Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 177
Filter
1.
BMJ Open ; 12(4): e058981, 2022 Apr 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784837

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The global cancer burden is a major public health problem. Cancer rehabilitation is an essential component of survivorship care for preventing complications, decreasing symptoms and improving functional quality of life (QOL). In addition to pre-existing challenges, the COVID-19 pandemic has greatly affected cancer rehabilitation programmes and their delivery to patients. This comprehensive systematic review will assess the efficacy and safety of telerehabilitation on functional outcomes and QOL in patients with cancer and survivors. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This study was conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Protocols. The following key electronic bibliographic databases will be searched from their inception to April 2021: MEDLINE, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro). We will include randomised controlled trials (RCTs) published in English that examine the effects of telerehabilitation programmes on patients with cancer and survivors. The terms 'telerehabilitation', 'neoplasm', 'RCT' and their analogous terms will be used in our search strategy. Two reviewers will independently complete the study screening, selection, data extraction and quality rating. The PEDro scale will be used to assess the methodological quality of the included studies. Narrative or quantitative synthesis will be conducted on the basis of the final data. The planned start and end dates for the study are 1 March 2021 and 1 May 2022, respectively. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval will not be required for this review, and the results will be disseminated in peer-reviewed journals. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42021243467.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Telerehabilitation , Humans , Quality of Life , Research Design , Review Literature as Topic , Survivors , Systematic Reviews as Topic
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 Mar 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785634

ABSTRACT

Older adults are vulnerable towards cognitive frailty that can lead to adverse health outcomes and telerehabilitation appears to be a potential platform to reverse cognitive frailty among older adults. The aim of this coping review is to identify the usage of telerehabilitation and its common platform of delivery among older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or cognitive frailty (CF). Articles published from January 2015 until October 2020 were selected. Out of the 1738 articles retrieved, six studies were identified. Two articles were randomized controlled trials, one was a pilot study and three were qualitative studies. The outcome suggests that telerehabilitation may improve the quality of life among participants as well as it can be a useful and supportive digital platform for health care. Some types of technologies commonly used were smartphones or telephones with internet, television-based assistive integrated technology, mobile application and videoconference. Telerehabilitation utilization in managing cognitive frailty among older adults is still limited and more research is required to evaluate its feasibility and acceptability. Although telerehabilitation appears to be implemented among older adults with MCI and CF, some social support is still required to improve the adherence and effectiveness of telerehabilitation. Future research should focus on the evaluation of acceptance and participants' existing knowledge towards telerehabilitation to achieve its target.


Subject(s)
Cognitive Dysfunction , Frailty , Telerehabilitation , Aged , Cognition , Cognitive Dysfunction/psychology , Humans , Pilot Projects , Quality of Life , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
4.
Front Public Health ; 10: 831762, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753420

ABSTRACT

Telerehabilitation provides Veteran patients with necessary rehabilitation treatment. It enhances care continuity and reduces travel time for Veterans who face long distances to receive care at a Veterans Health Administration (VHA) medical facility. The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic necessitated a sudden shift to telehealth-including telerehabilitation, where a paucity of data-driven guidelines exist that are specific to the practicalities entailed in telerehabilitation implementation. This paper explicates gains in practical knowledge for implementing telerehabilitation that were accelerated during the rapid shift of VHA healthcare from out-patient rehabilitation services to telerehabilitation during the COVID-19 pandemic. Group and individual interviews with 12 VHA rehabilitation providers were conducted to examine, in-depth, the providers' implementation of telerehabilitation. Thematic analysis yielded nine themes: (i) Willingness to Give Telerehabilitation a Chance: A Key Ingredient; (ii) Creativity and Adaptability: Critical Attributes for Telerehabilitation Providers; (iii) Adapting Assessments; (iv) Adapting Interventions; (v) Role and Workflow Adaptations; (vi) Appraising for Self the Feasibility of the Telerehabilitation Modality; (vii) Availability of Informal, In-Person Support Improves Feasibility of Telerehabilitation; (viii) Shifts in the Expectations by the Patients and by the Provider; and (ix) Benefit and Anticipated Future of Telerehabilitation. This paper contributes an in-depth understanding of clinical reasoning considerations, supportive strategies, and practical approaches for engaging Veterans in telerehabilitation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Telerehabilitation , Humans , Pandemics , Veterans Health
6.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 70(3): 1030, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742830

Subject(s)
Telerehabilitation , Eye , Humans
8.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 70(3): 1026-1029, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1715913

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The COVID-19 pandemic imposed challenges to access rehabilitation intervention to individuals with visual impairment, thereby increasing their disability effects. This study explored the viability maintaining the continuum of care through telerehabilitation. Methods: This study is a retrospective analysis of individuals with vision impairment who underwent telerehabilitation at the center of excellence in eye care at Hyderabad, Telangana, India, between April and September 2020. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health framework was followed to provide services such as counseling for mental well-being, information and resources, educational interventions, Assistive Technology programs, therapeutic interventions for children with multiple disabilities, access to digital audio books and rehabilitation helpline.A team of professionals involved in the service care. Phone and what's app calls were used to facilitate the training.The duration and the number of training sessions were individual need-based with an average of 45 minutes per session and 175 training sessions. Results: Three hundred and fifty individuals and their families benefited. The service include early intervention (n = 129), and low vision care (n = 176) inclusive of computer training (n = 53), soft skills (n = 53), digital books (n = 55).Nearly two-thirds of the participants were male (n = 205). Conclusion: Evidence from this study suggests telerehabilitation as a successful model of care.A well-planned telerehabilitation approach can expand the scope of reaching the visually impaired from geographically isolated areas where scarcity of service providers and service centers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telerehabilitation , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Rev. colomb. cardiol ; 28(4): 360-365, jul.-ago. 2021.
Article in Spanish | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1698946

ABSTRACT

Resumen La rehabilitación cardiaca es un tratamiento valioso para pacientes con enfermedades cardiacas establecidas, y en general para personas con riesgo cardiovascular elevado. La prescripción de la rehabilitación cardiaca debe ser progresiva y con metas individualizadas. Tradicionalmente se inicia en entornos hospitalarios luego de eventos cardiovasculares agudos y se continúa de manera ambulatoria en instituciones de menor complejidad. Se realizó una revisión no sistemática de la literatura sobre la evolución de la rehabilitación cardiaca en el tiempo, su relevancia en el cuidado de los pacientes con enfermedad cardiovascular, las diferentes modalidades en la prestación de este servicio con la tendencia a la rehabilitación cardiaca en casa y la telerrehabilitación, y su transformación acelerada durante la pandemia de COVID-19. Es fundamental garantizar la continuidad en el acceso, así como la suficiente participación de los pacientes en programas remodelados de rehabilitación cardiaca, capaces de transgredir hábitos en la prestación del servicio y de superar las barreras que puede representar la situación actual para la entrega de una atención de alta calidad.


Abstract Cardiac rehabilitation is a valuable treatment for patients with established heart disease, and in general, for people with high cardiovascular risk. The prescription of cardiac rehabilitation must be progressive and with individualized goals. Traditionally, it is performed in hospital settings after an acute cardiovascular event and it's continued as outpatient basis in less complex institutions. A non-systematic review of literature was conducted in terms of the evolution of cardiac rehabilitation over time, it's relevance in cardiovascular disease patient's care, different access modalities, including the evolving tendency towards home based cardiac rehabilitation and tele-rehabilitation, as well as its accelerated transformation during the COVID-19 pandemics. It is essential to guarantee continuity of access as well as sufficient participation of patients in restructured cardiac rehabilitation programs, capable of surpassing service delivery habits and overcoming the barriers that the current situation may represent for the delivery of a high-quality care.


Subject(s)
Humans , Cardiac Rehabilitation , COVID-19 , Disease , Telerehabilitation
10.
Sensors (Basel) ; 22(3)2022 Jan 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686936

ABSTRACT

Rapid growth of personal electronics with concurrent research into telerehabilitation solutions discovers opportunities to redefine the future of orthopedic rehabilitation. After joint injury or operation, convalescence includes free active range of movement exercises, such as joints bending and straightening under medical supervision. Flexion detection through wearable textile sensors provides numerous potential benefits such as: (1) reduced cost; (2) continuous monitoring; (3) remote telerehabilitation; (4) gamification; and (5) detection of risk-inducing activities in daily routine. To address this issue, novel piezoresistive multi-walled carbon nanotubes/graphite/styrene-butadiene-styrene copolymer (CNT/Gr/SBS) fiber was developed. The extrusion process allowed adjustable diameter fiber production, while being a scalable, industrially adapted method of manufacturing textile electronics. Composite fibers were highly stretchable, withstanding strains up to 285%, and exhibited exceptional piezoresistive parameters with a gauge factor of 91.64 for 0-100% strain range and 2955 for the full scope. Considering the composite's flexibility and sensitivity during a series of cyclic loading, it was concluded that developed Gr/CNT/SBS fibers were suitable for application in wearable piezoresistive sensors for telerehabilitation application.


Subject(s)
Graphite , Nanotubes, Carbon , Telerehabilitation , Wearable Electronic Devices , Electric Conductivity , Humans
11.
J Integr Neurosci ; 21(1): 8, 2022 Jan 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1687835

ABSTRACT

We report on our remote speech therapy experience in post-stroke aphasia. The aim was to test the feasibility and utility of telerehabilitation to support future randomized controlled trials. Post-stroke aphasia is a common and disabling speech disorder, which significantly affects patients' and caregivers' health and quality of life. Due to COVID-19 pandemic, most of the conventional speech therapy approaches had to stop or "switch" into telerehabilitation procedures to ensure the safety of patients and operators but, concomitantly, the best rehabilitation level possible. Here, we planned a 5-month telespeech therapy programme, twice per week, of a patient with non-fluent aphasia following an intracerebral haemorrhage. Overall, treatment adherence based on the operator's assessments was high, and incomplete adherence for technical problems occurred very rarely. In line with the patient's feedback, acceptability was also positive, since he was constantly motivated during the sessions and the exercises performed autonomously, as confirmed by the speech therapist and caregiver, respectively. Moreover, despite the sequelae from the cerebrovascular event, evident in some writing tests due to the motor deficits in his right arm and the disadvantages typical of all telepractices, more relevant results were achieved during the telerehabilitation period compared to those of the "face-to-face" therapy before the COVID-19 outbreak. The telespeech therapy performed can be considered successful and the patient was able to return to work. Concluding, we support it as a feasible approach offering patients and their families the opportunity to continue the speech and language rehabilitation pathway, even at the time of pandemic.


Subject(s)
Aphasia/rehabilitation , Stroke Rehabilitation/methods , Stroke/complications , Telerehabilitation , Aphasia/etiology , COVID-19 , Humans , Language Therapy/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Speech Therapy/methods , Treatment Outcome
12.
Stroke ; 53(3): e90-e91, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1673586

ABSTRACT

Despite evidence-based guidelines,1 stroke rehabilitation remains underutilized, particularly among women and minorities.2 Telerehabilitation is a promising alternative to traditional in-person rehabilitation and offers a novel strategy to overcome access barriers,3 which intensified during the COVID-19 pandemic.4 A broadband connection is a prerequisite for its wide adoption but its availability varies across the United States (https://broadbandnow.com/national-broadband-map). Little is known about demographic and geographic variation in internet use among stroke survivors. In this study, we sought to compare internet use in a nationally representative sample of individuals with and without stroke.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stroke Rehabilitation , Stroke , Telerehabilitation , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Internet Use , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/epidemiology , Survivors , United States/epidemiology
13.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(1): e34657, 2022 01 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662537

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: An understanding of the technology acceptance of home-based cardiac telerehabilitation programs is paramount if they are to be designed and delivered to target the needs and preferences of patients with coronary heart disease; however, the current state of technology acceptance of home-based cardiac telerehabilitation has not been systematically evaluated in the literature. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to provide a comprehensive summary of home-based cardiac telerehabilitation technology acceptance in terms of (1) the timing and approaches used and (2) patients' perspectives on its usability, utility, acceptability, acceptance, and external variables. METHODS: We searched PubMed, CENTRAL, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Scopus (inception to July 2021) for English-language papers that reported empirical evidence on the technology acceptance of early-phase home-based cardiac telerehabilitation in patients with coronary heart disease. Content analysis was undertaken. RESULTS: The search identified 1798 studies, of which 18 studies, with 14 unique home-based cardiac telerehabilitation programs, met eligibility criteria. Technology acceptance (of the home-based cardiac telerehabilitation programs) was mostly evaluated at intra- and posttrial stages using questionnaires (n=10) and usage data (n=11). The least used approach was evaluation through qualitative interviews (n=3). Usability, utility, acceptability, and acceptance were generally favored. External variables that influenced home-based cardiac telerehabilitation usage included component quality, system quality, facilitating conditions, and intrinsic factors. CONCLUSIONS: Home-based cardiac telerehabilitation usability, utility, acceptability, and acceptance were high; yet, a number of external variables influenced acceptance. Findings and recommendations from this review can provide guidance for developing and evaluating patient-centered home-based cardiac telerehabilitation programs to stakeholders and clinicians.


Subject(s)
Coronary Disease , Telerehabilitation , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires , Technology
14.
BMJ Open ; 12(1): e058932, 2022 01 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613014

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Respiratory rehabilitation is the use of exercise, education, and behavioural interventions to alleviate symptoms and improve quality of life. Recent studies highlight that respiratory rehabilitation is effective and safe for patients with COVID-19. We aim to evaluate the effectiveness and feasibility of respiratory telerehabilitation on patients infected with COVID-19 by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: PubMed, Web of Science, Science Direct, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Google Scholar and Cochrane Library databases will be searched from inception to the end of November 2021. Randomised controlled trials investigating the effectiveness of telerehabilitation in the management of COVID-19 will be included. The primary outcomes will be functional capacity, cardiopulmonary exercise tests and quality of life. Secondary outcomes will include anxiety/depression level, sleep quality, mortality rate, completion rate, reason for withdrawal, adverse events, service satisfaction, cost-effectiveness and other potential factors. Two reviewers will independently screen and extract data and perform quality assessment of included studies. The Cochrane risk of bias tool will be used to assess risk of bias. Review Manager V.5.4 (Cochrane Collaboration) software will be used for statistical analysis. Heterogeneity will be analysed using I² statistics. Mean difference or standardised mean difference with 95% CI and p value will be used to calculate treatment effect for outcome variables. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval is not required because this systematic review and meta-analysis is based on previously published data. Final result will be published in peer-reviewed journal and presented at relevant conferences and events. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42021287975.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telerehabilitation , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Systematic Reviews as Topic
15.
Am J Phys Med Rehabil ; 100(12): 1148-1151, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604793

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this observational study was to report the experience of a 1-yr home training with functional electrical stimulation cycling of a person with T4 American Impairment Scale A paraplegia for 9 yrs, homebound due to the COVID-19 health crisis. The 40-yr-old participant had a three-phase training: V1, isometric stimulation; V2, functional electrical stimulation cycling for 3 sessions/wk; and V3, functional electrical stimulation cycling for 2-4 sessions/wk. Data on general and physical tolerance, health impact, and performance were collected. Borg Scale score relating to fatigue was 10.1 before training and 11.8 after training. The average score for satisfaction at the end of sessions was 8.7. Lean leg mass increased more than 29%, although total bone mineral density dropped by 1.6%. The ventilatory thresholds increased from 19.5 to 29% and the maximum ventilatory peak increased by 9.5%. Rosenberg's Self-esteem Scale score returned to its highest level by the end of training. For the only track event on a competition bike, the pilot covered a distance of 1607.8 m in 17 mins 49 secs. When functional electrical stimulation cycling training is based on a clear and structured protocol, it offers the person with paraplegia the opportunity to practice this activity recreationally and athletically. In times of crisis, this training has proven to be very relevant.


Subject(s)
Bicycling/physiology , Electric Stimulation Therapy/methods , Exercise Therapy/methods , Paraplegia/rehabilitation , Telerehabilitation/methods , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Male , Paraplegia/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Single-Case Studies as Topic , Treatment Outcome
17.
Rev Cardiovasc Med ; 22(4): 1143-1155, 2021 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598363

ABSTRACT

Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Increased rates of morbidity and mortality have led to the increased need for the implementation of secondary prevention interventions. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) represents a multifactorial intervention, including elements of physical exercise and activity, education regarding healthy lifestyle habits (smoking cessation, nutritional habits), to improve the physical capacity and psychological status of cardiac patients. However, participation rates in CR programs remain low due to socioeconomic, geographical and personal barriers. Recently the COVID-19 pandemic restrictions have added another barrier to CR programs. Therefore there is an emerging need to further improve the types and methods of implementing CR. Cardiac telerehabilitation, integrating advanced technology for both monitoring and communicating with the cardiac population, appears to be an innovative CR alternative that can overcome some of the barriers preventing CR participation. This review paper aims to describe the background and core components of center-based CR and cardiac telerehabilitation, and discuss their implications for present day clinical practice and their future perspectives.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiac Rehabilitation , Telerehabilitation , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
18.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 12: 21501319211067674, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593923

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is increasingly recognized as having significant long-term impact on physical and mental health. The Primary Care Wellbeing Service (PCWBS) in Bradford District Care NHS Foundation Trust (BDCFT) is a psychology-led specialist interdisciplinary team of health professionals specializing in persistent physical symptoms (PPS) and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS)/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) with an emphasis on holistic integrated care. The PCWBS quickly recognized the risk of the long-term effects of COVID-19, particularly for social, health and care staff, and developed a 7-week virtual rehabilitation course which was piloted in October 2020. The "Recovering from COVID" course takes a whole system, biopsychosocial approach to understanding COVID-19 and post-viral fatigue (PVF) and is delivered by an interdisciplinary team consisting of a clinical psychologist, physiotherapist, occupational therapist, dietitian, speech and language therapist, assistant psychologist, and a personal support navigator with support from a team administrator. The course focuses on understanding PVF, sleep optimization, nutrition, swallowing, activity management, energy conservation, stress management, breathing optimization, managing setbacks, and signposting to appropriate resources and services. Since the pilot, PCWBS has delivered 7 courses to support over 200 people suffering from post-COVID-19 syndrome. One hundred and forty-nine individuals that enrolled on the "Recovering from COVID" course completed the EQ-5D-5L to assess Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) across 5 dimensions, including problems with mobility, self-care, usual activities, pain/discomfort, and anxiety/depression. Subsequently, 76 individuals completed these measures at the end of the rehabilitation course showing that patient ratings were significantly improved. In response to the NIHR recommendation for rapid evaluation of different service models for supporting people with post-COVID-19 syndrome, this data offers hope that rehabilitation is effective in reversing some of the problems faced by people living with the long-term effects of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telerehabilitation , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Clin Cardiol ; 45(1): 31-41, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1589153

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Center-based cardiac rehabilitation (CBCR) improves health outcomes but has some limitations. We designed and validated a telerehabilitation system to overcome these barriers. METHODS: We included 67 low-risk acute coronary syndrome patients in a randomized controlled trial allocated 1:1 to a 10-month cardiac telerehabilitation (CTR) program or an 8-week CBCR program. Patients underwent ergospirometry, blood tests, anthropometric measurements, IPAQ, PREDIMED, HADS, and EQ-5D questionnaires at baseline and 10 months. Data collectors were blinded to the treatment groups. RESULTS: The intention-to-treat analysis included 31 patients in the CTR group and 28 patients in the CBCR group. The primary outcome showed increased physical activity according to the IPAQ survey in the CTR group compared to the CBCR group (median increase 1726 METS-min/week vs. 636, p = .045). Mean VO2max increased 1.62 ml/(kg min) (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.56-2.69, p < .004) from baseline in the CTR group, and 0.60 mL/(kg min) (p = .40) in the CBCR group. Mean apoB/apoA-I ratio decreased 0.13 (95% CI: -0.03 to 0.24, p = .017) in the CTR group, with no significant change in the CBCR group (p = .092). The median non-HDL cholesterol increased by 7.3 mg/dl (IQR: -2.4 to 18.6, p = .021) in the CBCR group, but the increase was not significant in the CTR group (p = .080). Adherence to a Mediterranean diet, psychological distress, and quality of life showed greater improvement in the CTR group than in the CBCR group. Return-to-work time was reduced with the telerehabilitation strategy. CONCLUSION: This system allows minimal in-hospital training and prolonged follow-up. This strategy showed better results than CBCR.


Subject(s)
Acute Coronary Syndrome , Cardiac Rehabilitation , Telerehabilitation , Acute Coronary Syndrome/diagnosis , Humans , Quality of Life , Surveys and Questionnaires
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL