Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 49
Filter
1.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 16804, 2022 Oct 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2062251

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 vaccines have reduced infections and hospitalizations across the globe, yet resistance to vaccination remains strong. This paper investigates the role of cable television news in vaccine hesitancy and associated local vaccination rates in the United States. We find that, in the earlier stages of the vaccine roll-out (starting May 2021), higher local viewership of Fox News Channel has been associated with lower local vaccination rates. We can verify that this association is causal using exogenous geographical variation in the channel lineup. The effect is driven by younger individuals (under 65 years of age), for whom COVID-19 has a low mortality risk. Consistent with changes in beliefs about the effectiveness of the vaccine as a mechanism, we find that Fox News increased reported vaccine hesitancy in local survey responses. We can rule out that the effect is due to differences in partisanship, to local health policies, or to local COVID-19 infections or death rates. The other two major television networks, CNN and MSNBC, have no effect. That, in turn, indicates that more differentiated characteristics, like the networks' messaging or tendency for controversy, matter and that the effect of Fox News on COVID-19 vaccine uptake is not due to the general consumption of cable news. We also show that there is no historical effect of Fox News on flu vaccination rates, suggesting that the effect is COVID-19-specific and not driven by general skepticism toward vaccines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Television , United States/epidemiology , Vaccination
2.
PLoS One ; 17(10): e0275595, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2054388

ABSTRACT

Televised public service announcements were one of the ways that the U.S. federal government distributed health information about the COVID-19 pandemic to Americans in 2020. However, little is known about the reach of these campaigns or the populations who might have been exposed to the information these ads conveyed. We conducted a descriptive analysis of federally-affiliated public service announcement airings to assess where they were aired and the market-level social and demographic characteristics associated with the airings. We found no correspondence between airings and COVID-19 incidence rates from March to December 2020, but we found a positive association between airings and the Democratic vote share of the market, adjusting for other market demographic characteristics. Our results suggest that PSAs may have contributed to divergent exposure to health information among the U.S. public during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics , Television , United States/epidemiology
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(17)2022 Aug 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1997622

ABSTRACT

This study investigated the influence of screen time during COVID-19 on the physical and mental domains of the health-related quality of life of early adolescents. A total of 860 early adolescents were recruited. The 36-Item Short Form Health Survey was used to measure their health-related quality of life. The early adolescents reported their average daily time spent using smartphones and computers and watching television over the previous week. The results show that most early adolescents, on average, spent less than 1 h to more than 4 h per day during COVID-19 using smartphones (n = 833, 96.9%) and computers (n = 783, 91.0%), and watching television (n = 804, 93.5%), respectively. Though early male and female adolescents spent a similar amount of time daily on average using smartphones, early male adolescents spent more time using computers and watching television than early female adolescents and reported a significantly lower mean score for three out of the eight scales in the physical and mental domains of health-related quality of life. While health-related quality of life of early female adolescents was negatively associated with time spent using smartphones only, early male adolescents were adversely affected by the time spent using smartphones and computers and watching television (p < 0.05). Therefore, early adolescents who spent more time using display devices during COVID-19 had significantly poorer outcomes in their health-related quality of life, and gender difference was found in the influence of screen time on health-related quality of life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Television , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Computers , Female , Humans , Male , Quality of Life , Screen Time
4.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1536, 2022 08 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1993348

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Confusion of information has also colored the course of the Covid-19 pandemic in Indonesia. The study analyzes the relationship between media exposure and information clarity about Covid-19 in Indonesia. METHODS: The study collected extensive data (n = 5,397). The study determines information clarity about Covid-19 based on respondents' admissions. There were four types of media exposure analyzed: frequency of reading a newspaper/magazine, frequency of listening to a radio, frequency of watching television, and frequency of internet use. The study carried out a binary logistic regression test in the final stage. RESULTS: The results show read a newspaper/magazine every day is 1.670 times more likely than reading a newspaper/magazine > five days a week to get precise information about Covid-19. Reading a newspaper/magazine 2-3 days a week is 1.386 times more likely than reading a newspaper/magazine > five days a week to get precise information about Covid-19. Reading a newspaper/magazine 4-5 days a week is 1.470 times more likely than reading a newspaper/magazine > five days a week to get precise information about Covid-19. Watching television 2 to 3 days a week is 1.601 times more likely than watching television > five days a week to get clear details about Covid-19. Watching television 4 to 5 days a week are 1.452 times more likely than watching television > five days a week to get precise information about Covid-19. CONCLUSION: The study concluded two types of media exposure related to information clarity about Covid-19 in Indonesia: the frequency of reading newspapers and watching television.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Television , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , Logistic Models , Mass Media , Pandemics
5.
Front Public Health ; 10: 887579, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1952844

ABSTRACT

Background: The internet has become a major resource in information transfer during COVID-19, and traditional means of communication are digitized and accessible online to the public at large. Objectives: This study seeks to examine how Israel's two main television news channels (Channel 12 and Channel 13) covered the Covid-19 vaccination campaign, compared to how the Ministry of Health ran the campaign. Methods: A qualitative study based on triangulation of online content analyses from three different sources: advertising campaigns, social media posts and reports on television news channels. The research sample included 252 reports from the newsrooms of Channel 13 (n = 151) and Channel N12 (n = 101), Israel's two leading news channels, all broadcast between December 1, 2020 and November 30, 2021. The sample also included posts from Israel Ministry of Health Facebook page and advertising campaigns from the Facebook page of the Israel Government Advertising Agency (LAPAM), which constructs advertising campaigns for the MOH (113 items). Results: The research findings reveal congruence between the way the MOH framed its vaccination campaign and news coverage of the vaccination issue. The vaccination campaign used three primary framing strategies: (1) positive framing (emphasizing the vaccine's advantages and stressing that the vaccine is safe and effective based on cost-benefit calculations and public health perspectives); (2) fear appeal strategy (conveying persuasive messages that seek to arouse fear through threats of impending danger or harm); (3) attribution of responsibility strategy (blaming the unvaccinated and targeting all those who criticized Israel's generic vaccination policy). Conclusion: As the watchdog of democracy, the news should function as a professional and objective source that criticizes government systems if necessary and strives to uncover the truth throughout the crisis. Public trust, which is so essential during such a crisis, can be achieved only if the news channels provide reports and meaningful journalistic investigations that challenge the system. By doing so, they can help fight conflicts of interest that divert management of the crisis from the professional health field to the political-economic arena.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Immunization Programs , Israel , Television
6.
J Korean Med Sci ; 37(28): e225, 2022 Jul 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1952227

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has continued for a couple of years, the long-term effects of the pandemic and the subsequent school curriculum modification on the mental health of children and parents need to be investigated. To clarify the changes that can occur during one school year and to predict the risk factors for vulnerable groups, this study identified parameters relative to children's screen time, their problematic behavior, and parental depression. METHODS: A total of 186 participants were analyzed who were parents of elementary schoolchildren in South Korea. These parents were required to complete a web-based questionnaire twice. The questionnaires were conducted in June 2020 and September 2021. Participants' general demographics including family income, children's screen time, sleep patterns, problematic behavior, and parental depression were assessed via the parental questionnaire that included various measurement tools. RESULTS: Children's body mass index (BMI) increased significantly in 2021 (18.94 ± 3.75 vs. 18.14 ± 3.30, P < 0.001). Smartphone frequency of use per week (5.35 vs. 4.54, P < 0.001) and screen time per day (3.52 vs. 3.16, P < 0.001) significantly increased during the period of the COVID-19 pandemic. The television screen time (2.88 vs. 3.26, P < 0.001), frequency of viewing (3.77 vs. 4.77, P < 0.001), and children's problematic behaviors significantly decreased (9.15 vs. 11.85, P < 0.001). A lower income household was a key predictor of increased smartphone frequency (B = 1.840, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.923-2.757, P < 0.001) and smartphone screen time (B = 1.992, 95% CI, 1.458-2.525, P < 0.001). The results showed that the lower income household (B = 5.624, 95% CI, 2.927-8.320, P < 0.001) and a child's psychiatric treatment history (B = 7.579, 95% CI, 5.666-9.492, P < 0.001) was the most significant predictor of problematic behaviors of children and parental depression (B = 3.476, 95% CI, 1.628-5.325, P < 0.001; B = 3.138, 95% CI, 1.827-4.450, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: This study suggested that children's smartphone screen time and BMI increased during COVID-19 because of the school curriculum modification following school closures in South Korea. The increased children's problematic behaviors and parental depression were predicted by lower-income households and the previous psychiatric history of children. These results indicate that multiple social support systems to the vulnerable group are needed during the ongoing pandemic and that a modified school setting is required.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Pandemics , Parents/psychology , Smartphone , Surveys and Questionnaires , Television
7.
BMJ Paediatr Open ; 6(1)2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1909779
8.
Indian Pediatr ; 59(9): 718-719, 2022 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1905135

ABSTRACT

This questionnaire-based study was conducted to assess screen-based media use during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in children (n=278) aged between 1 to 12 years. Television was the most common media available for use (246, 88.5%), and mobile was the next most commonly available media (230, 82.7%). Daily screen time exposure and use of television (P<0.001), computer/Laptop (P<0.001), and tablet (P=0.001) were significantly more common in those aged 5-12 years. Majority (214, 76.9%) were using screen-based media for educational purposes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Computers , Humans , Infant , Screen Time , Television
9.
BMJ Open ; 12(6): e060302, 2022 06 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1902012

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: In July 2020 the UK Government announced an intention to restrict advertisements for products high in fat, salt or sugar on live broadcast, catch-up and on-demand television before 21:00 hours; and paid for online advertising. As no other jurisdiction has implemented similar regulations, there is no empirical evidence about how they might perturb the food system. To guide the regulations' implementation and evaluation, we aimed to develop a concept map to hypothesise their potential consequences for the commercial food system, health and society. METHODS: We used adapted group concept mapping in four virtual workshops with food marketing and regulation experts across academia, civil society, government organisations, and industry (n=14), supported by Miro software. We merged concepts derived from the four workshops to develop a master map and then invited feedback from participants via email to generate a final concept map. RESULTS: The concept map shows how the reactions of stakeholders to the regulations may reinforce or undermine the impact on the commercial food system, health and society. The map shows adaptations made by stakeholders that could reinforce, or undermine, positive impacts on public health. It also illustrates potential weaknesses in the design and implementation of the regulations that could result in little substantial difference to public health. CONCLUSIONS: Prior to the regulations' initial implementation or subsequent iterations, they could be altered to maximise the potential for reinforcing adaptations, minimise the potential for undermining adaptations and ensure they cover a wide range of advertising opportunities and foods. The concept map will also inform the design of an evaluation of the regulations and could be used to inform the design and evaluation of similar regulations elsewhere.


Subject(s)
Advertising , Food , Food Industry , Humans , Television , United Kingdom
10.
11.
Pediatr Res ; 92(4): 1168-1174, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1635963

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study investigated relations between background TV exposure (BTV) and executive function (EF) when children were engaged in activities during exposure and how cumulative risk moderated these relations. METHODS: A nationally-representative survey with US caregivers (N = 1180) of 2-8-years-old children participated in a telephone survey. Data included demographic information, the child's EF, and time use across a 24-h period. Total BTV exposure within various contexts was calculated from diaries. RESULTS: In the direct effects regressions, BTV during sleep predicted poorer EF for all children. Playing by self with BTV predicted poorer EF for preschoolers while playing with others with BTV predicted stronger EF for school-age children. When cumulative risk was included, engaging in routines and chores with BTV predicted stronger EF for preschoolers while high-risk school-age children evidenced stronger EF when exposed to BTV while socializing with family or engaging in academic enrichment. Low-risk school-age children evidenced poorer EF in both contexts. CONCLUSIONS: Reducing exposure can mitigate negative relations. This is an important goal as children are exposed to more of all forms of screen media during the COVID-19 pandemic. Results confirm the American Academy of Pediatrics' recommendation that TV be turned off in the background when a child is in the room. IMPACT: Young children are exposed to significant hours of background television per day across multiple contexts: socializing with family, playing alone or with others, engaging in routines/chores, eating/drinking, and sleeping. Most exposure (46%) occurred while sleeping. Sleep exposure predicted poorer executive functioning (EF). During background TV exposure, as preschoolers' time spent playing alone increased, EF scores worsened. School-age children's time spent playing with others during exposure predicted stronger EF. EF scores for low-risk school-age children worsened when background TV was on while socializing with family or engaging in academic activities whereas the reverse was true for high-risk school-age children.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Executive Function , Humans , Child , United States , Child, Preschool , Pandemics , Television , Schools
12.
J Community Health ; 47(2): 306-310, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1549475

ABSTRACT

A number of the people who have recovered from the acute effects of COVID-19 are facing long term sequelae from the infection. As the COVID-19 pandemic is still evolving, so is knowledge of the long-term effects of the virus on patients who still experience symptoms. Clearly, news media play a crucial role in distributing information and this distribution of information can, in turn, influence the actions of the public. The purpose of this study was to describe the content of news coverage of COVID-19 long haul symptoms currently posted on the internet. This study utilized Google News, a news aggregator service, and included the first 100 English language pieces of news. Video content and news article content were coded in depth for information on COVID-19 long haul symptoms. A total of 41% of news reports mentioned the length of time that the COVID-19 related symptoms persist. The length of time was reported to range from 1 month to more than 1 year. The symptom most commonly mentioned was tiredness or fatigue (74%), followed by difficulty breathing or shortness of breath (62 cases; 62%), and difficulty thinking or concentrating (50 cases; 50%). Other symptoms were mentioned less frequently. There were no statistically significant differences in any of the content including having video, written news reports, or both video and written news reports by source of the news reports based on consumer, professional, or television or internet-based news (p = .14). More complete coverage by online news media of the long-term effects of COVID-19 enhances public awareness of the post-acute syndromes, augments health providers' awareness of the range of chronic COVID-19 effects and the possibility of a second infection, increases the probability of patients' seeking and obtaining the proper care for their symptoms, and contributes to preventive actions for enhancing public health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Mass Media , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Television
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(23)2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542563

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has caused disruptions in the daily lives of individuals in Canada. Purpose: Examine how total and specific (i.e., watching television, using social media, going on the Internet, playing video games, and engaging in virtual social connection) recreational screen time behaviours changed throughout the first six months of the COVID-19 pandemic, in comparison to pre-pandemic levels; (2) Methods: Sixty four Canadians (mostly Caucasian, female, age range = 21-77 years) completed monthly surveys from April to September of 2020; (3) Results: A one-way repeated measures analysis of variance (RM-ANOVA) and subsequent post hoc analysis revealed that total recreational screen time was statistically higher in late March/April (292.5 min/day ± 143.0) and into May, compared to pre-COVID-19 (187.8 min/day ± 118.3), before declining in subsequent months; (4) Conclusions: Generally, specific recreational screen time behaviours, such as time spent watching television, followed the same trend. Future studies with larger sample sizes and from other countries examining recreational screen time behaviours longitudinally over the pandemic are still needed to allow for greater generalizability.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Video Games , Adult , Aged , Canada/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Screen Time , Television , Young Adult
14.
J Dev Behav Pediatr ; 42(8): 672-676, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1517916

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study examines the media use of children from low-income homes during school closings during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Caregivers of 151 kindergarteners from low-income homes completed questionnaires as part of a larger study. Caregivers reported how much time children spent watching television/videos and using apps on the most recent weekday and weekend days. Caregivers also reported how their child's current use of media for several different purposes compared with how much the child usually uses media for that purpose. RESULTS: Weekly average media use was 46.3 hours or 6.6 hours per day. Counter to previous research, weekday media use was higher than weekend media use, suggesting that media was likely used as a replacement for time usually spent in school. Caregivers reported increased child media use for positive purposes, such as education and maintaining relationships with family and friends outside of the home, and potentially useful but less socially valued purposes, such as occupying the child's time while caregivers were completing other tasks. Having more children in the household was related to higher media use, and girls used media for maintaining remote relationships more than boys. CONCLUSION: These findings provide reason for both concern and optimism for the impacts of pandemic closures on low-income children. High levels of media use seem to be prevalent in this population. However, the diverse purposes for media use suggest that caregivers relied on media to supplement children's academic and social growth at a time when school and socializing were not safe in their typical forms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Poverty , Television , Caregivers , Child, Preschool , Family Characteristics , Female , Humans , Male , Ohio , Pandemics , Television/statistics & numerical data
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(21)2021 10 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488568

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to understand differences in leisure, educational/work and social screen time behaviours experienced by parents and children due to COVID-19 lockdown restrictions, which may inform behaviour change strategies and policy in the transition to a COVID-normal life. Participants in the "Our Life at Home" study (n = 218 parents from Australia, 43.4 ± 6.8 years, 88% female) completed a cross-sectional online survey in April/May 2020. Parents recalled their own and their child (8.7 ± 2.0 years, 42% female) or adolescents (15.0 ± 1.5 years, 50% female) participation in nine screen time behaviours in the past month (during lockdown) and retrospectively for February 2020 (pre-lockdown), providing data on 436 individuals. Screen time behaviours included leisure (computer/laptop and tablet/smartphone for leisure, TV/videos/DVDs and game consoles); education/work (computer/laptop and tablet/smartphone for work/education); and social screen time (computer/tablet/smartphone for social communication with friends, family and work (parents only)). Wilcoxon signed-rank tests and effect sizes (r) compared the time spent in each behaviour pre-lockdown and during lockdown. Large differences were observed in social (parents: r = 0.41-0.57; children: r = 0.55-0.65; adolescents: r = 0.28-0.43) and education (children: r = 0.50-0.65 and adolescents: r = 0.25-0.37) behaviours. There were small or no differences in leisure time screen use. COVID-19 lockdown restrictions have impacted parent's and children's screen time, and future research and policy should consider strategies to support families to manage screen time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Screen Time , Adolescent , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Leisure Activities , Male , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Television
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(18)2021 09 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430876

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Adolescents and ethnic subgroups have been identified at high risks of overweight and its associated complications. Although some studies have investigated overweight, obesity, nutritional status, physical activity, and associated factors among Saudi students, no studies have examined these characteristics among non-Saudi students or compared non-Saudi to Saudi adolescent students. The objective of this study was to compare differences between Saudi and non-Saudi adolescent students regarding time spent watching television, using computers, engaging in physical activity, and their food preferences. The relationships between these lifestyle behaviors and body mass index by Saudi nativity and gender were tested. METHODS: Students aged 12 to 18 years (n = 214) from various schools in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, completed a self-administered questionnaire that included questions about demographic and anthropometric characteristics, daily after-school routine, physical activity, watching television, using computers, and food preferences. Non-parametric (Mann-Whitney U) tests assessed the statistical differences between Saudi and non-Saudi respondents, and males and females were separately tested. RESULTS: Saudi boys who reported physical activity two to five times per week, the most television time, the most computer time, and the highest frequency of eating fast food and drinking soft drinks had a significantly higher mean body mass index than the non-Saudi boys in their categories. However, there were no significant differences found between the Saudi and non-Saudi girls. CONCLUSIONS: High levels of sedentary and low levels of physical activities as well as high consumption of high-fat fast foods and high-sugar drinks threaten the health of Saudi adolescents. Cultural differences in lifestyle between Saudi and non-Saudi families should be considered when developing programs to improve knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors regarding diet quality and physical activity. The objective of this study is more important in the current situation where increased time spent on computers and mobile phones due to online teaching in schools or working from home, decreased physical activity due to precautionary lockdowns, and unchecked eating patterns while spending more time in sedentary activities in homes has become our COVID-19 pandemic lifestyle in all the age groups. A similar study should be replicated on a large scale to study the effect of this lifestyle on our lives in all the age groups.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Food Preferences , Adolescent , Body Mass Index , Communicable Disease Control , Computers , Cross-Sectional Studies , Exercise , Feeding Behavior , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia , Sedentary Behavior , Television
17.
Interface (Botucatu, Online) ; 25(supl.1): e200606, 2021. tab, graf, ilus
Article in Spanish | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1389002

ABSTRACT

Esta investigación analiza la cobertura mediática de la crisis del Covid-19 en España, y el papel que en ella ha tenido la comunicación sobre salud y sobre los profesionales sanitarios. Se estudia el tratamiento recibido por las fuentes y temas sanitarios en los informativos de Radiotelevisión Española (RTVE) emitidos entre el 31 diciembre 2019 y el 8 junio 2020. Para ello, se realiza un análisis de contenido cuantitativo de 452 noticias de 21 informativos. Los resultados muestran que los debates de política y los propios políticos ocupan más espacio como tema y fuentes, respectivamente, en los informativos analizados, por delante de la salud y de los profesionales sanitarios. El estudio confirma, por tanto, la falta de visibilidad de los profesionales de salud en la cobertura informativa televisiva en España sobre el Covid-19. (AU)


Esta pesquisa analisa a cobertura mediática da crise do Covid-19 na Espanha e o papel que a comunicação sobre a saúde e os profissionais de saúde nela tiveram. É estudado o tratamento recebido pelas fontes e questões de saúde nos telejornais da Radiotelevisión (RTVE) da Espanha, transmitidos entre 31 de dezembro de 2019 e 8 de junho de 2020. Para isso, é realizada uma análise quantitativa do conteúdo de 452 notícias de um total de 21 telejornais. Os resultados mostram que os debates sobre políticas e os próprios políticos ocupam mais espaço como tema e fontes, respectivamente, nos noticiários analisados, à frente dos profissionais de saúde e dos profissionais de saúde. O estudo, portanto, confirma a falta de visibilidade dos profissionais de saúde na cobertura noticiosa da televisão na Espanha sobre o Covid-19. (AU)


This study is an analysis on the Spanish media coverage of the Covid-19 crisis and the role of information on health and healthcare professionals within it. We studied the treatment given to healthcare sources and topics in news broadcasts released by Radiotelevisión Española (RTVE) between December 31, 2019, and June 8, 2020. To this end, we conducted a quantitative content analysis on 452 news items from 21 news broadcasts. The results showed that debates on political issues were the main topics and politicians were the main sources, in the broadcasts analyzed, ahead of health issues and healthcare professionals. Our study thus confirms the lack of visibility of healthcare professionals in the television news coverage of the Covid-19 crisis in Spain. (AU)


Subject(s)
Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Health Communication , COVID-19 , Mass Media , Spain , Television
18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(16)2021 08 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376827

ABSTRACT

Recently, 194 World Health Organization member states called on the international organization to develop a global campaign to combat ageism, citing its alarming ubiquity, insidious threat to health, and prevalence in the media. Existing media studies of age stereotypes have mostly been single-sourced. This study harnesses a 1.1-billion-word media database comprising the British National Corpus and Corpus of Contemporary American English-with genres including spoken/television, fiction, magazines, newspapers-to provide a comprehensive view of ageism in the United Kingdom and United States. The US and UK were chosen as they are home to the largest media conglomerates with tremendous power to shape public opinion. The most commonly used synonym of older adults was identified, and its most frequently used descriptors were analyzed for valence. Such computational linguistics techniques represent a new advance in studying aging narratives. The key finding is consistent, though no less alarming: Negative descriptions of older adults outnumber positive ones by six times. Negative descriptions tend to be physical, while positive ones tend to be behavioral. Magazines contain the highest levels of ageism, followed by the spoken genre, newspapers, and fiction. Findings underscore the need to increase public awareness of ageism and lay the groundwork to design targeted societal campaigns to tackle ageism-one of our generation's most pernicious threats.


Subject(s)
Ageism , Stereotyping , Public Opinion , Television , United States
19.
Lancet Psychiatry ; 8(9): 756-758, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1364541
20.
BMJ Open ; 11(8): e045547, 2021 08 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354574

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess the possible relationship between television viewing and overweight and obesity among Timorese women of reproductive age. METHODS: This cross-sectional study analysed the Timor-Leste Demographic and Health Survey 2016 dataset. A weighted sample of 11 398 Timorese women aged 15-49 years was chosen using a two-stage stratified random sampling technique. Asian criteria-based body mass index (BMI) cut-offs were used to define overweight (BMI 23.0 to <27.5 kg/m2) and obesity (BMI ≥27.5 kg/m2). Frequency of TV viewing was categorised into three groups: (1) not at all, (2) less than once a week and (3) at least once a week. Multilevel ordered logistic regression was performed to identify the correlates of overweight and obesity. Both crude and adjusted odds ratios (AOR) along with a 95% CI were calculated to show the strength of association. RESULTS: Among 11 398 respondents, 19.4% were overweight or obese (overweight: 15.7% and obese: 3.8%). Although about half of the respondents reportedly did not watch TV at all, just over two-thirds watched TV at least once a week. Women who watched TV at least once a week were found to have 1.3 times the odds of being overweight or obese compared with those who never watched TV (AOR: 1.3, 95% CI: 1.1 to 1.5; p<0.001). However, when stratified by settlement type, the statistical significance stood for the rural women only (AOR: 1.5, 95% CI: 1.2 to 1.8; p<0.001), after adjusting for the covariates. CONCLUSION: Watching TV at least once a week was found to be a significant correlate of overweight and obesity in rural Timorese women of reproductive age. Further studies need to be undertaken to assess physical activity, sedentary and dietary patterns to clarify the possible mechanism through which TV viewing may influence BMI in those groups.


Subject(s)
Overweight , Television , Body Mass Index , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Obesity/epidemiology , Overweight/epidemiology , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Timor-Leste
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL