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2.
Menopause ; 29(2): 184-188, 2021 12 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20244811

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate patient satisfaction with telephone appointments during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, determine visit type preference (in-person vs telephone), and predictors of those preferences. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, patient visits during the first wave of COVID-19 (March 20 to July 15, 2020) were characterized (in-person vs telephone) in a single provider's weekly menopause clinic in Toronto, Canada. Patients attending telephone appointments were asked to complete a modified Telemedicine Satisfaction Questionnaire with 5-point Likert-scale responses. Demographic information was collected along with the patient-reported cost to attend an in-person appointment (monetary, travel time, and time away from work). Of those who experienced both visit types, preference was evaluated and bivariate analysis was performed identifying factors associated with visit type preference and included in a multivariable binary logistic regression model. RESULTS: During the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, 214 women had 246 visits, attending mostly by telephone (221/246, 90%). Mean Telemedicine Satisfaction Questionnaire composite score was 4.23 ±â€Š0.72. Of those who attended a prepandemic in-person appointment (118/139, 85%), a minority (24/118, 20%) preferred in-person visits. Those favoring in-person were more likely to commute less than 30 minutes (OR 3.78, 95% CI 1.16-12.29, P = 0.027), require less than 2 hours away from work (OR 4.05, 95% CI 1.07-15.4, P = 0.04), and spend less than $10 to attend (OR 3.67, 95% CI 1.1-12.26, P = 0.035). CONCLUSIONS: Menopause clinic telephone appointments had high patient satisfaction, with most preferring this visit type, although in-person visits are preferred among a minority of women.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Menopause , Patient Satisfaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Telephone
3.
Arch Clin Neuropsychol ; 38(4): 570-585, 2023 May 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2326664

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic necessitated use of remote assessments by clinical neuropsychologists. Telehealth was particularly important for vulnerable groups, including persons living with HIV (PLWH); however, limited internet access can be a serious barrier to care. This study examined the preliminary validity of a telephone-based neuropsychological assessment in a clinical sample of PLWH. METHOD: A consecutive series of 59 PLWH were assessed via telephone at an HIV clinic in the southern U.S. between April 2020 and July 2022. The battery included auditory-verbal neuropsychological tests of memory, attention, and executive functions, and questionnaires assessing self-reported mood and activities of daily living (ADL). RESULTS: Study measures demonstrated acceptable internal consistency. PLWH demonstrated worse neuropsychological performance compared with expectations derived from the normal curve and an HIV-seronegative adult sample (N = 44). PLWH assessed via telephone demonstrated similar impairment rates to that of a consecutive series of PLWH (N = 41) assessed in-person immediately prior to the pandemic. Higher telephone-based global neuropsychological scores were related to younger age, more education, better fund of knowledge, White race/ethnicity, fewer medical conditions, and fewer depression symptoms. Global neuropsychological impairment was strongly and independently associated with greater dependence in ADL domains, particularly for instrumental activities. CONCLUSIONS: Although telephone-based approaches to neuropsychological assessment are not ideal, these data provide support for the feasibility, internal consistency, and preliminary validity of this method in a consecutive clinical series of PLWH. The direct comparability of telephone-based and in-person neuropsychological assessments remains to be determined by prospective, counterbalanced study designs examining both PLWH and seronegative individuals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Adult , Humans , Activities of Daily Living , Prospective Studies , Pandemics , Neuropsychological Tests , HIV Infections/psychology , Telephone
4.
BMC Geriatr ; 23(1): 270, 2023 05 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2322153

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study explored the experience of delivering care remotely among practitioners in a UK geriatric medicine clinic. METHODS: Nine semi-structured interviews were conducted with consultants (n = 5), nurses (n = 2), a speech and language and an occupational therapist, and thematically analysed. RESULTS: Four themes developed; Challenges of remote consultations; Perceived advantages of remote consultations; Disruption of involvement of family members; Impact on care staff. Participants felt that rapport and trust had been more feasible to develop remotely than they had anticipated, although this was more challenging for new patients and those with cognitive or sensory impairments. While practitioners identified advantages of remote consultations, including involving relatives, saving time, and reducing anxiety, they also experienced disadvantages such as consultations feeling like a 'production line', missing visual cues and reduced privacy. Some participants felt their professional identity was threatened by the lack of face-to-face contact, linked to feeling that remote consultations are not suitable for frail older adults or those with cognitive deficits. DISCUSSION: Staff perceived barriers to remote consultations that went beyond practical concerns, and suggest support for building rapport, involving families, and protecting clinician identity and job satisfaction may be warranted.


Subject(s)
Referral and Consultation , Telephone , Humans , Aged , Qualitative Research , Delivery of Health Care
5.
BMJ Open ; 13(5): e063094, 2023 05 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2316170

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: With the COVID-19 pandemic, telemedicine has been increasingly deployed in lieu of face-to-face consultations for management of diabetes in primary care. There was a need to evaluate clinical effectiveness of telephone consultations for diabetes management and this study aimed to show whether one-off telephone consultation was inferior or not to face-to-face consultation in terms of glycaemic control among patients with suboptimally controlled type 2 diabetes. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. Data of all patients with type 2 diabetes who had a chronic disease consultation during the period 9 April 2020-18 September 2020, and met the study's inclusion and exclusion criteria was obtained from the electronic medical records. SETTING: A primary care clinic in the north-eastern region of Singapore. The clinic's patient population was representative of Singapore's population in terms of gender and age. PARTICIPANTS: 644 patients with type 2 diabetes and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) 7.0% and above, aged 21-80 years old. INTERVENTIONS: Participants either underwent telephone or face-to-face consultation for diabetes management. OUTCOME MEASURE: Mean HbA1c change (∆HbA1c) between preintervention and postintervention. RESULTS: Over 4 months, the mean ∆HbA1c was -0.16 percentage points (p.p.) (95% CI -0.26 to -0.07) and -0.11 p.p. (95% CI -0.20 to -0.02) for face-to-face and telephone consultation groups, respectively. The difference in mean ∆HbA1c between the two groups was +0.05 p.p. (95% CI -∞ to 0.16), with the upper limit of the one-sided 95% CI less than the prespecified non-inferiority margin of 0.5 p.p. (p<0.05). In those with HbA1c≥9%, the difference in mean ∆HbA1c was +0.31 p.p. (95% CI -∞ to 0.79), which exceeded the non-inferiority margin. CONCLUSION: For patients with suboptimally controlled type 2 diabetes, one-time telephone consultation was non-inferior to face-to-face consultation in terms of glycaemic control in the short term. However, more studies are required to investigate the long-term effects of telephone consultations and for those with HbA1c≥9%.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Humans , Young Adult , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy , Glycemic Control , Referral and Consultation , Glycated Hemoglobin , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , COVID-19/therapy , Telephone , Treatment Outcome
6.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 14: 21501319231172897, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2313376

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Telehealth has the potential to improve access and timeliness of care, enabling primary care teams to deliver hybrid (virtual/in-person) services that will likely extend beyond the COVID-19 pandemic. To optimize its use and sustainability, it is imperative to understand how primary care teams perceive the suitability of telehealth services, including appropriate choice of mode (telephone or video). However, there is limited research on providers' decision-making processes surrounding telehealth use in primary care, including whether to use telephone or video, which this VA-focused study addresses. We examined how primary care (PC) team members determine whether to use telehealth and the mode of delivery, in the care of patients. METHODS: Qualitative case study that included 15 semi-structured interviews with employees who provided or supported telehealth care at primary care clinics at the Veterans Health Administration. We used a team-based rapid analysis approach to identify experiences using telehealth soon after COVID-19's emergence, consisting of the creation of structured summaries of each transcribed interview. The lead author then identified and compiled themes and sub-themes related to the suitability of telehealth in primary care, as well as associated quotes from transcripts. Resulting themes and quotes were reviewed and validated by 2 members of the project team. RESULTS: Primary care team members considered several factors when assessing both the suitability of telehealth for appointments, and mode of use. They were largely guided by patient-related factors including patient preferences, specific health issues, and access to technology. Additional considerations centered on team members' personal preferences and factors that supported the wellbeing of the team, such as the flexibility to work from home (work-life balance) and protection from infection. Generally, participants viewed the option of both telephone and video telehealth modalities as useful tools in the care of patients although a few respondents emphasized its inferiority to in-person care. CONCLUSIONS: Determining the suitability of telehealth services, including appropriate choice of mode is complex. Its suitability is tied to a variety of factors related to multilevel resources, preferences, and timing. When appropriate, telehealth should be considered a useful tool in the care of patients and for employee well-being.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Humans , Veterans Health , Pandemics , Telephone , Primary Health Care
7.
BMC Res Notes ; 16(1): 74, 2023 May 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2312712

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To examine the use of two coding systems used in the THIN UK primary care research database for the coding of telephone encounters between patient and healthcare professional in primary care. This is relevant to other research databases built on GP clinical systems. Consideration of telephone consultations was particularly important during the COVID-19 pandemic as remote interactions between patient and GP are more numerous than before and are likely to remain at a higher frequency. RESULTS: Telephone encounters could either be indicated by a consultation-type code or by a Read code. All three possible combinations (coded by one method, the other method and both) were in use. In 2014, 30% were coded by the consultation-type, 55% by Read codes and 15% by both. In contrast, in 2000, 77% were coded by the consultation-type, 21% by Read codes and 2% by both. This has important implications because national and regional consultation rates by GPs are often estimated from these research databases by looking only at the consultation-type codes and consequently many encounters will not be detected.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Referral and Consultation , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Telephone , Primary Health Care , United Kingdom
8.
MMW Fortschr Med ; 165(7): 33, 2023 04.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2306638

Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quarantine , Humans , Telephone
9.
Med Educ Online ; 28(1): 2207249, 2023 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2305837

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic diminished opportunities for medical students to gain clinical confidence and the ability to contribute to patient care. Our study sought out to understand the value of telephone outreach to schedule COVID-19 vaccines on medical student education. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty students engaged in telephone outreach targeting patients aged 65+ without active patient portals to schedule COVID-19 vaccines. Data consisted of a single administration retrospective pre/post survey inquiring about what students learned, expectations, other health-care processes that would benefit from outreach, and interest in a population health elective. Likert items were analyzed and open response analysis involved inductive coding and generation of thematic summaries by condensing codes into broader themes. Demographic data of patients called and subsequently received the vaccine were also collected. RESULTS: There were 33 survery respondents. There was a statistically significant increase in net comfortability for pre-clerkship students for documenting in Epic, providing telehealth care, counseling on common health-care myths, having challenging conversations, cold-calling patients, and developing an initial trusting relationship with patients. The majority called and who received the vaccine were non-Hispanic Black, within the high SVI category, and had Medicare and/or Medicaid. Qualitative data showed that students emphasized communication, the role of trusted messengers, the need to be open minded, and meeting patients where they are. DISCUSSION: Engaging students in telephone outreach early in the COVID-19 pandemic provided students the opportunity to develop their skills as physicians-in-training, contribute to combating the ongoing pandemic, and add value to the primary care team. This experience allowed students to practice patience, empathy, and vulnerability to understand why patients had not received the COVID-19 vaccine; this was an invaluable experience that helped students develop the skills to become empathetic and caring physicians, and supports the continued role of telehealth in future medical school curriculum.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , Aged , United States , Humans , Students, Medical/psychology , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Retrospective Studies , Medicare , Curriculum , Telephone , Vaccination
10.
Int J Clin Exp Hypn ; 71(2): 153-164, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2296228

ABSTRACT

Remote hypnotherapy is a treatment that is increasingly being utilized internationally. Its adoption has been accelerated following the COVID-19 pandemic when infection control measures mandated its implementation. Remote hypnotherapy via video, rather than telephone therapy, appears to be more popular and effective, which appears to be acceptable to patients and - compared to face-to-face therapy - has the potential to improve access. In this state-of-the-art article, the authors therefore review the latest literature in this exciting field of remote teletherapy, discussing adoption of video hypnotherapy; its evidence, including efficacy compared to face-to-face therapy; patient satisfaction; advantages and disadvantages of teletherapy; as well as practical considerations and factors that should be considered when deciding on the mode of delivery. They also discuss training implications of the recent developments. Finally, they highlight areas for future research and development. Overall, it is likely that remote hypnotherapy via video platforms is here to stay long term and has potential to become the standard form of therapy worldwide. However, recent data suggest that there may still be a need for face-to-face therapy with patient choice being an important factor.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypnosis , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Satisfaction , Telephone
11.
PLoS One ; 18(4): e0284557, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2295816

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Young children are among the most frequent patients at medical call centers, even though they are rarely severely ill. Respiratory tract symptoms are among the most prevalent reasons for contact in pediatric calls. Triage of children without visual cues and through second-hand information is perceived as difficult, with risks of over- and under-triage. OBJECTIVE: To study the safety and feasibility of introducing video triage of young children with respiratory symptoms at the medical helpline 1813 (MH1813) in Copenhagen, Denmark, as well as impact on patient outcome. METHODS: Prospective quality improvement study including 617 patients enrolled to video or standard telephone triage (1:1) from February 2019-March 2020. Data originated from MH1813 patient records, survey responses, and hospital charts. Primary outcome was difference in patients staying at home eight hours after the call. Secondary outcomes weas hospital outcome, feasibility and acceptability. Adverse events (intensive care unit admittance, lasting injuries, death) were registered. Logistic regression was used to test the effect on outcomes. The COVID-19 pandemic shut the study down prematurely. RESULTS: In total, 54% of the included patients were video-triaged., and 63% of video triaged patients and 58% of telephone triaged patients were triaged to stay at home, (p = 0.19). Within eight and 24 hours, there was a tendency of fewer video-triaged patients being assessed at hospitals: 39% versus 46% (p = 0.07) and 41% versus 49% (p = 0.07), respectively. At 24 hours after the call, 2.8% of the patients were hospitalized for at least 12 hours. Video triage was highly feasible and acceptable (>90%) and no adverse events were registered. CONCLUSION: Video triage of young children with respiratory symptoms at a medical call center was safe and feasible. Only about 3% of all children needed hospitalization for at least 12 hours. Video triage may optimize hospital referrals and increase health care accessibility.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Triage , Humans , Child , Child, Preschool , Prospective Studies , Quality Improvement , Pandemics , Telephone , Hospitals, Pediatric
12.
Dig Dis Sci ; 68(5): 1791-1796, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2302808

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic required an immediate and large-scale transition to telemedicine. Telemedicine includes phone visits and video visits. Studies suggest that hepatocellular cancer (HCC) screening rates fell at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. If left unaddressed, HCC morbidity/mortality may increase following the pandemic due to inadequate screening. AIMS: To assess the impact of phone-only visits on HCC screening rates in patients with cirrhosis. METHODS: Utilizing ICD-10 codes, 2 cohorts of patients with cirrhosis were identified. The pre-pandemic cohort had index visit between 1/1/2019 and 6/30/2019 (n = 290). The pandemic cohort (n = 112) was evaluated between 4/7/2020 and 6/7/2020. Each cohort was followed for 6 months from their index visit to determine HCC screening rate. Demographics and socioeconomic data from the American Community Survey database were compiled and compared between the cohorts. RESULTS: HCC screening rates in the pre-pandemic and pandemic cohorts were 72.4% and 69.6%, respectively, p = 0.67. No differences in HCC screening rates were observed between the two cohorts when stratified by demographic and socioeconomic factors. CONCLUSIONS: Use of phone-only visits was associated with adherence to HCC screening similar to that seen with in-person visits. The lack of influence on screening rates by racial/socioeconomic factors suggest telephone-only visits do not exacerbate healthcare disparities. In times of public health of crisis, telephone-only visits may provide the necessary access to hepatology care to ensure HCC screening regimens remain in-place for at-risk patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular , Liver Neoplasms , Telemedicine , Humans , Early Detection of Cancer , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/epidemiology , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Liver Neoplasms/diagnosis , Liver Neoplasms/epidemiology , Liver Cirrhosis/complications , Liver Cirrhosis/diagnosis , Liver Cirrhosis/epidemiology , Telephone
13.
Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf ; 48(12): 674-681, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2280596

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The rate of patients not keeping their appointments at our children's hospital outpatient pediatric neurology clinic (no-shows) was high. We conducted a quality improvement project to reduce no-show rates and improve operational efficiency. Specifically, we aimed to decrease the new patient no-show mean rate from 7% to 4% at the main campus and from 17% to 12% at the south campus. METHODS: After reviewing the previous literature on this topic and institutional data, we used the simplified failure mode and effects analysis (sFMEA) to identify the key drivers. Of the patients at the main campus who failed to keep their appointment, 84% had not confirmed their appointment. Errors in inpatient/family contact information, limited use of the electronic patient portal, and miscommunication were other key drivers identified. Three Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycles were completed over seven months. The key interventions we implemented were bidirectional text triage, telephone reminders, and promoting the use of the electronic patient portal. A run chart was used to assess the results of these interventions. RESULTS: A statistically significant shift was noted in the run chart for the median rate of no-shows, which declined from 7% to 4% at the main campus and 17% to 10% at the south campus. CONCLUSION: We were able to successfully reduce no-shows among new patients in the neurology clinic. The limitations of our study include unknown external factors, the potential impact of COVID-19, and the brief length of the study.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurology , Text Messaging , Child , Humans , Appointments and Schedules , Telephone , Reminder Systems
17.
J Foot Ankle Surg ; 62(3): 571-575, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2277540

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic has instigated to find alternative methods of assessing and treating patients with foot and ankle disorders. We have implemented virtual telephone clinic consultations along with the face-to-face consultations. It has reduced overcrowding in the busy outpatient waiting area and thus limiting close patient contact. The aim of this study is to audit the patient satisfaction outcomes, assess the feasibility and to find out the potential financial implications of introducing telephone clinic consultations for foot and ankle disorders. A total of 426 patients who had telephone consultations for foot and ankle disorders for a period of 1 year were included. Patients were given individual time slots for the consultations. The patient satisfaction outcomes were assessed using a structured questionnaire. The outcomes following the telephone consultation was audited. The financial cost was calculated for the study period. Following the telephone consultation 35% of the patients were discharged and 36% were given further face to face appointments. 97.5% were very satisfied or satisfied with the methodology and outcomes of the telephone consultation. Ninety-five percent of the patients commented that they would recommend telephone consultations for foot and ankle to their friends and family. The financial savings calculated during the study period was about £25,000 ($30,000). Virtual telephone clinic consultations are safe, efficient and cost effective with good patient satisfaction outcomes. It is an alternative or can be conducted adjunct to face to face consultations with adequate planning, training, good communication skills and proper documentation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Ankle , Telephone , Referral and Consultation , Pandemics
18.
JAMA Netw Open ; 6(3): e235242, 2023 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2260000

ABSTRACT

Importance: After the rapid expansion of telemedicine during the COVID-19 pandemic, there is debate about the role and reimbursement of telephone vs video visits. Missing is an understanding of what type of virtual visits clinicians may offer or patients may choose when given the option. Objective: To evaluate characteristics of Medicare beneficiaries associated with practices and clinicians offering telephone visits only and patients receiving telephone visits only, when both telephone and video were available. Design, Setting, and Participants: This survey study used 2019-2020 nationally representative Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey data. Participants included community-dwelling Medicare beneficiaries with a usual source of medical care who attended a practice offering telemedicine. Data were analyzed from May 3 to August 23, 2022. Main Outcomes and Measures: Multivariable regression analysis was used to identify patient sociodemographic (age, sex, race, ethnicity, educational level, income, English proficiency, housing type, and number living at home), clinical (dementia, mental illness, self-rated health, hearing impairment, and vision impairment), and technology (technology access and prior use of video visits) factors associated with respondents' report of (1) practices offering telephone virtual visits only, (2) being offered telephone visits only when both video and telephone visits were available, and (3) receiving telephone visits only when both video and telephone visits were offered. Results: Of 4691 respondents (representing 27 887 642 Medicare beneficiaries; mean [SD] age, 71.3[8.1] years; 55.0% female) reporting that their practice offered telemedicine, 1234 (23.3% weighted) reported that their practices offered telephone virtual visits only; factors associated with being in a practice offering telephone only included older age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.62 [95% CI, 1.10-2.39] for those aged ≥85 years vs 18-64 years), male sex (aOR, 1.36 [95% CI, 1.12-1.64]), Hispanic ethnicity (aOR, 1.41 [95% CI, 1.03-1.95]), lower income (aOR, 1.89 [95% CI, 1.43-2.49] for those with income ≤100% vs >200% of the federal poverty level), poor self-rated health (aOR, 1.25 [95% CI, 1.01-1.56]), and less technology access (aOR, 2.05 [95% CI, 1.61-2.60] for those with low vs high access). Of the 1593 patients in practices offering both video and telephone visits, 297 (16.7% weighted) were themselves offered telephone visits only; factors associated with being offered telephone only included Hispanic ethnicity (aOR, 1.96 [95% CI, 1.13-3.41]), limited English proficiency (aOR, 3.05 [95% CI, 1.28-7.31]), and less technology access (aOR, 1.68 [95% CI, 1.00-2.81] for those with low vs high access). Finally, of the 711 respondents who were themselves offered both video and telephone visits, 304 (43.1% weighted) had a telephone visit; factors associated with receiving telephone visits only were older age (aOR, 2.68 [95% CI, 1.21-5.92] for those aged 75-84 years vs 18-64 years) and less technology access (aOR, 2.65 [95% CI, 1.12-6.25] for those with moderate vs high access]). Among those who used video calls in other settings and were offered a choice, 122 (28.5%, weighted) chose telephone visits. Conclusions and Relevance: In this survey study of Medicare beneficiaries, respondents often reported being offered or choosing telephone visits even when video visits were available. Study findings suggest that policy makers and clinical leaders should support the use of telephone visits to the extent that telephone is appropriate, while addressing both practice-level and patient-level barriers to video visits.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Medicare , Aged , Humans , Male , Female , United States , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telephone
19.
Ann Med ; 55(1): 1070-1079, 2023 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2265503

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE(S)/INTRODUCTION: TURKOVAC™ is a whole-virion inactivated COVID-19 vaccine, which was developed and recently granted emergency use authorization (conditional marketing authorization) in Türkiye. The objective of this study is to assess the spectrum and the distribution of adverse events reported following the administration of the first 150,000 doses as primary and booster vaccine doses in 22 state hospitals of 17 provinces in Türkiye. PATIENTS/MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this cohort study, a verbal survey was conducted via telephone calls between 10 January and 17 January 2022, utilizing a structured questionnaire algorithm on a sample group of 20,000 persons on the third- and seventh-days following vaccination. The algorithm consisted of two parts focusing on both systemic and local adverse effects. Other adverse events reported by the participants were also recorded. 6023 people and 5345 people agreed to participate in the telephone survey on the 3rd- and 7th- days of having received the first dose of the vaccine, respectively. RESULTS: Thirty-six-point-six percent of the participants on the 3rd day and 22.5% of the participants on the 7th day reported any adverse event following the first dose of the vaccine. On both follow-up days, the most commonly reported (29.7% for Day 3 and 13.1% for Day 7) adverse events were on the injection site. Among the local adverse events, the most frequently reported one was the pain on the injection site (27.9% for Day 3 and 12.4% for Day 7), induration (4.8% for Day 3 and 2.7% for Day 7) and swelling (3.5% for Day 3 and 2.0% for Day 7). Fatigue/weakness (9.6% for Day 3 and 8.3% for Day 7) and headache (7.9% for Day 3 and 8.0% for Day 7) were the most frequent systemic adverse events. Younger age, vaccine dose, and female sex were associated with having any adverse event and pain (on the injection site). Female sex was associated with more swelling (on the injection site), induration (on the injection site), fever, and a higher impact on daily living. CONCLUSION(S): In this study, we conducted a rapid assessment of adverse events following the first dose of the TURKOVAC vaccine. The vaccine appears to have a good safety profile in the first 7 days following vaccination. Younger age, vaccine dose, and female sex are associated with any adverse event and pain (on the injection site). These results present valuable information for the community and may contribute to increasing vaccine confidence.KEY MESSAGESAs a whole-virion inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, the TURKOVAC™ vaccine, which has a favorable safety profile, can be an alternative to other COVID-19 vaccines including mRNA and viral vector vaccines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Antibodies, Viral , Cohort Studies , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Pain , SARS-CoV-2 , Telephone
20.
Gac Sanit ; 37: 102296, 2023.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2264273

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore experiences related to health-oriented behaviours during lockdown in the Spanish resident population from a gender perspective. METHOD: Qualitative research with a critical and feminist approach. Twenty-nine semi-structured interviews (17 women and 12 men) were conducted between June and July 2020 via telephone with people who had previously answered an online survey. The interviews were transcribed and a thematic content analysis was carried out, differentiating between the experiences of women and men. The data were triangulated by the research team. RESULTS: Among women, greater diversity emerged in terms of health behaviours. Among them, the difficult experiences related to COVID-19, the complexity of living together and doing unpaid care work, as well as the importance of support networks, stood out. Among men, there were different attitudes towards sport, self-care and having time for healthy eating were positively valued, and there was a good assessment of coexistence and organisation in household chores. In both men and women, work overload and economic problems were related to emotional distress and difficulties in carrying out healthy activities. CONCLUSIONS: Health-oriented behaviours during lockdown differed according to gender. They were mostly limited to COVID-19 experiences, socio-economic conditions and burden of care. It is essential to tailor public health and primary care programmes according to people's life moments, taking into account their social context and questioning traditional gender roles.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Behavior , Quarantine , Stress, Physiological , Humans , Male , Female , Spain/epidemiology , Quarantine/psychology , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Sex Factors , Qualitative Research , Telephone , Interviews as Topic , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diet, Healthy/psychology , Self Care/psychology , Sports/psychology , Workload/psychology , Financial Stress/psychology , Public Health , Psychosocial Support Systems
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