Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 11 de 11
Filter
1.
Mol Ther ; 29(6): 1970-1983, 2021 06 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1386766

ABSTRACT

A self-transcribing and replicating RNA (STARR)-based vaccine (LUNAR-COV19) has been developed to prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection. The vaccine encodes an alphavirus-based replicon and the SARS-CoV-2 full-length spike glycoprotein. Translation of the replicon produces a replicase complex that amplifies and prolongs SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein expression. A single prime vaccination in mice led to robust antibody responses, with neutralizing antibody titers increasing up to day 60. Activation of cell-mediated immunity produced a strong viral antigen-specific CD8+ T lymphocyte response. Assaying for intracellular cytokine staining for interferon (IFN)γ and interleukin-4 (IL-4)-positive CD4+ T helper (Th) lymphocytes as well as anti-spike glycoprotein immunoglobulin G (IgG)2a/IgG1 ratios supported a strong Th1-dominant immune response. Finally, single LUNAR-COV19 vaccination at both 2 µg and 10 µg doses completely protected human ACE2 transgenic mice from both mortality and even measurable infection following wild-type SARS-CoV-2 challenge. Our findings collectively suggest the potential of LUNAR-COV19 as a single-dose vaccine.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/biosynthesis , Antibodies, Viral/biosynthesis , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/administration & dosage , Alphavirus/genetics , Alphavirus/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Animals , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/drug effects , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/virology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/biosynthesis , COVID-19 Vaccines/genetics , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Female , Gene Expression , Humans , Immunity, Cellular/drug effects , Immunity, Humoral/drug effects , Interferon-gamma/genetics , Interferon-gamma/immunology , Interleukin-4/genetics , Interleukin-4/immunology , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , Replicon/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Th1 Cells/drug effects , Th1 Cells/immunology , Th1 Cells/virology , Transgenes , Treatment Outcome , Vaccination/methods , Vaccines, Synthetic/biosynthesis , Vaccines, Synthetic/genetics , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology
2.
Front Immunol ; 12: 641447, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1264330

ABSTRACT

The newly emerged novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, the causative agent of COVID-19 has proven to be a threat to the human race globally, thus, vaccine development against SARS-CoV-2 is an unmet need driving mass vaccination efforts. The receptor binding domain of the spike protein of this coronavirus has multiple neutralizing epitopes and is associated with viral entry. Here we have designed and characterized the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein fragment 330-526 as receptor binding domain 330-526 (RBD330-526) with two native glycosylation sites (N331 and N343); as a potential subunit vaccine candidate. We initially characterized RBD330-526 biochemically and investigated its thermal stability, humoral and T cell immune response of various RBD protein formulations (with or without adjuvant) to evaluate the inherent immunogenicity and immunomodulatory effect. Our result showed that the purified RBD immunogen is stable up to 72 h, without any apparent loss in affinity or specificity of interaction with the ACE2 receptor. Upon immunization in mice, RBD generates a high titer humoral response, elevated IFN-γ producing CD4+ cells, cytotoxic T cells, and robust neutralizing antibodies against live SARS-CoV-2 virus. Our results collectively support the potential of RBD330-526 as a promising vaccine candidate against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Immunity, Humoral/drug effects , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Peptide Fragments/administration & dosage , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/administration & dosage , Th1 Cells/drug effects , Adjuvants, Immunologic/administration & dosage , Animals , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Drug Stability , Glycosylation , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunization , Interferon-gamma/blood , Male , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Peptide Fragments/immunology , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , Protein Stability , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Th1 Cells/immunology , Th1 Cells/metabolism , Vaccines, Subunit/administration & dosage , Vaccines, Subunit/immunology , Vero Cells
3.
Eur J Pharmacol ; 904: 174193, 2021 Aug 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1230460

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) is spreading rapidly in the world and is still taking a heavy toll. Studies show that cytokine storms and imbalances in T-helper (Th)1/Th2 play a significant role in most acute cases of the disease. A number of medications have been suggested to treat or control the disease but have been discontinued due to their side effects. Melatonin, as an intrinsic molecule, possesses pharmacological anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that decreases in concentration with age; as a result, older people are more prone to various diseases. In this study, patients who were hospitalized with a diagnosis of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) were given a melatonin adjuvant (9 mg daily, orally) for fourteen days. In order to measure markers of Th1 and Th2 inflammatory cytokines (such as interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, and interferon (IFN)-γ) as well as the expression of Th1 and Th2 regulatory genes (signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)4, STAT6, GATA binding protein 3 (GATA3), and T-box expressed in T cell (T-bet)), blood samples were taken from patients at the beginning and end of the treatment. Adjuvant therapy with melatonin controlled and reduced inflammatory cytokines in patients with COVID-19. Melatonin also controlled and modulated the dysregulated genes that regulate the humoral and cellular immune systems mediated by Th1 and Th2. In this study, it was shown for the first time that melatonin can be used as a medicinal adjuvant with anti-inflammatory mechanism to reduce and control inflammatory cytokines by regulating the expression of Th1 and Th2 regulatory genes in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cytokines/blood , Melatonin , Signal Transduction , Th1 Cells , Th2 Cells , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/administration & dosage , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/immunology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunity, Cellular/drug effects , Immunity, Humoral/drug effects , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , Immunologic Factors/immunology , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Melatonin/administration & dosage , Melatonin/immunology , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Signal Transduction/immunology , Th1 Cells/drug effects , Th1 Cells/immunology , Th2 Cells/drug effects , Th2 Cells/immunology , Treatment Outcome
4.
J Med Virol ; 93(2): 892-898, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1206802

ABSTRACT

Since its emergence in December 2019, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has developed into a global pandemic within a matter of months. While subunit vaccines are one of the prominent options for combating coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the immunogenicity of spike protein-based antigens remains unknown. When immunized in mice, the S1 domain induced much higher IgG and IgA antibody levels than the receptor-binding domain (RBD) and more efficiently neutralized SARS-CoV-2 when adjuvanted with alum. It is inferred that a large proportion of these neutralization epitopes are located in the S1 domain but outside the RBD and that some of these are spatial epitopes. This finding indicates that expression systems with posttranslational modification abilities are important to maintain the natural configurations of recombinant spike protein antigens and are critical for effective COVID-19 vaccines. Further, adjuvants prone to a Th1 response should be considered for S1-based subunit COVID-19 vaccines to reduce the potential risk of antibody-dependent enhancement of infection.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/biosynthesis , Antibodies, Viral/biosynthesis , Antigens, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/biosynthesis , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Adjuvants, Immunologic/administration & dosage , Alum Compounds/administration & dosage , Animals , Antigens, Viral/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Female , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunity, Humoral/drug effects , Immunization , Immunization Schedule , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Immunoglobulin A/biosynthesis , Immunoglobulin G/biosynthesis , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Protein Domains/immunology , Recombinant Proteins/administration & dosage , Recombinant Proteins/genetics , Recombinant Proteins/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Th1 Cells/drug effects , Th1 Cells/immunology , Th2 Cells/drug effects , Th2 Cells/immunology
5.
J Inorg Biochem ; 219: 111454, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1157503

ABSTRACT

In recent years, some viruses have caused a grave crisis to global public health, especially the human coronavirus. A truly effective vaccine is therefore urgently needed. Vaccines should generally have two features: delivering antigens and modulating immunity. Adjuvants have an unshakable position in the battle against the virus. In addition to the perennial use of aluminium adjuvant, nanoparticles have become the developing adjuvant candidates due to their unique properties. Here we introduce several typical nanoparticles and their antivirus vaccine adjuvant applications. Finally, for the combating of the coronavirus, we propose several design points, hoping to provide ideas for the development of personalized vaccines and adjuvants and accelerate the clinical application of adjuvants.


Subject(s)
Adjuvants, Immunologic/chemistry , Adjuvants, Immunologic/pharmacology , Nanoparticles/chemistry , Viral Vaccines/immunology , Aluminum/chemistry , Antibodies, Neutralizing/drug effects , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/pharmacology , Calcium Phosphates/chemistry , Chitosan/chemistry , Gold/chemistry , Humans , Nanoparticles/administration & dosage , Th1 Cells/drug effects , Th1 Cells/immunology , Th2 Cells/drug effects , Th2 Cells/immunology , Viral Vaccines/chemistry
6.
J Immunother Cancer ; 8(2)2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-971586

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 outbreak caused by SARS-CoV-2 challenges the medical system by interfering with routine therapies for many patients with chronic diseases. In patients with cancer receiving immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs), difficulties also arise from the incomplete understanding of the intricate interplay between their routine treatment and pathogenesis of the novel virus. By referring to previous ICI-based investigations, we speculate that ICIs themselves are not linked to high-infection risks of respiratory diseases or inflammation-related adverse effects in patients with cancer. Moreover, ICI treatment may even enhance coronavirus clearance in some patients with malignant tumor by boosting antiviral T-cell responsiveness. However, the 'explosive' inflammation during COVID-19 in some ICI-treated patients with cancer was illustrated as exuberant immunopathological damage or even death. In case of the COVID-19 immunopathogenesis fueled by ICIs, we propose a regular monitor of pathogenic T-cell subsets and their exhaustion marker expression (eg, Th17 and interleukin (IL)-6-producing Th1 subsets with surface programmed death 1 expression) to guide the usage of ICI. Here we aimed to address these considerations, based on available literature and experience from our practice, that may assist with the decision-making of ICI administration during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/pharmacology , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Neoplasms/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Decision-Making , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Drug Monitoring , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Neoplasms/blood , Neoplasms/immunology , Pandemics , Patient Selection , Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor/antagonists & inhibitors , Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Th1 Cells/drug effects , Th1 Cells/immunology , Th1 Cells/metabolism , Th17 Cells/drug effects , Th17 Cells/immunology , Th17 Cells/metabolism , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
7.
Vaccine ; 38(48): 7581-7584, 2020 11 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-845859

ABSTRACT

Today, Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a global public health emergency and vaccination measures to counter its diffusion are deemed necessary. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the etiological agent of the disease, unleashes a T-helper 2 immune response in those patients requiring intensive care. Here, we illustrate the immunological mechanism to train the immune system towards a more effective and less symptomatic T-helper 1 immune response, to be exploited against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
BCG Vaccine/administration & dosage , Bacterial Vaccines/administration & dosage , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Propionibacteriaceae/immunology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Vaccines , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Corynebacterium , Humans , Immunization Schedule , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Interleukins/genetics , Interleukins/immunology , Patient Safety , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Th1 Cells/drug effects , Th1 Cells/immunology , Th1 Cells/virology , Th1-Th2 Balance/drug effects , Th2 Cells/drug effects , Th2 Cells/immunology , Th2 Cells/virology , Vaccination , Viral Vaccines/administration & dosage , Viral Vaccines/biosynthesis
8.
Front Immunol ; 11: 2056, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-769214

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a disease which causes severe lung injury and multiple organ damage, presents an urgent need for new drugs. The case severity and fatality of COVID-19 are associated with excessive inflammation, namely, a cytokine storm. Metformin, a widely used drug to treat type 2 diabetes (T2D) mellitus and metabolic syndrome, has immunomodulatory activity that reduces the production of proinflammatory cytokines using macrophages and causes the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Metformin also inhibits the cytokine production of pathogenic Th1 and Th17 cells. Importantly, treatment with metformin alleviates various lung injuries in preclinical animal models. In addition, a recent proteomic study revealed that metformin has the potential to directly inhibit SARS-CoV-2 infection. Furthermore, retrospective clinical studies have revealed that metformin treatment reduces the mortality of T2D with COVID-19. Therefore, metformin has the potential to be repurposed to treat patients with COVID-19 at risk of developing severe illness. This review summarizes the immune pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 and addresses the effects of metformin on inhibiting cytokine storms and preventing SARS-CoV-2 infection, as well as its side effects.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Lung Injury/drug therapy , Metformin/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Animals , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokines/antagonists & inhibitors , Drug Repositioning/methods , Extracellular Traps/drug effects , Humans , Immunologic Factors/adverse effects , Immunologic Factors/pharmacology , Inflammation/drug therapy , Macrophages/drug effects , Macrophages/immunology , Metformin/adverse effects , Metformin/pharmacology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Th1 Cells/drug effects , Th1 Cells/immunology , Th17 Cells/drug effects , Th17 Cells/immunology
9.
J Dtsch Dermatol Ges ; 18(8): 795-807, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-697169

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 has far-reaching direct and indirect medical consequences. These include both the course and treatment of diseases. It is becoming increasingly clear that infections with SARS-CoV-2 can cause considerable immunological alterations, which particularly also affect pathogenetically and/or therapeutically relevant factors. Against this background we summarize here the current state of knowledge on the interaction of SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19 with mediators of the acute phase of inflammation (TNF, IL-1, IL-6), type 1 and type 17 immune responses (IL-12, IL-23, IL-17, IL-36), type 2 immune reactions (IL-4, IL-13, IL-5, IL-31, IgE), B-cell immunity, checkpoint regulators (PD-1, PD-L1, CTLA4), and orally druggable signaling pathways (JAK, PDE4, calcineurin). In addition, we discuss in this context non-specific immune modulation by glucocorticosteroids, methotrexate, antimalarial drugs, azathioprine, dapsone, mycophenolate mofetil and fumaric acid esters, as well as neutrophil granulocyte-mediated innate immune mechanisms. From these recent findings we derive possible implications for the therapeutic modulation of said immunological mechanisms in connection with SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19. Although, of course, the greatest care should be taken with patients with immunologically mediated diseases or immunomodulating therapies, it appears that many treatments can also be carried out during the COVID-19 pandemic; some even appear to alleviate COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Cytokines/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/drug effects , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Humans , Immunotherapy , Th1 Cells/drug effects , Th1 Cells/immunology , Th17 Cells/drug effects , Th17 Cells/immunology
10.
J Med Virol ; 93(2): 892-898, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-661060

ABSTRACT

Since its emergence in December 2019, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has developed into a global pandemic within a matter of months. While subunit vaccines are one of the prominent options for combating coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the immunogenicity of spike protein-based antigens remains unknown. When immunized in mice, the S1 domain induced much higher IgG and IgA antibody levels than the receptor-binding domain (RBD) and more efficiently neutralized SARS-CoV-2 when adjuvanted with alum. It is inferred that a large proportion of these neutralization epitopes are located in the S1 domain but outside the RBD and that some of these are spatial epitopes. This finding indicates that expression systems with posttranslational modification abilities are important to maintain the natural configurations of recombinant spike protein antigens and are critical for effective COVID-19 vaccines. Further, adjuvants prone to a Th1 response should be considered for S1-based subunit COVID-19 vaccines to reduce the potential risk of antibody-dependent enhancement of infection.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/biosynthesis , Antibodies, Viral/biosynthesis , Antigens, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/biosynthesis , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Adjuvants, Immunologic/administration & dosage , Alum Compounds/administration & dosage , Animals , Antigens, Viral/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Female , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunity, Humoral/drug effects , Immunization , Immunization Schedule , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Immunoglobulin A/biosynthesis , Immunoglobulin G/biosynthesis , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Protein Domains/immunology , Recombinant Proteins/administration & dosage , Recombinant Proteins/genetics , Recombinant Proteins/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Th1 Cells/drug effects , Th1 Cells/immunology , Th2 Cells/drug effects , Th2 Cells/immunology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...