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1.
Cells ; 10(5)2021 05 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1274611

ABSTRACT

Th17 cells are recognized as indispensable in inducing protective immunity against bacteria and fungi, as they promote the integrity of mucosal epithelial barriers. It is believed that Th17 cells also play a central role in the induction of autoimmune diseases. Recent advances have evaluated Th17 effector functions during viral infections, including their critical role in the production and induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and in the recruitment and activation of other immune cells. Thus, Th17 is involved in the induction both of pathogenicity and immunoprotective mechanisms seen in the host's immune response against viruses. However, certain Th17 cells can also modulate immune responses, since they can secrete immunosuppressive factors, such as IL-10; these cells are called non-pathogenic Th17 cells. Here, we present a brief review of Th17 cells and highlight their involvement in some virus infections. We cover these notions by highlighting the role of Th17 cells in regulating the protective and pathogenic immune response in the context of viral infections. In addition, we will be describing myocarditis and multiple sclerosis as examples of immune diseases triggered by viral infections, in which we will discuss further the roles of Th17 cells in the induction of tissue damage.


Subject(s)
Myocarditis/immunology , Th17 Cells/metabolism , Virus Diseases/immunology , Adenoviridae , Animals , Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , Chikungunya virus , Cytokines/immunology , Dengue Virus , Humans , Immune System , Immunosuppressive Agents/pharmacology , Inflammation , Interleukin-10/biosynthesis , Lymphocytes/cytology , Multiple Sclerosis/immunology , Multiple Sclerosis/metabolism , Multiple Sclerosis/virology , Myocarditis/metabolism , Myocarditis/virology , Orthomyxoviridae , SARS-CoV-2 , Simplexvirus , Th1 Cells/cytology , Th2 Cells/cytology , Virus Diseases/drug therapy , Virus Diseases/metabolism , Zika Virus
2.
Cells ; 10(6)2021 06 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1273394

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is an acute infectious disease of the respiratory system caused by infection with the SARS-CoV-2 virus (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2). Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 infections occurs through droplets and contaminated objects. A rapid and well-coordinated immune system response is the first line of defense in a viral infection. However, a disturbed and over-activated immune response may be counterproductive, causing damage to the body. Severely ill patients hospitalised with COVID-19 exhibit increased levels of many cytokines, including Interleukin (IL)-1ß, IL-2, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, IL-17, granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Increasing evidence suggests that Th17 cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of COVID-19, not only by activating cytokine cascade but also by inducing Th2 responses, inhibiting Th1 differentiation and suppressing Treg cells. This review focuses on a Th17 pathway in the course of the immune response in COVID-19, and explores plausible targets for therapeutic intervention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Cellular/physiology , Th17 Cells/physiology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/therapy , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Immunotherapy, Adoptive/methods , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Th17 Cells/metabolism
3.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 97: 107828, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1253058

ABSTRACT

In various pathological conditions, cellular immunity plays an important role in immune responses. Amongimmunecells, T lymphocytes pdomotecellular and humoralresponses as well as innate immunity. Therefore, careful investigation of these cells has a significant impact on accurate knowledge in COVID-19diseasepathogenesis. In current research, the frequency and function of various T lymphocytes involved in immune responses examined in SARS-CoV-2 patients with various disease severity compared to normal subjects. In order to make an accurate comparison among patients with various disease severity, this study was performed on asymptomatic recovered cases (n = 20), ICU hospitalized patients (n = 30), non-ICU hospitalized patients (n = 30), and normal subjects (n = 20). To precisely evaluate T cells activity following purification, their cytokine secretion activity was examined. Similarly, immediately after purification of Treg cells, their inhibitory activity on T cells was investigated. The results showed that COVID-19 patients with severe disease (ICU hospitalized patients) not only had a remarkable increase in Th1 and Th17 but also a considerable decrease in Th2 and Treg cells. More importantly, as the IL-17 and IFN-γ secretion was sharply increased in severe disease, the secretion of IL-10 and IL-4 was decreased. Furthermore, the inhibitory activity of Treg cells was reduced in severe disease patients in comparison to other groups. In severe COVID-19 disease, current findings indicate when the inflammatory arm of cellular immunity is significantly increased, a considerable reduction in anti-inflammatory and regulatory arm occurred.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/virology , Adult , Aged , Cytokines/immunology , Cytokines/metabolism , Female , Healthy Volunteers , Humans , Immunity, Cellular , Inflammation/metabolism , Interferon-gamma/metabolism , Interleukin-10/metabolism , Interleukin-17/metabolism , Interleukin-4/metabolism , Leukocytes/immunology , Leukocytes/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Severity of Illness Index , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/metabolism , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/metabolism , Th1 Cells/immunology , Th1 Cells/metabolism , Th17 Cells/immunology , Th17 Cells/metabolism , Th2 Cells/immunology , Th2 Cells/metabolism , Young Adult
4.
Viruses ; 13(6)2021 05 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1244141

ABSTRACT

Patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) predominantly have a respiratory tract infection with various symptoms and high mortality is associated with respiratory failure second to severe disease. The risk factors leading to severe disease remain unclear. Here, we reanalyzed a published single-cell RNA-Seq (scRNA-Seq) dataset and found that bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of patients with severe disease compared to those with mild disease contained decreased TH17-type cells, decreased IFNA1-expressing cells with lower expression of toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and TLR8, increased IgA-expressing B cells, and increased hyperactive epithelial cells (and/or macrophages) expressing matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2), and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), which may together contribute to the pulmonary pathology in severe COVID-19. We propose IFN-I (and TLR7/TLR8) and PAI-1 as potential biomarkers to predict the susceptibility to severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Lung/pathology , B-Lymphocytes/metabolism , B-Lymphocytes/pathology , Biomarkers/metabolism , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Databases, Genetic , Humans , Hyaluronan Synthases/metabolism , Immunoglobulin A/metabolism , Interferon-alpha/metabolism , Lung/immunology , Lung/metabolism , Matrix Metalloproteinases/metabolism , Mucin-1/metabolism , Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1/metabolism , RNA-Seq , SARS-CoV-2 , Th17 Cells/metabolism , Th17 Cells/pathology
5.
EMBO Mol Med ; 13(6): e14045, 2021 06 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219070

ABSTRACT

The immune responses and mechanisms limiting symptom progression in asymptomatic cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection remain unclear. We comprehensively characterized transcriptomic profiles, cytokine responses, neutralization capacity of antibodies, and cellular immune phenotypes of asymptomatic patients with acute SARS-CoV-2 infection to identify potential protective mechanisms. Compared to symptomatic patients, asymptomatic patients had higher counts of mature neutrophils and lower proportion of CD169+ expressing monocytes in the peripheral blood. Systemic levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were also lower in asymptomatic patients, accompanied by milder pro-inflammatory gene signatures. Mechanistically, a more robust systemic Th2 cell signature with a higher level of virus-specific Th17 cells and a weaker yet sufficient neutralizing antibody profile against SARS-CoV-2 was observed in asymptomatic patients. In addition, asymptomatic COVID-19 patients had higher systemic levels of growth factors that are associated with cellular repair. Together, the data suggest that asymptomatic patients mount less pro-inflammatory and more protective immune responses against SARS-CoV-2 indicative of disease tolerance. Insights from this study highlight key immune pathways that could serve as therapeutic targets to prevent disease progression in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Carrier State/immunology , Biomarkers/metabolism , Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Carrier State/pathology , Carrier State/virology , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Monocytes/cytology , Monocytes/immunology , Monocytes/metabolism , Neutrophils/cytology , Neutrophils/immunology , Neutrophils/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Th17 Cells/cytology , Th17 Cells/immunology , Th17 Cells/metabolism , Transcriptome , Up-Regulation , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor D/metabolism
6.
Front Immunol ; 12: 645741, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1190313

ABSTRACT

Particulate matter (PM) induces neutrophilic inflammation and deteriorates the prognosis of diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, cancers, and infections, including COVID-19. Here, we addressed the role of γδ T cells and intestinal microbiome in PM-induced acute neutrophilia. γδ T cells are a heterogeneous population composed of Tγδ1, Tγδ2, Tγδ17, and naïve γδ T cells (TγδN) and commensal bacteria promote local expansion of Tγδ17 cells, particularly in the lung and gut without affecting their Vγ repertoire. Tγδ17 cells are more tissue resident than Tγδ1 cells, while TγδN cells are circulating cells. IL-1R expression in Tγδ17 cells is highest in the lung and they outnumber all the other type 17 cells such as Th17, ILC3, NKT17, and MAIT17 cells. Upon PM exposure, IL-1ß-secreting neutrophils and IL-17-producing Tγδ17 cells attract each other around the airways. Accordingly, PM-induced neutrophilia was significantly relieved in γδ T- or IL-17-deficient and germ-free mice. Collectively, these findings show that the commensal microbiome promotes PM-induced neutrophilia in the lung via Tγδ17 cells.


Subject(s)
Leukocytosis/etiology , Lung/immunology , Microbiota , Neutrophils/pathology , Particulate Matter/adverse effects , Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, gamma-delta/metabolism , Th17 Cells/immunology , Th17 Cells/metabolism , Animals , Asthma/etiology , Asthma/metabolism , Asthma/pathology , Biomarkers , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Disease Susceptibility , Fluorescent Antibody Technique , Immunity, Innate , Immunophenotyping , Leukocytosis/metabolism , Leukocytosis/pathology , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Mice , Neutrophils/metabolism , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/metabolism
7.
Clin Infect Dis ; 71(16): 2052-2060, 2020 11 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1153150

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The World Health Organization characterizes novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), as a pandemic. Here, we investigated the clinical, cytokine levels; T-cell proportion; and related gene expression occurring in patients with COVID-19 on admission and after initial treatment. METHODS: Eleven patients diagnosed with COVID-19 with similar initial treatment regimens were enrolled in the hospital. Plasma cytokine, peripheral T cell proportions, and microfluidic quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses for gene expression were conducted. RESULTS: Five patients with mild and 6 with severe disease were included. Cough and fever were the primary symptoms in the 11 COVID-19 cases. Older age, higher neutrophil count, and higher C-reactive protein levels were found in severe cases. IL-10 level significantly varied with disease progression and treatment. Decreased T-cell proportions were observed in patients with COVID-19, especially in severe cases, and all were returned to normal in patients with mild disease after initial treatment, but only CD4+ T cells returned to normal in severe cases. The number of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) increased with the disease progression, and decreased after initial treatment. All downregulated DEGs in severe cases mainly involved Th17-cell differentiation, cytokine-mediated signaling pathways, and T-cell activation. After initial treatment in severe cases, MAP2K7 and SOS1 were upregulated relative to that on admission. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings show that a decreased T-cell proportion with downregulated gene expression related to T-cell activation and differentiation occurred in patients with severe COVID-19, which may help to provide effective treatment strategies for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Aged , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cell Differentiation/physiology , Computational Biology , Female , Humans , Interleukin-10/metabolism , MAP Kinase Kinase 7/metabolism , Male , Microfluidics , Middle Aged , SOS1 Protein/metabolism , Signal Transduction/physiology , Th17 Cells/metabolism
8.
Front Immunol ; 11: 631299, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1122159

ABSTRACT

Serum amyloid A (SAA) is an acute phase protein with a significant importance for patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases (IRD). The central role of SAA in pathogenesis of IRD has been confirmed by recent discoveries, including its involvement in the activation of the inflammasome cascade and recruitment of interleukin 17 producing T helper cells. Clinical utility of SAA in IRD was originally evaluated nearly half a century ago. From the first findings, it was clear that SAA could be used for evaluating disease severity and monitoring disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and secondary amyloidosis. However, cost-effective and more easily applicable markers, such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), overwhelmed its use in clinical practice. In the light of emerging evidences, SAA has been discerned as a more sensitive biomarker in a wide spectrum of IRD, especially in case of subclinical inflammation. Furthermore, a growing number of studies are confirming the advantages of SAA over many other biomarkers in predicting and monitoring response to biological immunotherapy in IRD patients. Arising scientific discoveries regarding the role of SAA, as well as delineating SAA and its isoforms as the most sensitive biomarkers in various IRD by recently developing proteomic techniques are encouraging the revival of its clinical use. Finally, the most recent findings have shown that SAA is a biomarker of severe Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The aim of this review is to discuss the SAA-involving immune system network with emphasis on mechanisms relevant for IRD, as well as usefulness of SAA as a biomarker in various IRD. Therefore, over a hundred original papers were collected through an extensive PubMed and Scopus databases search. These recently arising insights will hopefully lead to a better management of IRD patients and might even inspire the development of new therapeutic strategies with SAA as a target.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Rheumatoid/blood , COVID-19/blood , Serum Amyloid A Protein/metabolism , Amyloidosis/blood , Amyloidosis/therapy , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/therapy , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Immunotherapy , Inflammasomes/metabolism , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/diagnosis , Severity of Illness Index , Th17 Cells/metabolism
9.
Sci Immunol ; 6(56)2021 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1099742

ABSTRACT

Hyperinflammation contributes to lung injury and subsequent acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with high mortality in patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). To understand the underlying mechanisms involved in lung pathology, we investigated the role of the lung-specific immune response. We profiled immune cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and blood collected from COVID-19 patients with severe disease and bacterial pneumonia patients not associated with viral infection. By tracking T cell clones across tissues, we identified clonally expanded tissue-resident memory-like Th17 cells (Trm17 cells) in the lungs even after viral clearance. These Trm17 cells were characterized by a a potentially pathogenic cytokine expression profile of IL17A and CSF2 (GM-CSF). Interactome analysis suggests that Trm17 cells can interact with lung macrophages and cytotoxic CD8+ T cells, which have been associated with disease severity and lung damage. High IL-17A and GM-CSF protein levels in the serum of COVID-19 patients were associated with a more severe clinical course. Collectively, our study suggests that pulmonary Trm17 cells are one potential orchestrator of the hyperinflammation in severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/metabolism , Immunologic Memory , Lung/immunology , Th17 Cells/metabolism , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/cytology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/immunology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , Clone Cells , Humans , Inflammation/etiology , Inflammation/immunology , Lung/pathology , Myeloid Cells , Pneumonia, Bacterial/immunology , Th17 Cells/immunology
10.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 91: 107331, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065225

ABSTRACT

The present review provides an overview of recent advances regarding the function of Th17 cells and their produced cytokines in the progression of viral diseases. Viral infections alone do not lead to virus-induced malignancies, as both genetic and host safety factors are also involved in the occurrence of malignancies. Acquired immune responses, through the differentiation of Th17 cells, form the novel components of the Th17 cell pathway when reacting with viral infections all the way from the beginning to its final stages. As a result, instead of inducing the right immune responses, these events lead to the suppression of the immune system. In fact, the responses from Th17 cells during persistent viral infections causes chronic inflammation through the production of IL-17 and other cytokines which provide a favorable environment for tumor growth and its development. Additionally, during the past decade, these cells have been understood to be involved in tumor progression and metastasis. However, further research is required to understand Th17 cells' immune mechanisms in the vast variety of viral diseases. This review aims to determine the roles and effects of the immune system, especially Th17 cells, in the progression of viral diseases; which can be highly beneficial for the diagnosis and treatment of these infections.


Subject(s)
Cell Transformation, Viral , Neoplasms/virology , Th17 Cells/virology , Tumor Virus Infections/virology , Viruses/pathogenicity , Animals , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Neoplasms/immunology , Neoplasms/metabolism , Th17 Cells/immunology , Th17 Cells/metabolism , Tumor Microenvironment , Tumor Virus Infections/immunology , Tumor Virus Infections/metabolism , Viruses/immunology
11.
J Cell Physiol ; 236(7): 5325-5338, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-995973

ABSTRACT

In novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the increased frequency and overactivation of T helper (Th) 17 cells and subsequent production of large amounts of proinflammatory cytokines result in hyperinflammation and disease progression. The current study aimed to investigate the therapeutic effects of nanocurcumin on the frequency and responses of Th17 cells in mild and severe COVID-19 patients. In this study, 40 severe COVID-19 intensive care unit-admitted patients and 40 patients in mild condition were included. The frequency of Th17 cells, the messenger RNA expression of Th17 cell-related factors (RAR-related orphan receptor γt, interleukin [IL]-17, IL-21, IL-23, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor), and the serum levels of cytokines were measured in both nanocurcumin and placebo-treated groups before and after treatment. A significant decrease in the number of Th17 cells, downregulation of Th17 cell-related factors, and decreased levels of Th17 cell-related cytokines were found in mild and severe COVID-19 patients treated by nanocurcumin compared to the placebo group. Moreover, the abovementioned parameters were significantly decreased in the nanocurcumin-treated group after treatment versus before treatment. Curcumin could reduce the frequency of Th17 cells and their related inflammatory factors in both mild and severe COVID-19 patients. Hence, it could be considered as a potential modulatory compound in improving the patient's inflammatory condition.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Curcumin/therapeutic use , Immunomodulation/drug effects , Nanoparticles/therapeutic use , Th17 Cells/drug effects , Adult , Cytokines/metabolism , Female , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/metabolism , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nanoparticles/administration & dosage , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Severity of Illness Index , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/drug effects , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/metabolism , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/virology , Th17 Cells/metabolism
12.
Front Immunol ; 11: 596553, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-979020

ABSTRACT

The severity of SARS-CoV-2 infection has been related to uncontrolled inflammatory innate responses and impaired adaptive immune responses mostly due to exhausted T lymphocytes and lymphopenia. In this work we have characterized the nature of the lymphopenia and demonstrate a set of factors that hinder the effective control of virus infection and the activation and arming of effector cytotoxic T CD8 cells and showing signatures defining a high-risk population. We performed immune profiling of the T helper (Th) CD4+ and T CD8+ cell compartments in peripheral blood of 144 COVID-19 patients using multiparametric flow cytometry analysis. On the one hand, there was a consistent lymphopenia with an overrepresentation of non-functional T cells, with an increased percentage of naive Th cells (CD45RA+, CXCR3-, CCR4-, CCR6-, CCR10-) and persistently low frequency of markers associated with Th1, Th17, and Th1/Th17 memory-effector T cells compared to healthy donors. On the other hand, the most profound alteration affected the Th1 subset, which may explain the poor T cells responses and the persistent blood virus load. Finally, the decrease in Th1 cells may also explain the low frequency of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells that express the HLA-DR and CD38 activation markers observed in numerous patients who showed minimal or no lymphocyte activation response. We also identified the percentage of HLA-DR+CD4+ T cells, PD-1+CD+4/CD8+ T cells in blood, and the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio as useful factors for predicting critical illness and fatal outcome in patients with confirmed COVID-19.


Subject(s)
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer/immunology , Th1 Cells/immunology , ADP-ribosyl Cyclase 1/immunology , ADP-ribosyl Cyclase 1/metabolism , Aged , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cell Differentiation/immunology , Female , HLA-DR Antigens/immunology , HLA-DR Antigens/metabolism , Humans , Lymphocyte Activation/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer/metabolism , Th1 Cells/metabolism , Th17 Cells/immunology , Th17 Cells/metabolism
13.
J Immunother Cancer ; 8(2)2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-971586

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 outbreak caused by SARS-CoV-2 challenges the medical system by interfering with routine therapies for many patients with chronic diseases. In patients with cancer receiving immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs), difficulties also arise from the incomplete understanding of the intricate interplay between their routine treatment and pathogenesis of the novel virus. By referring to previous ICI-based investigations, we speculate that ICIs themselves are not linked to high-infection risks of respiratory diseases or inflammation-related adverse effects in patients with cancer. Moreover, ICI treatment may even enhance coronavirus clearance in some patients with malignant tumor by boosting antiviral T-cell responsiveness. However, the 'explosive' inflammation during COVID-19 in some ICI-treated patients with cancer was illustrated as exuberant immunopathological damage or even death. In case of the COVID-19 immunopathogenesis fueled by ICIs, we propose a regular monitor of pathogenic T-cell subsets and their exhaustion marker expression (eg, Th17 and interleukin (IL)-6-producing Th1 subsets with surface programmed death 1 expression) to guide the usage of ICI. Here we aimed to address these considerations, based on available literature and experience from our practice, that may assist with the decision-making of ICI administration during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/pharmacology , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Neoplasms/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Decision-Making , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Drug Monitoring , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Neoplasms/blood , Neoplasms/immunology , Pandemics , Patient Selection , Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor/antagonists & inhibitors , Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Th1 Cells/drug effects , Th1 Cells/immunology , Th1 Cells/metabolism , Th17 Cells/drug effects , Th17 Cells/immunology , Th17 Cells/metabolism , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
14.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 3434, 2020 07 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-631255

ABSTRACT

The immune system of patients infected by SARS-CoV-2 is severely impaired. Detailed investigation of T cells and cytokine production in patients affected by COVID-19 pneumonia are urgently required. Here we show that, compared with healthy controls, COVID-19 patients' T cell compartment displays several alterations involving naïve, central memory, effector memory and terminally differentiated cells, as well as regulatory T cells and PD1+CD57+ exhausted T cells. Significant alterations exist also in several lineage-specifying transcription factors and chemokine receptors. Terminally differentiated T cells from patients proliferate less than those from healthy controls, whereas their mitochondria functionality is similar in CD4+ T cells from both groups. Patients display significant increases of proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory cytokines, including T helper type-1 and type-2 cytokines, chemokines and galectins; their lymphocytes produce more tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-17, with the last observation implying that blocking IL-17 could provide a novel therapeutic strategy for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/immunology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/metabolism , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/pathology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/pathology , COVID-19 , Cellular Senescence , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Cytokines/immunology , Cytokines/metabolism , Female , Humans , Immunologic Memory , Italy/epidemiology , Lymphocyte Activation , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , SARS-CoV-2 , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/metabolism , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/pathology , Th17 Cells/immunology , Th17 Cells/metabolism , Th17 Cells/pathology
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