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1.
Adv Skin Wound Care ; 35(2): 87-94, 2022 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1634060

ABSTRACT

GENERAL PURPOSE: To present the results of a scoping review exploring chronic wound care telemedicine before and during the pandemic, including the characteristics of the models implemented. TARGET AUDIENCE: This continuing education activity is intended for physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and nurses with an interest in skin and wound care. LEARNING OBJECTIVES/OUTCOMES: After participating in this educational activity, the participant will:1. Identify the characteristics of the studies the authors examined for their scoping review of chronic wound care telemedicine.2. Choose the electronic methods commonly used for wound care telemedicine in the studies the authors examined.3. Recognize the implications for the patients who participated in chronic wound care telemedicine in the studies the authors examined. ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVETo explore different chronic wound telemedicine models and identify current research on this topic.METHODSThe authors searched the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases on August 10, 2021 and identified 58 articles included in the analysis.RESULTSIncluded studies were published between 1999 and 2021, with more than half of the studies published between 2015 to 2019 (25.9%, n = 15/58) and 2020 to 2021 (25.9%, n = 15/58). There were 57 models identified, of which 87.7% (n = 50/57) used a blended model of care. Image assessment was the most common element in blended care (66.0%, n = 33/50), followed by video consultation (46.0%, n = 23/50), text (44.0%, n = 22/50), and telephone consultation (22.0%, n = 11/50). Purely virtual care was used in 12.3% (n = 7/57) of models, 85.7% (n = 6/7) of which were implemented during the COVID-19 pandemic. Most studies conducted a quantitative analysis (62.1%, n = 36/58); 20.7% (n = 12/58) conducted a qualitative analysis, and 17.2% (n = 10/58) conducted both. The most frequently assessed results were wound outcomes (53.4%, n = 31/58) and patient opinions (25.9%, n = 15/58).CONCLUSIONSChronic wound care-related telemedicine has common elements: image assessment, video and telephone consultation, and text-based information that can be combined in a variety of ways with unique implementation barriers. Blended care models are more common than purely virtual alternatives. Heterogeneity among outcomes and reporting methods make the results difficult to synthesize.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Humans , Pandemics , Referral and Consultation , SARS-CoV-2 , Telephone
2.
Br J Nurs ; 31(1): 8-14, 2022 Jan 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622854

ABSTRACT

With the arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic, outpatient clinics had to adjust and reduce the number of face-to-face appointments. The Cambridge stoma service has a recognised pathway of stoma care but needed to adjust this in line with government guidelines. The team took the opportunity to audit the current pathway and complete a patient experience survey to determine the future of the service and potential adaptations to the pathway in the future. AIM: To determine the need for adaptation and improvement of the standard stoma clinics pathway. METHOD: A survey was conducted using a postal questionnaire to all patients who attended stoma clinics between April and June 2020. FINDINGS: 160 questionnaires were sent and 72 responses returned (45%). All elements of the virtual clinic were rated positive by more than 80% of respondents, with nearly 90% of them feeling that all their stoma care needs were met. When asked to indicate their preferred consultation methods (patients were allowed to choose more than one), face to face received 50 votes, telephone 32 votes and video clinic 5 votes. CONCLUSION: There is a need to adapt the standard clinic pathway to be able to offer standardised care but with flexibility to adjust to circumstances and patients' preferences.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Critical Pathways , Humans , Patient Outcome Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telephone
3.
Am J Public Health ; 112(1): 43-47, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594512

ABSTRACT

When COVID-19 cases surge, identifying ways to improve the efficiency of contact tracing and prioritize vulnerable communities for isolation and quarantine support services is critical. During a fall 2020 COVID-19 resurgence in San Francisco, California, prioritization of telephone-based case investigation by zip code and using a chatbot to screen for case participants who needed isolation support reduced the number of case participants who would have been assigned for a telephone interview by 31.5% and likely contributed to 87.5% of Latinx case participants being successfully interviewed. (Am J Public Health. 2022;112(1):43-47. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2021.306563).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Contact Tracing/methods , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , San Francisco/epidemiology , Technology , Telephone
4.
BMJ Open ; 11(12): e055909, 2021 12 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583093

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aims to explore the attenuated impact of reported avoidance behaviours adherence on the transmission of COVID-19 through cross-sectional surveys in Hong Kong, in order to make up for the lack of research on avoidance behaviours fatigue. DESIGN: 40 cross-sectional telephone surveys. SETTING: All districts in Hong Kong. PARTICIPANTS: 31 332 Cantonese or English-speaking participants at age of 18 years or above. METHODS: We collected data on behaviours and estimated the average effective reproduction number ([Formula: see text]) among the Hong Kong adult population during the COVID-19 epidemic wave in November-December 2020 and compared with the preceding epidemic in June-July 2020. RESULTS: We observed a reduction in adherence to voluntary avoidance behaviours due to pandemic fatigue, but continued adherence to regulated avoidance behaviours. The average [Formula: see text] during the post-work from home period was higher in November-December wave with estimated [Formula: see text] of 0.81 (95% CI: 0.75 to 0.87) compared with the June-July wave with an [Formula: see text] of 0.67 (95% CI: 0.60 to 0.75). CONCLUSIONS: The declined effectiveness of social distancing interventions in reducing COVID-19 transmission was associated with fatigue with voluntary avoidance behaviours in Hong Kong population, implying a need for the government to reinvigorate the public to maintain effective pandemic control.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adolescent , Adult , Avoidance Learning , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/prevention & control , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telephone
5.
Telemed J E Health ; 27(7): 724-732, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575244

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Telephone-based telemedicine was temporarily permitted in Korea during the COVID-19 pandemic. The purpose of this study was to assess satisfaction with the telemedicine done during temporary hospital closing when in-person visits were not allowed due to in-hospital COVID-19 transmission. Methods: Survey questionnaires partially taken from a telehealth usability questionnaire (TUQ) were sent to 6,840 patients who used telephone-based telemedicine from February 24 to March 7, 2020. Questionnaires sent to patients and additionally created questionnaires to evaluate telemedicine were sent to medical staff (182 doctors and 138 nurses). Results: Response rates of patients and medical staff were 13.2% and 17.2%, respectively. Patients' satisfaction with telemedicine was significantly greater than medical staff's satisfaction for all five components taken from TUQ (all p = 0.000). In addition, created questionnaires showed good reliability, obtaining similar results between doctors and nurses (all p > 0.05). More than 85% of medical staff replied that telemedicine was needed in COVID-19, whereas more than 80% of them worried about incomplete assessment and communication of medical condition. Overall satisfaction with telemedicine by medical staff was 49.7%. The strength of telephone-based telemedicine was patients' convenience (53.4%). However, incomplete assessment of patients' condition (55.0%) was its weakness. Conclusion: Satisfaction with telephone-based telemedicine by patients was significantly greater than that by medical staff (doctors and nurses). Negative views for safety and inconvenience resulted in a greater proportion of dissatisfaction among medical staff. For safe application of telemedicine, medical staff insisted that developing a platform and creating guidelines should be needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Hospitals , Humans , Medical Staff , Pandemics , Patient Satisfaction , Personal Satisfaction , Reproducibility of Results , Republic of Korea , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telephone
6.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e26570, 2021 02 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574329

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19-related information on social media is overabundant and sometimes questionable, resulting in an "infodemic" during the pandemic. While previous studies suggest social media usage increases the risk of developing anxiety symptoms, how induced anxiety affects attitudes and behaviors is less discussed, let alone during a global pandemic. Little is known about the relationship between older adults using social media during a pandemic and their anxiety, their attitudes toward social trust in information, and behaviors to avoid contracting COVID-19. OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to investigate the associations between using social media for COVID-19-related information and anxiety symptoms as well as the mediation effect of anxiety symptoms on social trust in information and COVID-safe behaviors among older adults. METHODS: A cross-sectional telephone survey was conducted in Hong Kong between May and August 2020. A rapid warm-call protocol was developed to train social workers and volunteers from participant nongovernmental organizations to conduct the telephone surveys. Questions related to COVID-safe behaviors, social trust in information, social media use, anxiety and depressive symptoms, and sociodemographic information were asked. The number of confirmed COVID-19 cases at the community level was used to account for the risk of contracting COVID-19. Ordinary least squares regressions examined the associations between social media use and anxiety symptoms, and how they were associated with social trust in information and COVID-safe behaviors. Structural equation modeling further mapped out these relationships to identify the mediation effects of anxiety symptoms. RESULTS: This study collected information regarding 3421 adults aged 60 years and older. Use of social media for COVID-19-related information was associated with more anxiety symptoms and lower social trust in information but had no significant relationship with COVID-safe behaviors. Anxiety symptoms predicted lower social trust in information and higher COVID-safe behaviors. Lower social trust in information was predicted by using social media for COVID-19 information, mediated by anxiety symptoms, while no mediation effect was found for COVID-safe behaviors. CONCLUSIONS: Older adults who rely on social media for COVID-19-related information exhibited more anxiety symptoms, while showing mixed effects on attitudes and behaviors. Social trust in information may be challenged by unverified and contradictory information online. The negligible impact on COVID-safe behaviors suggested that social media may have caused more confusion than consolidating a consistent effort against the pandemic. Media literacy education is recommended to promote critical evaluation of COVID-19-related information and responsible sharing among older adults.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , Attitude to Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Behavior , Health Education , Social Media/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telephone , Trust , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics
7.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e25518, 2021 02 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574300

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has necessitated the implementation of innovative health care models in preparation for an influx of patients. A virtual ward model delivers clinical care remotely to patients in isolation. We report on an Australian cohort of patients with COVID-19 treated in a virtual ward. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe and evaluate the safety and efficacy of a virtual ward model of care for an Australian cohort of patients with COVID-19. METHODS: Retrospective clinical assessment was performed for 223 patients with confirmed COVID-19 treated in a virtual ward in Brisbane, Australia, from March 25 to May 15, 2020. Statistical analysis was performed for variables associated with the length of stay and hospitalization. RESULTS: Of 223 patients, 205 (92%) recovered without the need for escalation to hospital care. The median length of stay in the virtual ward was 8 days (range 1-44 days). In total, 18 (8%) patients were referred to hospital, of which 6 (33.3%) were discharged after assessment at the emergency department. Furthermore, 12 (5.4%) patients were admitted to hospital, of which 4 (33.3%) required supplemental oxygen and 2 (16.7%) required mechanical ventilation. No deaths were recorded. Factors associated with escalation to hospital care were the following: hypertension (odds ratio [OR] 3.6, 95% CI 1.28-9.87; P=.01), sputum production (OR 5.2, 95% CI 1.74-15.49; P=.001), and arthralgia (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.21-11.71; P=.02) at illness onset and a polymerase chain reaction cycle threshold of ≤20 on a diagnostic nasopharyngeal swab (OR 5.0, 95% CI 1.25-19.63; P=.02). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that a virtual ward model of care to treat patients with COVID-19 is safe and efficacious, and only a small number of patients would potentially require escalation to hospital care. Further studies are required to validate this model of care.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/methods , COVID-19/therapy , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Patient Isolation , Telemedicine/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Australia , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cohort Studies , Disease Management , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Female , Hospitals , Humans , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Nursing Assessment , Patient Discharge , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Telephone , Young Adult
8.
J Pediatr Orthop B ; 31(1): e69-e74, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561345

ABSTRACT

Telehealth services are innovative healthcare strategies that utilize communication technologies to improve healthcare access for patients. Teleradiology is a form of telehealth service that involves the transmission of radiological images, such as x-rays, CTs and MRIs, from one location to another to share patient information with other physicians. The purpose of this study was to assess teleradiology consultations for orthopaedic patients at a paediatric tertiary care centre. A retrospective review was conducted of patients who received teleradiology consultations with a single orthopaedic surgeon from 2015 to 2018 through the paediatric orthopaedic hip clinic at our institution. Teleradiology consultations involved follow-up radiographic imaging at a local community facility for patients who initially received healthcare services at our institution, followed by a telephone consultation to review imaging results and communicate next steps in care. Data collected included patient demographics, imaging type, facility location and distance from our institution. Eighty patients (F = 66, M = 14) who received teleradiology services were reviewed. Mean age was 3.5 years [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.5-4.4] at time of imaging. The average distance from community facilities to our institution was 1167 km (95% confidence interval: 920-1414), a measure of the total distance saved in travel for each patient in a single direction. The travel distance saved was substantial. Paediatric orthopaedic teleradiology services provide families specialized consultations and care continuity without costly travel. With increased implementation of teleradiology services, more patients and families can remain in their home communities while receiving the same quality of care.


Subject(s)
Orthopedics , Teleradiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Referral and Consultation , Retrospective Studies , Telephone , Tertiary Care Centers
9.
J Am Board Fam Med ; 34(6): 1103-1114, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1515525

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To review the frequency as well as the pros and cons of telephone and video-enabled telemedicine during the first 9 months of the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic as experienced by safety net providers across New York State (NYS). METHODS: Analysis of visits to 36 community health centers (CHCs) in NYS by modality (telephone vs video) from February to November 2020. Semi-structured interviews with 25 primary care, behavioral health, and pediatric providers from 8 CHCs. FINDINGS: In the week following the NYS stay-at-home order, video and telephone visits rose from 3.4 and 0% of total visits to 14.9 and 22.3%. At its peak, more than 60% of visits were conducted via telemedicine (April 2020) before tapering off to about 30% of visits (August 2020). Providers expressed a strong preference for video visits, particularly for situations when visual assessments were needed. Yet, more visits were conducted over telephone than video at all points throughout the pandemic. Video-specific advantages included enhanced ability to engage patients and use of visual cues to get a comprehensive look into the patient's life, including social supports, hygiene, and medication adherence. Telephone presented unique benefits, including greater privacy, feasibility, and ease of use that make it critical to engage with key populations and as a backup for when video was not an option. CONCLUSIONS: Despite challenges, providers reported positive experiences delivering care remotely using both telephone and video during the COVID-19 pandemic and believe both modalities are critical for enabling access to care in the safety net.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Child , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Safety-net Providers , Telephone
10.
Acta Biomed ; 92(S6): e2021441, 2021 10 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504330

ABSTRACT

The direct and indirect stressful effects of COVID-19 lockdown measures adopted to restrict population movements to help curb the epidemic impacted on people's daily lives. Biella is a small Northern Italy province, historically characterized by the presence of an important and once flourishing textile industry. For decades this province has had suicide rates higher than the Piedmonts and Italian average. In two most recent decades a positive correlation between financial stressors, 2008 economic crisis related, and suicide has been found. As the current economic crisis COVID-19 related is expected to exacerbate again the vulnerability to suicide of this province, during the first lockdown the Crisis Center for Suicide Prevention of Biella set up a telephone counselling service. We aimed to evaluate whether it represented a suitable and useful tool for suicidal crisis prevention. Each phone intervention consisted of four phases: (i) psychoeducation, (ii) emotional stabilization, (iii) personal resources identification/reinforcement, (iv) session ending. This service provided a rapid therapeutic response to urgent requests for care, psychological support, and reassurance. It was able to mitigate stress and reinforce resilience in particularly vulnerable populations. The most innovative element of this project was that it proposed interventions for the emotional stabilization, something that is usually used in face-to-face sessions. Using the right protocols, it proved to offer continuity care and reduce pressure on hospital emergency departments while delivering good outcomes and patient satisfaction. Therefore, the COVID-19 pandemic provided an opportunity to overcome normative, technological, and cultural barriers regarding the use of remote healthcare services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adaptation, Psychological , Communicable Disease Control , Counseling , Humans , Preliminary Data , SARS-CoV-2 , Telephone
11.
Neurol India ; 69(5): 1234-1240, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502576

ABSTRACT

Background: Globally, social distancing has been practiced during the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic to prevent the transmission of the virus. One of the measures to ensure social distancing and restricting the movements has been national lockdown, to break the chain of transmission. Telemedicine is a cost-effective measure to provide medical services to remote underserved areas. Objective: The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and acceptability of teleconsultation as an alternative option to in-person consultation in providing continued medical care for neurology patients during the national lockdown period of the COVID-19 pandemic. Materials and Methods: The clinical demographic profile, frequency of different neurological disorders, and treatment details of the patients attending the teleneurology consultation (TNCO) outpatient department (OPD) at Sir Sunderlal Hospital (S.S.H.), Institute of Medical Sciences (I.M.S.), BHU, Varanasi, India, were recorded in a prespecified pro forma. Results: A total of 1,567 patients attended the TNCO OPD over 90 days. The average patient attendance was 35 per day, and 72% were males. Out of these, 77% of patients were from the same district, and the majority of patients (68%) were regularly followed up in-person by the neurology OPD. The most common illness for consultation was epilepsy (19%) followed by low backache and stroke (18% each). The satisfaction rate among the patients with respect to teleservices was high (90%). Conclusion: TNCO seems to be as effective as in-person OPD in the management of neurological disorders. During the lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic, avoiding physical visits through TNCO may reduce the spread of the virus. Parallel tele-OPD with routine OPD is a good option in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy , Neurology , Remote Consultation , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Telephone
12.
Home Health Care Serv Q ; 40(4): 247-261, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1500865

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, older adults experienced great levels of social isolation and feelings of loneliness. We developed a telephone reassurance program, Caring Callers, to provide a weekly phone call to socially isolated older adults. Dyads were created which comprised of a Senior Companion volunteer and a homebound older adult. Using a mixed methods approach, we examined the program's impact on homebound older adults. The participants were satisfied with the program and showed a significant increase in overall health. They discussed social and emotional benefits of the program and other benefits that they gained from community resources. Due to the vulnerability of the participants, this telephone-based intervention seemed feasible without technological barriers. It is critical that aging service providers recognize the resourcefulness and relatability of older adult volunteers and utilize them to continue to support socially isolated older adults during an unprecedented event affecting people's isolation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Humans , Loneliness , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Telephone
16.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(11): e28105, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496823

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the initial months of the COVID-19 pandemic, rapidly rising disease prevalence in the United States created a demand for patient-facing information exchanges that addressed questions and concerns about the disease. One approach to managing increased patient volumes during a pandemic involves the implementation of telephone-based triage systems. During a pandemic, telephone triage hotlines can be employed in innovative ways to conserve medical resources and offer useful population-level data about disease symptomatology and risk factor profiles. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to describe and evaluate the COVID-19 telephone triage hotline used by a large academic medical center in the midwestern United States. METHODS: Michigan Medicine established a telephone hotline to triage inbound patient calls related to COVID-19. For calls received between March 24, 2020, and May 5, 2020, we described total call volume, data reported by callers including COVID-19 risk factors and symptomatology, and distribution of callers to triage algorithm endpoints. We also described symptomatology reported by callers who were directed to the institutional patient portal (online medical visit questionnaire). RESULTS: A total of 3929 calls (average 91 calls per day) were received by the call center during the study period. The maximum total number of daily calls peaked at 211 on March 24, 2020. Call volumes were the highest from 6 AM to 11 AM and during evening hours. Callers were most often directed to the online patient portal (1654/3929, 42%), nursing hotlines (1338/3929, 34%), or employee health services (709/3929, 18%). Cough (126/370 of callers, 34%), shortness of breath (101/370, 27%), upper respiratory infection (28/111, 25%), and fever (89/370, 24%) were the most commonly reported symptoms. Immunocompromised state (23/370, 6%) and age >65 years (18/370, 5%) were the most commonly reported risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: The triage algorithm successfully diverted low-risk patients to suitable algorithm endpoints, while directing high-risk patients onward for immediate assessment. Data collected from hotline calls also enhanced knowledge of symptoms and risk factors that typified community members, demonstrating that pandemic hotlines can aid in the clinical characterization of novel diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hotlines , Aged , Hotlines/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Pandemics , Telephone , Triage , United States
17.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 12: 21501327211051930, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496100

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 pandemic has led to health service modification and temporary disruption of the routine care provided to patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) in primary care. This was done to minimize outpatient visits, permit physical distancing, and ensure patients' and healthcare providers safety. There is no evidence that explored or measured the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on diabetes services and patients' glycemic outcome in Oman. AIM AND OBJECTIVES: To explore the accessibility of DM services in primary care after COVID-19 pandemic announcement, and measure patients' glycemic outcome. METHODS: Before and after, retrospective cohort study using Al-Shifa healthcare database in primary care. One thousand adult patients with diabetes who attended DM clinic before pandemic announcement in 2019 were randomly selected and followed up until end of 2020. Patients aged ≥18 years and had at least 2 visits in 2019 were included. Access to DM services was identified by number of patients received care, frequency of consultations, mode of consultation, and type of intervention given to patients. Patients' glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and other glycemic parameters after pandemic announcement in 2020 were determined and compared with the same parameters before pandemic in 2019. Association between patients' HbA1c and mode of consultation was measured using multivariable regression analysis. RESULTS: A total of 937 patients continued to follow and received DM care after pandemic announcement. Median number of consultations was 2 with interquartile range (IQR): 3-2. 57.4% had face-to-face alone, 32.4% had combined face to face and telephone consultation, and 10% had telephone consultation alone. Mean difference in HbA1c (%) before and after pandemic announcement was 0.2 ± 1.4 (95% CI: 0.1 to 0.3), P = .002. With multivariable linear regression, the mean difference in HbA1c was -0.3 (-2.3 to 1.5), P = .734 for telephone consultation alone, -0.5 (-2.4 to 1.4), P = .613 for face-to-face alone, and -0.5 (-2.4 to 1.3), P = .636 for combined consultations, compared to those who did not receive any formal consultation. CONCLUSION: Despite service modification and disruption of comprehensive care in primary care after COVID-19 pandemic announcement, DM services were accessible as majority of patients maintained follow up. There was an overall increase in mean glycated hemoglobin, however, it was a less than 1 unit increase. After adjusting for multivariable, glycated hemoglobin was reduced among those who received consultation including telephone consultation compared to those who did not, however evidence was unconvincing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Adolescent , Adult , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Humans , Oman , Pandemics , Primary Health Care , Referral and Consultation , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Telephone
18.
Br J Nurs ; 30(17): 1032-1038, 2021 Sep 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450992

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, virtual pre-assessment was introduced for all elective and semi-urgent surgeries to maintain surgical clinical services in the authors' Trust. This mainly involved telephone pre-assessments, although occasionally video technology was used. This had to be managed and maintained at a distance with little or no training or established method. This article includes experiences of staff involved in a single tertiary centre, an assessment of the pros and cons of virtual pre-assessment and concludes with a set of recommendations to enhance the utility of the service for the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Elective Surgical Procedures , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Telephone
19.
Torture ; 31(1): 37-52, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450937

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Freedom from Torture developed remote telephone assessments to provide interim medico-legal reports, ensuring people could obtain medical evidence to support their asylum claim. METHOD: To audit this new way of working, feedback was collected from the doctors, interpreters, individuals being assessed, and senior medical and legal staff who reviewed the reports. This paper presents findings from the first 20 assessments. RESULTS: Individuals assessed reported that the doctor developed good rapport, but in 35% of assessments reported that there were some experiences they felt unable to disclose. In 70% of assessments, doctors felt that rapport was not as good compared to face-to-face. In the majority of assessments, doctors were unable to gain a full account of the torture or its impact. They reported feeling cautious about pressing for more information on the telephone, mindful of individuals' vulnerability and the difficulty of providing support remotely. Nevertheless, in 85% of assessments doctors felt able to assess the consistency of the account of torture with the psychological findings, in accordance with the Istanbul Protocol (United Nations, 2004). Factors that hindered the assessment included the inability to observe body language, the person's ill health, and confidentiality concerns. CONCLUSION: This research indicates that psychological medico-legal reports can safely be produced by telephone assessment, but are more likely to be incomplete in terms of both full disclosure of torture experiences and psychological assessment. The limitations underline the need for a follow-up face-to-face assessment to expand the psychological assessment as well as undertake a physical assessment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Physician-Patient Relations/ethics , Refugees/psychology , Remote Consultation/ethics , Telephone , Torture , Humans , Medical History Taking , Pandemics , Physical Examination , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom/epidemiology
20.
Prof Case Manag ; 26(6): 286-297, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450477

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF STUDY: The specific aims of this study were to examine whether sociodemographic variables and medical-surgical diagnoses were associated with telephone follow-up (TFU) reach rates, emergency department visits, and hospital readmissions. PRIMARY PRACTICE OF SETTING: Acute care inpatient units in an academic medical center. METHODOLOGY AND SAMPLE: A correlational design was utilized, and a prospective medical record review of patients was conducted while implementing face-to-face prehospital discharge meeting interventions. The study sample (N = 176) included adult patients in two neurosurgical wards who were admitted between June 2016 and September 2016. Parametric and nonparametric tests were used to explore the balance between the intervention group receiving a face-to-face prehospital discharge meeting and comparison group receiving standard prehospital discharge care. Bivariate statistics were employed to determine associations between variables. RESULTS: A total of 15 sociodemographic and medical-surgical variables were used to correlate TFU reach rates, emergency department (ED) visits, and readmission rates. Educational attainment (p = .002), employment status (p = .014), parental status (p = .010), and hospital service (p = .039) had significant differences between the intervention and comparison groups. Results demonstrated an improved reach rate for the intervention group but despite the differences in the groups, phi and Cramer's V coefficients did not correlate any associations with TFU reach rate, ED visits, and readmission rates with sociodemographic and surgical variables. This outcome affirmed that despite the similarities and differences in the sample, a face-to-face meeting prehospital discharge is an effective intervention to improve telephone outreach. IMPLICATIONS TO CASE MANAGEMENT PRACTICE: There is a need to determine the most cost-effective way to increase TFU reach rates to prevent subsequent ED visits and hospital readmissions. There is also a need to develop a tool that can predict the hardest-to-reach patients posthospital discharge, so that case managers can meet those patients before leaving the hospital. In addition, it is important to identify alternative methods of "face-to-face" interactions during the COVID-19 pandemic crises. Case managers must explore ways with caution to leverage secured digital technology to bridge the gap of communicating with patients and family members when hospital visitations are limited.


Subject(s)
Community Health Services/organization & administration , Hospitalization , Patient Discharge , Telephone , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies
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