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1.
PLoS One ; 17(1): e0262202, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622355

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The unprecedented coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused millions of infections worldwide and represents a significant challenge facing modern health care systems. This study was conducted to investigate the impact of lockdown measures in a tertiary Children's Hospital in southwest China, which might be used to predict long-term effects related to health-seeking behavior of parents/caregivers. METHODS: This study included newborns enrolled over a span of 86 weeks between January 4, 2019, and August 27, 2020. We designated two time periods for analysis purposes: a stable pre-COVID period(55 weeks between January 4, 2019, and January 23, 2020) and a COVID-impacted period (31 weeks between January 24, 2020, and August 27, 2020). An interrupted time-series analysis was employed to compare changes and trends in hospital admissions and disease spectra before and after the period of nonpharmaceutical interventions (NPIs). Furthermore, this study was conducted to evaluate whether the health-seeking behavior of parents/caregivers was influenced by pandemic factors. RESULTS: Overall, 16,640 infants were admitted to the neonatology department during the pre-COVID period (n = 12,082) and the COVID-impacted period (n = 4,558). The per week neonatal admissions consistently decreased following the first days of NPIs (January 24, 2020). The average weekly admission rates of 220/week pre-COVID period and 147/week COVID-impacted period. There was an evident decrease in the volume of admissions for all disease spectra after the intervention, whereas the decrease of patients complaining about pathological jaundice-related conditions was statistically significant (p<0.05). In the COVID-impacted period, the percentage of patients who suffered from respiratory system diseases, neonatal encephalopathy, and infectious diseases decreased, while the percentage of pathological jaundice-related conditions and gastrointestinal system diseases increased. The neonatal mortality rates (NMRs) increased by 8.7% during the COVID-impacted period compared with the pre-COVID period. CONCLUSIONS: In summary, there was a significant decline in neonatal admissions in a tertiary care hospital during the COVID-19 Pandemic and the associated NPIs. Additionally, this situation had a remarkable impact on disease spectra and health-seeking behavior of parents/caregivers. We, therefore, advise continuing follow-ups and monitoring the main health indicators in vulnerable populations affected by this Pandemic over time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , China , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Interrupted Time Series Analysis/statistics & numerical data , Male
2.
BMJ Open ; 12(1): e051335, 2022 01 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613002

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The prolonged effects of the COVID-19 pandemic continue to have a serious impact on healthcare workers. We described and compared the experiences of healthcare workers in Japan during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic from March to May 2020, and during the lull from June to July 2020. DESIGN: In this qualitative study, we used a web-based survey to obtain comments from healthcare workers about their experiences during the pandemic, and explored these using inductive content analysis. SETTING: A tertiary emergency hospital in Tokyo, in April and July 2020. PARTICIPANTS: Participants were staff in the hospital, including physicians, nurses, pharmacists, radiological technicians and laboratory medical technicians. Many, but not all, had directly cared for patients with COVID-19. RESULTS: In total, 102 participants in the first survey and 154 in the second survey provided open-ended comments. Three themes were extracted: concerns, requests and gratitude. There were four subthemes under concerns: the hospital infection control system, fear of spreading infection to others, uncertainty about when the pandemic would end and being treated as a source of infection. There were 53 requests in the first survey and 106 in the second survey. These requests were divided into seven subthemes: compensation, staffing, information, facilities, leave time, PCR tests and equitable treatment. The theme on gratitude had two subthemes: information and emotional support, and material support. The fears and desires of healthcare workers included two types of uncertainty-related concerns, and requests were very different across the two surveys. CONCLUSIONS: It is important to apply a balance of information to help staff adjust to their new work environment, as well as support to minimise the burden of infection and impact on their families.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Personnel , Humans , Japan , Pandemics , Patient Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers
3.
JAMA Netw Open ; 5(1): e2142210, 2022 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1611175

ABSTRACT

Importance: A surge of COVID-19 occurred from March to June 2021, in New Delhi, India, linked to the B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant of SARS-CoV-2. COVID-19 vaccines were rolled out for health care workers (HCWs) starting in January 2021. Objective: To assess the incidence density of reinfection among a cohort of HCWs and estimate the effectiveness of the inactivated whole virion vaccine BBV152 against reinfection. Design, Setting, and Participants: This was a retrospective cohort study among HCWs working at a tertiary care center in New Delhi, India. Exposures: Vaccination with 0, 1, or 2 doses of BBV152. Main Outcomes and Measures: The HCWs were categorized as fully vaccinated (with 2 doses and ≥15 days after the second dose), partially vaccinated (with 1 dose or 2 doses with <15 days after the second dose), or unvaccinated. The incidence density of COVID-19 reinfection per 100 person-years was computed, and events from March 3, 2020, to June 18, 2021, were included for analysis. Unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using a Cox proportional hazards model. Estimated vaccine effectiveness (1 - adjusted HR) was reported. Results: Among 15 244 HCWs who participated in the study, 4978 (32.7%) were diagnosed with COVID-19. The mean (SD) age was 36.6 (10.3) years, and 55.0% were male. The reinfection incidence density was 7.26 (95% CI: 6.09-8.66) per 100 person-years (124 HCWs [2.5%], total person follow-up period of 1696 person-years as time at risk). Fully vaccinated HCWs had lower risk of reinfection (HR, 0.14 [95% CI, 0.08-0.23]), symptomatic reinfection (HR, 0.13 [95% CI, 0.07-0.24]), and asymptomatic reinfection (HR, 0.16 [95% CI, 0.05-0.53]) compared with unvaccinated HCWs. Accordingly, among the 3 vaccine categories, reinfection was observed in 60 of 472 (12.7%) of unvaccinated (incidence density, 18.05 per 100 person-years; 95% CI, 14.02-23.25), 39 of 356 (11.0%) of partially vaccinated (incidence density 15.62 per 100 person-years; 95% CI, 11.42-21.38), and 17 of 1089 (1.6%) fully vaccinated (incidence density 2.18 per 100 person-years; 95% CI, 1.35-3.51) HCWs. The estimated effectiveness of BBV152 against reinfection was 86% (95% CI, 77%-92%); symptomatic reinfection, 87% (95% CI, 76%-93%); and asymptomatic reinfection, 84% (95% CI, 47%-95%) among fully vaccinated HCWs. Partial vaccination was not associated with reduced risk of reinfection. Conclusions and Relevance: These findings suggest that BBV152 was associated with protection against both symptomatic and asymptomatic reinfection in HCWs after a complete vaccination schedule, when the predominant circulating variant was B.1.617.2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Reinfection , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , India/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Tertiary Care Centers , Vaccines, Inactivated/administration & dosage , Virion/immunology , Young Adult
4.
Gac Med Mex ; 157(3): 257-262, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1603574

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: As a result of COVID-19, many hospitals underwent a conversion for the care for this disease. OBJECTIVE: To analyze COVID-19 hospital epidemiological behavior from March to August 2020. METHODS: Through a series of cases, COVID-19 epidemiological behavior at the hospital was analyzed, for which simple case rates, percentages and incidence of COVID-19 per 100 hospital discharges were estimated. RESULTS: Out of 491 subjects who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, 156 (31.7 %) were hospitalized for clinical data of moderate to severe disease. Average age was 59.1 years; 121 cases (75 %) were discharged due to improvement, and 32 (20.5 %), due to death. Average age of those who died was 69.7 years, and the most affected age group was 60 to 80 years (45.4 %). Calculated lethality was 20.5 per 100 hospital discharges, while that calculated taking into account positive patients (outpatients and hospitalized patients) was 6.5. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 epidemiological behavior was similar to that described in other studies; however, lethality and mortality are above national average. The analysis of this and of the factors that favored it in our population is pending.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , Child , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Mexico/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Outpatients , Severity of Illness Index , Tertiary Care Centers , Young Adult
5.
Indian J Public Health ; 65(4): 384-386, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607696

ABSTRACT

A nationwide lockdown was imposed from March 25, 2020, to curb the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. The study aimed to analyze the trend, pattern of animal bite cases and to quantify the reduction in the incidence of animal bite cases due to diminution of exposure time with animals as a result of lockdown. The interrupted time series method was used to evaluate the effect of lockdown on the incidence of animal bite cases. Right after the lockdown, the mean number of reported animal bite cases decreased significantly (P = 0.04) by 8.3%. Furthermore, the month-to-month change of cases for the postlockdown period was in decreasing trend (ß3 = 0.872) and was significant (P < 0.05). Reduction in the exposure time with street animal surely reduce the incidence in animal bite cases and hence, the Government should take appropriate actions to control the intermixing of street dogs with marginal populations at the village and urban slums level.


Subject(s)
Bites and Stings , COVID-19 , Animals , Bites and Stings/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Dogs , Humans , India/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers
6.
BMJ Open ; 12(1): e054069, 2022 01 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606566

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The first COVID-19-19 epidemic wave was over the period of February-May 2020. Since 1 October 2020, Italy, as many other European countries, faced a second wave. The aim of this analysis was to compare the 28-day mortality between the two waves among COVID-19 hospitalised patients. DESIGN: Observational cohort study. Standard survival analysis was performed to compare all-cause mortality within 28 days after hospital admission in the two waves. Kaplan-Meier curves as well as Cox regression model analysis were used. The effect of wave on risk of death was shown by means of HRs with 95% CIs. A sensitivity analysis around the impact of the circulating variant as a potential unmeasured confounder was performed. SETTING: University Hospital of Modena, Italy. Patients admitted to the hospital for severe COVID-19 pneumonia during the first (22 February-31 May 2020) and second (1 October-31 December 2020) waves were included. RESULTS: During the two study periods, a total of 1472 patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia were admitted to our hospital, 449 during the first wave and 1023 during the second. Median age was 70 years (IQR 56-80), 37% women, 49% with PaO2/FiO2 <250 mm Hg, 82% with ≥1 comorbidity, median duration of symptoms was 6 days. 28-day mortality rate was 20.0% (95% CI 16.3 to 23.7) during the first wave vs 14.2% (95% CI 12.0 to 16.3) in the second (log-rank test p value=0.03). After including key predictors of death in the multivariable Cox regression model, the data still strongly suggested a lower 28-day mortality rate in the second wave (aHR=0.64, 95% CI 0.45 to 0.90, p value=0.01). CONCLUSIONS: In our hospitalised patients with COVID-19 with severe pneumonia, the 28-day mortality appeared to be reduced by 36% during the second as compared with the first wave. Further studies are needed to identify factors that may have contributed to this improved survival.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Aged , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Italy/epidemiology , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers
7.
J Cancer Res Ther ; 17(6): 1540-1546, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1597096

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has affected the entire health-care system and has led to a sense of fear and anxiety in the minds of patients. Patient's perceptions in this scenario of the pandemic are unknown. Providing continued care for cancer patients during the lockdown has been challenging. Measures are needed to improve patient safety and satisfaction during these challenging times and hence the importance of measuring the degree of satisfaction for the quality of care provided. The aim of the study was to evaluate the factors related to patients' satisfaction and also understand their apprehensions, fears, and anxieties they face as they receive radiotherapy treatment amid COVID-19 pandemic. The study's objective was to explore other aspects such as logistic issues, patient-staff communication, and also perceptions of the patients toward the outbreak. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted from April to September 2020. A questionnaire was created for which the patients were asked to provide answers. Parameters assessed included general information such as mode of transport used, frame of mind during treatment, awareness about pandemic, satisfaction toward care provided by health-care staff, and also documenting the suggestions to improve the quality of care. Results: During this period, we interviewed 108 patients: 56 males (51.9%) and 52 females (48.1%). 90.7% of the participants were satisfied with the condition and safety measures employed in waiting area and billing section. Majority (88.9%) were found to be aware about COVID-19. 74.1% of the participants were very satisfied with the services provided to them in the department of radiation oncology. Conclusion: The survey was useful in measuring the patient satisfaction, in understanding their fears and anxieties, and also in determining their awareness about the pandemic. The survey was also useful to get the patients' opinion and ideas for improvement in the health-care services.


Subject(s)
Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Professional-Patient Relations , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communication , Fear/psychology , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Safety , Quality of Health Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
Afr J Paediatr Surg ; 19(1): 40-45, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592223

ABSTRACT

Introduction: As a result of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, more than 28 million planned surgeries worldwide could be cancelled leading to patients facing long waiting period for their treatment. The outbreak of COVID-19 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS CoV-2) has spread to more than 220 countries around the world and has almost stopped all routine surgical work. In children, the delay in the management of surgical diseases could result in significant morbidity and mortality. Material and Method: Herein, we describe our experience with the management of Paediatric Surgical patients at our centre which is a tertiary level hospital catering to both COVID-19 positive and Non-COVID patients in all specialties. Observation and Results: During the COVID-19 pandemic, 69.41% fewer paediatric surgical patients underwent surgery relative to the corresponding period 1 year earlier. However, the number of emergency cases performed increased during the COVID pandemic by 62.12%, mostly involving, urological and gastrointestinal emergencies. Conclusion: As we gain experience in effective protocol-based management, which can be revised based on the evolving scientific evidence. It will be appropriate to resume the elective work in selected patients, following the appropriate level of precautions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Child , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580718

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to evaluate the mental health outcomes of health care workers (HCWs) of the Verona academic hospital trust (Italy) one year after the outbreak of COVID-19 and to identify predicted risk factors. A web-based survey was conducted from mid-April to mid-May 2021 on hospital workers one year after the first evaluation performed during the lock-down phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. Post-traumatic stress, general anxiety, depression, and burnout were assessed by using, respectively, the impact of event scale (IES-R), the self-rating anxiety scale (SAS), the patient health questionnaire (PHQ-9) and the Maslach burnout inventory-general survey (MBI-GS). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with each of the four mental health outcomes one year after the COVID-19 outbreak. A total of 1033 HCWs participated. The percentage of HCWs scoring above the cut-off increased from 2020 to 2021 in all of the outcome domains (anxiety, 50.1% vs. 55.7, p < 0.05; depression, 26.6% vs. 40.6%, p < 0.001; burnout, 28.6% vs. 40.6%, p < 0.001; chi-square test), with the exception of post-traumatic distress. There was also an increase when stratifying by occupation and workplace, with a greater increase for depression and burnout. Multivariate analysis revealed that, one year after the COVID-19 outbreak, nurses were at the greatest risk of anxiety and depression, whereas residents were at the greatest risk of burnout (in terms of low professional efficacy). Working in intensive care units was associated with an increased risk of developing severe emotional exhaustion and a cynical attitude towards work.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers
12.
BMJ Open ; 11(12): e055126, 2021 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583095

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic is still raging worldwide. While there is significant published evidence on the attributes of patients with COVID-19 from lower-income and middle-income countries, there is a dearth of original research published from Bangladesh, a low-income country in Southeast Asia. Based on a case series from a tertiary healthcare centre, this observational study has explored the epidemiology, clinical profile of patients with COVID-19 and short-term outcomes in Dhaka, Bangladesh. DESIGN AND SETTING: A total of 422 COVID-19-confirmed patients (via reverse transcription-PCR test) were enrolled in this study (male=271, female=150, 1 unreported). We have compiled medical records of the patients and descriptively reported their demographic, socioeconomic and clinical features, treatment history, health outcomes, and postdischarge complications. RESULT: Patients were predominantly male (64%), between 35 and 49 years (28%), with at least one comorbidity (52%), and had COVID-19 symptoms for 1 week before hospitalisation (66%). A significantly higher proportion (p<0.05) of male patients had diabetes, hypertension and ischaemic heart disease, while female patients had asthma (p<0.05). The most common symptoms were fever (80%), cough (60%), dyspnoea (41%) and sore throat (21%). The majority of the patients received antibiotics (77%) and anticoagulant therapy (56%) and stayed in the hospital for an average of 12 days. Over 90% of patients were successfully weaned, while 3% died from COVID-19, and 41% reported complications after discharge. CONCLUSION: The diversity of clinical and epidemiological characteristics and health outcomes of patients with COVID-19 across age groups and gender is noteworthy. Our result will inform the clinicians and epidemiologists of Bangladesh of their COVID-19 mitigation effort.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aftercare , Bangladesh/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Patient Discharge , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers
13.
Inquiry ; 58: 469580211060165, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582740

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Post-COVID-19 symptoms and its features in many recovered patients are almost similar to post-severe acute respiratory syndrome. The study aims to assess the outcome and manifestations during post-COVID follow-up period in recovered patients. METHODS: Ambidirectional longitudinal study was conducted among recovered COVID-19 patients from a tertiary care hospital near Chennai through telephonic interview after discharge. Total admitted patients from June to November 2020 were 3496 and among those 183 died and 12 transferred to other hospitals. Totally 1354 consented for study and the rest were wrong numbers or not willing to participate. Chi-square test and multinominal logistic regression analysis were done. RESULTS: Majority of, that is, 27.6% and 18.7% were in 21-30 years and >60 years, respectively. Majority were admitted with fever (38.3%), cough (15.3), and body pain (10%). Post-COVID symptoms reported were fatigue (39.7%), stress and anxiety (27.6%), and mood changes (5.8%). Some patients were newly diagnosed with diabetes mellitus (10), hypertension (5), and TB (1) after discharge. Having diabetes mellitus is an independent risk to have neurological and cardio-respiratory symptoms and patients who were discharged with minimal support were to have an independent risk factor of renal symptoms on follow-up than other subjects. CONCLUSION: The follow-up symptoms were associated with the patients' comorbidities, age, severity of illness, and environmental factors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , India , Longitudinal Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers
14.
Clin Med Res ; 19(4): 169-178, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581438

ABSTRACT

Objective: Both Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) have an emotional toll on healthcare workers (HCWs), but the difference of the impact between the two diseases remains unknown.Design: A cross sectional descriptive survey.Setting: A tertiary care hospital.Participants: 125 HCWs who worked during the 2014 MERS as well as the 2020 COVID-19 outbreaks in high-risk areas of the hospital including critical care, emergency room and COVID-19 clinics.Methods: The comprehensive survey comprised 5 sections and 68 questions and was administered to HCWs before availability of the COVID-19 vaccine. The survey evaluated hospital staff emotions, perceived stressors, external factors that reduced stress, personal coping strategies, and motivators for future outbreaks. The participants rated each question for MERS and COVID-19 simultaneously on a scale from 0-3. The responses were reported as mean and standard deviation, while Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to calculate the difference in responses.Results: There were 102 (82%) participants who returned the questionnaire. The ritual of obsessive hand washing, emotional and physical fatigue, ongoing changes in infection control guidelines, fear of community transmission, and limitations on socialization and travel were the major stressors that were significantly worse during COVID-19 compared to MERS (P<0.05) and led to HCWs adoption of additional 'personal' coping strategies during COVID-19. There was no difference between COVID-19 and MERS, however, among preferences for 'external' factors made available to HCWs that could reduce stress or in their preferences for motivators to work in future outbreaks (P>.05).Conclusion: Both the MERS and COVID-19 outbreaks were emotionally draining for HCWs. However, COVID-19 was a relatively more stressful experience than MERS for HCWs and led to greater personal, behavioral, and protective adaptations by the hospital staff.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cross-Sectional Studies , Emotions , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , Personnel, Hospital , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers
15.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 6995096, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1573872

ABSTRACT

At the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, early modelling studies estimated a reduction in childhood vaccinations in low- and middle-income countries. Regular provision of both curative and preventive services such as antenatal care and childhood immunizations has been negatively affected since the onset of the pandemic. Our study was aimed at examining the impact that the pandemic had on childhood vaccination services at the Tamale Teaching Hospital (TTH). A mixed methods study design was employed for the study, which was conducted at the Child Welfare Clinic (CWC) of the TTH. With quantitative approach, we retrospectively looked at the uptake of the various vaccines during the pandemic era, defined as the period between 1st March 2020 and 28th February, 2021, and the prepandemic era defined as the period 1st March 2019 to 29th February, 2020. The qualitative approach was used to understand the perspective of five healthcare providers at the CWC and the four caregivers of children who have missed a vaccine or delayed in coming, on the factors accounting for any observed change. Data analysis was done using Microsoft Excel 2016 and thematic content analysis. Quantitative data were presented in frequencies, percentages, and line graphs. With the exception of the Measles Rubella (MR) 2 vaccine, we observed a decline ranging from 47% (2298) to 10.5% (116), with the greatest decline seen in the BCG and the least decline seen in the MR1 vaccine. The month of May 2020 saw the greatest decline, that is, 70.6% (813). A decline of 38.3% (4473) was noted when comparison was made between the designated prepandemic and pandemic eras, for all the vaccines in our study. Fear of COVID-19 infection and misinformation were commonly given as reasons for the decline. Catch-up immunization schedule should be instituted to curtail possible future outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases.


Subject(s)
Immunization Programs/trends , Vaccination/trends , BCG Vaccine , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Ghana/epidemiology , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Measles Vaccine , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Retrospective Studies , Tertiary Care Centers/trends
16.
J Pediatr Orthop B ; 31(1): e69-e74, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561345

ABSTRACT

Telehealth services are innovative healthcare strategies that utilize communication technologies to improve healthcare access for patients. Teleradiology is a form of telehealth service that involves the transmission of radiological images, such as x-rays, CTs and MRIs, from one location to another to share patient information with other physicians. The purpose of this study was to assess teleradiology consultations for orthopaedic patients at a paediatric tertiary care centre. A retrospective review was conducted of patients who received teleradiology consultations with a single orthopaedic surgeon from 2015 to 2018 through the paediatric orthopaedic hip clinic at our institution. Teleradiology consultations involved follow-up radiographic imaging at a local community facility for patients who initially received healthcare services at our institution, followed by a telephone consultation to review imaging results and communicate next steps in care. Data collected included patient demographics, imaging type, facility location and distance from our institution. Eighty patients (F = 66, M = 14) who received teleradiology services were reviewed. Mean age was 3.5 years [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.5-4.4] at time of imaging. The average distance from community facilities to our institution was 1167 km (95% confidence interval: 920-1414), a measure of the total distance saved in travel for each patient in a single direction. The travel distance saved was substantial. Paediatric orthopaedic teleradiology services provide families specialized consultations and care continuity without costly travel. With increased implementation of teleradiology services, more patients and families can remain in their home communities while receiving the same quality of care.


Subject(s)
Orthopedics , Teleradiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Referral and Consultation , Retrospective Studies , Telephone , Tertiary Care Centers
17.
JNMA J Nepal Med Assoc ; 59(237): 490-493, 2021 May 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1554618

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Emergency Department overcrowding has become worsening problem internationally which may affect patient, emergency department efficiency and quality of care and this may lead to increased risk of in hospital mortality, higher costs, medical errors and longer times to treatment. With this pandemic COVID-19 likely to go on for months, if not a year or longer, the Emergency Department should be prepared for large influx of patients infected with COVID-19. The aim of this study is to find-out the length of stay in emergency department during COVID-19 pandemic at a tertiary care hospital in Nepal. METHODS: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study conducted in the Emergency Department of Kanti Children's Hospital. Ethical clearance was obtained from Institutional review committee Kanti Children's Hospital. Data collection was done from the emergency records from July 23, 2020 to July 29, 2020. The calculated sample size was 211. The data thus obtained was entered in Statistical Package for the Social Science software version 20 and necessary calculations were done. RESULTS: The median length of stay in emergency department was found to be 1.75 hours (Interquartile range 0 to 30 hours). CONCLUSIONS: Definitive management starts in respective wards and Intensive Care Units. During COVID-19, with longer emergency stay, chances of cross-infection increases, and the health workers serving in emergency department will be at risks. So guidelines for shorter emergency stay should be implemented.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Emergency Service, Hospital , Humans , Length of Stay , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers
19.
Gac Med Mex ; 157(3): 313-317, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1535087

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: During the COVID-19 pandemic, adherence to hygiene measures is an objective aimed at reducing morbidity and mortality. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate adherence to hand hygiene and protection measures during the COVID-19 pandemic in a tertiary care hospital. METHODS: Cross-sectional study on health personnel handwashing at the five moments recommended by the World Health Organization, as well as on the use of specific personal protective equipment. RESULTS: One hundred and seventeen hand hygiene opportunities were observed in health personnel. Hand washing was observed in 40 (34 %) and omission in 76 (65 %). Adherence to the use of face shield was observed in five (4 %), and lack of adherence in 112 (96%). Adherence to the use of face mask was observed in 65 nursing professionals (87 %), with appropriate use of the mask in 56 of them (60 %) and use of face shield in one (1 %). CONCLUSION: Health personnel showed low proportions of adherence to hand hygiene and use of equipment for specific protection during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Guideline Adherence/statistics & numerical data , Hand Hygiene/statistics & numerical data , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Personnel, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hand Hygiene/standards , Humans , Male , Personnel, Hospital/standards , Prospective Studies , Tertiary Care Centers , Time Factors
20.
Gac Med Mex ; 157(3): 237-244, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1535079

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19, caused by the betacoronavirus SARS-CoV-2, has overwhelmed the world's health systems. OBJECTIVE: To describe the epidemiological characteristics of patients treated in a tertiary care hospital. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study of patients diagnosed with or suspected of having COVID-19 from March 23 to July 31, 2020 was conducted. RESULTS: 4,401 patients were hospitalized at Central Military Hospital, out of which 35 % were beneficiaries, 26 % civilians, 28 % active military personnel, and only 11 %, retired military personnel. Male gender predominated, both in hospitalized patients and in those who died, as well as the O+ group and absence of comorbidities; among the observed comorbidities, the main ones were overweight and diabetes. Hospitalized patients' median age was 49 years, while median age of those who died was 62 years; women older than 51 years had a higher risk of dying. Adjusted case fatality rate was 18.5 %; 50 % died within the first six days. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, the epidemiological characteristics and main comorbidities in Mexican patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection were identified.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Overweight/epidemiology , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Mexico/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Tertiary Care Centers , Young Adult
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