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1.
Oncology (Williston Park) ; 34(9): 377-378, 2020 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2206550

ABSTRACT

The telehealth explosion was facilitated by the onset of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, but what happens when the crisis is over? Will there be lasting changes to the practice of medicine and delivery of care, or will providers and patients alike be eager to go back to the "old way" of doing things? Jeremy Gabrysch, MD, a physician and CEO of Remedy, an on-demand urgent care service that delivers doctors right to your front door, discusses what the future of telehealth may hold.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care , Reimbursement Mechanisms , Standard of Care , Telemedicine/trends , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/economics , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/standards
2.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(1): e21327, 2021 01 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2141283

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic, caused by SARS-CoV-2, has forced the health care delivery structure to change rapidly. The pandemic has further widened the disparities in health care and exposed vulnerable populations. Health care services caring for such populations must not only continue to operate but create innovative methods of care delivery without compromising safety. We present our experience of incorporating telemedicine in our university hospital-based outpatient clinic in one of the worst-hit areas in the world. OBJECTIVE: Our goal is to assess the adoption of a telemedicine service in the first month of its implementation in outpatient practice during the COVID-19 pandemic. We also want to assess the need for transitioning to telemedicine, the benefits and challenges in doing so, and ongoing solutions during the initial phase of the implementation of telemedicine services for our patients. METHODS: We conducted a prospective review of clinic operations data from the first month of a telemedicine rollout in the outpatient adult ambulatory clinic from April 1, 2020, to April 30, 2020. A telemedicine visit was defined as synchronous audio-video communication between the provider and patient for clinical care longer than 5 minutes or if the video visit converted to a telephone visit after 5 minutes due to technical problems. We recorded the number of telemedicine visits scheduled, visits completed, and the time for each visit. We also noted the most frequent billing codes used based on the time spent in the patient care and the number of clinical tasks (eg, activity suggested through diagnosis or procedural code) that were addressed remotely by the physicians. RESULTS: During the study period, we had 110 telemedicine visits scheduled, of which 94 (85.4%) visits were completed. The average duration of the video visit was 35 minutes, with the most prolonged visit lasting 120 minutes. Of 94 patients, 24 (25.54%) patients were recently discharged from the hospital, and 70 (74.46%) patients were seen for urgent care needs. There was a 50% increase from the baseline in the number of clinical tasks that were addressed by the physicians during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: There was a high acceptance of telemedicine services by the patients, which was evident by a high show rate during the COVID-19 pandemic in Detroit. With limited staffing, restricted outpatient work hours, a shortage of providers, and increased outpatient needs, telemedicine was successfully implemented in our practice.


Subject(s)
Pandemics/prevention & control , Telemedicine/methods , Ambulatory Care/methods , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/transmission , Humans , Michigan , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Patient Satisfaction , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , Telemedicine/trends , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Tertiary Care Centers/trends
3.
Psychiatr Danub ; 32(1): 25-31, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100748

ABSTRACT

Deep emotional traumas in societies overwhelmed by large-scale human disasters, like, global pandemic diseases, natural disasters, man-made tragedies, war conflicts, social crises, etc., can cause massive stress-related disorders. Motivated by the ongoing global coronavirus pandemic, the article provides an overview of scientific evidence regarding adverse impact of diverse human disasters on mental health in afflicted groups and societies. Following this broader context, psychosocial impact of COVID-19 as a specific global human disaster is presented, with an emphasis on disturbing mental health aspects of the ongoing pandemic. Limited resources of mental health services in a number of countries around the world are illustrated, which will be further stretched by the forthcoming increase in demand for mental health services due to the global COVID-19 pandemic. Mental health challenges are particularly important for the Republic of Croatia in the current situation, due to disturbing stress of the 2020 Zagreb earthquake and the high pre-pandemic prevalence of chronic Homeland-War-related posttraumatic stress disorders. Comprehensive approach based on digital psychiatry is proposed to address the lack of access to psychiatric services, which includes artificial intelligence, telepsychiatry and an array of new technologies, like internet-based computer-aided mental health tools and services. These tools and means should be utilized as an important part of the whole package of measures to mitigate negative mental health effects of the global coronavirus pandemic. Our scientific and engineering experiences in the design and development of digital tools and means in mitigation of stress-related disorders and assessment of stress resilience are presented. Croatian initiative on enhancement of interdisciplinary research of psychiatrists, psychologists and computer scientists on the national and EU level is important in addressing pressing mental health concerns related to the ongoing pandemic and similar human disasters.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Disasters , Mental Health Services , Mental Health , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Psychiatry , Telemedicine , Artificial Intelligence , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Croatia , Humans , Internet , Pandemics , Psychiatry/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/trends , User-Computer Interface
5.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(8): e40288, 2022 08 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1974543

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although the COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated the adoption of telemedicine and virtual consultations worldwide, complex factors that may affect the use of virtual clinics are still unclear. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to identify factors associated with the utilization of virtual clinics in the experience of virtual clinic service implementation in Taiwan. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed a total of 187,742 outpatient visits (176,815, 94.2%, in-person visits and 10,927, 5.8%, virtual visits) completed at a large general hospital in Taipei City from May 19 to July 31, 2021, after rapid implementation of virtual outpatient clinic visits due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Data of patients' demographic characteristics, disease type, physicians' features, and specialties/departments were collected, and physicians' opinions regarding virtual clinics were surveyed and evaluated using a 5-point Likert scale. Multilevel analysis was conducted to determine the factors associated with the utilization of virtual clinics. RESULTS: Patient-/visit-, physician-, and department-level factors accounted for 67.5%, 11.1%, and 21.4% of the total variance in the utilization of virtual clinics, respectively. Female sex (odds ratio [OR] 1.27, 95% CI 1.22-1.33, P<.001); residing at a greater distance away from the hospital (OR 2.36, 95% CI 2.15-2.58 if distance>50 km, P<.001; OR 3.95, 95% CI 3.11-5.02 if extensive travel required, P<.001); reimbursement by the National Health Insurance (NHI; OR 7.29, 95% CI 5.71-9.30, P<.001); seeking care for a major chronic disease (OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.24-1.42, P<.001); the physician's positive attitude toward virtual clinics (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.16-1.93, P=.002); and visits within certain departments, including the heart center, psychiatry, and internal medicine (OR 2.55, 95% CI 1.46-4.46, P=.004), were positively associated with the utilization of virtual clinics. The patient's age, the physician's age, and the physician's sex were not associated with the utilization of virtual clinics in our study. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that in addition to previously demonstrated patient-level factors that may influence telemedicine use, including the patient's sex and distance from the hospital, factors at the visit level (insurance type, disease type), physician level (physician's attitude toward virtual clinics), and department level also contribute to the utilization of virtual clinics. Although there was a more than 300-fold increase in the number of virtual visits during the pandemic compared with the prepandemic period, the majority (176,815/187,742, 94.2%) of the outpatient visits were still in-person visits during the study period. Therefore, it is of great importance to understand the factors impacting the utilization of virtual clinics to accelerate the implementation of telemedicine. The findings of our study may help direct policymaking for expanding the use of virtual clinics, especially in countries struggling with the development and promotion of telemedicine virtual clinic services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Telemedicine , Ambulatory Care Facilities , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Multilevel Analysis , Outpatients , Retrospective Studies , Taiwan , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/trends
6.
World Neurosurg ; 166: 90-119, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1946834

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has driven the increased use of telemedicine and the adoption of wearable technology in neurosurgery. We reviewed studies exploring the use of wearables on neurosurgical patients and analyzed wearables' scientific production trends. METHODS: The review encompassed PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library. Bibliometric analysis was performed using citation data of the included studies through Elsevier's Scopus database. Linear regression was utilized to understand scientific production trends. All analyses were performed on R 4.1.2. RESULTS: We identified 979 studies. After screening, 49 studies were included. Most studies evaluated wearable technology use for patients with spinal pathology (n = 31). The studies were published over a 24-year period (1998-2021). Forty-seven studies involved wearable device use relevant to telemedicine. Bibliometric analysis revealed a compounded annual growth rate of 7.3%, adjusted for inflation, in annual scientific production from 1998 to 2021 (coefficient=1.3; 95% Confidence Interval = [0.7, 1.9], P < 0.01). Scientific production steadily increased in 2014 (n = 1) and peaked from 2019 (n = 8) to 2021 (n = 13) in correlation with the COVID-19 pandemic. Publications spanned 34 journals, averaged 24.4 citations per article, 3.0 citations per year per article, and 8.3 authors per article. CONCLUSION: Wearables can provide clinicians with objective measurements to determine patient function and quality of life. The rise in articles related to wearables in neurosurgery demonstrates the increased adoption of wearable devices during the COVID-19 pandemic. Wearable devices appear to be a key component in this era of telemedicine and their positive utility and practicality are increasingly being realized in neurosurgery.


Subject(s)
Monitoring, Physiologic , Neurosurgery , Telemedicine , Wearable Electronic Devices , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Monitoring, Physiologic/trends , Neurosurgery/methods , Neurosurgery/trends , Quality of Life , Telemedicine/trends , Treatment Outcome , Wearable Electronic Devices/trends
7.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(2): e29519, 2022 02 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1714887

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic and the lockdowns for controlling the spread of infection have led to a surge in telehealth adoption by many health care organizations. It is unclear how this pandemic has impacted health professionals' view about telehealth. The analysis of textual data, such as comments posted on a discussion forum, can uncover information that may not be captured by a structured survey. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to examine the opinions of health care workers about telehealth services during the time frame of March 2013-December 2020. METHODS: Comments about telehealth posted by health care workers from at least 46 countries were collected from an online discussion forum dedicated to health professionals. The analysis included the computation of sentiment scores from the textual data and the use of structural topic modeling to identify the topics of discussions as well as the factors that may be associated with the prevalence of these topics. RESULTS: The analysis of the comments revealed positive opinions about the perceived benefits of telehealth services before and during the pandemic, especially the ability to reach patients who cannot come to the health facility for diverse reasons. However, opinions about these benefits were less positive during the pandemic compared to the prepandemic period. Specific issues raised during the pandemic included technical difficulties encountered during telehealth sessions and the inability to perform certain care routines through telehealth platforms. Although comments on the quality of care provided through telehealth were associated with a negative sentiment score overall, the average score was less negative during the pandemic compared to the prepandemic period, signaling a shift in opinion about the quality of telehealth services. In addition, the analysis uncovered obstacles to the adoption of telehealth, including the absence of adequate legal dispositions for telehealth services and issues regarding the payment of these services by health insurance organizations. CONCLUSIONS: Enhancing the adoption of telehealth services beyond the pandemic requires addressing issues related to the quality of care, payment of services, and legal dispositions for delivering these services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Personnel , Telemedicine , Attitude , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Pandemics , Telemedicine/trends
8.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0264436, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700564

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine is a rapidly expanding field of medicine and an alternative method for delivering quality medical care to patients' fingertips. With the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been an increase in the use of telemedicine to connect patients and healthcare providers, which has been made possible by mobile health (mHealth) applications. The goal of this study was to compare the satisfaction of patients with telemedicine among mHealth users and non-users. This was a survey-based study that included outpatients from Abu Dhabi. The association between patient satisfaction with telemedicine and use of mHealth technologies was described using regression models. This study included a total of 515 completed responses. The use of mHealth application was significantly associated with ease of booking telemedicine appointments (OR 2.61, 95% CI 1.63-4.18; P < .001), perception of similarity of quality of care between telemedicine consultations and in-person visits (OR 1.81, 95% CI 1.26-2.61; P = .001), and preference for using telemedicine applications over in-person visits during the COVID-19 pandemic (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.12-2.72; P = .015). Our study results support that the use of mHealth applications is associated with increased patient satisfaction with telemedicine appointments.


Subject(s)
Mobile Applications/trends , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/trends , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomedical Technology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Outpatients/psychology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Arab Emirates/epidemiology
10.
JAMA ; 327(3): 237-247, 2022 01 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1669298

ABSTRACT

Importance: Following reductions in US ambulatory care early in the pandemic, it remains unclear whether care consistently returned to expected rates across insurance types and services. Objective: To assess whether patients with Medicaid or Medicare-Medicaid dual eligibility had significantly lower than expected return to use of ambulatory care rates than patients with commercial, Medicare Advantage, or Medicare fee-for-service insurance. Design, Setting, and Participants: In this retrospective cohort study examining ambulatory care service patterns from January 1, 2019, through February 28, 2021, claims data from multiple US payers were combined using the Milliman MedInsight research database. Using a difference-in-differences design, the extent to which utilization during the pandemic differed from expected rates had the pandemic not occurred was estimated. Changes in utilization rates between January and February 2020 and each subsequent 2-month time frame during the pandemic were compared with the changes in the corresponding months from the year prior. Age- and sex-adjusted Poisson regression models of monthly utilization counts were used, offsetting for total patient-months and stratifying by service and insurance type. Exposures: Patients with Medicaid or Medicare-Medicaid dual eligibility compared with patients with commercial, Medicare Advantage, or Medicare fee-for-service insurance, respectively. Main Outcomes and Measures: Utilization rates per 100 people for 6 services: emergency department, office and urgent care, behavioral health, screening colonoscopies, screening mammograms, and contraception counseling or HIV screening. Results: More than 14.5 million US adults were included (mean age, 52.7 years; 54.9% women). In the March-April 2020 time frame, the combined use of 6 ambulatory services declined to 67.0% (95% CI, 66.9%-67.1%) of expected rates, but returned to 96.7% (95% CI, 96.6%-96.8%) of expected rates by the November-December 2020 time frame. During the second COVID-19 wave in the January-February 2021 time frame, overall utilization again declined to 86.2% (95% CI, 86.1%-86.3%) of expected rates, with colonoscopy remaining at 65.0% (95% CI, 64.1%-65.9%) and mammography at 79.2% (95% CI, 78.5%-79.8%) of expected rates. By the January-February 2021 time frame, overall utilization returned to expected rates as follows: patients with Medicaid at 78.4% (95% CI, 78.2%-78.7%), Medicare-Medicaid dual eligibility at 73.3% (95% CI, 72.8%-73.8%), commercial at 90.7% (95% CI, 90.5%-90.9%), Medicare Advantage at 83.2% (95% CI, 81.7%-82.2%), and Medicare fee-for-service at 82.0% (95% CI, 81.7%-82.2%; P < .001; comparing return to expected utilization rates among patients with Medicaid and Medicare-Medicaid dual eligibility, respectively, with each of the other insurance types). Conclusions and Relevance: Between March 2020 and February 2021, aggregate use of 6 ambulatory care services increased after the preceding decrease in utilization that followed the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the rate of increase in use of these ambulatory care services was significantly lower for participants with Medicaid or Medicare-Medicaid dual eligibility than for those insured by commercial, Medicare Advantage, or Medicare fee-for-service.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , Colonoscopy/statistics & numerical data , Colonoscopy/trends , Databases, Factual , Fee-for-Service Plans/statistics & numerical data , Fee-for-Service Plans/trends , Female , Health Services Needs and Demand/statistics & numerical data , Health Services Needs and Demand/trends , Humans , Insurance, Health/statistics & numerical data , Insurance, Health/trends , Male , Mammography/statistics & numerical data , Mammography/trends , Medicaid/statistics & numerical data , Medicare/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/trends , Time Factors , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
11.
Dermatol Online J ; 27(10)2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1643785

ABSTRACT

Teledermatology has been widely adopted during the COVID-19 pandemic as virtual patient care promotes social distancing and decreases viral exposure risk. As teledermatology has become more prominent during this period, it is essential to assess whether virtual visits allow for adequate patient care. To assess perceptions of advantages and disadvantages of teledermatology, a survey was sent to academic dermatologists through the Association of Professors of Dermatology (APD) listserv. Of the physicians surveyed, 94% reported their departments had implemented teledermatology during the COVID-19 pandemic. The majority (64%) described teledermatology as an effective tool for patient care because of improved access to care, decreased risk of COVID-19 exposure, and convenience. Frequently cited limitations of teledermatology were image quality, technical difficulties, and inability to perform a comprehensive skin examination. Thirty-seven percent of respondents reported teledermatology as a contributor to their professional burnout. Although teledermatology has become more prevalent as a result of the pandemic, its role moving forward is uncertain given its limitations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatologists , Dermatology/methods , Pandemics , Telemedicine , Adult , Age Distribution , Aged , Burnout, Professional/etiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Computer Terminals/standards , Dermatologists/psychology , Dermatologists/statistics & numerical data , Dermatology/trends , Female , Health Care Surveys , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Physical Examination , Sex Distribution , Telemedicine/trends , Uncertainty
12.
Curr Oncol Rep ; 24(1): 99-103, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1641006

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review is to describe the current state of telemedicine within neuro-oncology. This article will address the development of tele-neuro-oncology over time with a focus on current use and applications of telemedicine within the field. Current modalities and practical considerations for tele-neuro-oncology visits and opportunities for growth will be highlighted. RECENT FINDINGS: The use of telemedicine has expanded significantly during the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly within neuro-oncology. The use of telemedicine is widely accepted by neuro-oncologic patients and providers and continues to expand in utilization and scope. The use of tele-neuro-oncology is expected to develop further with opportunities for multidisciplinary and integrated care, clinical trials, research, and education. Telemedicine provides a unique, patient-centered approach to neuro-oncologic care. Telehealth will remain a valuable tool, and its use and role are expected to expand within neuro-oncology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Medical Oncology/methods , Nervous System Neoplasms , Telemedicine/trends , Humans , Nervous System Neoplasms/diagnosis , Nervous System Neoplasms/therapy , Patient-Centered Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/standards
14.
Lancet Psychiatry ; 9(1): 8-9, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1569159
15.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 5437237, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546594

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The present study was aimed at assessing the impact of teledentistry, its application, and trends in uplifting dental practice and clinical care around the world. Material and Methods. The present observational study comprised of an electronic survey distributed among dental professionals around the globe. The validated survey form consisted of a total 26 questions with 5-point Likert scale response. The questionnaire used was divided into four domains: usefulness of teledentistry for patients, its usefulness in dental practice, its capacity to improve the existing practice, and the concerns attached to its use. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS-25. ANOVA test was used to assess the effect of independent variables on dependent variables. A p value of ≤0.05 was taken as statistically significant. RESULTS: A total of 506 dental professionals participated in the study with the response rate of 89.39%. More than half of the participants (50-75%) endorsed that teledentistry is a useful tool for improving clinical practice as well as patient care. Two-thirds of the participants (69.96%) considered that teledentistry would reduce cost for the dental practices. On the other hand, about 50-70% of dental professionals expressed their concerns regarding the security of the data and consent of patients. The most preferred communication tool for teledentistry was reported to be videoconference followed by phone. The majority of participants recommended the use of teledentistry in the specialty of oral medicine, operative dentistry, and periodontics. There was a significant difference between the age, experience of dentists, and their qualifications with domains of teledentistry. CONCLUSIONS: The overall impact of dental professionals towards teledentistry was positive with adequate willingness to incorporate this modality in their clinical practice. However, the perceived concerns pertaining to teledentistry are significant impediments towards its integration within the oral health system. An in-depth study of its business model and cost-benefit needs of time, especially in the context of developing countries, in order to avail the optimum benefits of teledentistry.


Subject(s)
Dentistry/methods , Dentistry/trends , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/trends , Adult , Asia , Attitude of Health Personnel , Dentists , Europe , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States , Young Adult
16.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0258839, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528717

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, telehealth technologies were used in the primary health care setting in New Brunswick as a means to continue providing care to patients while following public health guidelines. This study aimed to measure these changes and examine if they improved timely access to primary care. A secondary goal was to identify which telehealth technologies were deemed sustainable by primary care providers. METHODS: This was a comparative study on the use of telehealth technology before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Between April 2020 and November 2020, 114 active primary care providers (family physicians or nurse practitioners) responded to the online survey. RESULTS: The findings illustrated an increase in the use of telehealth technologies. The use of phone consultations increased by 122%, from 43.9% pre-pandemic to 97.6% during the pandemic (p < 0.001). The use of virtual consultation (19.3% pre-pandemic vs. 41.2% during the pandemic, p < 0.001), emails and texts also increased during the pandemic. Whereas the more structural organizational tools (electronic medical charts and reservation systems) remained stable. However, those changes did not coincide with a significant improvement to timely access to care during the pandemic. Many participants (40.1%) wanted to keep phone consultations, and 21.9% of participants wanted to keep virtual consultations as part of their long-term practice. INTERPRETATION: The observed increase in the use of telehealth technologies may be sustainable, but it has not significantly improved timely access to primary care in New Brunswick.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Physicians, Primary Care/psychology , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/virology , Humans , New Brunswick/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/trends
17.
Ann Cardiol Angeiol (Paris) ; 70(5): 317-321, 2021 Nov.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525669

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine has been recognized since 2010 as a constitutive element of care, however, it was not until 2016 that the first national experiments were able to be launched with the aim of validating a framework allowing a possible rapid passage in the common right. These experiments, which are due to end in December 2021, have succeeded in involving more than 100,000 patients, mainly suffering from cardiac pathologies. The arrival of COVID-19 has made it possible to measure the usefulness of practices at a distance both from teleconsultation and telemonitoring, with the appearance of organizational and technical innovations that must now be maintained and developed in order to integrate the telemedicine of tomorrow into our actual medicine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Telemedicine/organization & administration , COVID-19/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Patient Satisfaction , Remote Consultation/methods , Remote Consultation/organization & administration , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Telemedicine/economics , Telemedicine/trends
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