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1.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(1): e21327, 2021 01 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2141283

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic, caused by SARS-CoV-2, has forced the health care delivery structure to change rapidly. The pandemic has further widened the disparities in health care and exposed vulnerable populations. Health care services caring for such populations must not only continue to operate but create innovative methods of care delivery without compromising safety. We present our experience of incorporating telemedicine in our university hospital-based outpatient clinic in one of the worst-hit areas in the world. OBJECTIVE: Our goal is to assess the adoption of a telemedicine service in the first month of its implementation in outpatient practice during the COVID-19 pandemic. We also want to assess the need for transitioning to telemedicine, the benefits and challenges in doing so, and ongoing solutions during the initial phase of the implementation of telemedicine services for our patients. METHODS: We conducted a prospective review of clinic operations data from the first month of a telemedicine rollout in the outpatient adult ambulatory clinic from April 1, 2020, to April 30, 2020. A telemedicine visit was defined as synchronous audio-video communication between the provider and patient for clinical care longer than 5 minutes or if the video visit converted to a telephone visit after 5 minutes due to technical problems. We recorded the number of telemedicine visits scheduled, visits completed, and the time for each visit. We also noted the most frequent billing codes used based on the time spent in the patient care and the number of clinical tasks (eg, activity suggested through diagnosis or procedural code) that were addressed remotely by the physicians. RESULTS: During the study period, we had 110 telemedicine visits scheduled, of which 94 (85.4%) visits were completed. The average duration of the video visit was 35 minutes, with the most prolonged visit lasting 120 minutes. Of 94 patients, 24 (25.54%) patients were recently discharged from the hospital, and 70 (74.46%) patients were seen for urgent care needs. There was a 50% increase from the baseline in the number of clinical tasks that were addressed by the physicians during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: There was a high acceptance of telemedicine services by the patients, which was evident by a high show rate during the COVID-19 pandemic in Detroit. With limited staffing, restricted outpatient work hours, a shortage of providers, and increased outpatient needs, telemedicine was successfully implemented in our practice.


Subject(s)
Pandemics/prevention & control , Telemedicine/methods , Ambulatory Care/methods , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/transmission , Humans , Michigan , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Patient Satisfaction , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , Telemedicine/trends , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Tertiary Care Centers/trends
2.
Rev Neurol ; 73(11): 390-393, 2021 12 01.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1539089

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Countries worldwide are having to cope with the COVID-19 pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2. The burden on their national health systems is currently at unprecedented levels. Telemedicine care was initiated at an early stage in our centre. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We conducted a descriptive and retrospective study to evaluate the usefulness of telemedicine during lockdown in our centre. Patients included in the study had a clinical diagnosis of epilepsy, with two visits via telemedicine, who had been followed up for at least six months during the normal situation prior to the COVID-19 pandemic and two face-to-face consultations during the same period. RESULTS: A total of 115 patients were included. The average age was 29 years, 53% were males, 52.2% had focal epilepsy, 58.3% with a structural causation and 57.4% had difficult-to-treat epilepsy. The mean number of seizures prior to lockdown was 9.73/month and 6.54/month during lockdown. The number of patients who were seizure-free when lockdown ended was higher than that observed in the phase before it began: 54 versus 45 out of 115. CONCLUSIONS: Telemedicine is a very useful strategy for monitoring the course, progress and therapeutic changes in epileptic patients in the short and medium term. The reduction in the seizure frequency can be sustained in the medium term, not only in the short term as corroborated in previous studies. Telemedicine allows access to virtually all patients and closer monitoring.


TITLE: Telemedicina y epilepsia: experiencia asistencial de un centro de referencia nacional durante la pandemia de COVID-19.Introducción. El mundo entero está afrontando la pandemia por COVID-19 causada por el SARS-CoV-2. Los sistemas de salud nacionales están sometidos a niveles de sobrecarga sin precedentes. En nuestro centro se inició de forma temprana la asistencia a través de telemedicina. Pacientes y métodos. Es un estudio descriptivo y retrospectivo para evaluar la utilidad de la telemedicina durante el confinamiento en nuestro centro. Se incluyó a los pacientes con diagnóstico clínico de epilepsia, con dos asistencias a través de telemedicina, que tuvieran seguimiento durante al menos seis meses durante la situación de normalidad previa a la pandemia por COVID-19 y dos consultas presenciales durante ese mismo período. Resultados. Se incluyó a 115 pacientes. La media de edad fue de 29 años, el 53% fueron varones, el 52,2% con epilepsia focal, el 58,3% de etiología estructural y el 57,4% presentaba epilepsia de difícil control. La media de crisis preconfinamiento fue de 9,73/mes y de 6,54/mes durante el confinamiento. El número de pacientes libres de crisis fue mayor al final del confinamiento respecto a la fase preconfinamiento, 54 frente a 45/115. Conclusiones. La telemedicina es una estrategia de mucha utilidad en la monitorización de la evolución, el control evolutivo y los cambios terapéuticos en pacientes epilépticos a corto y medio plazo. La reducción de la frecuencia de crisis puede mantenerse a medio plazo, no sólo a corto plazo como se corroboró en estudios previos. La telemedicina permite acceder a prácticamente la totalidad de los pacientes y realizar un seguimiento más cercano.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Epilepsy/drug therapy , Pandemics , Remote Consultation/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , Child , Child, Preschool , Disease Management , Drug Resistant Epilepsy/drug therapy , Drug Resistant Epilepsy/epidemiology , Epilepsies, Partial/drug therapy , Epilepsies, Partial/epidemiology , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Female , Guatemala/epidemiology , Health Facility Closure , Humans , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Mobile Applications , Office Visits/statistics & numerical data , Procedures and Techniques Utilization/statistics & numerical data , Remote Consultation/trends , Retrospective Studies , Seizures/epidemiology , Seizures/prevention & control , Telephone , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Treatment Outcome , Videoconferencing , Young Adult
3.
Clin Pediatr (Phila) ; 61(2): 177-183, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1523150

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic became an important public health problem affecting all age groups. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical and laboratory findings of newborns born to mothers with COVID-19. Thirty pregnant women with COVID-19 were admitted to Turgut Ozal University Hospital for delivery. Fourteen pregnant women had at least one symptom associated with COVID-19. Positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results were seen in only 3 (9.7%) of 31 newborns. A statistically significant difference was observed between PCR-positive and PCR-negative newborns in terms of any adverse pregnancy outcomes. Neonatal lymphocyte count and partial arterial oxygen pressure were significantly lower in the PCR-positive group. Results were also compared according to the interval from the maternal diagnosis time to delivery. Hemoglobin and hematocrit levels in newborns born to mothers diagnosed more than 7 days before delivery were significantly lower. Neonates born to mothers with COVID-19 had mild clinical symptoms and favorable outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Pregnant Women , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Transmission, Infectious/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data
4.
S Afr Med J ; 110(10): 968-972, 2020 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1362733

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has challenged the provision of healthcare in ways that are unprecedented in our lifetime. Planning for the sheer numbers expected during the surge has required public hospitals to de-escalate all non-essential clinical services to focus on COVID-19. Western Cape Province was the initial epicentre of the COVID-19 epidemic in South Africa (SA), and the Cape Town metro was its hardest-hit geographical region. We describe how we constructed our COVID-19 hospital-wide clinical service at Groote Schuur Hospital, the University of Cape Town's tertiary-level teaching hospital. By describing the barriers and enablers, we hope to provide guidance rather than a blueprint for hospitals elsewhere in SA and in low-resource countries that face similar challenges now or during subsequent waves.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Hospitals, University/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Electronic Health Records/organization & administration , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Humans , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Materials Management, Hospital , Pandemics , Patient Care Team , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Secondary Care Centers , South Africa/epidemiology
6.
Am J Health Syst Pharm ; 77(19): 1598-1605, 2020 09 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317904

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To describe our medical center's pharmacy services preparedness process and offer guidance to assist other institutions in preparing for surges of critically ill patients such as those experienced during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. SUMMARY: The leadership of a department of pharmacy at an urban medical center in the US epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic proactively created a pharmacy action plan in anticipation of a surge in admissions of critically ill patients with COVID-19. It was essential to create guidance documents outlining workflow, provide comprehensive staff education, and repurpose non-intensive care unit (ICU)-trained clinical pharmacotherapy specialists to work in ICUs. Teamwork was crucial to ensure staff safety, develop complete scheduling, maintain adequate drug inventory and sterile compounding, optimize the electronic health record and automated dispensing cabinets to help ensure appropriate prescribing and effective management of medication supplies, and streamline the pharmacy workflow to ensure that all patients received pharmacotherapeutic regimens in a timely fashion. CONCLUSION: Each hospital should view the COVID-19 crisis as an opportunity to internally review and enhance workflow processes, initiatives that can continue even after the resolution of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Medication Therapy Management/organization & administration , Pharmacy Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration , Academic Medical Centers/standards , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitals, Urban/organization & administration , Hospitals, Urban/standards , Humans , Leadership , New York/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/organization & administration , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/standards , Pharmacists/organization & administration , Pharmacy Service, Hospital/standards , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Tertiary Care Centers/standards , Workflow , Workforce/organization & administration , Workforce/standards
7.
Drug Discov Ther ; 15(3): 156-161, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1298217

ABSTRACT

A variable proportion of patients develop persistent/prolonged symptoms of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection (long COVID). We aimed to study the clinical predictors of persistent symptoms in patients with mild COVID-19 at 30 days post discharge (long COVID-19). We also tried to identify symptom clusters among mild COVID-19 patients. Fifty-seven patients admitted at a tertiary care centre after a positive RT-PCR report over a period of 2 months, were enrolled in the study. Details of presentation, history of illness, laboratory investigations and disease outcomes were recorded from documented medical records and discharge slip. The patients were contacted (telephonically) at 30 days after discharge and enquired regarding persistent symptoms, if any. Follow up data at 30 days post-discharge was available for 53 patients. Among them, the most common persistent symptom was fatigue (22.6%), followed by cough (9.4%) and myalgias (7.5%). There was a significant association of persistent symptoms with diarrhoea at presentation [OR 14.26 (95% CI 2.30-142.47; p = 0.009] and gap between symptom onset and admission [OR 1.40 (95% CI 1.08-1.93; p = 0.020] on multivariate logistic regression analysis. On cluster analysis, three phenotypes of mild COVID-19 were identified, which may have implications on monitoring and management. There appears to be a positive association of diarrhoea as a presenting manifestation and gap between symptom onset and admission with the persistence of symptoms classified as long COVID-19, even in mild illness. We also identified multiple phenotypes of mild COVID-19 illness, which warrant further exploration.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Time and Motion Studies , Young Adult
9.
J Cancer Res Ther ; 17(2): 551-555, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268377

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID 19) is a zoonotic viral infection that originated in Wuhan, China, in December 2019. It was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization shortly thereafter. This pandemic is going to have a lasting impact on the functioning of pathology laboratories due to the frequent handling of potentially infectious samples by the laboratory personnel. To deal with this unprecedented situation, various national and international guidelines have been put forward outlining the precautions to be taken during sample processing from a potentially infectious patient. PURPOSE: Most of these guidelines are centered around laboratories that are a part of designated COVID 19 hospitals. However, proper protocols need to be in place in all laboratories, irrespective of whether they are a part of COVID 19 hospital or not as this would greatly reduce the risk of exposure of laboratory/hospital personnel. As part of a laboratory associated with a rural cancer hospital which is not a dedicated COVID 19 hospital, we aim to present our institute's experience in handling pathology specimens during the COVID 19 era. CONCLUSION: We hope this will address the concerns of small to medium sized laboratories and help them build an effective strategy required for protecting the laboratory personnel from risk of exposure and also ensure smooth and optimum functioning of the laboratory services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Clinical Laboratory Services/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Cancer Care Facilities/organization & administration , Cancer Care Facilities/standards , Clinical Laboratory Services/standards , Decontamination/methods , Decontamination/standards , Developing Countries , Disinfection/methods , Disinfection/organization & administration , Disinfection/standards , Hospitals, Rural/organization & administration , Hospitals, Rural/standards , Humans , India/epidemiology , Infection Control/standards , Medical Laboratory Personnel/organization & administration , Medical Laboratory Personnel/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Specimen Handling/standards , Tertiary Care Centers/standards , Workforce/organization & administration , Workforce/standards
10.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 148(1): 168e-169e, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263729

Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Infection Control/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Surgery, Plastic/organization & administration , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Testing/standards , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 Testing/trends , Egypt/epidemiology , Elective Surgical Procedures/standards , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Elective Surgical Procedures/trends , Health Policy , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Infection Control/trends , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/standards , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/trends , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surgery Department, Hospital/standards , Surgery Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Surgery Department, Hospital/trends , Surgery, Plastic/standards , Surgery, Plastic/statistics & numerical data , Surgery, Plastic/trends , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Tertiary Care Centers/standards , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Care Centers/trends , Triage/organization & administration , Triage/standards , Triage/statistics & numerical data , Triage/trends
11.
Chest ; 160(5): 1714-1728, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1248853

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in unprecedented adjustments to ICU organization and care processes globally. RESEARCH QUESTIONS: Did hospital emergency responses to the COVID-19 pandemic differ depending on hospital setting? Which strategies worked well to mitigate strain as perceived by intensivists? STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Between August and November 2020, we carried out semistructured interviews of intensivists from tertiary and community hospitals across six regions in the United States that experienced early or large surges of COVID-19 patients, or both. We identified themes of hospital emergency responses using the four S framework of acute surge planning: space, staff, stuff, system. RESULTS: Thirty-three intensivists from seven tertiary and six community hospitals participated. Clinicians across both settings believed that canceling elective surgeries was helpful to increase ICU capabilities and that hospitals should establish clearly defined thresholds at which surgeries are limited during future surge events. ICU staff was the most limited resource; staff shortages were improved by the use of tiered staffing models, just-in-time training for non-ICU clinicians, designated treatment teams, and deployment of trainees. Personal protective equipment (PPE) shortages and reuse were widespread, causing substantial distress among clinicians; hands-on PPE training was helpful to reduce clinicians' anxiety. Transparency and involvement of frontline clinicians as stakeholders were important components of effective emergency responses and helped to maintain trust among staff. INTERPRETATION: We identified several strategies potentially to mitigate strain as perceived by intensivists working in both tertiary and community hospital settings. Our study also demonstrated the importance of trust and transparency between frontline staff and hospital leadership as key components of effective emergency responses during public health crises.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Health Workforce , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Physicians , Arizona , California , Critical Care Nursing , Elective Surgical Procedures , Equipment Reuse , Female , Hospitals, Community/organization & administration , Humans , Internship and Residency , Leadership , Louisiana , Male , Michigan , New York , Nurses/supply & distribution , Organizational Policy , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Process Assessment, Health Care , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Stakeholder Participation , Surge Capacity , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Washington
12.
Scott Med J ; 66(3): 142-147, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1221693

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: In 2010, a virtual sarcoma referral model was implemented, which aims to provide a centralised multidisciplinary team (MDT) to provide rapid advice, avoiding unnecessary appointments and providing a streamlined service. The aim of this study is to examine the feasibility of this screening tool in reducing the service burden and expediting patient journey. METHODS AND RESULTS: All referrals made to a single tertiary referral sarcoma unit from January 2010 to December 2018 were extracted from a prospective database. Only 26.0% events discussed required review directly. 30.3% were discharged back to referrer. 16.5% required further investigations. 22.5% required a biopsy prior to review. There was a reduction in the rate of patients reviewed at the sarcoma clinic, and a higher discharge rate from the MDT in 2018 versus 2010 (p < 0.001). This gives a potential cost saving of 670,700 GBP over the 9 year period. CONCLUSION: An MDT meeting which triages referrals is cost-effective at reducing unnecessary referrals. This can limit unnecessary exposure of patients who may have an underlying diagnosis of cancer to a high-risk environment, and reduces burden on services as it copes with increasing demands during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Oncology Service, Hospital , Patient Care Team , Referral and Consultation , Sarcoma/therapy , Triage/methods , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Feasibility Studies , Female , Health Care Costs , Humans , Male , Oncology Service, Hospital/economics , Oncology Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Patient Care Team/economics , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Referral and Consultation/economics , Referral and Consultation/organization & administration , Sarcoma/diagnosis , Sarcoma/economics , Scotland/epidemiology , Tertiary Care Centers/economics , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Triage/economics , Videoconferencing
13.
BJU Int ; 128(6): 752-758, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219502

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To analyse the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on a centralized specialist kidney cancer care pathway. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis of patient and pathway characteristics including prioritization strategies at the Specialist Centre for Kidney Cancer located at the Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust (RFH) before and during the surge of COVID-19. RESULTS: On 18 March 2020 all elective surgery was halted at RFH to redeploy resources and staff for the COVID-19 surge. Prioritizing of patients according to European Association of Urology guidance was introduced. Clinics and the specialist multidisciplinary team (SMDT) meetings were maintained with physical distancing, kidney surgery was moved to a COVID-protected site, and infection prevention measurements were enforced. During the 7 weeks of lockdown (23 March to 10 May 2020), 234 cases were discussed at the SMDT meetings, 53% compared to the 446 cases discussed in the 7 weeks pre-lockdown. The reduction in referrals was more pronounced for small and asymptomatic renal masses. Of 62 low-priority cancer patients, 27 (43.5%) were deferred. Only one (4%) COVID-19 infection occurred postoperatively, and the patient made a full recovery. No increase in clinical or pathological upstaging could be detected in patients who underwent deferred surgery compared to pre-COVID practice. CONCLUSION: The first surge of the COVID-19 pandemic severely impacted diagnosis, referral and treatment of kidney cancer at a tertiary referral centre. With a policy of prioritization and COVID-protected pathways, capacity for time-sensitive oncological interventions was maintained and no immediate clinical harm was observed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/therapy , Kidney Neoplasms/therapy , Patient Care Team/statistics & numerical data , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cancer Care Facilities/organization & administration , Cancer Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/pathology , Disease Progression , Hospitals, High-Volume/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Kidney Neoplasms/pathology , Neoplasm Staging , Nephrectomy/statistics & numerical data , Patient Selection , Retrospective Studies , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Time-to-Treatment , Watchful Waiting/statistics & numerical data
14.
Gynecol Oncol ; 162(1): 12-17, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1213578

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To compare gynecologic oncology surgical treatment modifications and delays during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic between a publicly funded Canadian versus a privately funded American cancer center. METHODS: This is a retrospective cohort study of all planned gynecologic oncology surgeries at University Health Network (UHN) in Toronto, Canada and Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) in Boston, USA, between March 22,020 and July 302,020. Surgical treatment delays and modifications at both centers were compared to standard recommendations. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to adjust for confounders. RESULTS: A total of 450 surgical gynecologic oncology patients were included; 215 at UHN and 235 at BWH. There was a significant difference in median time from decision-to-treat to treatment (23 vs 15 days, p < 0.01) between UHN and BWH and a significant difference in treatment delays (32.56% vs 18.29%; p < 0.01) and modifications (8.37% vs 0.85%; p < 0.01), respectively. On multivariable analysis adjusting for age, race, treatment site and surgical priority status, treatment at UHN was an independent predictor of treatment modification (OR = 9.43,95% CI 1.81-49.05, p < 0.01). Treatment delays were higher at UHN (OR = 1.96,95% CI 1.14-3.36 p = 0.03) and for uterine disease (OR = 2.43, 95% CI 1.11-5.33, p = 0.03). CONCLUSION: During the first wave of COVID-19 pandemic, gynecologic oncology patients treated at a publicly funded Canadian center were 9.43 times more likely to have a surgical treatment modification and 1.96 times more likely to have a surgical delay compared to an equal volume privately funded center in the United States.


Subject(s)
Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Genital Neoplasms, Female/surgery , Hospitals, Private/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Public/statistics & numerical data , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Canada/epidemiology , Cancer Care Facilities/organization & administration , Cancer Care Facilities/standards , Cancer Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Female , Genital Neoplasms, Female/diagnosis , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Gynecology/economics , Gynecology/organization & administration , Gynecology/standards , Gynecology/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Private/economics , Hospitals, Private/organization & administration , Hospitals, Private/standards , Hospitals, Public/economics , Hospitals, Public/organization & administration , Hospitals, Public/standards , Humans , Medical Oncology/economics , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Medical Oncology/standards , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Retrospective Studies , Tertiary Care Centers/economics , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Tertiary Care Centers/standards , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Time Factors , Triage/statistics & numerical data , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
15.
Przegl Epidemiol ; 74(4): 634-643, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1190771

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID -19 pandemic has imposed multiple questions and consideration in the minds of the patients and dental professionals. The understanding of patient's perceptions and dental services utilization can aid in modifying the pre-existing dental practices. The aim of the present study was to assess the awareness, perceptions and dental services utilization by patients visiting a tertiary care centre during COVID-19. METHODOLOGY: A cross-sectional study on 437 patients was carried using a validated questionnaire consisting of 22 questions on three domains. Strict sterilization protocol and infection control measures were practiced to avoid any contact between the investigator and the patient. RESULTS: Patients were aware of COVID -19 pandemic and were willing (76.7%) to inculcate preventive practices even post-pandemic. Concerns regarding the spread of infection (37.3%) and hygiene/cleanliness (28.6%) were most commonly reported. Patients visited the dental centre primarily for emergency management and preferred their queries being solved on the phone. CONCLUSION: Patients had a positive outlook towards visiting the dental centre for treatment in the near future and did not report any anxiety before visiting a dental centre.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/prevention & control , Dental Care/organization & administration , Practice Patterns, Dentists'/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dental Care/psychology , Dentists/psychology , Dentists/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Male , Poland , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration
16.
Clin Exp Metastasis ; 38(3): 257-261, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1147602

ABSTRACT

Cancer patients represent a vulnerable cohort during the Sars-CoV-2 pandemic. Oncological societies have generated a plethora of recommendations, but precise instructions about routine oncological procedures remain scarce. Here, we report on local COVID-19 protection measures established in an interdisciplinary approach at a tertiary care center during the first wave of the pandemia in Germany. Following these measures, no additional morbidity or mortality during oncological procedures was observed, and no nosocomial infections were registered. However, Validation of our measures is outstanding and regional SARS-CoV-2 prevalence was low. However, specific oncological measures might be important to ensure optimal oncological results, especially for advanced cancer stages during this and future pandemia. In the future, communication about these measures might be crucial to a cancer patient´s assigned network to reduce the danger of excess mortality within the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Infection Control/methods , Medical Oncology/methods , Neoplasms/immunology , Pandemics/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infection Control/standards , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Medical Oncology/standards , Neoplasms/complications , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration
17.
J Healthc Qual Res ; 36(3): 136-141, 2021.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1137459

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: During the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, elective surgical activity was reduced to a minimum. As both the number of cases and the hospitalization needs for this pathology decreased, we thought it appropriate to progressively recover scheduled surgical activity. This work describes how, even with the current alarm state, we were able to practically normalize this activity in a few weeks. METHODS: Two weeks before the intervention, the patients included in the waiting lists were contacted by telephone. After checking their health status and expressing their desire to undergo surgery, they were provided with recommendations to decrease the risk of coronavirus infection. Likewise, an exclusive circuit was established to carry out, 48 hours before the intervention, the detection of SARS-CoV-2 by means of exudates nasopharyngeal PCR. The results were evaluated by each surgical service and the anesthesiology service. In addition, asymptomatic Surgical Area professionals could undergo weekly screening for the early detection of coronavirus according to the recommendations of Occupational Health. RESULTS: In the midst of a pandemic, scheduled surgical activity was reduced by 85%. From the week of April 13, the operating rooms available were recovered, which allowed practically all surgical activity to be recovered the week of May 25. CONCLUSIONS: The creation of circuits and procedures to streamline surgical activity, still in full force of the state of alarm, has allowed us, in a few weeks, to recover almost all of it.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Elective Surgical Procedures , Hospitals, University/organization & administration , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Anesthesiology/organization & administration , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Urban/organization & administration , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient/prevention & control , Mass Screening , Nasopharynx/virology , Operating Rooms/statistics & numerical data , Personnel, Hospital , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spain , Time-to-Treatment , Waiting Lists
18.
Eval Health Prof ; 44(1): 98-101, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1102293

ABSTRACT

A single undiagnosed COVID-19 positive patient admitted in the green zone has the potential to infect many Health Care Workers (HCWs) and other patients at any given time with resultant spread of infection and reduction in the available workforce. Despite the existing triaging strategy at the Obstetric unit of a tertiary hospital in New Delhi, where all COVID-19 suspects obstetric patients were tested and admitted in orange zone and non-suspects in green zone, asymptomatic COVID-19 positive patients were found admitted in the green zone. This was the trigger to undertake a quality improvement (QI) initiative to prevent the admission of asymptomatic COVID-19 positive patients in green zones. The QI project aimed at reducing the admission of COVID-19 positive patients in the green zone of the unit from 20% to 10% in 4 weeks' time starting 13/6/2020 by means of dynamic triaging. A COVID-19 action team was made and after an initial analysis of the problem multiple Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycles were run to test the change ideas. The main change ideas were revised testing strategies and creating gray Zones for patients awaiting COVID-19 test results. The admission of unsuspected COVID-19 positive cases in the green zone of the unit reduced from 20% to 0% during the stipulated period. There was a significant reduction in the number of HCWs, posted in the green zone, being quarantined or test positive for COVID-19 infection as well. The authors conclude that Quality Improvement methods have the potential to develop effective strategies to prevent spread of the deadly Corona virus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Obstetrics/organization & administration , Quality Improvement/organization & administration , Triage/organization & administration , COVID-19/diagnosis , Humans , India/epidemiology , Mass Screening/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration
19.
BMJ Open ; 11(2): e043837, 2021 02 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1096994

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Healthcare personnel (HCP) are at an increased risk of acquiring COVID-19 infection especially in resource-restricted healthcare settings, and return to homes unfit for self-isolation, making them apprehensive about COVID-19 duty and transmission risk to their families. We aimed at implementing a novel multidimensional HCP-centric evidence-based, dynamic policy with the objectives to reduce risk of HCP infection, ensure welfare and safety of the HCP and to improve willingness to accept and return to duty. SETTING: Our tertiary care university hospital, with 12 600 HCP, was divided into high-risk, medium-risk and low-risk zones. In the high-risk and medium-risk zones, we organised training, logistic support, postduty HCP welfare and collected feedback, and sent them home after they tested negative for COVID-19. We supervised use of appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) and kept communication paperless. PARTICIPANTS: We recruited willing low-risk HCP, aged <50 years, with no comorbidities to work in COVID-19 zones. Social distancing, hand hygiene and universal masking were advocated in the low-risk zone. RESULTS: Between 31 March and 20 July 2020, we clinically screened 5553 outpatients, of whom 3012 (54.2%) were COVID-19 suspects managed in the medium-risk zone. Among them, 346 (11.4%) tested COVID-19 positive (57.2% male) and were managed in the high-risk zone with 19 (5.4%) deaths. One (0.08%) of the 1224 HCP in high-risk zone, 6 (0.62%) of 960 HCP in medium-risk zone and 23 (0.18%) of the 12 600 HCP in the low-risk zone tested positive at the end of shift. All the 30 COVID-19-positive HCP have since recovered. This HCP-centric policy resulted in low transmission rates (<1%), ensured satisfaction with training (92%), PPE (90.8%), medical and psychosocial support (79%) and improved acceptance of COVID-19 duty with 54.7% volunteering for re-deployment. CONCLUSION: A multidimensional HCP-centric policy was effective in ensuring safety, satisfaction and welfare of HCP in a resource-poor setting and resulted in a willing workforce to fight the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional , Medical Staff, Hospital , Occupational Diseases , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , Developing Countries , Female , Hospitals, University/organization & administration , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Male , Medical Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Models, Organizational , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Organizational Policy , Personal Protective Equipment , Prospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration
20.
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand ; 65(6): 755-760, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1096648

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The initial wave of the Covid-19 pandemic has hit Italy, and Lombardy in particular, with violence, forcing to reshape all hospitals' activities; this happened even in pediatric hospitals, although the young population seemed initially spared from the disease. "Vittore Buzzi" Children's Hospital, which is a pediatric/maternal hospital located in Milan (Lombardy Region), had to stop elective procedures-with the exception of urgent/emergent ones-between February and May 2020 to leave space and resources to adults' care. We describe the challenges of reshaping the hospital's identity and structure, and restarting pediatric surgery and anesthesia, from May on, in the most hit area of the world, with the purpose to avoid and contain infections. Both patients and caregivers admitted to hospital have been tested for Sars-CoV-2 in every case. METHODS: Observational cohort study via review of clinical charts of patients undergoing surgery between 16th May and 30th September 2020, together with SARS-CoV -2 RT-PCR testing outcomes, and comparison to same period surgeries in 2019. RESULTS: An increase of approximately 70% in pediatric surgeries (OR 1.68 [1.33-2.13], P < .001) and a higher increase in the number of surgeries were reported (OR 1.75 (1.43-2.15), P < .001). Considering only urgent procedures, a significant difference in the distribution of the type of surgery was observed (Chi-squared P-value < .001). Sars-CoV-2-positive patients have been 0.8% of total number; 14% of these was discovered through caregiver's positivity. CONCLUSION: We describe our pathway for safe pediatric surgery and anesthesia and the importance of testing both patient and caregiver.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Appointments and Schedules , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitals, Pediatric/organization & administration , Hospitals, University/organization & administration , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Adolescent , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/statistics & numerical data , Caregivers , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Diagnosis-Related Groups , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Emergencies/epidemiology , Female , Hospital Bed Capacity/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Pediatric/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, University/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Urban/organization & administration , Hospitals, Urban/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Nasopharynx/virology , Patients , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Symptom Assessment , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
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