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1.
J Med Genet ; 59(12): 1179-1188, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2193899

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Germline genetic testing affords multiple opportunities for women with breast cancer, however, current UK NHS models for delivery of germline genetic testing are clinician-intensive and only a minority of breast cancer cases access testing. METHODS: We designed a rapid, digital pathway, supported by a genetics specialist hotline, for delivery of germline testing of BRCA1/BRCA2/PALB2 (BRCA-testing), integrated into routine UK NHS breast cancer care. We piloted the pathway, as part of the larger BRCA-DIRECT study, in 130 unselected patients with breast cancer and gathered preliminary data from a randomised comparison of delivery of pretest information digitally (fully digital pathway) or via telephone consultation with a genetics professional (partially digital pathway). RESULTS: Uptake of genetic testing was 98.4%, with good satisfaction reported for both the fully and partially digital pathways. Similar outcomes were observed in both arms regarding patient knowledge score and anxiety, with <5% of patients contacting the genetics specialist hotline. All progression criteria established for continuation of the study were met. CONCLUSION: Pilot data indicate preliminary demonstration of feasibility and acceptability of a fully digital pathway for BRCA-testing and support proceeding to a full powered study for evaluation of non-inferiority of the fully digital pathway, detailed quantitative assessment of outcomes and operational economic analyses. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ISRCTN87845055.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , Referral and Consultation , Humans , Female , State Medicine , Telephone , Genetic Testing , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/genetics , United Kingdom
2.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord ; 24(5)2022 Sep 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2163863

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess user perception regarding different aspects of the telepsychiatry process.Methods: This cross-sectional survey study was conducted between July and September 2020 with follow-up patients attending teleconsultation at a tertiary care center (N = 108). The online survey included questions about the user's experience such as the appointment process and different aspects of teleconsultation, as well as perceived benefits, difficulties experienced, and suggestions for improvement. The sociodemographic and clinical data were retrieved from the electronic record.Results: The majority of patients expressed satisfaction with teleconsultation. The patients who were living far from the center (> 100 km) and those with psychotic illness favored telepsychiatry. Patients with nonpsychotic illnesses reported significantly less satisfaction with counseling in teleconsultation.Conclusions: The findings substantiate the acceptance of telepsychiatry services and emphasize the need for a tailor-made hybrid form of consultation as per the patient's profile.


Subject(s)
Psychiatry , Remote Consultation , Telemedicine , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Patient Satisfaction , Perception , Telephone
3.
Ir J Med Sci ; 191(6): 2459-2460, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2148949
4.
Rural Remote Health ; 22(4): 7196, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2146089

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Remote consultations help reduce contact between people and prevent cross-contamination. Little is known about the changes in consultation in European rural primary care during the SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic. The purpose of this mixed-methods cross-sectional study was to find out more about the effects of the pandemic on changes in patient consultations in European rural primary care. METHODS: A key informant survey from 16 member countries of the European Rural and Isolated Practitioners Association (EURIPA) was undertaken using a self-developed questionnaire. The steering committee of this project, called EURIPA Covid-19 study, developed a semi-structured questionnaire with 68 questions, 21 of which included free-text comments. Proportions were calculated for dichotomized or categorized data, and means were calculated for continuous data. Multivariate analysis by logistic regression model was used to assess the association of multiple variables. RESULTS: A total of 406 questionnaires from primary care providers (PCPs) in 16 European countries were collected; 245 respondents (60.5%) were females, 152 PCPs were rural (37.5%), 124 semi-rural (30.5%). Mean age of the respondents was 45.9 years (standard deviation (SD) 11.30) while mean seniority (length of experience) was 18.2 years (SD 11.6). A total of 381 (93.8%) respondents were medical doctors. Significant differences were found between countries in adopting alternative arrangements to face-to-face consultation: remote teleconsultation is well appreciated by both healthcare professionals and patients, but the most common way of remote consultation remains telephone consultation. A factor significantly inversely associated with the adoption of video consultation was the seniority of the PCP (odds ratio 1.19, 95% confidence interval 1.02-1.40, p=0.03). CONCLUSION: Telephone consultation is the most common form of remote consultation. The adoption of video-consultation is inversely related to the seniority of the informants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Remote Consultation , Telemedicine , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Telephone , Telemedicine/methods
5.
Front Public Health ; 10: 894128, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2142313

ABSTRACT

Background: During the COVID-19 pandemic, protective measures have been prescribed to prevent or slow down the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 virus and protect the population. Individuals follow these measures to varying degrees. We aimed to identify factors influencing the extent to which protective measures are adhered to. Methods: A cross-sectional survey (telephone interviews) was undertaken between April and June 2021 to identify factors influencing the degree to which individuals adhere to protective measures. A representative sample of 1,003 people (age >16 years) in two Austrian states (Carinthia, Vorarlberg) was interviewed. The questionnaire was based on the Health Belief Model, but also included potential response-modifying factors. Predictors for adherent behavior were identified using multiple regression analysis. All predictors were standardized so that regression coefficients (ß) could be compared. Results: Overall median adherence was 0.75 (IQR: 0.5-1.0). Based on a regression model, the following variables were identified as significant in raising adherence: higher age (ß = 0.43, 95%CI: 0.33-0.54), social standards of acceptable behavior (ß = 0.33, 95%CI: 0.27-0.40), subjective/individual assessment of an increased personal health risk (ß = 0.12, 95%CI: 0.05-0.18), self-efficacy (ß = 0.06, 95%CI: 0.02-0.10), female gender (ß = 0.05, 95%CI: 0.01-0.08), and low corona fatigue (behavioral fatigue: ß = -0.11, 95%CI: -0.18 to -0.03). The model showed that such aspects as personal trust in institutions, perceived difficulties in adopting health-promoting measures, and individual assessments of the risk of infection, had no significant influence. Conclusions: This study reveals that several factors significantly influence adherence to measures aimed at controlling the COVID-19 pandemic. To enhance adherence, the government, media, and other relevant stakeholders should take the findings into consideration when formulating policy. By developing social standards and promoting self-efficacy, individuals can influence the behavior of others and contribute toward coping with the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Telephone , Fatigue/epidemiology
6.
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak ; 22(1): 302, 2022 Nov 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139265

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Telemedicine is increasingly relied upon for care delivery in primary care, but the impact of visit type on clinical ordering behavior is uncertain. METHODS: Within Kaiser Permanente Northern California, we identified patients who self-scheduled and completed telemedicine encounters with their personal primary care provider or another available primary care provider in the same medical group, between April 1st, 2020, and October 31st, 2020, while physical distancing restrictions for COVID-19 were in place. We collected patient sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, measures of technology access, and categorized the most common primary encounter diagnoses. We measured proportions of patient-scheduled video versus telephone visits for each of eight diagnosis groups (Skin & Soft Tissue, Musculoskeletal Pain, Back Pain, General Gastrointestinal, Hypertension & Diabetes, Mental Health, Upper Respiratory, and Abdominal Pain), and compared physician orders for medications, antibiotics, lab and imaging studies by visit type within each diagnosis group. RESULTS: There were 273,301 included encounters, with 86,676 (41.5%) video visits and 122,051 (58.5%) telephone visits. Of the diagnosis groups, Skin & Soft Tissue conditions had the highest proportion of video visits (59.7%), while Mental Health conditions had the highest proportion of telephone visits (71.1%). After adjusting for covariates, the overall rates of medication orders (46.6% vs. 44.5%), imaging orders (17.3% vs. 14.9%), lab orders (19.5% vs. 17.2%), and antibiotic orders (7.5% vs. 5.2%) were higher during video visits as compared to telephone visits (p < 0.05). The largest difference within diagnosis groups was for Skin & Soft Tissue conditions, where the rate of medication orders was 9.1% higher than during video visits than telephone visits (45.5% vs. 36.5%, p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: We observed statistically significant differences in clinician orders by visit type during telemedicine encounters for common primary care conditions. Our findings suggest that, for certain conditions, visual information conveyed during video visits may promote clinical work-up and treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Humans , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Telephone , Primary Health Care
7.
BMC Complement Med Ther ; 22(1): 292, 2022 Nov 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119479

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Belief in complementary and alternative medicine practices is related to reduced preparedness for vaccination. This study aimed to assess home remedy awareness and use in South Tyrol, where vaccination rates in the coronavirus pandemic were lowest in Italy and differed between German- and Italian-speaking inhabitants. METHODS: A population-based survey was conducted in 2014 and analyzed using descriptive statistics, multiple logistic regression, and latent class analysis. RESULTS: Of the representative sample of 504 survey respondents, 357 (70.8%) participants (43.0% male; primary language German, 76.5%) reported to use home remedies. Most commonly reported home remedies were teas (48.2%), plants (21.0%), and compresses (19.5%). Participants from rural regions were less likely (odds ratio 0.35, 95% confidence interval 0.19-0.67), while female (2.62, 1.69-4.10) and German-speaking participants (5.52, 2.91-9.88) were more likely to use home remedies. Latent classes of home remedies were "alcoholic home remedies" (21.4%) and "non-alcohol-containing home remedies" (78.6%). Compared to the "non-alcohol-containing home remedies" class, members of the "alcoholic home remedies" class were more likely to live in an urban region, to be male and German speakers. CONCLUSION: In addition to residence and sex, language group membership associates with awareness and use of home remedies. Home remedies likely contribute to socio-cultural differences between the language groups in the Italian Alps. If the observed associations explain the lower vaccination rates in South Tyrol among German speakers requires further study.


Subject(s)
Complementary Therapies , Medicine, Traditional , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telephone
8.
J Telemed Telecare ; 28(10): 733-739, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108475

ABSTRACT

In Australia, the COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in the exponential growth in the delivery of telehealth services. Medicare data indicates that the majority of telehealth consultations have used the telephone, despite the known benefits of using video. The aim of this study was to understand the perceived quality and effectiveness of in-person, telephone and videoconsultations for cancer care. Data was collected via online surveys with consumers (n = 1162) and health professionals (n = 59), followed by semi-structured interviews with telehealth experienced health professionals (n = 22) and consumers (n = 18). Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and significance was tested using the chi-square test. A framework analysis and thematic analysis were used for qualitative data. Results indicate telehealth is suitable for use across the cancer care pathway. However, consumers and health professionals perceived videoconsultations facilitated visual communication and improved patients' quality of care. The telephone was appropriate for short transactional consultations such as repeat prescriptions. Consumers were rarely given the choice of consultation modality. The choice of modality depended on a range of factors such as the type of consultation and stage of cancer care. Hybrid models of care utilising in-person, video and telephone should be developed and requires further guidance to promote the adoption of telehealth in cancer care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Telemedicine , Aged , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Pandemics , Referral and Consultation , Telephone , National Health Programs , Telemedicine/methods , Neoplasms/therapy
9.
J Telemed Telecare ; 28(10): 750-756, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108474

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The primary aim was to compare the successful completion rates of pre-treatment medication history consults conducted by pharmacists with patients either via an unscheduled telephone consult (current standard care) or a scheduled videoconference consult model. Secondary aims were to examine pharmacist perceptions of the telephone and videoconference consults and explore patient (+/- support person) perceptions of videoconference consults. METHOD: Completion data were collected and compared for the two modalities. In addition, pharmacists commented on any positive/negative factors impacting all consults. For the final 35 participants completing a videoconference consult, patients, support people, and pharmacists involved, completed a survey exploring perceptions and satisfaction. RESULTS: A significantly higher completion rate (p < 0.0001) was found for the videoconferencing model, with 94% (76 of 81) completed successfully compared to 72% (76 of 105) of the unscheduled telephone consults. Pharmacists reported multiple factors impacting the success of the telephone consults including scheduling issues and patient factors. Survey responses revealed that 100% of patients/support people and 82% of pharmacists reported satisfaction with videoconference consults. Surveyed participants noted some technical issues, however, the 'ability to show/view medication containers and/or labels' and 'convenience of scheduled time' were benefits of the videoconference model. DISCUSSION: Results indicate that pre-treatment medication history consults should be offered via videoconference to maximise success.


Subject(s)
Neoplasms , Pharmacists , Humans , Videoconferencing , Telephone , Medical History Taking
10.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0276982, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098770

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic was associated with far-reaching changes all over the world. Health care systems were and are also affected. Little is known about the impact of these changes and the duration of the pandemic on people with mental disorders. The aim of this longitudinal follow-up study was to investigate the mental health status, medical care provision, and attitudes towards the pandemic of these people at the end of the second pandemic lockdown in Germany in 2021, and to compare these findings with the results of 2020. METHODS: People with mental disorders currently receiving treatment in the psychiatric outpatient department of the University Hospital Leipzig, Germany, were asked about depressive symptoms (PHQ-9), self-reported medical care provision, attitudes and social and emotional aspects of the pandemic (social support [ESSI], perceived stress [PSS-4], loneliness [UCLA-3-LS], and resilience [BRS]) using structured telephone interviews. RESULTS: In total, N = 75 participants who had already participated in the first survey in 2020 took part in the follow-up telephone interviews. The most frequent clinician-rated diagnoses were attention deficit disorder/attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (n = 21; 28.0%) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (n = 16; 21.3%). In comparison to 2020, a significantly higher proportion of participants reported no problems in receiving medical care provision. Compared to the previous year, the resilience of the participants had significantly decreased. Depressive symptoms, social support, perceived stress, and loneliness remained stable. Significantly more participants felt restricted by the pandemic-related government measures in 2021 than in 2020. CONCLUSIONS: This study highlights the importance for continued efforts to maintain stable medical care provision for people with mental disorders during the COVID-19 pandemic, as except for a decrease in resilience, mental health status remained stable. Nonetheless there is still a need for continued treatment to stabilise and improve this status.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Outpatients , Follow-Up Studies , Communicable Disease Control , Qualitative Research , Telephone
11.
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med ; 28(1): 80, 2020 Aug 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098373

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Rapid access to emergency medical communication centers (EMCCs) is pivotal to address potentially life-threatening conditions. Maintaining public access to EMCCs without delay is crucial in case of disease outbreak despite the significant increased activity and the difficulties to mobilize extra staff resources. The aim of our study was to assess the impact of two-level filtering on EMCC performance during the COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: A before-after monocentric prospective study was conducted at the EMCC at the Nantes University Hospital. Using telephone activity data, we compared EMCC performance during 2 periods. In period one (February 27th to March 11th 2020), call takers managed calls as usual, gathering basic information from the caller and giving first aid instructions to a bystander on scene if needed. During period two (March 12th to March 25th 2020), calls were answered by a first-line call taker to identify potentially serious conditions that required immediate dispatch. When a serious condition was excluded, the call was immediately transferred to a second-line call taker who managed the call as usual so the first-line call taker could be rapidly available for other incoming calls. The primary outcome was the quality of service at 20 s (QS20), corresponding to the rate of calls answered within 20 s. We described activity and outcome measures by hourly range. We compared EMCC performance during periods one and two using an interrupted time series analysis. RESULTS: We analyzed 45,451 incoming calls during the two study periods: 21,435 during period 1 and 24,016 during period 2. Between the two study periods, we observed a significant increase in the number of incoming calls per hour, the number of connected call takers and average call duration. A linear regression model, adjusted for these confounding variables, showed a significant increase in the QS20 slope (from - 0.4 to 1.4%, p = 0.01), highlighting the significant impact of two-level filtering on the quality of service. CONCLUSIONS: We found that rapid access to our EMCC was maintained during the COVID-19 pandemic via two-level filtering. This system helped reduce the time gap between call placement and first-line call-taker evaluation of a potentially life-threatening situation. We suggest implementing this system when an EMCC faces significantly increased activity with limited staff resources.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Communication , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Emergencies , Emergency Medical Service Communication Systems/organization & administration , Emergency Medical Services/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Triage/methods , COVID-19 , Controlled Before-After Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Telephone
12.
Ir J Psychol Med ; 38(2): 132-139, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096524

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been a shift globally from face-to-face consultations to remote consultations. In our department, remote consultations have taken in the form of telephone consultations. In this paper, we set out to study a group of Irish psychiatrists' experience of these consultations. METHODS: We identified recurrent themes in the existing literature on doctors' experience of telephone consultations with a view to determining the applicability of these themes to a group of Irish psychiatrists. A questionnaire was developed based on themes in the literature. This was sent to all psychiatrists working in a busy psychiatric service in Dublin. RESULTS: The questionnaire response rate was 72% (n = 26/35). Diagnostic challenges, the effect of phone consultation on the therapeutic alliance, challenges associated with the use of technology and ethical concerns were identified as issues. Flexibility in the working day and convenience were identified as possible benefits to telephone consultations. CONCLUSIONS: The group that participated in this research study identified a number of challenges to carrying out successful phone consultations. This study highlights the need at our clinical site for interventions to address the issues identified by staff. The findings also highlight the requirement for larger studies with stronger methodologies to determine the generalisability of our results.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychiatry , Remote Consultation , Humans , Outpatients , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Telephone
13.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 8(11): e40977, 2022 Nov 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079997

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Contact tracing is an important public health tool for curbing the spread of infectious diseases. Effective and efficient contact tracing involves the rapid identification of individuals with infection and their exposed contacts and ensuring their isolation or quarantine, respectively. Manual contact tracing via telephone call and digital proximity app technology have been key strategies in mitigating the spread of COVID-19. However, many people are not reached for COVID-19 contact tracing due to missing telephone numbers or nonresponse to telephone calls. The New York City COVID-19 Trace program augmented the efforts of telephone-based contact tracers with information gatherers (IGs) to search and obtain telephone numbers or residential addresses, and community engagement specialists (CESs) made home visits to individuals that were not contacted via telephone calls. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the contribution of information gathering and home visits to the yields of COVID-19 contact tracing in New York City. METHODS: IGs looked for phone numbers or addresses when records were missing phone numbers to locate case-patients or contacts. CESs made home visits to case-patients and contacts with no phone numbers or those who were not reached by telephone-based tracers. Contact tracing management software was used to triage and queue assignments for the telephone-based tracers, IGs, and CESs. We measured the outcomes of contact tracing-related tasks performed by the IGs and CESs from July 2020 to June 2021. RESULTS: Of 659,484 cases and 861,566 contact records in the Trace system, 28% (185,485) of cases and 35% (303,550) of contacts were referred to IGs. IGs obtained new phone numbers for 33% (61,804) of case-patients and 11% (31,951) of contacts; 50% (31,019) of the case-patients and 46% (14,604) of the contacts with new phone numbers completed interviews; 25% (167,815) of case-patients and 8% (72,437) of contacts were referred to CESs. CESs attempted 80% (132,781) of case and 69% (49,846) of contact investigations, of which 47% (62,733) and 50% (25,015) respectively, completed interviews. An additional 12,192 contacts were identified following IG investigations and 13,507 following CES interventions. CONCLUSIONS: Gathering new or missing locating information and making home visits increased the number of case-patients and contacts interviewed for contact tracing and resulted in additional contacts. When possible, contact tracing programs should add information gathering and home visiting strategies to increase COVID-19 contact tracing coverage and yields as well as promote equity in the delivery of this public health intervention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Contact Tracing , Humans , Contact Tracing/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Quarantine , Telephone , Public Health
14.
PLoS One ; 17(10): e0273492, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079732

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic triggered a rapid shift towards telephone consultations (TC) in the out-patient clinic setting with little knowledge of the consequences. The aims of this study were to evaluate patient-centred experiences with TC, to describe patterns in clinical outcomes from TC and to pinpoint benefits and drawbacks associated with this type of consultations. METHODS: This mixed methods study combined an analysis of quantitative and qualitative data. A quantitative, retrospective observational study was conducted employing data from all 248 patients who received TC at an out-patient cardiology clinic during April 2020 with a one-month follow-up. Semi-structured interviews were conducted; Ten eligible patients were recruited from the outpatient clinic by purposive sampling. RESULTS: Within the follow-up period, no patients died or were acutely hospitalised. Approximately one in every four patients was transferred to their general practitioner, while the remaining three-quarter of the patients had a new examination or a new consultation planned. The cardiologist failed to establish contact with more than a fifth of the patients, often due to missing phone numbers. Ten patients were interviewed. Five themes emerged from the interviews: 1) Knowing an estimated time of the consultation is essential for patient satisfaction, 2) TC are well perceived when individually adapted, 3) TC can be a barrier to patient questions, 4) Video consultations should only be offered to patients who request it, and 5) Prescriptions or instructions made via TC do not cause uncertainty in patients. CONCLUSIONS: The TC program was overall safe and the patients felt comfortable. Crucial issues include precise time planning, the patient's availability on the phone and a correct phone number. Patients stressed that TC are unsuitable when addressing sensitive topics. A proposed visitation tool is presented.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiology , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Referral and Consultation , Pandemics , Telephone , Ambulatory Care Facilities
15.
Can J Urol ; 29(5): 11307-11311, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2073248

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic teleconsultation was allowed as an insured service in the province of Quebec, Canada. We assessed the preferences of vasectomized patients for a pre-vasectomy consultation conducted in-person or by telephone. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In September 2021, we sought the participation of 214 men who had their pre-vasectomy consultation over the phone to complete an anonymous three-item survey on their preferred modality for pre-vasectomy consultation. They completed their questionnaire in the waiting room of the vasectomy clinic just after the surgical procedure. We calculated the proportion and 95% confidence interval [CI] of patients preferring each modality. We assessed the difference in preference according to the distance between hometown and vasectomy clinic (< 25 km, 25-50 km, and > 50 km) with Fisher's exact test. RESULTS: Participation rate was 98% (n = 209/214). Most patients would have preferred telephone over in-person pre-vasectomy consultation if they had been given a choice (96%; 95% CI 92% to 98%), if they had had to recommend a modality to a friend (95%; 95% CI 91% to 98%), and if they had had to do a pre-vasectomy consultation again (prefer or no preference; total 97%; 95% CI 94% to 99%). Distance between hometown and vasectomy clinic did not significantly influence their preferences (p > 0.29 for each of the three items). CONCLUSIONS: Vasectomized men preferred having pre-vasectomy consultation by telephone instead of in person. If maintained as an insured service after the COVID-19 pandemic, Canadian physicians offering vasectomy services should consider making this service available to their patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vasectomy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Canada , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Referral and Consultation , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telephone
16.
Int J Med Inform ; 168: 104885, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2069137

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Leading influencing factors for telemedicine implementation remain unclear, affecting the focus of intervention strategies. Despite recent effectiveness evidence of video telemedicine visits, limited evidence exists regarding patients' willingness to use video follow-up. Moreover, patients' acceptance is crucial for implementing such services. OBJECTIVE: We conducted a large-sample survey to analyze patient willingness and perceptions of post-discharge video follow-up and assessed the factors influencing their willingness during the COVID-19 outbreak. METHOD: In February and March 2022, we conducted a face-to-face questionnaire survey involving inpatients in a tertiary care hospital in Longhua District, Shenzhen, China. We assessed demographics, health-related determinants, access to technology and literacy, preferences, willingness, and opinions toward video telemedicine follow-up. We implemented random forest and logistic regression analyses to obtain reliable results. RESULTS: In total, 1,017 inpatients completed the survey. Overall, as an initial choice, 44.9 % preferred telephone consultation for post-discharge follow-up, which was followed by video telemedicine (17.1 %), WeChat voice calls (11.6 %), SMS text messages (10.7 %), WeChat graphic messages (10.5 %), and in-person visits (4.5 %). Moreover, 54.9 % were willing to experience video visits. The results highlight the perceived benefits outweighing the risks (OR 2.64, 95 % CI 1.76, 3.95), patients' trust in the physician (OR 2.41, 95 % CI 1.45, 3.99), access to a private space (OR 2.18, 95 % CI 1.01, 2.96), medium geographical distance (compared to long distance, OR 0.72, 95 % CI 0.54, 0.98), moderate disease (compared to mild disease, OR 0.75, 95 % CI 0.57, 0.99), followed by the comfort with video technology (OR 1.73, 95 % CI 1.76, 3.95), broadband internet accessibility (OR 1.56, 95 % CI 1.07, 2.27), privacy concerns (OR 0.62, 95 % CI 0.43, 0.89), and prior telemedicine video experience (OR 1.77, 95 % CI 1.15, 2.72), as factors influencing the willingness to use video follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: A low percentage of patients chose video visits as their initial decisions; nevertheless, most had a positive attitude toward video follow-up visits. The willingness to choose video telemedicine post-discharge follow-up was influenced by geographical distance, disease severity, basic telemedicine requirements, physician-patient relationship, and perceptions of video communication.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Referral and Consultation , Patient Discharge , Aftercare , Follow-Up Studies , Telephone , COVID-19/epidemiology , Telemedicine/methods
17.
Eur J Oncol Nurs ; 61: 102228, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2068913

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aimed to explore the cancer care experiences of people living with and beyond cancer during COVID-19 in Ireland. METHODS: The study adopted a longitudinal qualitative design using semi-structured interviews with sixteen participants. Interviews were undertaken on three occasions over six months (January-June 2021). The National Comprehensive Cancer Network Distress Thermometer (NCCN DT), and Connor-Davidson-Resilience Scale (CD-RISC2) were also used as part of the interviews to measure distress and resilience. Thematic analysis of interview data was conducted and participants' self-rating for distress and resilience was analysed using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Sixteen patients participated. The findings revealed participants' constant fear of COVID-19 over time and efforts to stay safe by following the 'rules'. Isolation was a common experience as COVID-19 restrictions resulted in being alone when attending the hospital for treatment and limited support from family and friends. Telephone follow-up was limited in terms of support and patients' opportunity to ask questions. For a minority, COVID-19 restrictions meant they were 'not missing out'. On average, participants reported moderate to high levels of resilience at all time points. Distress scores were low but trended upwards from T1 to T2. CONCLUSIONS: The findings highlight the need to avoid restrictions on carers accompanying their close relatives to the hospital for treatment. An evaluation of the effects of the rapid introduction of telephone follow-up on patient outcomes is warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Humans , Qualitative Research , Caregivers , Telephone , Neoplasms/therapy
18.
Z Psychosom Med Psychother ; 68(3): 283-296, 2022 Oct.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2067274

ABSTRACT

Objectives: During their domestic quarantine, Covid-19 patients face major physical, psychological and social challenges. The description of support needs and specific topics brought to supportive conversations will be used to add to the body of knowledge about stressors and resources. Methods: A total of 109 telephone conversations with 69 quarantined Corona patients were documented by psychotherapists and physicians at Heidelberg University Hospital from November 2020 to April 2021. Subsequently, clinical documentations were analyzed according to a qualitative content analysis. Results: Most physical complaints related to cardio-respiratory symptoms (29 %), previous illnesses (24 %), and exhaustion or fatigue (16 %). On the psychological level, patients reported mainly anxiety (31 %) and depressive symptoms (16 %). On a social level, patients described stress related to family (56 %), work (20 %), and time in quarantine (16 %). Social support, individual coping strategies, a positive prognosis on the course of the corona disease, psychotherapy, and satisfactory medical care were mentioned as relieving factors. Therapeutic interventions aimed at stabilization and consisted of psychoeducation, relaxation techniques, and general counseling. Conclusions: The study shows that physical complaints, psychological symptoms, and social factors are brought into telephone support conversations. The support offer met a high demand and was well accepted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quarantine , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Psychophysiologic Disorders , Quarantine/psychology , Telephone
19.
JAMA Netw Open ; 5(10): e2236298, 2022 10 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2059209

ABSTRACT

Importance: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic prompted policy changes to allow increased telehealth delivery of buprenorphine, a potentially lifesaving medication for opioid use disorder (OUD). It is unclear how characteristics of patients who access different treatment modalities (in-person vs telehealth, video vs telephone) vary, and whether modality is associated with retention-a key indicator of care quality. Objectives: To compare patient characteristics across receipt of different treatment modalities and to assess whether modality was associated with retention during the year following COVID-19-related policy changes. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the national Veterans Health Administration. Participants included patients who received buprenorphine for OUD during March 23, 2020, to March 22, 2021. Analyses examining retention were stratified by buprenorphine initiation time (year following COVID-19-related changes; prior to COVID-19-related changes). Exposures: Patient characteristics; treatment modality (at least 1 video visit, at least 1 telephone visit but no video, only in-person). Main Outcomes and Measures: Treatment modality; 90-day retention. Results: Among 17 182 patients, 7094 (41.3%) were aged 30 to 44 years and 6251 (36.4%) were aged 45 to 64 years; 15 835 (92.2%) were male, 14 085 (82.0%) were White, and 16 292 (94.8%) were non-Hispanic; 6547 (38.1%) had at least 1 video visit, 8524 (49.6%) had at least 1 telephone visit but no video visit, and 2111 (12.3%) had only in-person visits. Patients who were younger, male, Black, unknown race, Hispanic, non-service connected, or had specific mental health/substance use comorbidities were less likely to receive any telehealth. Among patients who received telehealth, those who were older, male, Black, non-service connected, or experiencing homelessness and/or housing instability were less likely to have video visits. Retention was significantly higher for patients with telehealth compared with only in-person visits regardless of initiation time (for initiated in year following COVID-19-related changes: adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.31; 95% CI, 1.12-1.53; for initiated prior to COVID-19-related changes: aOR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.08-1.39). Among patients with telehealth, higher retention was observed in those with video visits compared with only telephone for patients who initiated in the year following COVID-19 (aOR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.26-1.71). Conclusions and Relevance: In this cross-sectional study, many patients accessed buprenorphine via telephone and some were less likely to have any video visits. These findings suggest that discontinuing or reducing telephone access may disrupt treatment for many patients, particularly groups with access disparities such as Black patients and those experiencing homelessness. Telehealth was associated with increased retention for both new and continuing patients.


Subject(s)
Buprenorphine , COVID-19 , Opioid-Related Disorders , Buprenorphine/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Opiate Substitution Treatment , Opioid-Related Disorders/drug therapy , Opioid-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Pandemics , Telephone
20.
Rev Med Chil ; 150(3): 302-308, 2022 Mar.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2055641

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During sanitary emergencies such as the recent pandemic, health services can collapse. In these cases, remote orientation services such as call centers may help to debottleneck these services. AIM: To assess the demand and problem resolution of a clinical guidance telephone service during the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The call registry between May and August 2020 of an orientation call center for COVID-19 was analyzed. The number of calls, sociodemographic features of callers, type of enquiry and given indications were described. RESULTS: We analyzed 1,278 telephone calls, corresponding to 655 people. Sixty nine percent of queries were resolved during the call and in 31% of calls, users were referred to face-to-face evaluation. Two percent of these referrals were to an emergency service. CONCLUSIONS: The call center had a high level of resolution, favoring remote consultation and reducing face-to-face care, improving users'accessibility.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Call Centers , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Referral and Consultation , Telephone
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