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1.
J Am Med Inform Assoc ; 27(11): 1727-1731, 2020 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1024115

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The objective was to understand how people respond to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) screening chatbots. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted an online experiment with 371 participants who viewed a COVID-19 screening session between a hotline agent (chatbot or human) and a user with mild or severe symptoms. RESULTS: The primary factor driving user response to screening hotlines (human or chatbot) is perceptions of the agent's ability. When ability is the same, users view chatbots no differently or more positively than human agents. The primary factor driving perceptions of ability is the user's trust in the hotline provider, with a slight negative bias against chatbots' ability. Asian individuals perceived higher ability and benevolence than did White individuals. CONCLUSIONS: Ensuring that COVID-19 screening chatbots provide high-quality service is critical but not sufficient for widespread adoption. The key is to emphasize the chatbot's ability and assure users that it delivers the same quality as human agents.


Subject(s)
Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Medical Informatics Applications , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Telemedicine , Trust , Communication , Female , Humans , Male , Text Messaging
3.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(12): e22201, 2020 12 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-999981

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Older people are at increased risk of adverse health events because of reduced physical activity. There is concern that activity levels are further reduced in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, as many older people are practicing physical and social distancing to minimize transmission. Mobile health (mHealth) and eHealth technologies may offer a means by which older people can engage in physical activity while physically distancing. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess the evidence for mHealth or eHealth technology in the promotion of physical activity among older people aged 50 years or older. METHODS: We conducted a rapid review of reviews using PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines. We searched for systematic reviews published in the English language in 3 electronic databases: MEDLINE, CINAHL Plus, and Scopus. Two reviewers used predefined inclusion criteria to select relevant reviews and extracted data on review characteristics and intervention effectiveness. Two independent raters assessed review quality using the AMSTAR-2 tool. RESULTS: Titles and abstracts (n=472) were screened, and 14 full-text reviews were assessed for eligibility. Initially, we included 5 reviews but excluded 1 from the narrative as it was judged to be of critically low quality. Three reviews concluded that mHealth or eHealth interventions were effective in increasing physical activity. One review found that the evidence was inconclusive. CONCLUSIONS: There is low to moderate evidence that interventions delivered via mHealth or eHealth approaches may be effective in increasing physical activity in older adults in the short term. Components of successful interventions include self-monitoring, incorporation of theory and behavior change techniques, and social and professional support.


Subject(s)
Exercise , Telemedicine , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Humans , Telemedicine/methods , Text Messaging
4.
BMC Med ; 18(1): 391, 2020 12 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-977678

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mobile health innovations are well adapted for ambulatory coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients who risk clinical deterioration at home during the second week of illness. METHODS: A short message service (SMS) communication program was implemented by French physicians to monitor COVID-19 patients after discharge from outpatient or emergency care. The aim of the SMS tracking is to advise patients about their need for medical reassessment if reporting worsening of COVID-19 symptoms. A follow-up via SMS to all confirmed positive patients in the Nîmes area (France) was established. Every morning, patients received four follow-up questions. Daily responses were converted to green, orange or red trees, analysed in real time by physicians. "Red" patients were called immediately to check their condition and organise transfer to hospital if needed. "Orange" patients were called within two hours to verify whether the specific instructions following the SMS had been followed. RESULTS: From March 21 to June 30, 2020, 1007 patients agreed to sign up to the SMS tracking, 62% were women and the mean age was 41.5 years (standard deviation (SD) 16.0). During follow-up, 649 (64%) became "orange" and 69 (7%) "red". Ten patients were directly admitted to the Infectious Diseases Department during their follow-up due to clinical worsening, all but one as a result of SMS alerts and subsequent telephone assessment by physicians. CONCLUSION: SMS tracking platforms could be useful as an early warning system to refer patients with worsening clinical status to hospital-based care or additional clinician advice.


Subject(s)
Aftercare/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Text Messaging , Adult , Communication , Female , France , Humans , Male
5.
Harm Reduct J ; 17(1): 98, 2020 12 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-966241

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Harm reduction services to people who use drugs (PWUD) in Russia are insufficient in terms of quantity, government endorsement, and accessibility. The situation has recently deteriorated even further because of social distancing measures of the COVID-19 pandemic. Several organizations have started to provide some harm reduction services via online platforms by web outreach. However, little is known on how online outreach services are organized and implemented. Drawing on the example of St. Petersburg-based NGO "Humanitarian Action," we explored web outreach work in Telegram instant messenger. METHODS: Our data were comprised of 4 semi-structured interviews with the NGO staff and 301 cases of web outreach work with PWUD. We used thematic analysis to study the process of web outreach, harm reduction service provision, and needs of PWUD. RESULTS: Three stages of the process of web outreach work were identified: clients initiating communication, NGO workers addressing clients' needs, and NGO workers receiving clients' feedback. Communication proceeded in group chat or direct messages. Challenges in addressing clients' needs happened when clients turned for help after hours, sent recorded voice messages, sent unclear messages, and/or were unwilling to transition to telephone communication. All web outreach workers reported receiving only positive feedback on their work. The needs of PWUD were categorized into two major themes, depending on whether they can be addressed fully or partially online. In cases of online only provision of services, web outreach workers helped PWUD treat minor injection drug use complications, obtain verified harm reduction information and receive general psychological support. In instances of partial online services provision, PWUD were assisted in getting treatment of severe injection drug use complications, overdoses, and in accessing offline medical, psychological, social, legal and harm reduction services. CONCLUSIONS: Our research demonstrated that web outreach work is a convenient tool for delivering some harm reduction services to PWUD either partially or completely online and for recruiting new clients (including hard-to-reach PWUD that avoid attending brick-and-mortar facilities). Harm reduction organizations should consider incorporating online harm reduction services into their activities. However, further research is needed to explore relative advantages and disadvantages of online harm reduction services.


Subject(s)
Harm Reduction , Internet-Based Intervention , Organizations , Substance-Related Disorders , Text Messaging , Case Management , Health Services , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Legal Services , Mental Health Services , Narcotic Antagonists/therapeutic use , Needle-Exchange Programs , Needs Assessment , Patient Education as Topic , Psychosocial Support Systems , Qualitative Research , Referral and Consultation , Russia , Self Care , Social Work , Substance Abuse, Intravenous
6.
PLoS One ; 15(11): e0240526, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-902034

ABSTRACT

In-person (face-to-face) data collection methods offer many advantages but can also be time-consuming and expensive, particularly in areas of difficult access. We take advantage of the increasing mobile phone penetration rate in rural areas to evaluate the feasibility of using cell phones to monitor the provision of key health and nutrition interventions linked to the first 1,000 days of life, a critical period of growth and development. We examine response rates to calendarized text messages (SMS) and phone calls sent to 1,542 households over a period of four months. These households have children under two years old and pregnant women and are located across randomly selected communities in Quiche, Guatemala. We find that the overall (valid) response rate to phone calls is over 5 times higher than to text messages (75.8% versus 14.4%). We also test whether simple SMS reminders improve the timely reception of health services but do not find any effects in this regard. Language, education, and age appear to be major barriers to respond to text messages as opposed to phone calls, and the rate of response is not correlated with a household's geographic location (accessibility). Moreover, response veracity is high, with an 84-91% match between household responses and administrative records. The costs per monitored intervention are around 1.12 US dollars using text messages and 85 cents making phone calls, with the costs per effective answer showing a starker contrast, at 7.76 and 1.12 US dollars, respectively. Our findings indicate that mobile phone calls can be an effective, low-cost tool to collect reliable information remotely and in real time. In the current context, where in-person contact with households is not possible due to the COVID-19 crisis, phone calls can be a valuable instrument for collecting information, monitoring development interventions, or implementing brief surveys.


Subject(s)
Cell Phone/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Monitoring, Physiologic/statistics & numerical data , Nutritional Status/physiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Rural Population/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Cell Phone/economics , Child, Preschool , Female , Guatemala/epidemiology , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Monitoring, Physiologic/economics , Pregnancy , Reminder Systems/economics , Reminder Systems/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/economics , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Text Messaging/economics , Text Messaging/statistics & numerical data
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(21)2020 10 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-895357

ABSTRACT

Background: HIV poses a threat to global health. With effective treatment options available, education and testing strategies are essential in preventing transmission. Text messaging is an effective tool for health promotion and can be used to target higher risk populations. This study reports on the design, delivery and testing of a mobile text messaging SMS intervention for HIV prevention and awareness, aimed at adults in the construction industry and delivered during the COVID-19 pandemic. Method: Participants were recruited at Test@Work workplace health promotion events (21 sites, n = 464 employees), including health checks with HIV testing. Message development was based on a participatory design and included a focus group (n = 9) and message fidelity testing (n = 291) with assessment of intervention uptake, reach, acceptability, and engagement. Barriers to HIV testing were identified and mapped to the COM-B behavioural model. 23 one-way push SMS messages (19 included short web links) were generated and fidelity tested, then sent via automated SMS to two employee cohorts over a 10-week period during the COVID-19 pandemic. Engagement metrics measured were: opt-outs, SMS delivered/read, number of clicks per web link, four two-way pull messages exploring repeat HIV testing, learning new information, perceived usefulness and behaviour change. Results: 291 people participated (68.3% of eligible attendees). A total of 7726 messages were sent between March and June 2020, with 91.6% successfully delivered (100% read). 12.4% of participants opted out over 10 weeks. Of delivered messages, links were clicked an average of 14.4% times, max 24.1% for HIV related links. The number of clicks on web links declined over time (r = -6.24, p = 0.01). Response rate for two-way pull messages was 13.7% of participants. Since the workplace HIV test offer at recruitment, 21.6% reported having taken a further HIV test. Qualitative replies indicated behavioural influence of messaging on exercise, lifestyle behaviours and intention to HIV test. Conclusions: SMS messaging for HIV prevention and awareness is acceptable to adults in the construction industry, has high uptake, low attrition and good engagement with message content, when delivered during a global pandemic. Data collection methods may need refinement for audience, and effect of COVID-19 on results is yet to be understood.


Subject(s)
Cell Phone , Coronavirus Infections , HIV Infections , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Text Messaging , Adult , Betacoronavirus , Construction Industry , HIV Infections/diagnosis , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Humans , United Kingdom
8.
J Public Health Dent ; 80 Suppl 2: S27-S34, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-863516

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: There are both opportunities and challenges with the implementation of oral health value-based care (OHVBC). To tackle concerns and advance conversation, a symposium was convened with subject matter experts to develop a gap analysis and capture insights into professional readiness for value-based care design. METHODS: The symposium was convened as a private event for 46 participants over the course of one and a half days in December 2019. Thematic analyses utilized the OHVBC Readiness Framework (DentaQuest Partnership, 2019) to further codify conversations as part of the gap-analysis process. Poll Everywhere, a text messaging application that allows participants to answer questions in real time, was also employed to solicit responses. RESULTS: Attendees of the symposium felt that OHVBC would have a large portion of market share within the next 10 years. A qualitative assessment of multiple table discussions determined that the participants developed more consensus around themes for the current state and the future-desired state than the action-planning needed to close the gap between the two. This may relate to individual ideology, and the siloed environment is still prevalent in the oral health realm. In a postsymposium survey, respondent attendees did not perceive that COVID-19 would delay or negatively impact the adoption of OHVBC and may result in accelerating its utilization. CONCLUSION: The oral health community is experiencing multiple drivers to adopt more OHVBC within business and care models. However, there is still a lack of uniformity on how to execute this delivery model.


Subject(s)
Text Messaging , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Oral Health
9.
PLoS Med ; 17(10): e1003358, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-810270

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Loss of smell and taste are commonly reported symptoms associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19); however, the seroprevalence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) antibodies in people with acute loss of smell and/or taste is unknown. The study aimed to determine the seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in a community-based population with acute loss of smell and/or taste and to compare the frequency of COVID-19 associated symptoms in participants with and without SARS-CoV-2 antibodies. It also evaluated whether smell or taste loss are indicative of COVID-19 infection. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Text messages, sent via primary care centers in London, United Kingdom, invited people with loss of smell and/or taste in the preceding month, to participate. Recruitment took place between 23 April 2020 and 14 May 2020. A total of 590 participants enrolled via a web-based platform and responded to questions about loss of smell and taste and other COVID-19-related symptoms. Mean age was 39.4 years (SD ± 12.0) and 69.1% (n = 392) of participants were female. A total of 567 (96.1%) had a telemedicine consultation during which their COVID-19-related symptoms were verified and a lateral flow immunoassay test that detected SARS-CoV-2 immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies was undertaken under medical supervision. A total of 77.6% of 567 participants with acute smell and/or taste loss had SARS-CoV-2 antibodies; of these, 39.8% (n = 175) had neither cough nor fever. New loss of smell was more prevalent in participants with SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, compared with those without antibodies (93.4% versus 78.7%, p < 0.001), whereas taste loss was equally prevalent (90.2% versus 89.0%, p = 0.738). Seropositivity for SARS-CoV-2 was 3 times more likely in participants with smell loss (OR 2.86; 95% CI 1.27-6.36; p < 0.001) compared with those with taste loss. The limitations of this study are the lack of a general population control group, the self-reported nature of the smell and taste changes, and the fact our methodology does not take into account the possibility that a population subset may not seroconvert to develop SARS-CoV-2 antibodies post-COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that recent loss of smell is a highly specific COVID-19 symptom and should be considered more generally in guiding case isolation, testing, and treatment of COVID-19. TRIALS REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04377815.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Olfaction Disorders/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Taste Disorders/virology , Adult , Betacoronavirus , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , London , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Point-of-Care Testing , Seroconversion , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Text Messaging
10.
Seizure ; 81: 29-35, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-652178

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and the lockdown measures employed by the government have forced neurologists across the world to look upon telemedicine as the only feasible and practical option to continue providing health care towards children with epilepsy in home isolation. Children with epilepsy are challenging for teleconsultation as direct information from the patient is missing, regarding seizures and adverse effects, especially behavioral and psychological side effects. METHODS: Clinical and epilepsy-related details of telephonic consultations for children 1 month-18 years, performed between 26th March and 17th May 2020 in a tertiary care teaching hospital in Uttarakhand (a state of India known for hilly terrains with low per capita income) were recorded. Suitable changes in the dose/commercial brand of antiepileptic drug (AED) regimen were performed, along with the addition of new AED and referral to local practitioners for immediate hospitalization, when urgent health care issues were detected. Voice call, text message, picture/video message, and all other possible measures were employed to accumulate maximum clinical information in real-time. RESULTS: A total of 153 children(95 males [62 %], 9.45 ±â€¯3.24 years, 140 lower/middle socioeconomic status) were enrolled after screening 237 children with various neurological disorders, whose caregivers contacted for teleconsultation. A total of 278 telephone consultations performed for these 153 children (1-5 telephone calls per patient). Hundred-thirteen children were identified to have a total of 152 significant clinical events (breakthrough seizure/uncontrolled epilepsy (108), AED related (13), and unrelated systemic adverse effects (24), worsening of associated co-morbidities (7). In rest of the patients, the query of the caregiver included unavailability of AED/prescribed commercial brand in the locality, query related to the dose of drugs, proxy for a scheduled routine visit (no active issues), and concern regarding COVID-19 related symptoms and effect of COVID-19 and lockdown in children with epilepsy. Ninety-three (60 %) patients required hiking up of AED dose, whereas 29 (17 %) patients required the addition of a new AED/commercial brand. Five children were advised immediate admission to a nearby hospital. Overall, 147 (96 %) caregivers were satisfied with the quality of medical advice. CONCLUSION: Teleconsultation is one of the few feasible options with good effectiveness for providing medical advice to children with epilepsy during pandemic times.


Subject(s)
Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections , Epilepsy/drug therapy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Telemedicine/methods , Adolescent , Betacoronavirus , Child , Child, Preschool , Disease Management , Feasibility Studies , Female , Health Resources , Hospitalization , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , India , Infant , Male , Neurology , Referral and Consultation , Remote Consultation , Telephone , Tertiary Care Centers , Text Messaging , Videoconferencing
11.
Psychiatr Serv ; 71(12): 1218-1224, 2020 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-635066

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and clinical utility of training intensive psychiatric community care team members to serve as "mobile interventionists" who engage patients in recovery-oriented texting exchanges. METHODS: A 3-month pilot randomized controlled trial was conducted to compare the mobile interventionist approach as an add-on to assertive community treatment (ACT) versus ACT alone. Participants were 49 individuals with serious mental illness (62% with schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder, 24% with bipolar disorder, and 14% with depression). Clinical outcomes were evaluated at baseline, posttreatment, and 6-month follow-up, and satisfaction was evaluated posttreatment. RESULTS: The intervention appeared feasible (95% of participants assigned to the mobile interventionist arm initiated the intervention, texting on 69% of possible days and averaging four messages per day), acceptable (91% reported satisfaction), and safe (no adverse events reported). Exploratory posttreatment clinical effect estimations suggested greater reductions in the severity of paranoid thoughts (Cohen's d=-0.61) and depression (d=-0.59) and improved illness management (d=0.31) and recovery (d=0.23) in the mobile interventionist group. CONCLUSIONS: Augmentation of care with a texting mobile interventionist proved to be feasible, acceptable, safe, and clinically promising. The findings are encouraging given the relative ease of training practitioners to serve as mobile interventionists, the low burden placed on patients and practitioners, and the simplicity of the technology. The technical resources are widely accessible to patients and practitioners, boding well for potential intervention scalability. When pandemics such as COVID-19 block the possibility of in-person patient-provider contact, evidence-based texting interventions can serve a crucial role in supporting continuity of care.


Subject(s)
Community Mental Health Services , Mental Disorders , Telemedicine/methods , Text Messaging , Adult , /prevention & control , Community Mental Health Services/methods , Community Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Evidence-Based Practice , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mentally Ill Persons/psychology , Pilot Projects , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Telemedicine/instrumentation , Treatment Outcome
14.
Neurology ; 95(13): 583-592, 2020 09 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-690386

ABSTRACT

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic epicenter in Bronx, NY, the Montefiore Neuroscience Center required rapid and drastic changes when considering the delivery of neurologic care, health and safety of staff, and continued education and safety for house staff. Health care leaders rely on principles that can be in conflict during a disaster response such as this pandemic, with equal commitments to ensure the best care for those stricken with COVID-19, provide high-quality care and advocacy for patients and families coping with neurologic disease, and advocate for the health and safety of health care teams, particularly house staff and colleagues who are most vulnerable. In our attempt to balance these principles, over 3 weeks, we reformatted our inpatient neuroscience services by reducing from 4 wards to just 1, in the following weeks delivering care to over 600 hospitalized patients with neuro-COVID and over 1,742 total neuroscience hospital bed days. This description from members of our leadership team provides an on-the-ground account of our effort to respond nimbly to a complex and evolving surge of patients with COVID in a large urban hospital network. Our efforts were based on (1) strategies to mitigate exposure and transmission, (2) protection of the health and safety of staff, (3) alleviation of logistical delays and strains in the system, and (4) facilitating coordinated communication. Each center's experience will add to knowledge of best practices, and emerging research will help us gain insights into an evidence-based approach to neurologic care during and after the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Hospital Departments/organization & administration , Medical Staff, Hospital/organization & administration , Neurology/organization & administration , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Ambulatory Care , Betacoronavirus , Communication , Delivery of Health Care , Hospital Units/organization & administration , Hospitalization , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Neurology/education , Neuroscience Nursing , Nursing Staff, Hospital/organization & administration , Personal Protective Equipment , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling , Telemedicine , Text Messaging
15.
JMIR Mhealth Uhealth ; 8(8): e19529, 2020 Aug 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-680221

ABSTRACT

With all 50 US states reporting cases of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), people around the country are adapting and stepping up to the challenges of the pandemic; however, they are also frightened, anxious, and confused about what they can do to avoid exposure to the disease. Usual habits have been interrupted as a result of the crisis, and consumers are open to suggestions and strategies to help them change long-standing attitudes and behaviors. In response, a novel and innovative mobile communication capability was developed to present health messages in English and Spanish with links to fotonovelas (visual stories) that are accessible, easy to understand across literacy levels, and compelling to a diverse audience. While SMS text message outreach has been used to build health literacy and provide social support, few studies have explored the benefits of SMS text messaging combined with visual stories to influence health behaviors and build knowledge and self-efficacy. In particular, this approach can be used to provide vital information, resources, empathy, and support to the most vulnerable populations. This also allows providers and health plans to quickly reach out to their patients and members without any additional resource demands at a time when the health care system is severely overburdened.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Health Communication/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Text Messaging , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Diffusion of Innovation , Health Behavior , Health Literacy/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Photography , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , United States/epidemiology
16.
J Am Med Inform Assoc ; 27(11): 1727-1731, 2020 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-638126

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The objective was to understand how people respond to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) screening chatbots. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted an online experiment with 371 participants who viewed a COVID-19 screening session between a hotline agent (chatbot or human) and a user with mild or severe symptoms. RESULTS: The primary factor driving user response to screening hotlines (human or chatbot) is perceptions of the agent's ability. When ability is the same, users view chatbots no differently or more positively than human agents. The primary factor driving perceptions of ability is the user's trust in the hotline provider, with a slight negative bias against chatbots' ability. Asian individuals perceived higher ability and benevolence than did White individuals. CONCLUSIONS: Ensuring that COVID-19 screening chatbots provide high-quality service is critical but not sufficient for widespread adoption. The key is to emphasize the chatbot's ability and assure users that it delivers the same quality as human agents.


Subject(s)
Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Medical Informatics Applications , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Telemedicine , Trust , Communication , Female , Humans , Male , Text Messaging
17.
Euro Surveill ; 25(23)2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-594585

ABSTRACT

We report the effectiveness of automated text messaging for active surveillance of asymptomatic close contacts of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) cases in the Cork/Kerry region of Ireland. In the first 7 weeks of the COVID-19 outbreak, 1,336 close contacts received 12,421 automated texts. Overall, 120 contacts (9.0%) reported symptoms which required referral for testing and 35 (2.6%) tested positive for COVID-19. Non-response was high (n = 2,121; 17.1%) and this required substantial clinical and administrative resources for follow-up.


Subject(s)
Asymptomatic Infections , Contact Tracing , Coronavirus Infections , Coronavirus , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Public Health Surveillance/methods , Text Messaging , Betacoronavirus , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , Ireland/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Watchful Waiting
18.
J Am Med Inform Assoc ; 27(8): 1300-1305, 2020 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-433968

ABSTRACT

The US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is using an automated short message service application named "Annie" as part of its coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) response with a protocol for coronavirus precautions, which can help the veteran monitor symptoms and can advise the veteran when to contact his or her VA care team or a nurse triage line. We surveyed 1134 veterans on their use of the Annie application and coronavirus precautions protocol. Survey results support what is likely a substantial resource savings for the VA, as well as non-VA community healthcare. Moreover, the majority of veterans reported at least 1 positive sentiment (felt more connected to VA, confident, or educated and/or felt less anxious) by receiving the protocol messages. The findings from this study have implications for other healthcare systems to help manage a patient population during the coronavirus pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Text Messaging , Veterans , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Decision Trees , Humans , Mobile Applications , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Telemedicine , Triage , United States , United States Department of Veterans Affairs
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