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1.
Rev. costarric. cardiol ; 22(2)dic. 2020.
Article in Spanish | LILACS-Express | ID: biblio-1389007

ABSTRACT

Resumen La pandemia mundial producto del coronavirus que causa la enfermedad (COVID-19) ha ocasionado un gran impacto a nivel mundial y en los programas de rehabilitación cardíaca tradicional (RCT). En la actualidad, se debe promover que los pacientes con enfermedades cardiovasculares (ECV) se mantengan haciendo ejercicio físico a pesar de la pandemia. Objetivo: Analizar la evidencia científica sobre rehabilitación cardíaca domiciliar (RCD) y RCT en la seguridad del paciente y su eficacia en la mejora del volumen de oxígeno máximo (VO2máx) y capacidad funcional en pacientes con ECV. Metodología: Se desarrolló mediante los lineamientos PRISMA. Se realizó la búsqueda de artículos en las bases de datos: "PubMed", "ScienceDirect", "Academic Search Ultimate" y "SportDiscus". Se utilizó el término de búsqueda: ("heart disease" OR "cardiac disease" OR "coronary artery disease" OR "heart failure") AND ("cardiac rehabilitation" OR "center based" OR "exercise" OR "training") AND ("home based" OR "home training" OR "home exercise") NOT ("animal"). Resultados: Se analizaron un total de 1516 estudios de los cuales se incluyeron 21 artículos. La muestra fue de 1316 pacientes con ECV. Existe una prevalencia de eventos adversos de 3.8% en la RCD y de 4.3% en RCT. El VO2máx aumentó entre 4.1% a 39.6% utilizando la RCD y entre 4% y 54.1% con RCT. La capacidad funcional incrementó entre 3.0% y 11.7% con RCD y entre 4.9% y 11.8% con RCT. Conclusiones: Los programas de RCD son tan seguros y eficaces como los programas de RCT manifestando incrementos similares en el VO2máx y la capacidad funcional.


Abstract Home cardiac rehabilitation as an alternative in times of pandemic: a systematic review The worldwide pandemic caused by the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has produced global health, economic and social impact, as well in traditional cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs. Patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) should be encouraged to keep doing exercise, despite the pandemic. Objective: To analyze the scientific evidence on home-based CR (HBCR) and traditional CR (TRC) in patient safety and its efficacy in improving the maximum oxygen volume (VO2max) and functional capacity in patients with CVD. Methods: This systematic review was developed through PRISMA agreements. The scientific articles were searched using the electronic databases: "PubMed", "ScienceDirect", "Academic Search Ultimate" and "SportDiscus". Two search terms or Boolean phrase were used: ("heart disease" OR "cardiac diseases" OR "coronary artery disease" OR "heart failure") AND ("cardiac rehabilitation" OR "center-based" OR "exercise" OR "training") AND ("home-based" OR "home training" OR "home exercise") NOT ("animal"). Results: A total of 1516 studies were reviewed where 21 articles were included and 1316 patients with CVD that met inclusion criteria. The prevalence of adverse events was 3.8% in HCR and 4.3% in TCR. VO2max increased from 4.1% to 39.6% with HCR and between 4.0% to 54.1% with TCR. Functional capacity increased between 3.0% to 11.7% with HCR and between 4.9% and 11.8% withTCR. Conclusions: This scientific evidence shows that HBCR programs are as safe and effective as TCR programs providing similar improving effects on increasing VO2max and functional capacity and offering a great exercise alternative during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Humans , Telerehabilitation/instrumentation , Cardiac Rehabilitation/methods , Pandemics , COVID-19
2.
Sensors (Basel) ; 22(9)2022 May 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35591203

ABSTRACT

Intensive balance and coordination training is the mainstay of treatment for symptoms of impaired balance and mobility in individuals with hereditary cerebellar ataxia. In this study, we compared the effects of home-based balance and coordination training with and without vibrotactile SA for individuals with hereditary cerebellar ataxia. Ten participants (five males, five females; 47 ± 12 years) with inherited forms of cerebellar ataxia were recruited to participate in a 12-week crossover study during which they completed two six-week blocks of balance and coordination training with and without vibrotactile SA. Participants were instructed to perform balance and coordination exercises five times per week using smartphone balance trainers that provided written, graphic, and video guidance and measured trunk sway. The pre-, per-, and post-training performance were assessed using the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA), SARAposture&gait sub-scores, Dynamic Gait Index, modified Clinical Test of Sensory Interaction in Balance, Timed Up and Go performed with and without a cup of water, and multiple kinematic measures of postural sway measured with a single inertial measurement unit placed on the participants' trunks. To explore the effects of training with and without vibrotactile SA, we compared the changes in performance achieved after participants completed each six-week block of training. Among the seven participants who completed both blocks of training, the change in the SARA scores and SARAposture&gait sub-scores following training with vibrotactile SA was not significantly different from the change achieved following training without SA (p>0.05). However, a trend toward improved SARA scores and SARAposture&gait sub-scores was observed following training with vibrotactile SA; compared to their pre-vibrotacile SA training scores, participants significantly improved their SARA scores (mean=-1.21,  p=0.02) and SARAposture&gait sub-scores (mean=-1.00,  p=0.01). In contrast, no significant changes in SARA scores and SARAposture&gait sub-scores were observed following the six weeks of training without SA compared to their pre-training scores immediately preceding the training block without vibrotactile SA (p>0.05). No significant changes in trunk kinematic sway parameters were observed as a result of training (p>0.05). Based on the findings from this preliminary study, balance and coordination training improved the participants' motor performance, as captured through the SARA. Vibrotactile SA may be a beneficial addition to training regimens for individuals with hereditary cerebellar ataxia, but additional research with larger sample sizes is needed to assess the significance and generalizability of these findings.


Subject(s)
Cerebellar Ataxia , Gait Disorders, Neurologic , Physical Therapy Modalities , Sensation Disorders , Adult , Cerebellar Ataxia/etiology , Cerebellar Ataxia/therapy , Cross-Over Studies , Feedback , Female , Gait , Gait Disorders, Neurologic/therapy , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Postural Balance , Self Care , Sensation Disorders/therapy , Smartphone/instrumentation , Telerehabilitation/instrumentation , Touch , Vibration
3.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0261220, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34910786

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Functional exercise is crucial for breast cancer patients after surgery, and the use of virtual reality technology to assist patients with postoperative upper limb functional rehabilitation has gradually attracted the attention of researchers. However, the usability of the developed rehabilitation system is still unknown to a large extent. The purpose of this study was to develop a virtual reality upper limb rehabilitation system for patients after breast cancer surgery and to explore its usability. METHODS: We built a multidisciplinary team based on virtual reality and human-computer interaction technology and designed and developed an upper limb function rehabilitation system for breast cancer patients after surgery. Breast cancer patients were recruited from a grade III-a general hospital in Changchun city for the experiment. We used the System Usability Scale to evaluate the system availability, the Presence Questionnaire scale to measure the immersive virtual reality scene, and the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire subjective measurement scale for simulator sickness symptoms. RESULTS: This upper limb rehabilitation system hardware consisted of Head-mounted Display, a control handle and notebook computers. The software consisted of rehabilitation exercises and game modules. A total of 15 patients were tested on this system, all of whom were female. The mean age was 54.73±7.78 years, and no patients were excluded from the experiment because of adverse reactions such as dizziness and vomiting. The System Usability Scale score was 90.50±5.69, the Presence Questionnaire score was 113.40±9.58, the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire-nausea score was 0.93±1.16, the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire-oculomotor score was 0.80±1.27, the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire-disorientation score was 0.80±1.27, and the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire total score was 2.53±3.40. CONCLUSIONS: This study fills in the blanks regarding the upper limb rehabilitation of breast cancer patients based on virtual reality technology system usability research. As the starting point of research in the future, we will improve the system's function and design strictly randomized controlled trials, using larger samples in the promotion, to evaluate its application in breast cancer patients with upper limbs and other physiological functions and the feasibility and effects of rehabilitation.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/rehabilitation , Exercise Therapy/methods , Telerehabilitation/methods , Adult , China , Exergaming , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Pilot Projects , Software , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telerehabilitation/instrumentation , Upper Extremity/physiology , User-Computer Interface , Virtual Reality
4.
J Neuroeng Rehabil ; 18(1): 66, 2021 04 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33882949

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Manual treadmill training is used for rehabilitating locomotor impairments but can be physically demanding for trainers. This has been addressed by enlisting robots, but in doing so, the ability of trainers to use their experience and judgment to modulate locomotor assistance on the fly has been lost. This paper explores the feasibility of a telerobotics approach for locomotor training that allows patients to receive remote physical assistance from trainers. METHODS: In the approach, a trainer holds a small robotic manipulandum that shadows the motion of a large robotic arm magnetically attached to a locomoting patient's leg. When the trainer deflects the manipulandum, the robotic arm applies a proportional force to the patient. An initial evaluation of the telerobotic system's transparency (ability to follow the leg during unassisted locomotion) was performed with two unimpaired participants. Transparency was quantified by the magnitude of unwanted robot interaction forces. In a small six-session feasibility study, six individuals who had prior strokes telerobotically interacted with two trainers (separately), who assisted in altering a targeted gait feature: an increase in the affected leg's swing length. RESULTS: During unassisted walking, unwanted robot interaction forces averaged 3-4 N (swing-stance) for unimpaired individuals and 2-3 N for the patients who survived strokes. Transients averaging about 10 N were sometimes present at heel-strike/toe-off. For five of six patients, these forces increased with treadmill speed during stance (R2 = .99; p < 0.001) and increased with patient height during swing (R2 = .71; p = 0.073). During assisted walking, the trainers applied 3.0 ± 2.8 N (mean ± standard deviation across patients) and 14.1 ± 3.4 N of force anteriorly and upwards, respectively. The patients exhibited a 20 ± 21% increase in unassisted swing length between Days 1-6 (p = 0.058). CONCLUSIONS: The results support the feasibility of locomotor assistance with a telerobotics approach. Simultaneous measurement of trainer manipulative actions, patient motor responses, and the forces associated with these interactions may prove useful for testing sensorimotor rehabilitation hypotheses. Further research with clinicians as operators and randomized controlled trials are needed before conclusions regarding efficacy can be made.


Subject(s)
Exercise Therapy/instrumentation , Robotics/instrumentation , Stroke Rehabilitation/instrumentation , Telerehabilitation/instrumentation , Adult , Aged , Exercise Therapy/methods , Feasibility Studies , Female , Gait Disorders, Neurologic/rehabilitation , Humans , Locomotion/physiology , Male , Middle Aged , Robotics/methods , Stroke Rehabilitation/methods , Telerehabilitation/methods
5.
J Neuroeng Rehabil ; 18(1): 48, 2021 03 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33726801

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: HoMEcare aRm rehabiLItatioN (MERLIN) is an unactuated version of the robotic device ArmAssist combined with a telecare platform. Stroke patients are able to train the upper limb function using serious games at home. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of MERLIN training on the upper limb function of patients with unilateral upper limb paresis in the chronic phase of stroke (> 6 months post stroke). METHODS: Patients trained task specific serious games for three hours per week during six weeks using an unactuated version of a robotic device. Progress was monitored and game settings were tailored through telerehabilitation. Measurements were performed six weeks pre-intervention (T0), at the start (T1), end (T2) and six weeks post-intervention (T3). Primary outcome was the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT). Secondary outcomes were other arm function tests, quality of life, user satisfaction and motivation. RESULTS: Twelve patients were included, ten completed the training. From start of the intervention to six weeks follow up, WMFT improved significantly with 3.8 points (p = .006), which is also clinically relevant. No significant changes in quality of life were observed. Patients were overall satisfied with the usability of the device. Comfort and the robustness of the system need further improvements. CONCLUSION: Patients in the chronic phase of stroke significantly improved their upper limb function with the MERLIN training at home. Trial registration This study is registered at the Netherlands Trial Register (NL7535). Registered 18-02-2019, https://www.trialregister.nl/trial/7535 .


Subject(s)
Robotics/instrumentation , Stroke Rehabilitation/instrumentation , Telerehabilitation/instrumentation , Video Games , Aged , Arm/physiopathology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Quality of Life , Robotics/methods , Stroke Rehabilitation/methods , Telerehabilitation/methods , Treatment Outcome , Upper Extremity/physiopathology
6.
J Healthc Eng ; 2021: 6680762, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33628406

ABSTRACT

Out of all the changes to our daily life brought by the COVID-19 pandemic, one of the most significant ones has been the limited access to health services that we used to take for granted. Thus, in order to prevent temporary injuries from having lingering or permanent effects, the need for home rehabilitation device is urgent. For this reason, this paper proposes a cable-driven device for limb rehabilitation, CUBE2, with a novel end-effector (EE) design and autotuning capabilities to enable autonomous use. The proposed design is presented as an evolution of the previous CUBE design. In this paper, the proposed device is modelled and analyzed with finite element analysis. Then, a novel vision-based control strategy is described. Furthermore, a prototype has been manufactured and validated experimentally. Preliminary test to estimate home position repeatability has been carried out.


Subject(s)
Home Care Services , Telerehabilitation , Algorithms , Biomechanical Phenomena , COVID-19 , Calibration/standards , Equipment Design , Humans , Robotics/instrumentation , SARS-CoV-2 , Telerehabilitation/instrumentation , Telerehabilitation/methods , Telerehabilitation/standards
7.
J Neuroeng Rehabil ; 18(1): 41, 2021 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33622344

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Neuroscience and neurotechnology are transforming stroke rehabilitation. Robotic devices, in addition to telerehabilitation, are increasingly being used to train the upper limbs after stroke, and their use at home allows us to extend institutional rehabilitation by increasing and prolonging therapy. The aim of this study is to assess the usability of the MERLIN robotic system based on serious games for upper limb rehabilitation in people with stroke in the home environment. METHODS: 9 participants with a stroke in three different stages of recovery (subacute, short-term chronic and long-term chronic) with impaired arm/hand function, were recruited to use the MERLIN system for 3 weeks: 1 week training at the Maimonides Biomedical Research Institute of Cordoba (IMIBIC), and 2 weeks at the patients' homes. To evaluate usability, the System Usability Scale (SUS), Adapted Intrinsic Motivation Inventory (IMI), Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with assistive Technology (QUEST), and the ArmAssist Usability Assessment Questionnaire were used in the post-intervention. Clinical outcomes for upper limb motor function were assessed pre- and post-intervention. RESULTS: 9 patients participated in and completed the study. The usability assessment reported a high level of satisfaction: mean SUS score 71.94 % (SD = 16.38), mean QUEST scale 3.81 (SD = 0.38), and mean Adapted IMI score 6.12 (SD = 1.36). The results of the ArmAssist Questionnaire showed an average of 6 out of 7, which indicates that MERLIN is extremely intuitive, easy to learn and easy to use. Regarding clinical assessment, the Fugl-Meyer scores showed moderate improvements from pre- to post-intervention in the total score of motor function (p = 0.002). There were no significant changes in the Modified Ashworth scale outcomes (p = 0.169). CONCLUSIONS: This usability study indicates that home-based rehabilitation for upper limbs with the MERLIN system is safe, useful, feasible and motivating. Telerehabilitation constitutes a major step forward in the use of intensive rehabilitation at home. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04405609. Registered 06 January 2020-Retrospectively registered, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04405609.


Subject(s)
Robotics/instrumentation , Stroke Rehabilitation/instrumentation , Telerehabilitation/instrumentation , Video Games , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Exercise Therapy/instrumentation , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Satisfaction , Recovery of Function , Stroke Rehabilitation/methods , Upper Extremity/physiopathology , User-Computer Interface
8.
Work ; 68(1): 33-43, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33459678

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Musculoskeletal and psychosocial problems have tended to increase during the COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the changes in musculoskeletal problems and psychosocial status of teachers during the COVID-19 pandemic due to online education and to investigate the effects of preventive telerehabilitation applications for musculoskeletal problems. METHODS: Forty teachers who conducted online education during the pandemic volunteered to participate in the study. All assessments were performed via online methods. The Cornell Musculoskeletal Discomfort Questionnaire (CMDQ), ProFitMap-Neck questionnaire, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Upper Extremity Functional Index (UEFI) were used to evaluate musculoskeletal problems; the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were used to evaluate anxiety and depression, respectively; and the Work-Life Balance Scale (WLBS) was used to evaluate how well individuals achieve this balance. Information about before online education, during online education, and after training was obtained with the assessments. After the first assessment, telerehabilitation, which involved presentations and brochures, was applied to 18 participants willing to participate in the training. RESULTS: The ProFitMap, UEFI, and WLBS scores during the online education decreased significantly, while the scores of the CMDQ, ODI, BDI, and BAI during the online education increased significantly compared to the pre-online education scores (p < 0.05). In addition, the total CMDQ, ProFitMap, and ODI scores improved significantly after the training (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Musculoskeletal and psychosocial problems increased in teachers during online education. Preventive telerehabilitation methods will be beneficial for individuals who do not have access to face-to-face physiotherapy.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance/methods , Musculoskeletal Diseases/etiology , Psychology , Telerehabilitation/standards , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Education, Distance/standards , Ergonomics/methods , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Musculoskeletal Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Preventive Medicine/instrumentation , Preventive Medicine/methods , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telerehabilitation/instrumentation , Telerehabilitation/methods , Turkey
9.
Fisioterapia (Madr., Ed. impr.) ; 42(6): 319-326, nov.-dic. 2020. graf
Article in Spanish | IBECS | ID: ibc-197911

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCCIÓN: La lesión medular congénita o adquirida produce deficiencias motoras, sensitivas y autonómicas. Por tanto, la recuperación de la función motora es uno de los factores más importantes en el proceso de rehabilitación. En este contexto, las aplicaciones móviles se plantean como herramientas que pueden facilitar el proceso de rehabilitación. OBJETIVO: Conocer el efecto del uso de aplicaciones móviles sobre la función motora en personas con lesión medular. MATERIALES Y MÉTODOS: Se realizó una búsqueda sistemática en la literatura acerca del uso de aplicaciones móviles para personas (en inglés, applications o apps) para personas con lesión medular de cualquier edad y origen, en diferentes bases de datos, cuya elegibilidad se realizó mediante la estrategia CONSORT y la calidad metodológica se evaluó aplicando la escala PEDro. Asimismo, se realizó una búsqueda en los principales mercados de aplicaciones móviles para identificar la utilidad de éstas en la recuperación de la función motora. RESULTADOS: Se incluyeron dos artículos que cumplían con los criterios de inclusión, con un total de participación de 46 personas, 18 asignados al grupo control y 28 que recibieron intervención usando aplicaciones móviles. El grupo de aplicaciones móviles mostró mejorías en la función motora tras la intervención. La búsqueda en los mercados de aplicaciones móviles arrojó 65 apps, de las cuales 27 se centraron específicamente en la función motora de personas con lesión medular y 40 tenían potencial utilidad sobre la misma. CONCLUSIÓN: Debido al número de estudios y a la calidad metodológica de los mismos, no son concluyentes los efectos del uso de aplicaciones móviles sobre la función motora en personas con lesión medular. Aun así, existe una gran cantidad de aplicaciones móviles no validadas en mercados de aplicaciones móviles que fueron específicamente diseñadas o que tienen potencial utilidad para mejorar la función motora de personas con lesión medular


INTRODUCTION: Spinal cord injury of either congenital or acquired origin produces motor, sensory and autonomic deficiencies. Therefore, the recovery of motor function is one of the most important factors in the rehabilitation process; that is why mobile applications are currently considered tools that facilitate the rehabilitation process. AIM: To determine the effects of the use of mobile applications on motor function in people with spinal cord injury. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic literature search was carried out on the use of mobile applications for people with spinal cord injury of any age and origin of injury in different databases, whose eligibility was achieved through the CONSORT strategy and the evaluation of methodological quality using the PEDro scale. We also searched the main mobile applications markets to identify their utility in recovery of motor function. RESULTS: Two articles that met the inclusion criteria were included; with the participation of 46 people, 18 assigned to the control group and 28 received intervention using mobile applications. The latter showed improvement in motor function after the intervention. The search of the application markets showed 65 apps, of which 27 focused specifically on motor function in patients with spinal cord injury and 40 with potential utility. CONCLUSION: Due to the number of studies and their methodological quality, the effects of the use of mobile applications on motor function in people with spinal cord injury are not conclusive. Even so, there are many unverified mobile apps on the apps markets, specifically designed or potentially useful in relation to the motor function of people with spinal cord injury


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adolescent , Young Adult , Adult , Middle Aged , Mobile Applications , Spinal Cord Injuries/rehabilitation , Locomotion/physiology , Motor Activity/physiology , Spinal Cord Injuries/therapy , Telerehabilitation/instrumentation
10.
Codas ; 32(3): e20200144, 2020.
Article in Portuguese | LILACS (Americas) | ID: biblio-1133499

ABSTRACT

RESUMO Apresentamos um relato de experiência de implementação de telefonoaudiologia em tempo real para pacientes que anteriormente eram atendidos em ambulatório em um serviço de atenção primária em saúde. No total, 25 usuários estavam sendo acompanhados pela equipe de fonoaudiologia quando da notificação dos primeiros casos de COVID-19 no sul do Brasil. Destes, julgou-se que 12 pacientes demandavam teleatendimento, pelo menos, quinzenalmente. A teleconsulta disponibilizada nesta primeira etapa, em caráter emergencial na implementação do projeto neste formato, a fim de garantir a manutenção dos atendimentos de pacientes que poderiam sofrer agravamento ou mesmo comorbidades associadas à suspensão da fonoterapia, foram realizadas por telefone, com vídeo, por estudantes de fonoaudiologia, extensionistas do projeto e supervisionadas por um fonoaudiólogo, de forma síncrona. Todas as conversas e orientações durante a teleconsulta são encaminhadas com a maior calma possível e, no caso de pacientes infantis, permeadas por algumas atividades lúdicas. A telessaúde tem se mostrado um recurso eficiente para atendimento de pacientes com demandas fonoaudiológicas, possibilitando o atendimento remoto com a mesma qualidade que o atendimento presencial. Além disso, tem potencial relevante, considerando que há um número significativo de pacientes que precisam de avaliação fonoaudiológica e residem em regiões nas quais há escassez de profissionais qualificados.


ABSTRACT We present an experience report on the implementation of real-time telehealth in speech-language and hearing therapy for patients who were previously seen on an outpatient basis in a primary health care service. The Speech-Language Therapy (SLT) team was monitoring twenty-five users when the first cases of COVID-19 were notified in southern Brazil. Of these, it was judged that twelve patients required at least a monitoring call every two weeks. Teleconsultations were available in this first stage, on an emergency basis, during the implementation of the project in this format. The idea was to guarantee, due to the suspension of the SLT sessions, the maintenance of the care service for patients who could suffer worsening of their cases or even comorbidities. The appointments were carried out by video calls by SLT students, therapists of the extension project, and supervised by a speech-language therapist, synchronously. All conversations and orientations during the teleconsultation were conducted as calmly as possible and, in the case of infant patients, permeated by some playful activities. Telehealth has shown to be an efficient resource for the care of patients with SLT demands, enabling remote care with the same quality as face-to-face care. Besides, it has relevant potential, once there is a significant number of patients, who need SLT assessment and live in regions where there is a shortage of qualified professionals.


Subject(s)
Humans , Child , Adult , Aged , Pneumonia, Viral , Speech Therapy/organization & administration , Program Development , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Betacoronavirus , Speech Therapy/psychology , Brazil , Telemedicine/instrumentation , Telerehabilitation/instrumentation , Telerehabilitation/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19 , Language Therapy/organization & administration , Language Therapy/psychology
11.
J Neuroeng Rehabil ; 17(1): 155, 2020 11 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33228709

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: After stroke, sustained hand rehabilitation training is required for continuous improvement and maintenance of distal function. METHODS: In this paper, we present a system designed and implemented in our lab: the Home based Virtual Rehabilitation System (HoVRS). Fifteen subjects with chronic stroke were recruited to test the feasibility of the system as well as to refine the design and training protocol to prepare for a future efficacy study. HoVRS was placed in subjects' homes, and subjects were asked to use the system at least 15 min every weekday for 3 months (12 weeks) with limited technical support and remote clinical monitoring. RESULTS: All subjects completed the study without any adverse events. Subjects on average spent 13.5 h using the system. Clinical and kinematic data were collected pre and post study in the subject's home. Subjects demonstrated a mean increase of 5.2 (SEM = 0.69) on the Upper Extremity Fugl-Meyer Assessment (UEFMA). They also demonstrated improvements in six measurements of hand kinematics. In addition, a combination of these kinematic measures was able to predict a substantial portion of the variability in the subjects' UEFMA score. CONCLUSION: Persons with chronic stroke were able to use the system safely and productively with minimal supervision resulting in measurable improvements in upper extremity function.


Subject(s)
Recovery of Function , Stroke Rehabilitation/instrumentation , Telerehabilitation/instrumentation , User-Computer Interface , Adult , Aged , Biomechanical Phenomena , Female , Hand/physiopathology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Physical Therapy Modalities , Pilot Projects , Stroke/physiopathology , Stroke Rehabilitation/methods , Telerehabilitation/methods , Upper Extremity/physiopathology
12.
Musculoskeletal Care ; 19(2): 208-216, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33107154

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There has been increased usage of virtual telerehabilitation approach during the COVID-19 pandemic. It is crucial to establish reliability of conducting virtual assessments for musculoskeletal conditions. OBJECTIVES: This research determined the intra- and interrater reliability of measuring knee and wrist range of motion (ROM) assessed virtually and obtained face-to-face (F2F) using a goniometer (UG) for a student and an experienced examiner. METHOD: Knee and wrist joint ROM for 54 healthy participants was assessed virtually and F2F by a student examiner and an experienced physical therapist. Intra- (virtual vs. UG assessment) and inter-rater (virtual or UG assessment between examiners) reliabilities were examined for all ROM using Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The ICC values were considered good (>0.75) or excellent (>0.90). Bland and Altman plots determined the limits of agreement (LOA) in assessing joint ROM. RESULTS/FINDINGS: Student examiner had good reliability in virtually estimating knee extension (ICC = 0.79), wrist flexion (ICC = 0.82) and wrist extension (ICC = 0.78), whereas the experienced examiner had excellent reliability in virtually estimating all knee and wrist ROM (ICC > 0.90). The LOA in assessing knee and wrist ROM for the student examiner were wider indicating higher disagreement between virtual and UG-obtained ROM in some cases. CONCLUSIONS: Virtual estimation of knee and wrist ROM is a reliable technique, however experience level impacts the precision of measurement. It is suggested that the same examiner conducts all the ROM assessments throughout the clinical course of a patient receiving virtual interventions for knee or wrist pathologies.


Subject(s)
Arthrometry, Articular/instrumentation , Knee Joint/physiology , Range of Motion, Articular/physiology , Telerehabilitation/instrumentation , Wrist Joint/physiology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Healthy Volunteers , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2
13.
J Speech Lang Hear Res ; 63(10): 3293-3310, 2020 10 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32910735

ABSTRACT

Purpose Surface electromyography (sEMG) is often used for biofeedback during swallowing rehabilitation. However, commercially available sEMG electrodes are not optimized for the head and neck area, have rigid form, and are mostly available in large medical centers. We developed an ultrathin, soft, and flexible sEMG patch, specifically designed to conform to the submental anatomy and which will be ultimately incorporated into a telehealth system. To validate this first-generation sEMG patch, we compared its safety, efficiency, and signal quality in monitoring submental muscle activity with that of widely used conventional sEMG electrodes. Method A randomized crossover design was used to compare the experimental sEMG patch with conventional (snap-on) sEMG electrodes. Participants completed the same experimental protocol with both electrodes in counterbalanced order. Swallow trials included five trials of 5- and 10-ml water. Comparisons were made on (a) signal-related factors: signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), baseline amplitude, normalized mean amplitude, and sEMG burst duration and (b) safety/preclinical factors: safety/adverse effects, efficiency of electrode placement, and satisfaction/comfort. Noninferiority and equivalence tests were used to examine signal-related factors. Paired t tests and descriptive statistics were used to examine safety/preclinical factors. Results Forty healthy adults participated (24 women, M age = 67.5 years). Signal-related factors: SNR of the experimental patch was not inferior to the SNR of the conventional electrodes (p < .0056). Similarly, baseline amplitude obtained with the experimental patch was not inferior to that obtained with conventional electrodes (p < .0001). Finally, normalized amplitude values were equivalent across swallows (5 ml: p < .025; 10 ml: p < .0012), and sEMG burst duration was also equivalent (5 ml: p < .0001; 10 ml: p < .0001). Safety/preclinical factors: The experimental patch resulted in fewer mild adverse effects. Participant satisfaction was higher with the experimental patch (p = .0476, d = 0.226). Conclusions Our new wearable sEMG patch is equivalent with widely used conventional sEMG electrodes in terms of technical performance. In addition, our patch is safe, and healthy older adults are satisfied with it. With lessons learned from the current COVID-19 pandemic, efforts to develop optimal swallowing telerehabilitation devices are more urgent than ever. Upon further validation, this new technology has the potential to improve rehabilitation and telerehabilitation efforts for patients with dysphagia. Supplemental Material https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.12915509.


Subject(s)
Deglutition Disorders/rehabilitation , Electrodes , Electromyography/instrumentation , Telerehabilitation/instrumentation , Wearable Electronic Devices , Aged , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections , Cross-Over Studies , Deglutition/physiology , Electromyography/methods , Equipment Design , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Codas ; 32(3): e20200144, 2020.
Article in Portuguese, English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32578694

ABSTRACT

We present an experience report on the implementation of real-time telehealth in speech-language and hearing therapy for patients who were previously seen on an outpatient basis in a primary health care service. The Speech-Language Therapy (SLT) team was monitoring twenty-five users when the first cases of COVID-19 were notified in southern Brazil. Of these, it was judged that twelve patients required at least a monitoring call every two weeks. Teleconsultations were available in this first stage, on an emergency basis, during the implementation of the project in this format. The idea was to guarantee, due to the suspension of the SLT sessions, the maintenance of the care service for patients who could suffer worsening of their cases or even comorbidities. The appointments were carried out by video calls by SLT students, therapists of the extension project, and supervised by a speech-language therapist, synchronously. All conversations and orientations during the teleconsultation were conducted as calmly as possible and, in the case of infant patients, permeated by some playful activities. Telehealth has shown to be an efficient resource for the care of patients with SLT demands, enabling remote care with the same quality as face-to-face care. Besides, it has relevant potential, once there is a significant number of patients, who need SLT assessment and live in regions where there is a shortage of qualified professionals.


Apresentamos um relato de experiência de implementação de telefonoaudiologia em tempo real para pacientes que anteriormente eram atendidos em ambulatório em um serviço de atenção primária em saúde. No total, 25 usuários estavam sendo acompanhados pela equipe de fonoaudiologia quando da notificação dos primeiros casos de COVID-19 no sul do Brasil. Destes, julgou-se que 12 pacientes demandavam teleatendimento, pelo menos, quinzenalmente. A teleconsulta disponibilizada nesta primeira etapa, em caráter emergencial na implementação do projeto neste formato, a fim de garantir a manutenção dos atendimentos de pacientes que poderiam sofrer agravamento ou mesmo comorbidades associadas à suspensão da fonoterapia, foram realizadas por telefone, com vídeo, por estudantes de fonoaudiologia, extensionistas do projeto e supervisionadas por um fonoaudiólogo, de forma síncrona. Todas as conversas e orientações durante a teleconsulta são encaminhadas com a maior calma possível e, no caso de pacientes infantis, permeadas por algumas atividades lúdicas. A telessaúde tem se mostrado um recurso eficiente para atendimento de pacientes com demandas fonoaudiológicas, possibilitando o atendimento remoto com a mesma qualidade que o atendimento presencial. Além disso, tem potencial relevante, considerando que há um número significativo de pacientes que precisam de avaliação fonoaudiológica e residem em regiões nas quais há escassez de profissionais qualificados.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Program Development , Speech Therapy/organization & administration , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Adult , Aged , Brazil , COVID-19 , Child , Humans , Language Therapy/organization & administration , Language Therapy/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Speech Therapy/psychology , Telemedicine/instrumentation , Telerehabilitation/instrumentation , Telerehabilitation/organization & administration
15.
Eur J Phys Rehabil Med ; 56(4): 403-411, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32293811

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Telerehabilitation is a promising approach for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), but uncertainties regarding patients' access and preferences remain. AIM: To investigate the access to telecommunication technologies and rehabilitation services of patients with MS, and their willingness to use these technologies for rehabilitation. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. SETTING: Outpatient neurological facility. POPULATION: Patients with MS. METHODS: Patients with MS attending consultations in the Neurology department were asked to fill in a paper questionnaire. This anonymous z was designed to gain information about needs and access to rehabilitation and telecommunication technologies, as well as interests and perspectives of telerehabilitation among these patients. Descriptive statistics, Chi-squared tests and logistic regressions were used to describe the sample and survey answers. RESULTS: Two hundred patients completed the questionnaire. Mean age was 44.41(±12.52) years. Seventy-one percent were women, and 49% were unemployed. Ninety-one percent of the patients regularly used internet and 73% used apps. Most patients were interested in using telecommunication technologies to receive a program of physical exercises (62%), for information and personalized advice about physical activity and MS (69%), and to communicate with caregivers (75%). Patients with EDSS>4 were less interested than patients with EDSS≤4 in communicating with the caregivers via apps (33% vs. 52%,Δ19%[CI-36%;-2%],P=0.04) but expressed greater interest in receiving information and personal advice about physical activity and MS via the internet (70% vs. 51%,Δ19%[CI+2%;+36%],P=0.03). One third of the patients was not interested in receiving telerehabilitation interventions (32%), notably patients with EDSS>4 and non-workers. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with MS are mainly interested in using telecommunication technologies for rehabilitation services, and most of these patients have access to the required technology. Being mildly disabled and having a professional activity are associated with a greater interest in telerehabilitation. In contrary, patients with moderate-to-severe disability and non-workers have reportedly less access and ease in using the required technologies. CLINICAL REHABILITATION IMPACT: Telerehabilitation is feasible and wished by patients with MS, specifically in patients with low EDSS scores and workers. Given the strong need for rehabilitation in more disabled patients, the barriers to its access, the lower access and ease of use of telecommunication technologies, a special effort is needed to facilitate their use in these patients.


Subject(s)
Health Services Accessibility , Multiple Sclerosis/rehabilitation , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Telerehabilitation/methods , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Telerehabilitation/instrumentation
16.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(11): e19556, 2020 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32176113

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Telerehabilitation in cardiology has the potential to become the alternative to regular outpatient cardiac rehabilitation. Our study focuses on the wrist heart rate monitor as a telerehabilitation device, defines detected limitations, and compares results between home-based and regular outpatient rehabilitation methods, related to physical fitness, quality of life, and training adherence. The study design was a randomized controlled trial. METHODS: Eligible 56 cardiac rehabilitation patients were randomized into a 12-week regular outpatient training group (ROT) and interventional home-based telerehabilitation group (ITG). For both groups, the intensity of the training was prescribed to be performed at 70% to 80% of heart rate reserve for 60 minutes, 3 times a week. The ITG patients started their training with a wrist heart rate monitor in their home environment. These patients received feedback once a week, reflecting data uploaded on the internet application. The ROT patients performed their exercise under the direct supervision of a physical specialist in a regular outpatient clinic. Physical fitness and health-related quality of life were assessed at baseline and after 12 weeks. Training adherence in both groups was determined and compared. RESULTS: Fifty-one patients comleted the intervention (91%); no serious adverse events were recorded. Physical fitness expressed as peak oxygen uptake showed significant improvement (P < .001) in ROT group from 23.4 ±â€Š3.3 to 25.9 ±â€Š4.1 mL/kg/min and (P < .01) in ITG group from 23.7 ±â€Š4.1 to 26.5 ±â€Š5.7 mL/kg/min without significant between-group differences after 12 weeks of intervention. The training adherence between groups was similar. CONCLUSION: Our study shows that telerehabilitation via wrist heart rate monitor could become an alternative kind of cardiac rehabilitation which deserves attention and further analyzing.


Subject(s)
Cardiac Rehabilitation/instrumentation , Cardiovascular Diseases/psychology , Monitoring, Physiologic/instrumentation , Patient Compliance , Telerehabilitation/instrumentation , Wrist , Female , Heart Rate , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Quality of Life
17.
Sensors (Basel) ; 20(3)2020 Jan 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32013222

ABSTRACT

Digital rehabilitation is a novel concept that integrates state-of-the-art technologies for motion sensing and monitoring, with personalized patient-centric methodologies emerging from the field of physiotherapy. Thanks to the advances in wearable and portable sensing technologies, it is possible to provide patients with accurate monitoring devices, which simplifies the tracking of performance and effectiveness of physical exercises and treatments. Employing these approaches in everyday practice has enormous potential. Besides facilitating and improving the quality of care provided by physiotherapists, the usage of these technologies also promotes the personalization of treatments, thanks to data analytics and patient profiling (e.g., performance and behavior). However, achieving such goals implies tackling both technical and methodological challenges. In particular, (i) the capability of undertaking autonomous behaviors must comply with strict real-time constraints (e.g., scheduling, communication, and negotiation), (ii) plug-and-play sensors must seamlessly manage data and functional heterogeneity, and finally (iii) multi-device coordination must enable flexible and scalable sensor interactions. Beyond traditional top-down and best-effort solutions, unsuitable for safety-critical scenarios, we propose a novel approach for decentralized real-time compliant semantic agents. In particular, these agents can autonomously coordinate with each other, schedule sensing and data delivery tasks (complying with strict real-time constraints), while relying on ontology-based models to cope with data heterogeneity. Moreover, we present a model that represents sensors as autonomous agents able to schedule tasks and ensure interactions and negotiations compliant with strict timing constraints. Furthermore, to show the feasibility of the proposal, we present a practical study on upper and lower-limb digital rehabilitation scenarios, simulated on the MAXIM-GPRT environment for real-time compliance. Finally, we conduct an extensive evaluation of the implementation of the stream processing multi-agent architecture, which relies on existing RDF stream processing engines.


Subject(s)
Physical Therapy Modalities/instrumentation , Telerehabilitation/instrumentation , Humans , Monitoring, Physiologic/instrumentation , Physical Therapists , Semantics , Software , Telerehabilitation/methods , Wearable Electronic Devices
18.
Phys Ther ; 100(4): 708-717, 2020 04 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31984420

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Gait and mobility aid assessments are important components of rehabilitation. Given the increasing use of telehealth to meet rehabilitation needs, it is important to examine the feasibility of such assessments within the constraints of telerehabilitation. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to examine the reliability and validity of the Tinetti Performance-Oriented Mobility Assessment gait scale (POMA-G) and cane height assessment under various video and transmission settings to demonstrate the feasibility of teleassessment. DESIGN: This repeated-measures study compared the test performances of in-person, slow motion (SM) review, and normal-speed (NS) video ratings at various fixed frame rates (8, 15, and 30 frames per second) and bandwidth (128, 384, and 768 kB/s) configurations. METHODS: Overall bias, validity, and interrater reliability were assessed for in-person, SM video, and NS video ratings, with SM video rating as the gold standard, as well as for different frame rate and bandwidth configurations within NS videos. RESULTS: There was moderate to good interrater reliability for the POMA-G (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.66-0.77 across all configurations) and moderate validity for in-person (ß = 0.62; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.37-0.87) and NS video (ß = 0.74; 95% CI = 0.67-0.80) ratings compared with the SM video rating. For cane height, interrater reliability was good (ICC = 0.66-0.77), although it was significantly lower at the lowest frame rate (8 frames per second) (ICC = 0.66; 95% CI = 0.54-0.76) and bandwidth (128 kB/s) (ICC = 0.69; 95% CI = 0.57-0.78) configurations. Validity for cane height was good for both in-person (ß = 0.80; 95% CI = 0.62-0.98) and NS video (ß = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.81-0.90) ratings compared with SM video rating. LIMITATIONS: Some lower frame rate and bandwidth configurations may limit the reliability of remote cane height assessments. CONCLUSIONS: Teleassessment for POMA-G and cane height using typically available internet and video quality is feasible, valid, and reliable.


Subject(s)
Canes , Gait Analysis/methods , Gait Disorders, Neurologic/rehabilitation , Telerehabilitation/methods , Confidence Intervals , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Reproducibility of Results , Telerehabilitation/instrumentation
19.
Med Eng Phys ; 76: 20-31, 2020 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31882393

ABSTRACT

Telerehabilitation systems provide some advantages against the classic rehabilitation methods. The ability of the shoulders depends on active motion range of them to do activities in daily life and to do sports. To evaluate the shoulder motions, range of motion (ROM) measurement is a basic method. Clinical goniometer and digital goniometer are the most commonly used measurement tools. However, these measurement tools have some deficiencies and difficulties. In this paper, we consider a Kinect One Sensor (Kinect V2) based measurement system for shoulder motions as an alternative method. The aim of this study is to examine the reliability and validity analyzes of the proposed shoulder measurement system. Three systems were used to evaluate validity of the Kinect V2 to measure shoulder motions: Kinect V2 based system, clinical goniometer and digital goniometer. One expert physical therapist measured shoulder abduction, flexion, external rotation, internal rotation and extension ROM values using a clinical goniometer and a digital goniometer in 40 healthy volunteers (22 males, 18 females, and 19-33 years old). All poses for each shoulder motion were captured with the Kinect V2 based system again and the ROM values were calculated. These procedures were carried out with all of the volunteer participants in three repetitions. In reliability for Kinect V2 based shoulder motion measurement system, we used the intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), standard error of the measure (SEM), minimal detectable change (MDC). The validity test includes the 95% limits of agreement (LOA) and mean difference between the Kinect V2 based system and the both of the goniometer systems for measuring shoulder motions. The high ICC values show that the Kinect V2 based shoulder motion measurement system has very good intra-rater reliability for abduction, flexion, external rotation, internal rotation shoulder poses. For extension pose, it has good reliability result according to the ICC value. The validity analysis gives good results for all shoulder poses except internal rotation between Kinect V2 and clinical/digital goniometer. As a result, Kinect V2 based measurement system is a reliable and valid alternative telerehabilitation tool for shoulder motions.


Subject(s)
Movement , Shoulder/physiology , Telerehabilitation/instrumentation , Female , Humans , Male , Range of Motion, Articular , Reproducibility of Results , Rotation , Young Adult
20.
Sensors (Basel) ; 20(1)2019 Dec 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31861514

ABSTRACT

With increased demand for tele-rehabilitation, many autonomous home-based rehabilitation systems have appeared recently. Many of these systems, however, suffer from lack of patient acceptance and engagement or fail to provide satisfactory accuracy; both are needed for appropriate diagnostics. This paper first provides a detailed discussion of current sensor-based home-based rehabilitation systems with respect to four recently established criteria for wide acceptance and long engagement. A methodological procedure is then proposed for the evaluation of accuracy of portable sensing home-based rehabilitation systems, in line with medically-approved tests and recommendations. For experiments, we deploy an in-house low-cost sensing system meeting the four criteria of acceptance to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed evaluation methodology. We observe that the deployed sensor system has limitations in sensing fast movement. Indicators of enhanced motivation and engagement are recorded through the questionnaire responses with more than 83 % of the respondents supporting the system's motivation and engagement enhancement. The evaluation results demonstrate that the deployed system is fit for purpose with statistically significant ( ϱ c > 0 . 99 , R 2 > 0 . 94 , I C C > 0 . 96 ) and unbiased correlation to the golden standard.


Subject(s)
Telerehabilitation/methods , Adult , Female , Healthy Volunteers , Humans , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telerehabilitation/instrumentation , Walking , Wearable Electronic Devices , Young Adult
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