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1.
Work ; 68(1): 77-80, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2198518

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, rehabilitation facilities have become less accessible for patients with a stroke. Lack of early, intensive rehabilitation misses the opportunity for recovery during the critical time window of endogenous plasticity and improvement post-stroke. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this commentary was to highlighting the benefits of telework and telerehabilitation programs for workers with a stroke during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Relevant publications regarding the management of individuals with a stroke, telerehabilitation and teleworking in the setting of COVID-19 were reviewed. RESULTS: Previous studies showed that telerehabilitation can effectively provide an alternate method of promoting recovery for patients with a stroke. With the physical distancing precautions in place for mitigating viral spread, teleworking can also provide a method for long term recovery and improvements in quality of life after a stroke. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, this commentary addresses the benefits of physically distant, safe and effective alternatives to support individuals who live with a stroke during COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Disabled Persons/rehabilitation , Stroke/complications , Telerehabilitation/methods , Teleworking , Work/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Disabled Persons/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Telerehabilitation/trends , Work/trends
2.
Biomed Res Int ; 2022: 7366063, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2070621

ABSTRACT

Telerehabilitation offers an alternative healthcare delivery remotely in a patient's environment at a lower cost, better accessibility, and equivalent quality to the standard approach. Several studies had examined the effectiveness of telerehabilitation inpatients with musculoskeletal disorders, and although there is evidence that it is at least equally effective as the standard care, the patient and rehabilitation professional satisfaction with the delivery method is not conclusive. A systematic review was conducted to study the patients' and rehabilitation professionals' satisfaction with telerehabilitation for musculoskeletal disorders. A search for relevant studies on 29 April 2021 was carried out in Medline/PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science (WOS). The search terms included "telerehabilitation," AND "satisfaction" AND "musculoskeletal disorders," "telehealth," "telemedicine," "patient experience," and "pain". Fifteen eligible studies with 12,341 patients were included in this systematic review. A report was included if it (a) assessed the satisfaction of patients or professionals or both as one of the outcomes of a telerehabilitation intervention, (b) included adults 18 years and above with musculoskeletal disorders, and (c) is an intervention study using a quantitative approach. The quality of studies was assessed using the critical appraisal checklist tool developed by Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI). Most of the studies reported that patients were satisfied with both telerehabilitation and face-to-face intervention. However, few studies reported that patients were more satisfied with telerehabilitation compared to face-to-face of intervention. Patients in one study had preferred the incorporation of telerehabilitation and face-to-face sessions. Two of three studies had reported overall satisfaction with telerehabilitation by the professionals. Overall, there is evidence that patients and rehabilitation professional are satisfied with telerehabilitation compared to face-to-face consultation.


Subject(s)
Musculoskeletal Diseases , Telemedicine , Telerehabilitation , Adult , Humans , Patient Satisfaction , Personal Satisfaction , Telerehabilitation/methods
3.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(31): e29639, 2022 Aug 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2051685

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine is proving to be a useful tool in the telemonitoring of respiratory patients and telerehabilitation programs. The use of telemedicine has been proposed by the main medical societies because of the limited resources and the healthcare workers infection risk in the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The aim of this pilot program is to evaluate the feasibility of COVID-19 telerehabilitation program from the hospital to the home with clinical, functional and patient satisfaction outcomes. Rehabilitation was initiated in the hospital by a physiotherapist and complemented by "Estoi" (a mobile application), which was continued at home with telemonitoring and messaging with the medical team. Patients' habitual use of smartphones was not queried for inclusion. Sixteen patients were consecutively enrolled, 47% women with a mean age of 63 years old. 50% of patients completed ≥15 rehabilitation sessions. In total, 88% of patients referred that the mobile application incentive them to do more physical therapy, and 63% would choose telerehabilitation instead of center-based rehabilitation for new rehabilitation programs. Patient satisfaction (0-10) for the mobile application was 8.4 and 8.9 for the telerehabilitation program. Beginning telerehabilitation in the hospital could increase the efficacy and efficiency of physical therapy, which is safe for patients and healthcare workers. Following at home, this telerehabilitation program seems to encourage and empower patients who have reported high satisfaction. Further randomized studies with larger numbers of patients and multicenter studies are required to evaluate these results.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telerehabilitation , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Reported Outcome Measures , Pilot Projects , Prospective Studies , Telerehabilitation/methods
4.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 58(10)2022 Sep 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2043860

ABSTRACT

Background and objective: Patients with heart failure are a high-risk group who may have a higher mortality rate if infected during the COVID-19 pandemic. The problem of a patient's non-adherence to cardiac rehabilitation programs is still a challenge, resulting in disappointing long-term benefits of cardiac rehabilitation. Telehealth, including telerehabilitation, has grown in popularity to improve access to quality healthcare. It is more valuable and safer compared to usual rehabilitation care, especially during the current COVID-19 pandemic, to cut down unnecessary hospital visits and reduce the risk of cluster infections. This study aims to identify the efficacy of relevant randomized control trials (RCTs) using telerehabilitation in managing heart failure. The model, delivery care, safety, and efficacy were assessed. Material and Methods: This study was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis for Scoping Reviews (PRISMA-ScR). The authors included relevant records published in the last ten years from three databases: PubMed/MEDLINE, ProQuest, and EBSCO. Each included study was further assessed using Cochrane's Risk of Bias (Rob 2) tool. Results: The telerehabilitation models consisted of cellphones, instant messaging, or online videoconferencing software. Some also included tool sets to monitor patients' vital signs regularly or during exercise. Most patients adhered to and completed all provided programs. Cardiac telerehabilitation successfully improved patients' physical fitness, quality of life, and mental health. No major adverse outcomes or significant complications were associated with the program. Conclusion: Cardiac telerehabilitation has the potential to deliver rehabilitation for heart failure patients, evidenced by its feasibility, efficacy, and safety. As a future perspective, this delivery care type can be applied throughout transmissible disease outbreaks or even globally.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiac Rehabilitation , Heart Failure , Telerehabilitation , Humans , Telerehabilitation/methods , Cardiac Rehabilitation/methods , Quality of Life , Disease Outbreaks , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
5.
PLoS One ; 17(7): e0270766, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1938444

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: About 40% of patients who have had COVID-19 still have symptoms three months later whereas a 10% may experience physical and/or psychological consequences two years later. Therefore, it is necessary to perform preventive interventions when patients are discharged from the hospital to decrease the aforementioned sequelae. The purpose of this pilot-controlled trial will be to determine the efficacy of a rehabilitation program on functional status and psychosocial factors for post-COVID-19 patients when it is delivered through a tele-care platform versus a booklet-based rehabilitation. METHODS: The estimated sample size will be of 50 participants who have been discharged after COVID-19 and have a level of fatigue equal or greater than 4 on the Fatigue Severity Scale. The primary outcome will be the severity of fatigue. Participants will be randomly allocated to an "asynchronous telerehabilitation group" or to a "booklet-based rehabilitation group". Treatment in both groups will be the same and will consist of a combination of therapeutic exercise and an educative program. Treatment outcomes will be evaluated the last day of the intervention and at three- and six-months follow-up. DISCUSSION: The telerehabilitation intervention appears to be a viable and efficacy option in decreasing severe fatigue and other fitness variables such as strength and aerobic capacity, similar to other traditional rehabilitation formats such as through an explanatory booklet. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: This trial has been prospectively registered at clinialtrials.gov identifier: NCT04794036.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telerehabilitation , Fatigue , Humans , Pilot Projects , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Telerehabilitation/methods , Treatment Outcome
6.
Phys Ther ; 102(5)2022 05 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1873986

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to examine associations between frequency of telerehabilitation (TR) and outcomes of functional status (FS), number of visits, and patient satisfaction during COVID-19 and to compare FS outcomes by TR delivery mode for individuals with low back pain. METHODS: Propensity score matching was used to match episodes of care with or without TR exposure by the probability of receiving TR. FS, visits, and satisfaction were compared for individuals without TR and those who received care by TR for "any," "few," "most," or "all" frequencies (4 matched samples), and FS was compared for individuals receiving synchronous, asynchronous, and mixed TR modes (3 matched samples). Standardized differences were used to compare samples before and after matching. Outcomes between matched samples were compared using z tests with 95% CI. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 91,117 episodes of care from 1398 clinics located in 46 states (58% women; mean age = 55 [SD = 18]). Of those, only 5013 episodes (5.5%) involved any amount of TR. All standardized differences between matched samples were <0.1. There was no significant difference in FS points (range = 0-100, with higher representing better FS) between matched samples, except for episodes that had ``few'' (-1.7) and ``all'' (+2.0) TR frequencies or that involved the asynchronous (-2.6) TR mode. These point differences suggest limited clinical importance. Episodes with any TR frequency involved significantly fewer visits (0.7-1.3) than episodes with no TR, except that those with the "most" TR frequency had non-significantly fewer visits (0.6). A smaller proportion of individuals with TR (-4.0% to -5.0%) than of individuals with no telerehabilitation reported being very satisfied with treatment results, except for those with the "all" TR frequency. CONCLUSIONS: A positive association between TR and rehabilitation outcomes was observed, with a trend for better FS outcomes and fewer visits when all care was delivered through TR. Satisfaction tended to be lower with TR use. Overall, this observational study showed that for people with low back pain, physical therapy delivered through TR was equally effective as and more efficient than in-person care, with a trend of higher effectiveness when used for all visits during the episode of care. No differences in FS outcomes were observed between care delivered with synchronous and mixed TR delivery modes and care delivered with no TR. However, the asynchronous mode of TR was associated with worse functional outcomes than no TR. Although the majority of people were very satisfied with their treatment results with and without TR, very high satisfaction rates were reported by a slightly smaller proportion of individuals with TR versus those without TR. Our results suggest that TR is a viable option for rehabilitation care for individuals with low back pain and should also be considered in the post-COVID-19 era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Low Back Pain , Telerehabilitation , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Satisfaction , Telerehabilitation/methods
7.
Med Princ Pract ; 31(2): 156-164, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1861721

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to explore satisfaction and attitudes of patients towards the use of telerehabilitation during the COVID-19 pandemic and to report the experience of physical therapists (PTs) with the use of telerehabilitation. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A modified Telemedicine Satisfaction and Usefulness Questionnaire was used to assess the satisfaction and attitudes of musculoskeletal patients who had received telerehabilitation services during the COVID-19 pandemic. Face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight PTs to explore their experiences with telerehabilitation, including difficulties and benefits. RESULTS: Out of 53 patients who received telerehabilitation, 46 questionnaires were completed, with a response rate of 86.8%. In general, the patients were satisfied with and had positive attitudes towards the telerehabilitation services. The majority (89.2%) of the patients felt more involved in their care via telerehabilitation and a majority (93.5%) believed that video call sessions were a convenient form of telerehabilitation during the COVID-19 pandemic. Seven out of 8 PTs reported benefits of telerehabilitation (i.e., reduced patients' waiting lists and improved access to physical therapy care). Also, they were in favour of continuing using telerehabilitation to support the conventional physical therapy care, despite the lack of technological infrastructure. CONCLUSION: The patients as well as the PTs were generally satisfied with their telerehabilitation experiences. Using telerehabilitation in Kuwait was favoured as an adjunct method during and after the COVID-19 pandemic. However, with extensive training, optimal allocation of resources, and the development of local guidelines, telerehabilitation would become an effective mean for the health delivery system in Kuwait.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physical Therapists , Telerehabilitation , Humans , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telerehabilitation/methods
8.
PLoS One ; 17(5): e0265828, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1841150

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Despite the available evidence regarding effectiveness of stroke telerehabilitation, there has been little focus on factors influencing its delivery or translation from the research setting into practice. There are complex challenges to embedding telerehabilitation into stroke services and generating transferable knowledge about scaling up and routinising this service model. This review aimed to explore factors influencing the delivery of stroke telerehabilitation interventions, including platforms, technical requirements, training, support, access, cost, usability and acceptability. METHODS: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science and Cochrane Library and Central Registry of Clinical Trials were searched to identify full-text articles of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and protocols for RCTs published since a Cochrane review on stroke telerehabilitation services. A narrative synthesis was conducted, providing a comprehensive description of the factors influencing stroke telerehabilitation intervention delivery. RESULTS: Thirty-one studies and ten protocols of ongoing studies were included. Interventions were categorised as synchronous telerehabilitation (n = 9), asynchronous telerehabilitation (n = 11) and tele-support (n = 11). Telephone and videoconference were the most frequently used modes of delivery. Usability and acceptability with telerehabilitation were high across all platforms, although access issues and technical challenges may be potential barriers to the use of telerehabilitation in service delivery. Costs of intervention delivery and training requirements were poorly reported. CONCLUSIONS: This review synthesises the evidence relating to factors that may influence stroke telerehabilitation intervention delivery at a crucial timepoint given the rapid deployment of telerehabilitation in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. It recommends strategies, such as ensuring adequate training and technical infrastructure, shared learning and consistent reporting of cost and usability and acceptability outcomes, to overcome challenges in embedding and routinising this service model and priorities for research in this area.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stroke , Telerehabilitation , Humans , Telephone , Telerehabilitation/methods , Videoconferencing
9.
Musculoskelet Sci Pract ; 60: 102565, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1796294

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Little is known about how people with haemophilia (PWH) perceive and assess the usefulness, safety and effectiveness of telerehabilitation. OBJECTIVE: To describe usefulness, safety, effectiveness and limitations of a telerehabilitation program applied in people with severe haemophilia implemented during the COVID-19 pandemic in Chile. DESIGN AND METHODS: A qualitative study was conducted based on a focus group. Four analytical categories were predefined, three of which involved elements of Donabedian's model for quality assessment in health care (structure, process and results). RESULTS: One of the most important aspects according to all of the participants is the sense of safety they experienced while being taken care of by a physiotherapist specializing in PWH rehabilitation. This facilitated trust in the professional and adherence to treatment. All participants reported improvements in their physical condition and sense of well-being. The lack of adequate equipment at home, the limited length of the sessions, the perception that the physiotherapist may not be able to perform an appropriate physical examination and the lack of direct supervision were described as disadvantages. CONCLUSIONS: The findings underscored that telerehabilitation had high satisfaction among PWH. Telerehabilitation was perceived by PWH as a safe and effective intervention to improve physical condition. Telerehabilitation could be further supported and improved, and coverage could be enhanced, including rural and remote areas, which suffer from chronic inequalities in access to rehabilitation. The lack of face-to-face supervision and physical examination were perceived as the principal disadvantages. These results may help to improve telerehabilitation programs in PWH elsewhere.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hemophilia A , Telerehabilitation , Chile , Humans , Pandemics , Telerehabilitation/methods
10.
Am J Phys Med Rehabil ; 100(12): 1148-1151, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604793

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this observational study was to report the experience of a 1-yr home training with functional electrical stimulation cycling of a person with T4 American Impairment Scale A paraplegia for 9 yrs, homebound due to the COVID-19 health crisis. The 40-yr-old participant had a three-phase training: V1, isometric stimulation; V2, functional electrical stimulation cycling for 3 sessions/wk; and V3, functional electrical stimulation cycling for 2-4 sessions/wk. Data on general and physical tolerance, health impact, and performance were collected. Borg Scale score relating to fatigue was 10.1 before training and 11.8 after training. The average score for satisfaction at the end of sessions was 8.7. Lean leg mass increased more than 29%, although total bone mineral density dropped by 1.6%. The ventilatory thresholds increased from 19.5 to 29% and the maximum ventilatory peak increased by 9.5%. Rosenberg's Self-esteem Scale score returned to its highest level by the end of training. For the only track event on a competition bike, the pilot covered a distance of 1607.8 m in 17 mins 49 secs. When functional electrical stimulation cycling training is based on a clear and structured protocol, it offers the person with paraplegia the opportunity to practice this activity recreationally and athletically. In times of crisis, this training has proven to be very relevant.


Subject(s)
Bicycling/physiology , Electric Stimulation Therapy/methods , Exercise Therapy/methods , Paraplegia/rehabilitation , Telerehabilitation/methods , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Male , Paraplegia/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Single-Case Studies as Topic , Treatment Outcome
12.
Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol ; 17(3): 275-282, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585327

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This report presents two cases of successful telerehabilitation delivery for patients quarantined due to COVID-19. One of the patients did not speak the therapists' language, whereas the other presented complete deafness. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We assembled a telerehabilitation system using commercial applications, including a remote-control application that minimizes the need for patient's input. The telerehabilitation comprised a combination of video calls with a physical therapist and a 20-minute exercise video. The first case was of a 72-year-old man who could only speak Cantonese, a language that none of the service providers could speak, making communication difficult. Therefore, telerehabilitation was provided using Google Translate to simultaneously translate the therapist's instructions in Japanese to Cantonese. The second case involved a 49-year-old man with neurofibromatosis and complete deafness. In this case, communication during the exercise programme was achieved using 25 cue cards that were prepared in advance and used to convey instructions. The patients' satisfaction was assessed using either of a simple three-item questionnaire (Case 1) or the Telemedicine Satisfaction Questionnaire with five additional items (Case 2). RESULTS: In both cases, the exercise programme was successfully conducted, and the patients reported being highly satisfied with the programme. CONCLUSIONS: Communication barriers can impede telerehabilitation therapy; this problem is aggravated when the recipients cannot receive on-site education for device operation and exercise performance in advance due to COVID-19 restrictions. However, the use of supplementary methodologies may contribute to solving these issues, further expanding the coverage and applicability of telerehabilitation.IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATIONWe provided telerehabilitation for two patients with communication difficulties who were quarantined due to COVID-19.Telerehabilitation was carried out using a system with a remote-control mechanism to minimise patient input and avoid problems caused by their unfamiliarity in operating the devices.In addition, an online translation mechanism was used to overcome language differences, while cue cards were used for a patient with a hearing impairment.Telerehabilitation was performed without any technical issues. Both patients reported being highly satisfied with the intervention.This experience of providing telerehabilitation and overcoming communication difficulties may help develop a strategy to expand the coverage of telerehabilitation in the treatment of patients in isolation due to highly transmissible diseases, such as COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Deafness , Physical Therapists , Telerehabilitation , Aged , Communication Barriers , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Telerehabilitation/methods
13.
Am J Phys Med Rehabil ; 101(1): 53-60, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574749

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The COVID-19 pandemic has propelled an unprecedented global implementation of telemedicine and telerehabilitation as well as its integration into the healthcare system. Here, we describe the clinical implementation of the A3E framework for the deployment of telerehabilitation in the inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation continuum by addressing accessibility, adaptability, accountability, and engagement during the COVID-19 pandemic. By using an organized, coordinated, and stratified approach, we increased our telerehabilitation practice from 0 to more than 39,000 visits since the pandemic began. Learning from both the successes and challenges can help address the need to increase access to rehabilitation services even beyond the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Services Accessibility , Pandemics , Telerehabilitation/methods , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Responsibility , United States/epidemiology
16.
Clin Rehabil ; 36(4): 486-497, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518217

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of two different exercise-based programs through telerehabilitation in patients with coronavirus disease 2019. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled, parallel, double-blinded, three-arm clinical trial. SETTING: Patients' homes through telerehabilitation devices. SUBJECTS: Subjects with coronavirus disease 2019 in the acute phase. INTERVENTIONS: Subjects were divided into three groups: breathing exercises group, strength exercises group or no treatment/control group. MAIN MEASURES: We analysed visual analogue scale for fatigue, 6-minute walking test, 30-seconds sit-to-stand test, multidimensional dyspnoea-12 questionnaire and Borg scale at baseline and 14 days later. RESULTS: From 93 subjects recruited, 88 were enrolled, and 77 patients (mean [SD] age 39.40 [11.71]) completed the 14-days intervention and were included in the analysis: 26 in strength exercises group, 29 in breathing exercises group and 22 in control group. The intergroup analysis shows significant differences between the study groups and control group in all variables (p < 0.05); Borg scale, multidimensional dyspnoea-12 questionnaire (pre-post intervention score: strength exercises group: 7.85 [6.82] - 4.54[4.82], breathing exercises group: 11.04 [6.49] - 5.32 [3.63], control group: 10.27 [6.49] - 10.59[6.58]), visual analogue scale for fatigue, 6-minute walking test and 30-seconds sit-to-stand test (pre-post intervention score: strength exercises group: 12.19 [4.42] - 13.58 [5.37], breathing exercises group: 11.18 [3.42] - 12.79 [4.00], control group: 10.45 [2.15] - 9.86[1.88]). The greatest effect sizes were found in the variables Borg Scale (R2 = 0.548) and multidimensional dyspnoea-12 questionnaire (R2 = 0.475). CONCLUSIONS: Strength exercises group and breathing exercises group obtained significant improvements in fatigue, dyspnoea, perceived effort, and physical state, compared to control group, although the greatest benefits were found for dyspnoea and aerobic capacity in breathing exercises group.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telerehabilitation , Adult , Breathing Exercises/methods , Exercise Therapy/methods , Humans , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Telerehabilitation/methods
17.
Eur J Phys Rehabil Med ; 58(2): 179-189, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1451034

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Telerehabilitation is the provision of rehabilitation remotely through Information and Communication Technologies (ICT). Recently, there has been an increase of interest in its application thanks to increasing a new technology. The aim of this systematic review was to examine the evidence of the literature regarding the management of neurogenic dysphagia via telerehabilitation, compared to face-to-face rehabilitation treatment. The secondary aim was to create recommendations on telerehabilitation sessions for patients diagnosed with neurogenic dysphagia. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: The databases were: Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Scopus. A total of 235 records emerged from bibliographic research, manual search of full text and from gray literature, published until January 2021. Two blinded authors carried out titles and abstract screening and followed by full-text analysis. Sixteen articles were included in the systematic review and assessed through critical appraisal tools. EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: The research shows that the majority of the studies on neurogenic dysphagia involved the Clinical Swallow Examination via telerehabilitation, compared with the in-person modality. Significant levels of agreement and high satisfaction from clinicians and patients are reported to support the use of telerehabilitation. Based on the results of this systematic review and qualitative analysis, the authors developed practical recommendations for the management of telerehabilitation sessions for patients with neurogenic dysphagia. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the presence of barriers, telerehabilitation allowed healthcare provision and increasing access to care and services with specialized professionals, remote rehabilitation can be a valid resource during the health emergency due to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Deglutition Disorders , Telemedicine , Telerehabilitation , COVID-19/complications , Deglutition Disorders/diagnosis , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Telerehabilitation/methods
18.
Telemed J E Health ; 28(6): 873-877, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1437810

ABSTRACT

Background: In March 2020, the pandemic added a major barrier resulting in the cancelation of all low vision ocular rehabilitation services. To prevent delay of beginning low vision ocular rehabilitation services, all low vision care was switched to telerehabilitation to home. Methods: Case managers began to cancel all in-person services and offer Veterans Affairs (VA) video connect services to their home. Patients with video access scheduled a home VA video connect telerehabilitation evaluation and therapy assessment. Patients who did not have video access waited to schedule a future in-person low vision appointment (postpandemic). Results: Of the in-person canceled appointments, 54% who scheduled the new home telerehabilitation evaluation were delayed on average 25 calendar days. Patients who waited for in-person low vision care were delayed on average 98, 138, or 153 calendar days. Of the 56 new patients referred for low vision optometry services during this 4-month period (COVID-19), 91% scheduled home low vision ocular telerehabilitation evaluations without delay; 5% waited until in-person clinics were open; and 4% waited until rural VA's and community-based outpatient centers were open. Discussion: Veterans with low vision who live in rural communities have limited access to services unless they are able to travel several miles to a specialty low vision clinic. Low vision ocular rehabilitation telehealth services have been successfully provided at the VA Western New York Healthcare System (Buffalo, NY) low vision clinic. Conclusions: Home low vision ocular rehabilitation telehealth increases access as early as possible once diagnosed with ocular pathology resulting in low vision.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Telerehabilitation , Vision, Low , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Telerehabilitation/methods , Vision, Low/epidemiology , Vision, Low/rehabilitation
19.
Int J Obes (Lond) ; 46(1): 95-99, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1402044

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to examine the effects of exercise training through telerehabilitation applied during COVID-19 isolation period on overweight and obese individuals on physical fitness and quality of life. SUBJECTS/METHODS: In our study, 41 participants between the ages of 18-65 years and whose BMI values were 25 kg/m2 and above were randomly divided into two groups as telerehabilitation group (n: 21) and control group (n: 20). Exercise training applied to the telerehabilitation group with remote live connection included warm-up exercises, trunk stabilization exercises and breathing exercises under the supervision of a physiotherapist for 6 weeks, 3 days in a week. The control group was only informed about the importance of exercise for one session and evaluated at baseline and after 6 weeks. The physical fitness levels of individuals was assessed by Senior Fitness Test protocol and quality of life by Short Form-36. RESULTS: As a result of the study, statistically significant improvements were obtained in all parameters of physical fitness, quality of life in the telerehabilitation group (p < 0.05). In the difference values of the two groups, all parameters of physical fitness and quality of life were observed that there were statistically significant differences in favor of telerehabilitation group (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: As a result, it was found that exercise training applied through telerehabilitation during the COVID-19 pandemic process was an effective, safe and viable approach in overweight and obese individuals. In the future, studies investigating the long-term effectiveness of telerehabilitation in this population are needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/rehabilitation , Exercise Therapy/methods , Obesity/rehabilitation , Overweight/rehabilitation , Telerehabilitation/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Body Mass Index , Exercise , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Physical Fitness , Quality of Life , Social Isolation
20.
Phys Med Rehabil Clin N Am ; 32(2): 263-276, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392486

ABSTRACT

Cardiopulmonary telerehabilitation is a safe and effective alternative to traditional center-based rehabilitation. It offers a sustainable solution to more conveniently meet the needs of patients with acute or chronic, preexisting or newly acquired, cardiopulmonary diseases. To maximize success, programs should prioritize basic, safe, and timely care options over comprehensive or complex approaches. The future should incorporate new strategies learned during a global pandemic and harness the power of information and communication technology to provide evidence-based patient-centered care. This review highlights clinical considerations, current evidence, recommendations, and future directions of cardiopulmonary telerehabilitation.


Subject(s)
Cardiac Rehabilitation/methods , Health Services Accessibility , Respiratory Therapy/methods , Telerehabilitation/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiac Rehabilitation/economics , Humans , Pandemics , Respiratory Therapy/economics , SARS-CoV-2 , Telerehabilitation/economics , United States/epidemiology
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