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1.
J Clin Psychiatry ; 82(2)2021 03 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066785

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The early COVID-19 pandemic resulted in great psychosocial disruption and stress, raising speculation that psychiatric disorders may worsen. This study aimed to identify patients vulnerable to worsening mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This retrospective observational study used electronic health records from March 9 to May 31 in 2019 (n = 94,720) and 2020 (n = 94,589) in a large, community-based health care system. Percent change analysis compared variables standardized to the average patient population for the respective time periods. RESULTS: Compared to 2019, psychiatric visits increased significantly (P < .0001) in 2020, with the majority being telephone/video-based (+264%). Psychiatric care volume increased overall (7%), with the greatest increases in addiction (+42%), behavioral health in primary care (+17%), and adult psychiatry (+5%) clinics. While patients seeking care with preexisting psychiatric diagnoses were mainly stable (−2%), new patients declined (−42%). Visits for substance use (+51%), adjustment (+15%), anxiety (+12%), bipolar (+9%), and psychotic (+6%) disorder diagnoses, and for patients aged 18­25 years (+4%) and 26­39 years (+4%), increased. Child/adolescent and older adult patient visits decreased (−22.7% and −5.5%, respectively), and fewer patients identifying as White (−3.8%) or male (−5.0) or with depression (−3%) or disorders of childhood (−2%) sought care. CONCLUSIONS: The early COVID-19 pandemic was associated with dramatic changes in psychiatric care facilitated by a rapid telehealth care transition. Patient volume, demographic, and diagnostic changes may reflect comfort with telehealth or navigating the psychiatric care system. These data can inform health system resource management and guide future work examining how care delivery changes impact psychiatric care quality and access.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Community Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Primary Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Child , Electronic Health Records , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/diagnosis , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
2.
J Am Coll Surg ; 234(2): 191-202, 2022 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1713819

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Surgical patients with limited digital literacy may experience reduced telemedicine access. We investigated racial/ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in telemedicine compared with in-person surgical consultation during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of new visits within the Division of General & Gastrointestinal Surgery at an academic medical center occurring between March 24 through June 23, 2020 (Phase I, Massachusetts Public Health Emergency) and June 24 through December 31, 2020 (Phase II, relaxation of restrictions on healthcare operations) was performed. Visit modality (telemedicine/phone vs in-person) and demographic data were extracted. Bivariate analysis and multivariable logistic regression were performed to evaluate associations between patient characteristics and visit modality. RESULTS: During Phase I, 347 in-person and 638 virtual visits were completed. Multivariable modeling demonstrated no significant differences in virtual compared with in-person visit use across racial/ethnic or insurance groups. Among patients using virtual visits, Latinx patients were less likely to have video compared with audio-only visits than White patients (OR, 0.46; 95% CI 0.22-0.96). Black race and insurance type were not significant predictors of video use. During Phase II, 2,922 in-person and 1,001 virtual visits were completed. Multivariable modeling demonstrated that Black patients (OR, 1.52; 95% CI 1.12-2.06) were more likely to have virtual visits than White patients. No significant differences were observed across insurance types. Among patients using virtual visits, race/ethnicity and insurance type were not significant predictors of video use. CONCLUSION: Black patients used telemedicine platforms more often than White patients during the second phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. Virtual consultation may help increase access to surgical care among traditionally under-resourced populations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , General Surgery/statistics & numerical data , Office Visits/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Ambulatory Surgical Procedures , Computer Literacy , Ethnicity/statistics & numerical data , Female , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Insurance Coverage/statistics & numerical data , Logistic Models , Male , Massachusetts/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Public Health , Racial Groups/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Socioeconomic Factors , Telephone/statistics & numerical data
3.
Am J Nurs ; 122(1): 15-16, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1672273
4.
JAMA ; 327(3): 237-247, 2022 01 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1669298

ABSTRACT

Importance: Following reductions in US ambulatory care early in the pandemic, it remains unclear whether care consistently returned to expected rates across insurance types and services. Objective: To assess whether patients with Medicaid or Medicare-Medicaid dual eligibility had significantly lower than expected return to use of ambulatory care rates than patients with commercial, Medicare Advantage, or Medicare fee-for-service insurance. Design, Setting, and Participants: In this retrospective cohort study examining ambulatory care service patterns from January 1, 2019, through February 28, 2021, claims data from multiple US payers were combined using the Milliman MedInsight research database. Using a difference-in-differences design, the extent to which utilization during the pandemic differed from expected rates had the pandemic not occurred was estimated. Changes in utilization rates between January and February 2020 and each subsequent 2-month time frame during the pandemic were compared with the changes in the corresponding months from the year prior. Age- and sex-adjusted Poisson regression models of monthly utilization counts were used, offsetting for total patient-months and stratifying by service and insurance type. Exposures: Patients with Medicaid or Medicare-Medicaid dual eligibility compared with patients with commercial, Medicare Advantage, or Medicare fee-for-service insurance, respectively. Main Outcomes and Measures: Utilization rates per 100 people for 6 services: emergency department, office and urgent care, behavioral health, screening colonoscopies, screening mammograms, and contraception counseling or HIV screening. Results: More than 14.5 million US adults were included (mean age, 52.7 years; 54.9% women). In the March-April 2020 time frame, the combined use of 6 ambulatory services declined to 67.0% (95% CI, 66.9%-67.1%) of expected rates, but returned to 96.7% (95% CI, 96.6%-96.8%) of expected rates by the November-December 2020 time frame. During the second COVID-19 wave in the January-February 2021 time frame, overall utilization again declined to 86.2% (95% CI, 86.1%-86.3%) of expected rates, with colonoscopy remaining at 65.0% (95% CI, 64.1%-65.9%) and mammography at 79.2% (95% CI, 78.5%-79.8%) of expected rates. By the January-February 2021 time frame, overall utilization returned to expected rates as follows: patients with Medicaid at 78.4% (95% CI, 78.2%-78.7%), Medicare-Medicaid dual eligibility at 73.3% (95% CI, 72.8%-73.8%), commercial at 90.7% (95% CI, 90.5%-90.9%), Medicare Advantage at 83.2% (95% CI, 81.7%-82.2%), and Medicare fee-for-service at 82.0% (95% CI, 81.7%-82.2%; P < .001; comparing return to expected utilization rates among patients with Medicaid and Medicare-Medicaid dual eligibility, respectively, with each of the other insurance types). Conclusions and Relevance: Between March 2020 and February 2021, aggregate use of 6 ambulatory care services increased after the preceding decrease in utilization that followed the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the rate of increase in use of these ambulatory care services was significantly lower for participants with Medicaid or Medicare-Medicaid dual eligibility than for those insured by commercial, Medicare Advantage, or Medicare fee-for-service.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , Colonoscopy/statistics & numerical data , Colonoscopy/trends , Databases, Factual , Fee-for-Service Plans/statistics & numerical data , Fee-for-Service Plans/trends , Female , Health Services Needs and Demand/statistics & numerical data , Health Services Needs and Demand/trends , Humans , Insurance, Health/statistics & numerical data , Insurance, Health/trends , Male , Mammography/statistics & numerical data , Mammography/trends , Medicaid/statistics & numerical data , Medicare/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/trends , Time Factors , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
5.
Eur J Psychotraumatol ; 13(1): 2012374, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1651100

ABSTRACT

Background: The impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic have disproportionally affected different population groups. Veterans are more likely to have pre-existing mental health conditions compared to the general Canadian population, experience compounded stressors resulting from disruptions to familial, social, and occupational domains, and were faced with changes in health-care delivery (e.g. telehealth). The objectives of this study are to assess (a) the mental health impact of COVID-19 and related life changes on the well-being of Veterans and (b) perceptions of and satisfaction with changes in health-care treatments and delivery during the pandemic. Methods: A total of 1136 Canadian Veterans participated in an online survey. Participants completed questions pertaining to their mental health and well-being, lifestyle changes, and concerns relating to the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as experiences and satisfaction with health-care treatments during the pandemic. Results: Results showed that 55.9% of respondents reported worse mental health functioning compared to before the pandemic. The frequency of probable posttraumatic stress disorder, major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, alcohol use disorder, and suicidal ideation were 34.2%, 35.3%, 26.8%, 13.0%, and 22.0%, respectively. Between 38.6% and 53.1% of respondents attributed their symptoms as either directly related to or exacerbated by the pandemic. Approximately 18% of respondents reported using telehealth for mental health services during the pandemic, and among those, 72.8% indicated a choice to use telehealth even after the pandemic. Conclusions: This study found that Veterans experienced worsening mental health as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. The use of telehealth services was widely endorsed by mental health treatment-seeking Veterans who transitioned to virtual care during the pandemic. Our findings have important clinical and programmeadministrator implications, emphasizing the need to reach out to support veterans, especially those with pre-existing mental health conditions and to enhance and maintain virtual care even post-pandemic.


Antecedentes: Los impactos de la pandemia del COVID-19 han afectado de manera desproporcionada a diferentes grupos de la población. Los veteranos tienen más probabilidades de tener afecciones de salud mental preexistentes en comparación con la población canadiense en general, experimentar factores estresantes agravados como resultado de las interrupciones en los dominios familiares, sociales, y ocupacionales, y se enfrentan a cambios en la prestación de la atención médica (por ejemplo, telesalud). Los objetivos de este estudio son evaluar (a) el impacto en la salud mental del COVID-19 y los cambios de vida relacionados en el bienestar de los Veteranos y (b) las percepciones y la satisfacción con los cambios en los tratamientos y la entrega de la atención médica durante la pandemia.Métodos: Un total de 1136 veteranos canadienses participaron en una encuesta en línea. Los participantes completaron preguntas relacionadas con su salud mental y bienestar, cambios en el estilo de vida, e inquietudes relacionadas con la pandemia del COVID-19, así como experiencias y satisfacción con los tratamientos de atención médica durante la pandemia.Resultados: Los resultados mostraron que el 55,9% de los encuestados informaron un peor funcionamiento de la salud mental en comparación con antes de la pandemia. La frecuencia de probable trastorno de estrés postraumático, trastorno depresivo mayor, trastorno de ansiedad generalizada, trastorno por consumo de alcohol, e ideación suicida fue del 34,2%, 35,3%, 26,8%, 13,0% y 22,0%, respectivamente. Entre el 38,6% y el 53,1% de los encuestados atribuyeron sus síntomas como directamente relacionados con la pandemia o agravados por ella. Aproximadamente el 18% de los encuestados informó haber utilizado la telesalud para los servicios de salud mental durante la pandemia, y entre ellos, el 72,8% indicó que había optado por utilizar la telesalud incluso después de la pandemia.Conclusiones: Este estudio encontró que los Veteranos experimentaron un empeoramiento de la salud mental como resultado de la pandemia del COVID-19. El uso de los servicios de telesalud fue ampliamente respaldado por los Veteranos en busca de tratamiento de salud mental que hicieron la transición a la atención virtual durante la pandemia. Nuestros hallazgos tienen importantes implicaciones clínicas y para los administradores de programas, enfatizando la necesidad de ayudar a los veteranos, especialmente a aquellos con condiciones de salud mental preexistentes, y de mejorar y mantener la atención virtual incluso después de una pandemia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Veterans/psychology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Canada , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Veterans/statistics & numerical data
6.
Dermatol Online J ; 27(10)2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1643787

ABSTRACT

Social distancing requirements associated with the COVID-19 pandemic have allowed for the expansion of different healthcare delivery modalities. Namely, there has been an increase in the utilization of remote diagnostic services for both primary and specialist care. Dermatology care has traditionally been inaccessible to many pediatric patients; this is due in part to a limited number of practicing pediatric dermatologists, as well as a maldistribution of the pediatric dermatology workforce with the majority of providers located in large metropolitan areas. There is therefore a need for an accessible alternative for care to reach underserved patient populations. This commentary highlights evidence from recent studies on remote dermatology care (teledermatology) and how it has not only improved access to dermatologic care but also quality of care. Although teledermatology does not completely replace traditional in-person visits and is limited by poor broadband access in traditionally underserved areas, teledermatology can, in some instances, be a cost-effective and efficient alternative for pediatric patients otherwise lacking dermatologic care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatologists/supply & distribution , Dermatology/methods , Health Services Accessibility , Telemedicine , Child , Child, Preschool , Dermatology/statistics & numerical data , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Healthcare Disparities/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Pediatricians/supply & distribution , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data
7.
Telemed J E Health ; 26(12): 1461-1465, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1639432

ABSTRACT

Objective: During the current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, telemedicine has been brought to the forefront of attention. This report aimed to assess psychiatric comorbidities in COVID-19 patients by utilizing telepsychiatry. Methods: COVID-19 patients admitted in Fasa University Hospital and nonhospitalized outpatients of Fasa city were interviewed by a psychiatrist through video chat for a 1-month period (March-April, 2020). Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), Generalized Anxiety Disorder Assessment (GAD-7), and Perceived Stress Scale-14 (PSS 14) questionnaires were administered for all patients. Each patient's mental status was recorded, and if any psychiatric problem was diagnosed, supportive psychotherapy, pharmacotherapy, and follow-up visits based on the patient's condition were started. Result: From a total of 82 COVID-19 patients who entered the study, 32 (39.03%) and 50 (60.97%) subjects were inpatients and outpatients, respectively. Moreover, 32 (39.03%) subjects were male and 50 (60.97%) were female. Insomnia seen in 24 (29.3%) patients and adjustment disorder in 13 (15.9%) patients were the most common psychiatric disorders among a total of 33 (40.2%) patients suffering from mental illness. Female and hospitalized patients presented significantly more frequent comorbidities than males and outpatients. Conclusions: Psychiatric disorders were significantly more common in patients with hospital admission than those without and more frequent in female versus male subjects. There were no significant differences between male and female subjects with and without admission according to the PHQ-9, GAD-7, and PSS-14 scores. It was concluded that telepsychiatry in the early stages of mental problems during a catastrophic event like the coronavirus pandemic, can be an efficient instrument for the screening of psychosomatic comorbidities, so that pharmacological treatment (considering possible drug interactions with COVID-19 medications) and psychotherapeutic intervention can be optimized by psychiatrists.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/diagnosis , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/psychology , Inpatients/statistics & numerical data , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Sex Factors , Video Recording/statistics & numerical data
9.
Neuromodulation ; 24(2): 337-342, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1599565

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore the utility of deep brain stimulation (DBS) telemedicine in the management of patients with movement disorders from January 2019 to March 2020, covering the main period of the COVID-19 outbreak in China. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We obtained data from 40 hospitals around China that employed DBS tele-programming for their outpatients with Parkinson's disease or dystonia from January 2019 to March 2020. Data were obtained on the number and nature of patients' DBS health care service requests, reasons for their requests, the number of DBS telemedicine sessions subsequently completed, safety issues, and the patients' satisfaction with the DBS tele-programing parameter adjustments made. RESULTS: There were 909 DBS tele-programming health service requests (from 196 patients) completed during the study period. The results showed: 1) the number of DBS telemedicine sessions requested and the number of patients examined increased during the COVID-19 outbreak in February and March 2020 when compared with the monthly numbers in 2019; 2) the most common reason for the patients' health service requests was poor symptom control; 3) the most common DBS tele-programming adjustment made was voltage change; 4) overall, most (89%) DBS tele-programming adjustment sessions were experienced by the patients as satisfactory; and 5) significant adverse events and unexpected treatment interruptions caused by connection failure or other hardware- or software-related problems did not occur. CONCLUSIONS: DBS telemedicine could have a unique role to play in maintaining the delivery of DBS treatment and medical care to outpatients with movement disorders during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Deep Brain Stimulation/methods , Movement Disorders/therapy , Pandemics , Telemedicine/methods , Adult , Aged , Ambulatory Care , China , Deep Brain Stimulation/adverse effects , Deep Brain Stimulation/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Satisfaction , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data
10.
Dermatol Surg ; 48(2): 187-190, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595787

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Covid-19 Pandemic prompted the widespread implementation of telemedicine across healthcare. OBJECTIVE: To analyze telemedicine adoption by Mohs Micrographic surgeons (MMS) during the COVID-19 pandemic; to analyze the attitudes and perceived barriers to its long-term continuation by MMS practices. METHODS AND MATERIALS: An online multiple-choice survey was distributed to members of the American College of Mohs Surgeons. RESULTS: 86.1% of surveyed Mohs surgeons initiated telemedicine during the pandemic surge. The most common uses for telemedicine amongst respondents were post-surgery management (77.4%), "spot checks" (60.9%), and surgical consultations (59.1%). 73.1% report patients were receptive to telemedicine. 68.6% believe that telemedicine has a place in dermatologic surgery; 49.5% plan to incorporate telemedicine into their surgical practices long-term. Physical exam limitations, fitting telemedicine into practice workflow, and patient reception/patient training were viewed as the most significant barriers to long-term implementation. CONCLUSIONS: While valuable use cases for telemedicine were identified with most Mohs surgeon respondents feeling that telemedicine has a place in their practices, there is uncertainty in how to implement telemedicine into the dermatologic surgery practice workflow.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatology/statistics & numerical data , Mohs Surgery , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/prevention & control , Dermatology/organization & administration , Humans , Patient Education as Topic , Patient Satisfaction , Physical Examination , Pilot Projects , Postoperative Care , Referral and Consultation , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workflow
11.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e24767, 2021 02 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575466

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Online medical records are being used to organize processes in clinical and outpatient settings and to forge doctor-patient communication techniques that build mutual understanding and trust. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to understand the reasons why patients tend to avoid using online medical records and to compare the perceptions that patients have of online medical records based on demographics and cancer diagnosis. METHODS: We used data from the Health Information National Trends Survey Cycle 3, a nationally representative survey, and assessed outcomes using descriptive statistics and chi-square tests. The patients (N=4328) included in the analysis had experienced an outpatient visit within the previous 12 months and had answered the online behavior question regarding their use of online medical records. RESULTS: Patients who were nonusers of online medical records consisted of 58.36% of the sample (2526/4328). The highest nonuser rates were for patients who were Hispanic (460/683, 67.35%), patients who were non-Hispanic Black (434/653, 66.46%), and patients who were older than 65 years (968/1520, 63.6%). Patients older than 65 years were less likely to use online medical records (odds ratio [OR] 1.51, 95% CI 1.24-1.84, P<.001). Patients who were White were more likely to use online medical records than patients who were Black (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.43-2.05, P<.001) or Hispanic (OR 1.65, 95% CI 1.37-1.98, P<.001). Patients who were diagnosed with cancer were more likely to use online medical records compared to patients with no cancer (OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.11-1.55, 95% CI 1.11-1.55, P=.001). Among nonusers, older patients (≥65 years old) preferred speaking directly to their health care providers (OR 1.76, 95% CI 1.35-2.31, P<.001), were more concerned about privacy issues caused by online medical records (OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.22-2.66, P<.001), and felt uncomfortable using the online medical record systems (OR 10.55, 95% CI 6.06-19.89, P<.001) compared to those aged 18-34 years. Patients who were Black or Hispanic were more concerned about privacy issues (OR 1.42, 1.09-1.84, P=.007). CONCLUSIONS: Studies should consider social factors such as gender, race/ethnicity, and age when monitoring trends in eHealth use to ensure that eHealth use does not induce greater health status and health care disparities between people with different backgrounds and demographic characteristics.


Subject(s)
Electronic Health Records/standards , Health Information Exchange/standards , Surveys and Questionnaires/standards , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Data Analysis , Female , History, 21st Century , Humans , Internet Use , Male , Middle Aged , Physician-Patient Relations , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
12.
JAMA Surg ; 156(7): 620-626, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1573991

ABSTRACT

Importance: While telehealth use in surgery has shown to be feasible, telehealth became a major modality of health care delivery during the COVID-19 pandemic. Objective: To assess patterns of telehealth use across surgical specialties before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Design, Setting, and Participants: Insurance claims from a Michigan statewide commercial payer for new patient visits with a surgeon from 1 of 9 surgical specialties during one of the following periods: prior to the COVID-19 pandemic (period 1: January 5 to March 7, 2020), early pandemic (period 2: March 8 to June 6, 2020), and late pandemic (period 3: June 7 to September 5, 2020). Exposures: Telehealth implementation owing to the COVID-19 pandemic in March 2020. Main Outcomes and Measures: (1) Conversion rate defined as the rate of weekly new patient telehealth visits divided by mean weekly number of total new patient visits in 2019. This outcome adjusts for a substantial decrease in outpatient care during the pandemic. (2) Weekly number of new patient telehealth visits divided by weekly number of total new patient visits. Results: Among 4405 surgeons in the cohort, 2588 (58.8%) performed telehealth in any patient care context. Specifically for new patient visits, 1182 surgeons (26.8%) used telehealth. A total of 109 610 surgical new outpatient visits were identified during the pandemic. The median (interquartile range) age of telehealth patients was 46.8 (34.1-58.4) years compared with 52.6 (38.3-62.3) years for patients who received care in-person. Prior to March 2020, less than 1% (8 of 173 939) of new patient visits were conducted through telehealth. Telehealth use peaked in April 2020 (week 14) and facilitated 34.6% (479 of 1383) of all new patient visits during that week. The telehealth conversion rate peaked in April 2020 (week 15) and was equal to 8.2% of the 2019 mean weekly new patient visit volume. During period 2, a mean (SD) of 16.6% (12.0%) of all new patient surgical visits were conducted via telehealth (conversion rate of 5.1% of 2019 mean weekly new patient visit volumes). During period 3, 3.0% (2168 of 71 819) of all new patient surgical visits were conducted via telehealth (conversion rate of 2.5% of 2019 new patient visit volumes). Mean (SD) telehealth conversion rates varied by specialty with urology being the highest (14.3% [7.7%]). Conclusions and Relevance: Results from this study showed that telehealth use grew across all surgical specialties in Michigan in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. While rates of telehealth use have declined as in-person care has resumed, telehealth use remains substantially higher across all surgical specialties than it was prior to the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Specialties, Surgical , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Cohort Studies , Humans , Michigan/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
13.
J Med Genet ; 59(1): 23-27, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575174

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to the rapid adoption of virtual clinic processes and healthcare delivery. Herein, we examine the impact of virtualising genetics services at Canada's largest cancer centre. A retrospective review was conducted to evaluate relevant metrics during the 12 weeks prior to and during virtual care, including referral and clinic volumes, patient wait times and genetic testing uptake. The number of appointments and new patients seen were maintained during virtual care. Likewise, there was a significant increase in the number of patients offered testing during virtual care who did not provide a blood sample (176/180 (97.7%) vs 180/243 (74.1%); p<0.001), and a longer median time from the date of pretest genetic counselling to the date a sample was given (0 vs 11 days; p<0.001). Referral volumes significantly decreased during virtual care (35 vs 22; p<0.001), which was accompanied by a decreased median wait time for first appointment (55 days vs 30 days; p<0.001). The rapid virtualisation of cancer genetic services allowed the genetics clinic to navigate the COVID-19 pandemic without compromising clinical volumes or access to genetic testing. There was a decrease in referral volumes and uptake of genetic testing, which may be attributable to pandemic-related clinical restrictions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Genetic Services/organization & administration , Genetic Services/statistics & numerical data , Neoplasms/genetics , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Canada , Female , Genetic Counseling , Genetic Testing , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Male , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Referral and Consultation , Research Design , Retrospective Studies , Syndrome
15.
Am J Public Health ; 111(12): 2157-2166, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1559064

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic caused substantial disruptions in the field operations of all 3 major components of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). The MEPS is widely used to study how policy changes and major shocks, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, affect insurance coverage, access, and preventive and other health care utilization and how these relate to population health. We describe how the MEPS program successfully responded to these challenges by reengineering field operations, including survey modes, to complete data collection and maintain data release schedules. The impact of the pandemic on response rates varied considerably across the MEPS. Investigations to date show little effect on the quality of data collected. However, lower response rates may reduce the statistical precision of some estimates. We also describe several enhancements made to the MEPS that will allow researchers to better understand the impact of the pandemic on US residents, employers, and the US health care system. (Am J Public Health. 2021;111(12):2157-2166. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2021.306534).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Expenditures/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Electronic Health Records/statistics & numerical data , Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Insurance Coverage/organization & administration , Insurance Coverage/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Population Health/statistics & numerical data , Quality of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , United States/epidemiology
16.
Diabet Med ; 39(4): e14755, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1550817

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to the rapid implementation of remote care delivery in type 1 diabetes. We studied current modes of care delivery, healthcare professional experiences and impact on insulin pump training in type 1 diabetes care in the United Kingdom (UK). METHODS: The UK Diabetes Technology Network designed a 48-question survey aimed at healthcare professionals providing care in type 1 diabetes. RESULTS: One hundred and forty-three healthcare professionals (48% diabetes physicians, 52% diabetes educators and 88% working in adult services) from approximately 75 UK centres (52% university hospitals, 46% general and community hospitals), responded to the survey. Telephone consultations were the main modality of care delivery. There was a higher reported time taken for video consultations versus telephone (p < 0.001). Common barriers to remote consultations were patient familiarity with technology (72%) and access to patient device data (67%). We assessed the impact on insulin pump training. A reduction in total new pump starts (73%) and renewals (61%) was highlighted. Common barriers included patient digital literacy (61%), limited healthcare professional experience (46%) and time required per patient (44%). When grouped according to size of insulin pump service, pump starts and renewals in larger services were less impacted by the pandemic compared to smaller services. CONCLUSION: This survey highlights UK healthcare professional experiences of remote care delivery. While supportive of virtual care models, a number of factors highlighted, especially patient digital literacy, need to be addressed to improve virtual care delivery and device training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/therapy , Health Personnel , Self-Management/education , Telemedicine , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , Biomedical Technology/education , Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring/instrumentation , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/blood , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/epidemiology , Glycemic Control/instrumentation , Health Personnel/organization & administration , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Insulin Infusion Systems , Pandemics , Patient Education as Topic/methods , Patient Education as Topic/organization & administration , Remote Consultation/methods , Remote Consultation/organization & administration , Self-Management/methods , Self-Management/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , United Kingdom/epidemiology
17.
Gac. méd. Méx ; 157(3): 323-326, may.-jun. 2021. tab
Article in Spanish | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1552052

ABSTRACT

Resumen Introducción: Los pacientes con diabetes experimentan dificultades para mantener el control glucémico durante el confinamiento por la pandemia de COVID-19, con el riesgo de presentar complicaciones crónicas de la diabetes y COVID-19 grave. Objetivo: El propósito de este estudio fue evaluar la conversión de un centro de atención primaria presencial de diabetes a un servicio de telemedicina por llamada telefónica. Métodos: Se realizaron consultas médicas por llamada telefónica durante la etapa inicial del confinamiento (abril a junio de 2020), para continuar el seguimiento de pacientes ingresados a un programa de atención multicomponente en diabetes. Resultados: Se realizaron 1118 consultas por llamada telefónica para continuar el seguimiento de 192 pacientes con diabetes tipo 2. Participaron diferentes profesionales de distintas áreas de la salud: atención médica, educación en diabetes, nutrición, psicología y podología. Conclusiones: La atención multicomponente en diabetes se transformó con éxito de un esquema de atención presencial a un servicio de telemedicina. Numerosos pacientes de atención primaria pueden ser candidatos a telemedicina. Se debe considerar un rediseño del modelo de atención que incorpore la telemedicina para mitigar la carga de morbimortalidad en enfermedades crónicas impuesta por la pandemia de COVID-19, pero también para la era pos-COVID-19.


Abstract Introduction: Patients with diabetes experience difficulties to maintain glycemic control during the confinement due to the COVID-19 pandemic, with the risk of developing diabetes chronic complications and severe COVID-19. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the conversion of an outpatient diabetes primary care center from a face-to-face care modality to a telemedicine care service by telephone. Methods: Medical consultations were made by telephone during the initial phase of confinement (April to June 2020), to then continue the follow-up of patients admitted to a multicomponent diabetes care program. Results: A total of 1,118 consultations were made by telephone and follow-up was subsequently continued in 192 patients with type 2 diabetes. Different professionals from different health areas participated, including medical care, diabetes education, nutrition, psychology and podiatry. Conclusions: Multicomponent diabetes care was successfully transformed from a face-to-face care modality to a telemedicine service. Many primary care patients may be candidates for telemedicine. A redesign of the care model that incorporates telemedicine should be considered to mitigate chronic diseases burden of morbidity and mortality imposed by COVID-19 pandemic, but also for the post-COVID-19 era.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Telemedicine/methods , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy , Ambulatory Care/methods , COVID-19 , Primary Health Care/methods , Primary Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Prospective Studies , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data
19.
Gac Med Mex ; 157(3): 309-312, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1535086

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Patients with diabetes experience difficulties to maintain glycemic control during the confinement due to the COVID-19 pandemic, with the risk of developing diabetes chronic complications and severe COVID-19. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the conversion of an outpatient diabetes primary care center from a face-to-face care modality to a telemedicine care service by telephone. METHODS: Medical consultations were made by telephone during the initial phase of confinement (April to June 2020), to then continue the follow-up of patients admitted to a multicomponent diabetes care program. RESULTS: A total of 1,118 consultations were made by telephone and follow-up was subsequently continued in 192 patients with type 2 diabetes. Different professionals from different health areas participated, including medical care, diabetes education, nutrition, psychology and podiatry. CONCLUSIONS: Multicomponent diabetes care was successfully transformed from a face-to-face care modality to a telemedicine service. Many primary care patients may be candidates for telemedicine. A redesign of the care model that incorporates telemedicine should be considered to mitigate chronic diseases burden of morbidity and mortality imposed by COVID-19 pandemic, but also for the post-COVID-19 era.


INTRODUCCIÓN: Los pacientes con diabetes experimentan dificultades para mantener el control glucémico durante el confinamiento por la pandemia de COVID-19, con el riesgo de presentar complicaciones crónicas de la diabetes y COVID-19 grave. OBJETIVO: El propósito de este estudio fue evaluar la conversión de un centro de atención primaria presencial de diabetes a un servicio de telemedicina por llamada telefónica. MÉTODOS: Se realizaron consultas médicas por llamada telefónica durante la etapa inicial del confinamiento (abril a junio de 2020), para continuar el seguimiento de pacientes ingresados a un programa de atención multicomponente en diabetes. RESULTADOS: Se realizaron 1118 consultas por llamada telefónica para continuar el seguimiento de 192 pacientes con diabetes tipo 2. Participaron diferentes profesionales de distintas áreas de la salud: atención médica, educación en diabetes, nutrición, psicología y podología. CONCLUSIONES: La atención multicomponente en diabetes se transformó con éxito de un esquema de atención presencial a un servicio de telemedicina. Numerosos pacientes de atención primaria pueden ser candidatos a telemedicina. Se debe considerar un rediseño del modelo de atención que incorpore la telemedicina para mitigar la carga de morbimortalidad en enfermedades crónicas impuesta por la pandemia de COVID-19, pero también para la era pos-COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/methods , COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy , Telemedicine/methods , Adult , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Primary Health Care/methods , Primary Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Prospective Studies , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data
20.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(11): e2133877, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1530062

ABSTRACT

Importance: Telehealth use including secure messages has rapidly expanded since the COVID-19 pandemic, including for multidisciplinary aspects of cancer care. Recent reports described rapid uptake and various benefits for patients and clinicians, suggesting that telehealth may be in standard use after the pandemic. Objective: To examine attitudes and perceptions of multidisciplinary cancer care clinicians toward telehealth and secure messages. Design, Setting, and Participants: Cross-sectional specialty-specific survey (ie, some questions appear only for relevant specialties) among multidisciplinary cancer care clinicians, collected from April 29, 2020, to June 5, 2020. Participants were all 285 clinicians in the fields of medical oncology, radiation oncology, surgical oncology, survivorship, and oncology navigation from all 21 community cancer centers of Kaiser Permanente Northern California. Main Outcomes and Measures: Clinician satisfaction, perceived benefits and challenges of telehealth, perceived quality of telehealth and secure messaging, preferred visit and communication types for different clinical activities, and preferences regarding postpandemic telehealth use. Results: A total of 202 clinicians (71%) responded (104 of 128 medical oncologists, 34 of 37 radiation oncologists, 16 of 62 breast surgeons, 18 of 28 navigators, and 30 of 30 survivorship experts; 57% (116 of 202) were women; 73% [147 of 202] between ages 36-55 years). Seventy-six percent (n = 154) were satisfied with telehealth without statistically significant variations based on clinician characteristics. In-person visits were thought to promote a strong patient-clinician connection by 99% (n = 137) of respondents compared with 77% (n = 106) for video visits, 43% (n = 59) for telephone, and 14% (n = 19) for secure messages. The most commonly cited benefits of telehealth to clinicians included reduced commute (79%; n = 160), working from home (74%; n = 149), and staying on time (65%; n = 132); the most commonly cited negative factors included internet connection (84%; n = 170) or equipment problems (72%; n = 146), or physical examination needed (64%; n = 131). Most respondents (59%; n = 120) thought that video is adequate to manage the greater part of patient care in general; and most deemed various telehealth modalities suitable for any of the queried types of patient-clinician activities. For some specific activities, less than half of respondents thought that only an in-person visit is acceptable (eg, 49%; n = 66 for end-of-life discussion, 35%; n = 58 for new diagnosis). Most clinicians (82%; n = 166) preferred to maintain or increase use of telehealth after the pandemic. Conclusions and Relevance: In this survey of multidisciplinary cancer care clinicians in the COVID-19 era, telehealth was well received and often preferred by most cancer care clinicians, who deemed it appropriate to manage most aspects of cancer care. As telehealth use becomes routine in some cancer care settings, video and telephone visits and use of asynchronous secure messaging with patients in cancer care has clear potential to extend beyond the pandemic period.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Neoplasms/therapy , Patient Care Team/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Videoconferencing/statistics & numerical data
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