase of care, defined as a new diagnosis, local recurrence, or newly discovered metastatic disease, were included. RESULTS: 240 distinct patients with thoracic malignancies were seen: 132 patients (55.0%) were seen initially in-person vs 108 (45.0%) via telemedicine. The majority of visits were for a diagnosis of a new thoracic cancer (87.5%). Among newly diagnosed patients referred to the thoracic oncology team, the median time from referral to initial visit was significantly shorter amongst the patients seen via telemedicine vs. in-person (median 5.0 vs. 6.5 days, p < 0.001). Patients received surgery (32.5%), radiation (24.2%), or systemic therapy (30.4%). Time from initial visit to treatment initiation by modality did not differ by telemedicine vs in-person: surgery (22 vs 16 days, p = 0.47), radiation (27.5 vs 27.5 days, p = 0.86, systemic therapy (15 vs 13 days, p = 0.45). CONCLUSIONS: Rapid adoption of telemedicine allowed timely delivery of oncologic care during the initial surge of the COVID19 pandemic by a thoracic oncology multi-disciplinary clinic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Services Accessibility , Pandemics , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Thoracic Neoplasms/therapy , Time-to-Treatment , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Patient Care Team , Philadelphia/epidemiology , Quality of Health Care , Referral and Consultation , Retrospective Studies , Telemedicine/standards , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Thoracic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Thoracic Neoplasms/pathology , Time Factors
4.
Eur J Endocrinol ; 185(4): G35-G42, 2021 Aug 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448609

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has changed the nature of medical consultations, emphasizing virtual patient counselling, with relevance for patients with diabetes insipidus (DI) or hyponatraemia. The main complication of desmopressin treatment in DI is dilutional hyponatraemia. Since plasma sodium monitoring is not always possible in times of COVID-19, we recommend to delay the desmopressin dose once a week until aquaresis occurs allowing excess retained water to be excreted. Patients should measure their body weight daily. Patients with DI admitted to the hospital with COVID-19 have a high risk for mortality due to volume depletion. Specialists must supervise fluid replacement and dosing of desmopressin. Patients after pituitary surgery should drink to thirst and measure their body weight daily to early recognize the development of postoperative SIAD. They should know hyponatraemia symptoms. Hyponatraemia in COVID-19 is common with a prevalence of 20-30% and is mostly due to SIAD or hypovolaemia. It mirrors disease severity and is an early predictor of mortality. Hypernatraemia may also develop in COVID-19 patients, with a prevalence of 3-5%, especially in ICU, and derives from different multifactorial reasons, for example, due to insensible water losses from pyrexia, increased respiration rate and use of diuretics. Hypernatraemic dehydration may contribute to the high risk of acute kidney injury in COVID-19. IV fluid replacement should be administered with caution in severe cases of COVID-19 because of the risk of pulmonary oedema.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Insipidus/therapy , Endocrinology/standards , Hyponatremia/therapy , Ambulatory Care/methods , Ambulatory Care/standards , Consensus , Diabetes Insipidus/epidemiology , Diabetes Insipidus/pathology , Distance Counseling/methods , Distance Counseling/standards , Endocrinology/history , Endocrinology/trends , Expert Testimony , History, 21st Century , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Hyponatremia/epidemiology , Hyponatremia/pathology , Pandemics , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/history , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/standards , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Telemedicine/history , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/standards
5.
Aust J Gen Pract ; 50(10): 778-781, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1444662

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Telehealth has seen rapid but unregulated growth in Australia during the COVID-19 pandemic, facilitated by the interim establishment of a universal Medicare Benefits Schedule item for telehealth consultations. Consumers and healthcare providers, including many general practitioners, have turned to telehealth with enthusiasm. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this article is to present evidence and analysis supporting the adoption of national telehealth standards in Australia. DISCUSSION: Despite efforts by professional organisations to develop telehealth standards, Australia lacks a national telehealth strategy and a unified set of shared standards for clinical governance and quality assurance that can be applied across the health system. To ensure consumer safety and support healthcare providers in telehealth, a national regulatory framework and telehealth standards should be established on the basis of the latest evidence on safety and quality in all forms of telehealth.


Subject(s)
Telemedicine/standards , Australia , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , National Health Programs , Pandemics
6.
Sch Psychol ; 36(5): 377-387, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1442722

ABSTRACT

School psychologists play a critical role in school-based Autism (AU) evaluations. Evidence-based AU evaluations should be multimodal, include multiple informants, and assess functioning across several domains. In the current era of COVID-19, school-based AU evaluations have become increasingly complex with school psychologists having to significantly adapt face-to-face evaluation procedures and/or conduct evaluations via teleassessment approaches. This poses profound challenges for some families, many of whom are from vulnerable groups. In the current article, we outline school psychologists' traditional role in school-based AU evaluations and review best practice guidelines. We then discuss the impact of COVID-19 on these processes and provide a framework for school psychologists to use when conducting school-based AU evaluations during this unprecedented time. We also provide resources school psychologists may find useful as they conduct school-based AU evaluations during the COVID-19 pandemic. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder/diagnosis , COVID-19 , Psychology , School Mental Health Services , Schools , Telemedicine , Behavior Rating Scale , Child , Education, Special , Humans , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Psychology/instrumentation , Psychology/methods , Psychology/standards , School Mental Health Services/standards , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/standards
7.
J Urol ; 206(6): 1469-1479, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1410198

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We examined changes in urological care delivery due to COVID-19 in the U.S. based on patient, practice, and local/regional demographic and pandemic response features. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed real-world data from the American Urological Association Quality (AQUA) Registry collected from electronic health record systems. Data represented 157 outpatient urological practices and 3,165 providers across 48 U.S. states and territories, including 3,297,721 unique patients, 12,488,831 total outpatient visits and 2,194,456 procedures. The primary outcome measure was the number of outpatient visits and procedures performed (inpatient or outpatient) per practice per week, measured from January 2019 to February 2021. RESULTS: We found large (>50%) declines in outpatient visits from March 2020 to April 2020 across patient demographic groups and states, regardless of timing of state stay-at-home orders. Nonurgent outpatient visits decreased more across various nonurgent procedures (49%-59%) than for procedures performed for potentially urgent diagnoses (38%-52%); surgical procedures for nonurgent conditions also decreased more (43%-79%) than those for potentially urgent conditions (43%-53%). African American patients had similar decreases in outpatient visits compared with Asians and Caucasians, but also slower recoveries back to baseline. Medicare-insured patients had the steepest declines (55%), while those on Medicaid and government insurance had the lowest percentage of recovery to baseline (73% and 69%, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: This study provides real-world evidence on the decline in urological care across demographic groups and practice settings, and demonstrates a differential impact on the utilization of urological health services by demographics and procedure type.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Urologic Diseases/therapy , Urology/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Ambulatory Care/standards , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , Ambulatory Care/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/standards , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Telemedicine/standards , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/trends , United States/epidemiology , Urologic Surgical Procedures/standards , Urologic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Urologic Surgical Procedures/trends , Urology/standards , Urology/trends , Young Adult
8.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 15(5): 102242, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1397297

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Emergence of COVID-19 pandemic has led to increased use of telemedicine in health care delivery. Telemedicine facilitates long-term clinical care for monitoring and prevention of complications of diabetes mellitus. GUIDELINES: Precise indications for teleconsultation, clinical care services which can be provided, and good clinical practices to be followed during teleconsultation are explained. Guidance on risk assessment and health education for diabetes risk factors, counselling for blood glucose monitoring, treatment compliance, and prevention of complications are described. CONCLUSION: The guidelines will help physicians in adopting teleconsultation for management of diabetes mellitus, facilitate access to diabetes care and improve health outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy , Remote Consultation/standards , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , Biomedical Research/standards , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Expert Testimony , Humans , India/epidemiology , Pandemics , Remote Consultation/methods , Remote Consultation/organization & administration , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards
11.
Prof Case Manag ; 26(5): 250-254, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354348

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To review current literature on texting as a sustainable intervention of case management in the outpatient setting. FINDINGS: Texting, as a case management intervention, provides the medically complex client with a pathway to achieve care plan goals. Texting increases adherence, communication, and self-management. It can increase client enrollment in disease management programs, while providing support, flexibility, convenience, cost savings, and increased participation. IMPLICATIONS FOR CASE MANAGEMENT PRACTICE: In current practice, such as management of the coronavirus (COVID-19), other pandemics, or natural/environmental disasters, texting is a solution-focused intervention that can deliver and retrieve real-time information to a medically complex population. It can link patients to resources and increase outreach, efficiency, quality, and coordination of care. Texting can promote adherence to appointments, increase medication compliance and disease management interventions, and provide motivational change messages. However, there are legal and regulatory concerns that carry potential consequences and implications that should be approached judiciously (Mellette, 2015). Texting is not one size fits all; it can cause HIPAA breeches, hinder communication with certain populations, confuse health messaging, and replace human communication, thereby reducing staffing in practice.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/standards , Case Management/standards , Communication , Guidelines as Topic , Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act/standards , Telemedicine/standards , Text Messaging/standards , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , United States
12.
J Psychiatr Pract ; 27(4): 245-253, 2021 07 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348094

ABSTRACT

Telehealth has been rapidly deployed in the environment of the Coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic to help meet critical mental health needs. As systems of care use telehealth during the pandemic and evaluate the future of telehealth services beyond the crisis, a quality and safety framework may be useful in weighing important considerations for using telehealth to provide psychiatric and behavioral health services within special populations. Examining access to care, privacy, diversity, inclusivity, and sustainability of telehealth to meet behavioral and psychiatric care needs in geriatric and disadvantaged youth populations can help highlight key considerations for health care organizations in an increasingly electronic health care landscape.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health Services , Patient Safety , Psychiatry , Quality Improvement , Telemedicine , Adolescent , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Mental Health Services/standards , Mental Health Services/trends , Psychiatry/standards , Psychiatry/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/standards , Telemedicine/trends
13.
J Genet Couns ; 30(4): 969-973, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1323891

ABSTRACT

Inherited eye diseases (IED) are among the most common causes for childhood and young adulthood blindness in developed countries. Genetic counseling and testing have become an essential part of caregiving for families affected by one of these severe ocular pathologies. The objective of our study is to describe our experience during the 2020 (COVID-19) pandemic, following a practice protocol of safe genetic counseling for inherited ophthalmic diseases. We conducted a review of the genetic counseling practices from January until December 2020 in a multidisciplinary clinic for patients with visual impairment, in a tertiary hospital. The new protocol covered patient screening, required personal protective equipment, and the implementation of telemedicine. One hundred and eighty-three counseling sessions were done in this period of time; 33/183 were telemedicine counseling. The results of this study indicate that the practice of genetic counseling in regard to inherited eye diseases in the era of COVID-19 is effective and safe. Despite the high risk of infectivity that threatened healthcare professionals, safety measures adopted to reduce the risk of infection allowed us to prevent the cancelation of routine counseling, while keeping patient care our priority. The use of telemedicine was a very useful tool for providing counseling during lockdown periods in 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Eye Diseases/genetics , Genetic Counseling/organization & administration , Telemedicine/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Genetic Counseling/standards , Humans , Israel/epidemiology , Pandemics , Telemedicine/standards
14.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 7: CD013786, 2021 07 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317492

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Many millions of people living with dementia around the world are not diagnosed, which has a negative impact both on their access to care and treatment and on rational service planning. Telehealth - the use of information and communication technology (ICT) to provide health services at a distance - may be a way to increase access to specialist assessment for people with suspected dementia, especially those living in remote or rural areas. It has also been much used during the COVID-19 pandemic. It is important to know whether diagnoses made using telehealth assessment are as accurate as those made in conventional, face-to-face clinical settings. OBJECTIVES: Primary objective: to assess the diagnostic accuracy of telehealth assessment for dementia and mild cognitive impairment. Secondary objectives: to identify the quality and quantity of the relevant research evidence; to identify sources of heterogeneity in the test accuracy data; to identify and synthesise any data on patient or clinician satisfaction, resource use, costs or feasibility of the telehealth assessment models in the included studies. SEARCH METHODS: We searched multiple databases and clinical trial registers on 4 November 2020 for published and 'grey' literature and registered trials. We applied no search filters and no language restrictions. We screened the retrieved citations in duplicate and assessed in duplicate the full texts of papers considered potentially relevant. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included in the review cross-sectional studies with 10 or more participants who had been referred to a specialist service for assessment of a suspected cognitive disorder. Within a period of one month or less, each participant had to undergo two clinical assessments designed to diagnose dementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI): a telehealth assessment (the index test) and a conventional face-to-face assessment (the reference standard). The telehealth assessment could be informed by some data collected face-to-face, e.g. by nurses working in primary care, but all contact between the patient and the specialist clinician responsible for synthesising the information and making the diagnosis had to take place remotely using ICT. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently extracted data from included studies. Data extracted covered study design, setting, participants, details of index test and reference standard, and results in the form of numbers of participants given diagnoses of dementia or MCI. Data were also sought on dementia subtype diagnoses and on quantitative measures of patient or clinician satisfaction, resource use, costs and feasibility. We assessed risk of bias and applicability of each included study using QUADAS-2. We entered the results into 2x2 tables in order to calculate the sensitivity and specificity of telehealth assessment for the diagnosis of all-cause dementia, MCI, and any cognitive syndrome (combining dementia and MCI). We presented the results of included studies narratively because there were too few studies to derive summary estimates of sensitivity and specificity. MAIN RESULTS: Three studies with 136 participants were eligible for inclusion. Two studies (20 and 100 participants) took place in community settings in Australia and one study (16 participants) was conducted in veterans' homes in the USA. Participants were referred from primary care with undiagnosed cognitive symptoms or were identified as being at high risk of having dementia on a screening test in the care homes. Dementia and MCI were target conditions in the larger study; the other studies targeted dementia diagnosis only. Only one small study used a 'pure' telehealth model, i.e. not involving any elements of face-to-face assessment. The studies were generally well-conducted. We considered two studies to be at high risk of incorporation bias because a substantial amount of information collected face-to-face by nurses was used to inform both index test and reference standard assessments. One study was at unclear risk of selection bias. For the diagnosis of all-cause dementia, sensitivity of telehealth assessment ranged from 0.80 to 1.00 and specificity from 0.80 to 1.00. We considered this to be very low-certainty evidence due to imprecision, inconsistency between studies and risk of bias. For the diagnosis of MCI, data were available from only one study (100 participants) giving a sensitivity of 0.71 (95% CI 0.54 to 0.84) and a specificity of 0.73 (95% CI 0.60 to 0.84). We considered this to be low-certainty evidence due to imprecision and risk of bias. For diagnosis of any cognitive syndrome (dementia or MCI), data from the same study gave a sensitivity of 0.97 (95% CI 0.91 to 0.99) and a specificity of 0.22 (95% CI 0.03 to 0.60). The majority of diagnostic disagreements concerned the distinction between MCI and dementia, occurring approximately equally in either direction. There was also a tendency for patients identified as cognitively healthy at face-to-face assessment to be diagnosed with MCI at telehealth assessment (but numbers were small). There were insufficient data to make any assessment of the accuracy of dementia subtype diagnosis. One study provided a small amount of data indicating a good level of clinician and especially patient satisfaction with the telehealth model. There were no data on resource use, costs or feasibility. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: We found only very few eligible studies with a small number of participants. An important difference between the studies providing data for the analyses was whether the target condition was dementia only (two studies) or dementia and MCI (one study). The data suggest that telehealth assessment may be highly sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of all-cause dementia when assessed against a reference standard of conventional face-to-face assessment, but the estimates are imprecise due to small sample sizes and between-study heterogeneity, and may apply mainly to telehealth models which incorporate a considerable amount of face-to-face contact with healthcare professionals other than the doctor responsible for making the diagnosis. For the diagnosis of MCI by telehealth assessment, best estimates of both sensitivity and specificity were somewhat lower, but were based on a single study. Errors occurred at the cognitively healthy/MCI and the MCI/dementia boundaries. However, there is no evidence that diagnostic disagreements were more frequent than would be expected due to the known variation between clinicians' opinions when assigning a dementia diagnosis.


Subject(s)
Cognitive Dysfunction/diagnosis , Dementia/diagnosis , Telemedicine/standards , Bias , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Patient Satisfaction , Reference Standards , Sensitivity and Specificity
15.
Parkinsonism Relat Disord ; 89: 199-205, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1300965

ABSTRACT

The use of telemedicine in the management of chronic neurological conditions including movement disorders has expanded over time. In addition to enabling remote access to specialized care, telemedicine has also been shown to reduce caregiver burden and to improve patient satisfaction. With the COVID-19 pandemic, implementation of telehealth for patients with movement disorders, particularly those with more severe mobility issues, has increased rapidly. Although telemedicine care has been shown to be effective for patients with various movement disorders, its utilization for patients with device aided therapies such as deep brain stimulation (DBS) is limited due to challenges related to adjusting these devices remotely and to the lack of consensus recommendations for using telemedicine in this patient population. Thus, guidelines for telemedicine and DBS will assist clinicians on the appropriate implementation of telemedicine to provide care to DBS patients. Optimizing the use of telemedicine for DBS will expand this type of therapy to remote locations with limited access to programming expertise, and also reduce the need for patient travel. Telemedicine is particularly important during the ongoing pandemic due to infection risk and limited access to clinic visits. In this article we review the currently available and emerging strategies for telemedicine and remote care for DBS. We then outline common principles and recommendations for telemedicine care in patients with DBS, review patient selection and best practices. Finally, we briefly discuss the current state of reimbursement for DBS telemedicine visits.


Subject(s)
Deep Brain Stimulation/trends , Telemedicine/trends , COVID-19 , Deep Brain Stimulation/standards , Humans , Pandemics , Remote Consultation , Telemedicine/standards
16.
J Anal Psychol ; 66(3): 484-505, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1299068

ABSTRACT

Given the contemporary situation of many analysts in the world now being forced to work online due to the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, it is important to review the working online issue. Substantial debate over previous years has questioned whether a genuine analytic process can unfold through online work. This debate is reviewed with the conclusion that such a process is not necessarily precluded. Research outcomes are then reviewed to highlight those things that can facilitate positive outcomes when working online. These cover the 'online disinhibition effect', the therapeutic alliance, particular ways of using the screen, focussing on trauma, the importance of self-awareness, knowing the predictors of mental health, certain potential positives of isolation/quarantine and psychotherapy interventions that may be currently needed. Final recommendations and suggestions are then presented as in the diagnosis issue, professional development and guidelines to do with practical and ethical considerations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physical Distancing , Psychoanalytic Therapy , Telecommunications , Telemedicine , Therapeutic Alliance , Humans , Psychoanalytic Therapy/ethics , Psychoanalytic Therapy/standards , Telecommunications/ethics , Telecommunications/standards , Telemedicine/ethics , Telemedicine/standards
17.
J Psychiatr Pract ; 27(3): 152-163, 2021 May 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1290432

ABSTRACT

Crisis intervention psychotherapy (CIP) is an underutilized form of therapy that can be offered as a treatment during psychiatric disasters and emergencies, and it may be especially useful during the age of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). CIP is a problem-solving, solution-focused, trauma-informed treatment, utilizing an individual or systemic/family-centered approach. CIP is a brief form of psychotherapy delivered as a companion or follow-up to psychological first aid. Crisis psychotherapy is designed to resolve a crisis and restore daily functioning. CIP can be adapted as a single session for a COVID-19 mental health emergency or for a hotline or as 2 to 20 sessions of treatment with COVID-19 patients and families offered virtually on a psychiatric inpatient unit, through a consultation-liaison service, or in outpatient settings. This article reviews the history of critical incident stress management and the use of its replacement, psychological first aid. The history and core principles of crisis psychotherapy and 8 core elements of treatment are described. The use of digital and virtual technology has enabled the delivery of crisis psychotherapy during the COVID-19 pandemic. A case study of a family impacted by COVID-19 is reported as an illustration. The use of a 6-week timeline, an ecological map, and a problem-solving wheel-and-spoke treatment plan are demonstrated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Crisis Intervention , Family Therapy , Psychotherapy, Brief , Telemedicine , Crisis Intervention/methods , Crisis Intervention/standards , Family Therapy/methods , Family Therapy/standards , Humans , Psychotherapy, Brief/methods , Psychotherapy, Brief/standards , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/standards
20.
Adm Policy Ment Health ; 47(4): 489-491, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1274863

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic threatens to disrupt the provision of mental health services. In response, policymakers, administrators, and providers have taken bold steps toward enabling telepsychiatry to bridge this sudden gap in care for our most vulnerable populations. With rapid deregulation and adoption of this modality of care, careful consideration of issues related to policy and implementation is essential to maximize its effectiveness and mitigate unintended consequences. Though the crisis places the healthcare system under strain, it sets the stage for a lasting shift in not only how care is delivered, but also our beliefs around the system's capacity for rapid, innovative change.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Psychiatry/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Pandemics , Psychiatry/standards , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/standards , Vulnerable Populations
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